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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, November 07, 1912, Image 1

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V
PROGRESSIVE
But Not Radical
Wetti'i0rl{
aErtbtttvje
New Yorka Only
Republican Paper
V^1^XI1[30 24,098. c^.?_a^rS__.~ NEW-YORK, THIHSDAY. NOVEMBER 7, 11)12.-S1XTEEX PAtiKS. * * PRICE ONE CEXT"""-^,!S?.sYg^g^
901 ON BOARD
Canadian Steamship Royal
George Drives on Rocks in
the St. Lawrence River
During Fog.
SPEED SAID TO BE HIGH
Qnebec Dispatch Reports Ves
iel in Shallow Water, Diffi
cult of Access, with Keel
Ripped from Stem to
Stern.
Quebec. Nov. fi.?Tiie Can.tdian
N'orthern Royal Mail steamer Royal
George. arlth 001 passensers on board.
-rounded on rocks during a fog in ihe
Bt. Lawrence River early to-nlaht.
ghe was said to be golng at fuM
ipeed at the time she met with the
accldent
The grounded steamer is in a posi
tion difflcult of access. and news of
the developments is sk>w in reaching
ihore.
The tugs which went to the rescue of
the ateamer. it was learned late t.>
alght, were unable to go alongslde be
r*useof the shallow water imir.edtately
tround her. The ateamer. it developed.
ftood in only about aix feet ..f w;it?-r.
looming up high ln the air. and seein
ingly belng in danger of toppllng over.
Xaviaatnrs estimated that the steam?
er must BBV8 been runnlng eightr.cn
milea an hour to have thus ploughed
her way over the rock botton. of the
river her full length. and were of the
oplnlon tlmt she must have ripped her
bottom Irom Btem le aOeen.
The passengers and crew are all safe.
Four hundred passengers were taken
Off at a late hour and are OT. their way
to Quebec.
The vegael went SgTO?nd about one
mlie east of Point St. Laurcnt. Island
(.f Or ? ans, ten miles below Quehec.
The wrseklag steamer. l.orrt Strath
mna and two tujts were at once sent to
the Royal George'a aid The rocks on
which the steamer struck lie on the
north alde of the South channel.
The Royal George left Grosse Isle
quaravine station for Quebec shortly
after 4 o'clock thl? afternoon. She
waa on htr way from Avonmouth. Kng
land. and was due in Montieal t,?
ntorrow
The Royal George was on its last trip
ln th?- St. Lawrence this season.
o
EARTH SHOCKS IN JERSEY
Atlantic City Residents Suspect
Its Real "Quake."
TRy Tflficraph to I hf T: IbtHM. 1
Atlantic City, 5Tov. 6.?Viulent ahocks.
believtd bv scorea to have been cauaed
by an earthquake, shook a big aectJon
here bttWSSB 3:30 and 4:30 o'clock this
afternoon.
Because of the absence of seismo
graphs or other recordlng lnstruments,
lt has been impossible to determine
whethrr or not tliere waa a real oarth
Quake. Dlrector Judklna of the fed
eral Weather Bureau here ls of the
oplnlon that the tremora were cauaed
by the settllng of lower atrata of the
Island s foundatlon. Fully a hundred
persons living from Kentueky avenue
to Longport, a dlstance of about alx
miles, called the bureau by telephone
to inquire the cauae of the ahocka,
which they declared could be dlstlnctly
felt during intervals. This aection of
the Island appears to be the only terrl
tory affected.
Mrs John P. Oiheraon. jr.. a guest
at the Hotel Deville, ln Kentueky
avenue. near the Boardwalk, declares
she was awakened from a aound aleep
hy the shaking of the bullding. Mra.
Edward Warren. of Newark; George
E. W. Copeland and H. E. Thompson,
of Phlladelphla, and other guests say
they were alarmed by the repeaUd
dlaturbancea, which rattled the win
-owb furiously at time*.
