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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, April 19, 1912, Image 1

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i70U LXXII....Na 23,896.
T??-dB.T, cloudy.
To-?norr?i?*i, fair; we?t wind?.
NEW-YORK, FRIDAY, APRIL 10. 1912.-?SIXTEEN" PAGES
a a
PRICE ONE CENTfa^l?wWB?Wofa?Sl
Hobokea.
HIT BERG Afll^KNOT SPEED
CARPATHIAN STORY OF TITANIC5 L055,
WITH THRILLING DETAILS OF RESCUE
THE CARPATHIA, WiTH TITANIC SURVIVORS, ARRIVING AT HER DOCK LAST NIGHT.
SLUNG ON HER SIDE ARE THREE OF THE TITANIC S LIFEBOATS, FROM WHICH WERE RESCUED SOME 150 PAS?
SENGERS OF THE ILL-FATED LINER. THESE BOATS HAD TO BE LOWERED AND TOWED AWAY BEFORE
THE CARPATHIA COULD BE BROUGHT ALONGSIDE THE CUXARD PIER.
ALL DARK AFTER CRASH;
RUSHING CROWD INSANE
Robert W. Daniel, a Philadelphia Banker,
Describes Scene on Great Liner After
She Crashed Into the Iceberg.
Among the first survivors to leave the Carpathia was Robert W.
Daniel, a Philadelphia banker. The majority of the survivors were
dazed. The gangway was thronged with ambulance surgeons.
Daniel said the Titanic collided with the iceberg at 10:20 o'clock
on Sunday night and sank at 2:20. He was in bed at the time. He
leaped into a collapsible boat and was picked up five hours later.
Mr. Daniel carried from the steamer Carpathia Mrs. Lucian P.
Smith, daughter of Congressman Hughes, in a fainting condition. Mrs.
Smith was rescued by the Carpathia. She was hurriedly taken from
the pier by her father.
Two-thirds of the survivors were dazed when they were assisted
on to the pier. Some of the women passengers screamed hysterically.
The ambulance surgeons were unable to care for those who needed
immediate medical attention.
Mr. Daniel also said:
"I had just left the music room and disrobed, and was in my bunk,
when there was a terrifie crash. The boat quivered and the lights went
out. In the darkness I rushed on deck almost naked. There seemed
to be thousands fighting and shouting in the dark, and then they got
the storage batteries going, and that gave us a little light.
"Captain Smith was the biggest hero I ever saw. He stood on the
bridge and shouted through a megaphone, trying to make himself heard.
The crew obeyed his orders as well as could be expected.
EVERYBODY SEEMED INSANE.
"Five minutes after the crash everybody seemed to have gone
insane. Men and women fought, bit and scratched to be in line for the
< ontlnued on fourth vage, sixth column.
SAYS ISMAY PICKED CREW
One of First in Lifeboat, and
Then Selected Men to Row.
Arcordlng to Mr?. W. J. Cardc-za, of
Philadelphia after she had arrived at
the Rltz-Carlton with T. I. M. Oardeza.
J. Bruce Ismay, managing dire?-tor of the
White Star Line, not only wai? safely
seated In a lifeboat before It was filled,
but he also selected the crew that rowed
the boat. Accruing to Mrs. C_.rd??z*i,
Mr. Utjiay knew that Mr. ?'ardeza was
?n expert oar-man and he beckoned him
Into bis l>oa|,. Mr. Cardeza manned an
?*?r until Mr. itmay's boat was picked up
???bout two hours later.
ANTIDILUVIAN WHISKEY.
Jo?e th? dltter*****. * ?moles Bros., N. T_
SAYS BIG MEN CAUSED PANIC
Official Says Prominent Passen?
gers Led Rush for Lifeboat3.
?'aptaln Roberts, ?uperlntendent ?,f
dock* for the White Star Line, who was
present at the arrival of the Carpathia
and went on board at once to see mem?
bers of the crew of the Titanic who
tremo a m on* the survivors, was later
heard to say to s??me of the officials of
the White Star Line on the Carpathia:
'?'.entlemen, the panic on board the
Titanic wan caused by the men whom
We would naturally expect to attempt to
avert mich B thing. It was our Con
, jnm*nflll our Senators and our big ,ncn
I who led iu the crush for the lifeboat?.**
GREAT BEAR SPRING WATER.
60c par case ot ? gU*?-?top*x**MKl boulin.
~A4vt
NUN ON BRIDGE
TELLS OF COLLIll
-
Going Top Speed. Titanio Quai
termaster Savs, 21 Knots.