This Morning's News
LOCAL Page
HufcbsM Suei Moose Candidate. B
NewepapeiK Get a Chldlng. 7
lYag Typhoid Vacclnatlon.11
Grtnt Ib Becker Counsel, He Says-lg
FOLXTICAI..
Wilson Asbui es Bualneaa Men. 1
AnilyalB of Wilson's Victory. 1
New EnglHnd States for Wilson. 8
Uoooeveit Candidate ln 1910. 2
^?w Jersey S*ept Clean by Democrats 3
'looaeven Intent on Recouping. 3
alasjr Meaaages for Sulzer. 3
' ' w R*P-bltcans in Legislature. 4
fi (lz?r Runa Ahead of Wilson. 4
Tafl Sees Victory for Party. B
Wll-on'a Benate Path TroubleBome... 8
Ntw Brrnx County BUI Needed. 8
?omen Wln Vote in Four States. 8
Democrat* Kigure on Patronage.18
, " 0EV8BAZ..
Uner r>n the Hoeka.7. 1
l>?x Appolnts Brother-ln-Law.18
-OBBZO*.
Europer Felirltatlona for Wilson- 3
B-nxarlani at Tchataldja Llne. 8
Turka RealUe Knd Has Come. 8
-CfB<ra--_ar_ovB.
*?awe for Women. 7
B-ltorltl . 8
Soelety . 8
Obltusry . 8
?pertfc .10 snd 11
Army an(t Navy.11
weathir .11
?Olpplng N>wb ."
Inaneial and Msrkets_18, 13 and 14
*?*J Estata .14 and 1
MASSACRE DANGER IS
FOR CHRISTIAN OTTOMANS
Soldiers Believe Their Defeat
Due to Non-Mussulman
Element in Army.
London, Nov. 7?The Constantinople
eorrespondent of "The Dally News"
sends the followlng, under date of No?
vember 5:
"Last nlght wa* an unforgettable"
night of terror. The arrival of fam
ishing parties of the defeated troops,
lllled with the convktion that the de?
feat waa due to the preseme of Chrls
tians in the army, created a panlc and
nameless fear ainong the foreign resi
dents.
"To show how easily disaster might
arrive. an imldent o.curred to-night
! near the fl?4ata brldge. A Greek in a
oallboal was coogratulatlag his i-om
p.inions on the Bulgarian victnries.
1 Suddenly a calque slld alongside and a
I Turk sTOruag himself aboard the Greek
I Itoal. A knlfe gleamed and the Greek
I fell o\ erl.oard dead. Then a revolver
' cracked and the Turk and his < ompan
I ions fell.
Inimediately Uiere was flring in all
i direi'tions. and thirty-six Greeks and
Turks were kllled or wounded before a
i poticg boat arrived and quelled the dlO?
turbance.
' I believe that forelgners are safe,
bui no government measures will suf
flce to protact Chrlstian nttomana in
I the event of an outbreak of riotlng."
CHILDREN TOSSED INTO FIRE
Turks' Veneer of European Civ
ilization Vanishes.
London, Nov. 7. -The Constantinople
eorrespondent of "The Daily Chronirle"
sends tlie followlng:
"At any morr.ent the storm may break
and Involve us ln the red ruln of mas
sacre and outrage. Soon Consutnt!
BOpta itself will be surrounded. All the
| disenrdant elements of tb* v-opulatlon,
I Turk, Armenlan, Greek, Kurd and a
heterogeneous mass of Europeans, will
be crushed together. and all the old
hatreds will blaze into scorching flame.
? For flve hundred yearB the Turk has
lorded lt over the Infldel.' The last
hours of that asoendancy. it is feared,
may be dyrd ln blood. We had a fore
ta*t* of what is to eome in the newj
I frorn Rodosto. Thlther ran.e bands of
Nizams, drUen from Lub- Burgas by
the victorious Bulgars. The thin veneer
| <-f European civlliza-tion \anished llke
mist in the morning sunllght. A sccne
of horror followed. The town was glven
up to masssacre. outrage and pillago.
lt was set on flre ln seven places. Chil
dren were hurled Into raglng flarnes.