Though Warned as to
Ice Fields.
[EXPLOSION RENDS VESSE
This, Caused by Water Pourin
Through Gaps in Hull to the
Boilers, Caused Catas?
trophe. Some Sur?
vivors Believe.
Quartermast? t Moody ITM OH lh>
bridge of the Tltani?* on Sunday OVMI
ling. Tin- ihlr *h" thon tnakiiiK h<
top .speed, uri*?*(l to her utfnost t1
demonstrate to the w??ild what th
gr?at?-st ?hip could do. Th?- ?hip irai
making not hSBO than twenty-un?- knots
the ?*<*iiiviii?-iit of more than twenty
thre?' land mile?, or mor?? than five bun
<lre?l miles ii da\ .
Captain Smith bad been wain.-?l i.j
several vessels <<l the proximity <?f I
dangerous i?*e fiel?), and had replied ii
at least <?ne of them, the Mesal?a, of tin
Atlantic Transport i-ln?*, trou ?Londoii
his appre'iatlo;* of the w??rning. 0*9
Bunda) evening the Titanic, which ba?j
i>t*t-n ronnlng through smooth irater and
beneath a brilliantly starlit sky. eut? r?-?l
a llgLI l?'K bank. an?l th.- t.-mp.-ratur?.
fell.
The ship's ..ii li?-stra was playing an?!
th?* passengers wer?? diverting them?
selves with cards, Looks and In the varl
<?us ways customary to seagoer?-*, ?-??m.
promenading the decks, when the man
in th?* <-row s-nest, far up abov?- th?*
pntmena?!?* deck, suddenly criad out:
??Berg ahead! Port your helm!"
Quartermaster .Moody instinctivel?,
obeyed the order and sheered his vessel
sharply off the starboard, through thi?
ll. ?I?! ?.f ice that surround.-?! him. Hut
the warning ha?l come too late, for the
graal ship juagad her p??rt hern against
the side of a craggy l??*rg that loomed
In her path, and with a ripping and
rending of steel against Ice this sea pal?
ace was rent from stem to ??midships,
and the <??can waters pound in Upon the
doomed hundreds.
The shock was not great, for the ship
? ontlnurd on fourth page, ??-?null rolutnn.
WAUMBEK AND COTTAGES.
Jefferson. N. M . in the White Mountains.
(?pens Satunlay. June 29th. 18-hole ?iolf
course maintained in excellent ?un'lltlon.
Scenic auto mute. Attractlr? family ?of
?aires completely furnish?'?! for rani with
, hotel service. Charles V- Murpliy, Mgr.
! Addr.'ss Laurel Houae, Lakewood, N. J.,.
until June 1st.?Advt.
COL. ASTOR DIED BRAVELY,
GIVING PLACE TO WOMAN
Left His Bride's Side and Stepped from th<
Lifeboat, Saying: 'The Ladies Will
Have to Go First"
Stories from the suivivors of the wreck seem to be agreed in th?
main that Colonel John Jacob Astor met death heroically. According
to one story, told by Miss Margaret Hays, of No. 304 East 83d street
Astor himself chose death to save an unknown woman who came alon?
just as the lifeboat in v/hich he had a place because of the absence oi
! any more women was about to be lowered.
It was a grim lottery, in which Astor had drawn a fortunate num?
ber, which he later fteely surrendered to a woman whose name is not
known. The story as told by Miss Hays was as follows:
"When the Titanic struck I did not feel the shock very much. I
made my way to the deck, where everything was excitement, and was
assisted into a lifeboat that was waiting to be lowered.
"Colonel Astor, with his wife, came out on deck at that moment,
1 and both got into another boat. Colonel Astor had his arms about his
! wife and assisted her into the boat. At the time there were no women
waiting to get into the boats, and the ship's officer at that point invited
Colonel Astor to get into the boat with his wife. The colonel after
looking around and seeing no women got into the boat and his wife
threw her arms about him.
"The boat in which Colonel Astor and his wife were sitting was
about to be lowered when a woman came running out of the com
panionway. Raising his hand, Colonel Astor stopped the preparations
to lower his boat, and stepping out assisted the woman into the seat
he had occupied. Mrs. Astor cried out and wanted to get out of the
boat with her husband, but the colonel patted her on the back and said
' something in a low tone of voice. As the boat was being lowered I
1 heard him say : 'The ladies will have to go first.'
Another story, told by Colonel Gracie, revealed Astor as a devoted
husband, seeking only, in that hour of terror, to save his young bride
from peril and death.