"ln their agony of fear many trled to
get to the open sea ln boats?anywhere
| from those human wolves. ln some
! cases the boatmen were maasa<-red. In
othera those who trusted to the sea
1 found ? merciful death beneath the
| sagvea.
"The victorious march of the Bul?
garian army results in simllar scenes
j v, herever the Turks antlcipate the com
Ing of the enemy."__
!BULGAR LEFT ADVANCES.
Occupies Heights Near Istran
dia, Driving Enemy Back.
Vienna. Nov. 7.?The "Reichposf
eorrespondent with the Bulgarian army
>-.>ii<!s the followlng dispatch. underdate
<-f November 6:
"Aftar heavy flghting. the Bulgarian
lafl Biaf oc? upied the heights to th?
tM$n ?>( rflrandia, having driven the
Turkish rlght wing into the forest re
gion west of Lake Derkos.
"The Bulgarlans are now bringing
their forces from Ietrandla and Yenl
keui to dellver an attaok on the Tcha?
taldja position south of Lake Derkos.
The Bulgarian centre and right wlng
are energetically forcing the defeated
Turkish rear guard back along the llne,
sixteen miles east of Tchorlu, and will
execute an attack on the Turkish posi
tions on both sldes of Tchataldja.
"In the recent flghting the Turkish
artillery supportcd the infantry very
indifferently. It seldom held out until
Ihe last moment, thus leavlng the in?
fantry exposed to the attat ks of the
pursuing Bulgarlans. As a result, tho
retreat of the Turks haa almost invarl
ably degenerated into a regular fllght.
?Before Adrlanople the Turks are
valijly trying to break through the Bul?
garian ring. Despite the Turkish
s.-aivhlights, the Bulgarlans frequently
make night assaults.
Fighting is also occurrlng daily at
KaraRar. on the right bank of the Ma
ritza River. The failure of the last
-..rtle at Adrianople appeara to have al
most broken the garrlson's powers of
r^slsunce. and its fall ls expected im
medlately."
(tMlier ?lar News on nlnth Pa?e.)
'PLANE AND AUTO IN RACE
Leave Omaha for 1,000-Mile
Trip to New Orleans.
(By Tel'grapt. to Tha Trlbune 1
<>,.,aha. Nov. O.-A thousand-mlle
r;...- between a hydro-aeroplane and an
automohile was begun here this after?
noon, when "Tony" Jannus. flylng ln a
Benoist Plane, and Chatles L. Young ln
a Bergdoll automobile. atarted from
omaha to New Orleans. The fllght will
follow the MIsBouri Hlver to St. Louls
and the Misslsaippl to New Orleans.
The plane can only allght ln water. as
lt is not provlded with wheels. .
Jannus attained a speed of slxty mllea
an hour and tled up to-nlght at Ne
braska City, aeventy-flve mlles by ri\er
fTOCfl Omaha. Seventy-aexen mlnutea
were conaumed in the fllght. By road
the dlatance la forty-five mlles. and the
automoblle made thla in a little less
than two hours.
a -'
Atlanta. Niw Orlaana and Southweat
>l. So,,?hern r.allway. Three through
tralna dally. Innlng. alerplna. Ilbrsiv and
obVrvatlsa cara. BaatafroVort II:*
K M 138 P. M an.i 12:88 Mtjln. P?*f
ynrK Offl.e. 2*ii Fifth A\enii>. Aau.
E
FEAR, SAYS WILSON
President-Elect Avers Whole
some Commerce Will Meet
Neither Interference Nor
Embarrassment.
GREETS iVTCOMBS WARMLY
Morning Given to Answering
Congratulatory Messages?
Replies to Taft, Roosevelt
and Bryan Among
Hundreds.
I Bv Tel?_TBP- to Th* Trll>un?\ |
Prlnceton. N. J.. Nov. <'..? -Wllliam F.
McCombs realtzed a dream to-day.
He shook hand.s with Governor Wood
roa wilson of New Jersey and called
him "Mr. President." There were in
the eve of the thln. frall man. wh >
spent his health to land hla candidate,
a Ught and a twtnkle which ohowed
thnt he had his reward The triumph
ha.l wlped out all tliouglit <>f the UttST
struggle through which he had gofie in
winning flrst the nominati-.n <>f WtlBOfl
and then his election.
"1*084 shaking hand-. a'iggested a
photographer.
' < >h, that'O too artiflcial," said Go\ -
ernor Wilson, and he threw his urm
around the shoulder of his campaign
mnnager.
7t waa Governor Wilson wix. said in
rcply to a QtMBtlOB as to McCoBlbs'a
health: "He remind* nie ..f Bomethtng
Jeepph Choate oncc aald; he'o gon.
through bla constltutlon; he'o j'lst
siniggling along <.n liis by-law
Money Left in Party'a Cheat.
There were more rfBBOBO than one
for Mr. MfComhs's optimlam. He 8*88
al.le to announce a aurplua iti th<
DemoCfBtfO campaign treasure . h> sl.
His return to the campaign waa a
fortunate thlng for his party, for he
left all his Bssoclates far bshlnd la his
ablllttSB as a money rollector. Tha cosl
of the campaign ha ast-BISted \at
fljOOOuOOOti He Is not ojiitc through with
his work, BUt he said he aZpCCtsd l ?
ha\e everything flnlahed ln i fsa dajra
"And what ar..' >'0_ g.-niK to du
then?" he was aaked.
"Just rest," he answeird, with the
pride of a man whu had earned a vaca
tion.
Mr. IfeCeroba arrivsd Bl tha fjov
ernor's bOBM before lun<-hc>n, and left
there ln thr afternoon after h long talk
with his chief. Wl.Mher or n..t thln
talk concerned the Cnl.inet of the next
President neither ti. nor Governor U'il
son would say. The Gotrernor e/ould
gi\c no hlnt as to the men he v\lll
rhoose. nor s/OBld he evofl ellSBtnata
uny of the nvany men arho hava been
suggest* d.
Evaaive as to His Cabinet.
"It aeems," ba aald, when a story was
read to him purporting to give tbe
make-up of his Cabinet, 'that some of
the newspapcrs are pr< pare.l to meel
the news half S_y, In fact. they're
ready to meet lt before lt starta."
Iicar me," he addfd hs an after
thought, "Ml have to give up reading
tiie newspapcra. They mlght prejudlos
my cholce."
His flrst visltors of the day 8 ere
Ahran, 1. Elkus, Rolla Wells, treasurer
of the campaign committee. Krederlc
C. I'enfleld, one of the heaviest con
trlbutors to the fund, and Henry Mor
genthau, chalrman of the flnance com?
mittee. Mr. Morgenthau had amoothed
the way for his own comlng by sendlng
an enormous cake. the welght of which
was estin.ated at anything from two t<
twenty-flve pounds. On the cake waa
a miniature Whlte House.
To hla visltors Ciovernor Wilson read
a statement which ho had prepared. lt
ls his last atatement, for later iu the
day he aald: "I'm done with state
ments. Now I'm going to do a lot of
thlnklng."
Makes a Formal 8tatament.
The statement was as follows
The reBulta flll me with the hope that
the thoughtful progre^lve rOI-SS of the
nation mav now at last unlte to give the
country freedom of tnterprlse and a go1 -
ernment released from all selflah and
prtvafa lnfluences, Uevoted to Justh-e and
progress . , _ ..