"The conduct of Colonel Astor," said Colonel Gracie, "was de?
serving of the highest praise. He devoted all his energy to saving his
young bride, who was in delicate health. Colonel Astor helped us in
our efforts to get her into the boat. I lifted her into the boat, and as
she took her place Colonel Astor requested permission of the second
! officer to go with her for her own protection. The officer told him no
! man should go aboard the boat until all the women were off, and Colonel
Astor simply inquired as to the number of the boat, and turned to the
work of clearing other boats and reassuring frightened women."
It was evident last night that the young Mrs. Astor was not aware
of the supreme sacrifice which her husband made. She spoke? of him
I hopefully as having escaped, but she knew nothing of how it might
| have been accomplished. At the homej^her parents, Mr. and Mrs.
* Can.la.ird on aacsnd gage, tttb caluma. I
Mrs. Straus Refused to Leave Her Husband;
Major Butt and Colonel Astor Together
as Steamer Sank?Captain Smith
Reported To Have Shot Himself.
MEN IN I ST AND 2D CABINS CALM;
ITALIANS SHOT TO KEEP ORDER
Survivors Agreed That, Despite Promise to Contrary, Vessel
Was Speeding, and Struck Berg on Clear
Night?No Searchlights.
SAVED FROM THE TITANIC.775
LOST " " " .1565
Saved.
First cabin passengers . 330 . . . 240
Second cabin passengers 320 . ... 125
Steerage passengers . . 750 ...? 200
Officers and crew . . . 940 .... 210
2340 775
The maximum capacity of the life boats was less than
one-third of the complement of the vessel in passengers and
(crew, and they carried 80 per cent of their capacity
I away from the s-nking ship.
The Cuiiard liner Carpathia reached New York last night,
bringing the survivora of the wreck of the giant White Star
liner Titanic, with the firs, authentic accounts of the loss of
I the Titanic.
Among the many tragic and heroic incidents of the wreck
.hat of the heroism of Mrs. Isidor Straus, who refused to he
?saved and leave her husband to drown, stood out.
Mrs. Straus was in one of the lifeboats which was about to
put off from the Titanic. She railed for her husband to join
her. He waved his hand in goodby and smilingly refused to
1 take the pla*ce of a woman who might be saved. Before the boat
could ?be lowered into the water Mrs. Straus scrambled out and
half fell at the feet of her husband. Xo urging could maku?
lier take a place in another boat, and she went down on the
Titanic with Mr. Straus.
Colonel .lohn Jacob Astor and Major Archibald Butt
stood side by side as the Titanic sank, and waved goodbv to the
small boats hardly to be seen a mile away on the starlit sra.
When the order was first given for the passengers to take
to the lifeboats Major Butt had defended the passage from
the steerage with an iron bar against the maddened rush o? the
panicstricken men in the steerage and saved the lifeboats for
the women and children.
Mrs. Churchill (andre, of Washington, one of the rescih d,
said last night that Major Butt placed her in a boat and re?
mained on the Titanic's deck himself.
Prom the stories told by survivors these salient facts stand 4
out:
The Titanic struck an iceberg from fifty to one hundred
feet high. The blow was not head-on, but rather a glancing
one. It thus ripped the great ship's sides and made useless the
watertight compartments most essential.
The Titanic was going at full speed at the time.
Promises had been made to the passengers that no attempt
would be made to break the record in crossing the Atlantic.
Despite these promises the ship was urged ahead at full
speed from the time she left Daunts Rock.
No ice had been seen during the day.
It was a clear and starlight night.
Captain K. J. Smith was not on the bridge when the ship
struck the iceberg.
The first officer was in charge.
Fifteen minutes after the ship struck the ice the berg had
disappeared from view.
The Titanic struck the iceberg on her starboard bow and
a great hole was ripped in her side.
The passengers were at first assured that the ship was in
110 danger and was unsinkable.
The ice was struck at 11:.'J5 p. m.
Fifteen minutes later the passengers were called oil deck
and told to put on life preservers.
Forty minutes after the collision the passengers were told
to take to the lifeboats.
The passengers who were in bed were not aroused by the
collision, but by the stopping of the engines.
The maximum capacity of the lifeboats was less than one
third the complement of the ship in crew and passengers.
The men in the first and second cabins made no attempt
to save themselves, but remained to sink with the ship, and
watched the women put oft' in the lifeboats.
Some of the men in the steerage tried to storm the lifeboats,
and half a dozen were shot to protect the women in the boats.
The Titanic sank two hours and forty-live minutes after
she struck the ice.

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