There ls ahaoltitelv nothlng for the
honest and enllghtened buslness men of
the country to feai No man whoae
buslness la conducte.l without violatlon
of the rights of free competltion and
without bucIi prlvate uiiderstandltiga and
, secret alllances as vlolate the prlndple
|of our law and the policy of all whole
-uine commerce and enterprlse neod fear
. ither interference or embarrasstnent
from the adminlstration
our hope and purpose is now to brlng
all the free lorces of the nation lnto ac
tlve and Intelllgent co-operatlon and to
give to our proHperlty a freshnesa and
Bplrll and a eonfldence such as it has
"not had ln our tlme.
The responslbtlitlea of the task are
[ treinendous. but they are rommon re
sponslbilltles which all lea.lers ol action
and oplnlon must ahare And with the
C mfldence of the people behlnd ua evsry
Ihlng that ls right la posslbla My own
ambltlon will be more than BStlaflad If I
may be pennltted to be the fratik spokes
in:ih of the nation'a thoughtful purpOSSS
in theae great mattera.
Governor Wilson g?t uj. early. al?
though he broke hia pledge of retirlng
;,t 11 o'clock last night. His election
cost hlni no sleep.
"Good l>>rd, no," he Bald, in answer
to a questlon. "I had to put] myself
out hy the halr of my head."
Thla must have been a feat for the
Governor's halr would afford a man
scanty purchaae.
Telagrama Gain on Him.
He fSCSd a problem aa soon a* he
flnlahed breakfast. It was the prob
(ontlniied ob rtfth page. PeSSOJl column.
Dewey'a Old Burgundy snd Clarets
Wltb m.-ais. Btrenathen Uraln and Bodi
ii t Dtwey _?ona4_o..WK_ltso?t..N.Y.
Advt
PRESroENTELECT AND IIIS WARWICK
Woodrow Wilson, wiili his arm around the shoulders of William F. Mc
Comba, the man who brotight about his nomination by the Raltimore
cont iMition.
. I'lioionrapheJ at Princeton yesterday.)
PrOTO t? f>Y A?4BB_>* PaiH AllOfi-t.OM
STRIKING POINTS OF
THIS YEAR'S ELECTION
Wilson's vote far below the com
bined Republican and Bull Mtnne.
Womin'i suffrage exter.ded, prob?
ably in four more statea.
Wilbam M. Caldar, re-elected to
Congreas from Brooklyn; only Re?
publican to v/in in qreatar New
York.
Taft led Rooaevelt in New York
handaomely.
MaiMJ, after two qene.-ations,
Democratic.
Republican Gevernors elected in
several Wilson ttatea.
Roosevelt electora in South Da?
kota muBt vote for Taft. under the
ante election agreement.
lowa. for firat tima m its history,
Democratic.
BIG DIAMOND IS INFERIOR
Weight Is 1,649 Carats, Ac
! cording to Official Statement.
lobauuMoburg. Nov. 0 Th* graal
dlano_4, lh* lnrgest In Ibo arorld
| whi. h has |ua1 baari 41a o-arad ln lh*
I preantar mlaa, may not prove to be i ?
i v-aluable as at nral thoughl It lo noa
ofjidail] atatad ihat la* dtamoad,
Which Mclghs 1.?W!i-arais. 18 Of Inferio,
quality. _
POLICE SILENT ON BOMB
Under Orders in Suppressing
Explosion Details, They Say.
Ifn< h laereey rorroBBda tho throwtog
of a bomb al T-'.tb atraat aad 3d ave
?,?.. lasl nlght Aithough the dar-affl
done to the plale gla** aUMloa of I
,]rug store on tb* COTtr** was slight.
and no 0B8 ?:<? Injured, UlO police of
the Kast 67th BtPOOt POlle* stntion
malntalne.l a stubhorn bUOAC* regar-1
ing the details. saylng th** B*TO "act
ing und.-r orders."
Paraoaa waiking paa* tbe drug ator*
at NO 1 '03 Thlr.l avenue, owned by
Thomas Latbam, arofo atartlod about I
o*cloek by a tarriflc axplorton. [I
?a*ra*d no thoagh tb* bomb bad baon
tbrown trom ? padolBi northbound
tjavatad train. Mr. Latbam naa baon
ln his present pla.-e of buataagg for
tWOBt) -seven years. H* COUM BOl
Imngliie why any pers.m should at
t.u.i.t to h.irm hln. Naat dbo* la a
fmii stora k?pt by Joaoph Nannlata,
an iiaii.in. u l" booMved tbe bomb was
intended for hlm. althotigh ba aald he
had r?>. eived no threatening l.-ti.-rs.
Lieutt-naiit Oloatar, who arga on duty
b.-hind rhe daab at tb* Kast 6Ttii str. et
polte* stntion. rafuaed t" raad th* entrj
on tba bi'.it.-r ragardlag th* bomb
lardwlrsf. On Augaal N Olaotar araa
df-posed as eaptaln of ;he fourth detae
thr- diatrlct the resnlt. it 811 sai.l. ol
his IniiHlvlty ln tbo Cnrran mur.l.i
TEN BROTHERS FOR WILSON
Vote of Fish Family Went Sol
idly to the Governor.
| H- Telearaph lo The Trll.un.-.J
Stroudsbiirg, Fenn., Nov. li.-l'hilaii
der Flsh. of Prince Townshlp, and his
nine brothers, Chnrles, James. John S.,
William R.. Moses R.. M< < 'L-llan. B. E.
F.. Phllip M. and Morris N . all voted
for Wilson on Tuesday.
Th* agea of the Flsh brolhers range
from slxty to thlrty-elght years.
e
BUTTER?VERY BEST?38c. LB. Vo
nre a-irc ..f fresh blltter from A< k?-r. M*T?
rall K t'ondll Co.'a sU'tts ln (Jrraier N. Y.
AdTt
THE ELECTORAL COLLEGE.
WILSON.
ALABAMA . 12
AKIZONA. 3
ARKANSAS . 9
CALIFORNIA. 13
COLORADO.J. 6
CONNECTICUT. 7
DELAWARE. 3
FLORIDA . 6
GEORGIA . 14
INDIANA. 15
IOV/A . 13
KANSAS . 10
KENTUCKY . 13
LOUISIANA. 10
MA1NE. 6
MARYLAND . 8
I MASSACHUSETTS. 18
MINNESOTA. 12
MISSISSIPPI. 10
MISSOURI . 18
MOMTANA. 4
NEBRASKA . 8
NEVADA. 3
NEW HAMPSHIRE. 4
NEW JERSEY. 14
NEW MEXICO. 3
NEW YORK. 45
NORTH CAROLINA. 12
NORTH DAKOTA. 5
OHIO . 24
OKLAHOMA. 10
OREGON.-. 5
RHODE ISLAND. 5
SOUTH CAROLINA. 9
TENNESSEE. 12
TEXAS. 20
VIRGINIA . 12
WEST VIRGINIA. 8
WISCONSIN . 13
Total .422
ROOSEVELT.
MICHIGAN . 15
PENNSYLVANIA . 38
WASHINGTON . 7
Total .'.... 60
TAFT.
IDAHO. 4
*SOUTH DAKOTA. 5
UTAH. 4
VERMONT. 4
TOTAL . 17
DOUBTFUL.
ILLINOIS. 29
WYOMING. 3
Total . 32
?Flodgsd to Taft _
FINDS TUBERCULOSIS CURE
! German Doctor Treats by
Means of Living Bacilli.
Befiia, Wor. ?'?.-At a meeting of the
I llerlin Medlcal Soclety to-day Dr.
j Friedrich F. Friedmann announced the
I diSCOVsry Ot what he belleved to be a
praetlcal C-f8 for every form of tuber
. ulosls.
ii. exhtbttsd cured paUsata and de
.lared that he had treated ti-SJ casea by
hi.s method with invariable improve
ment and almost invarlaMy complete
CB-_S>
Prominent phyalcians testifled to buc
regBBa by this method in their own
practJi >'.
Ur Friedmann injecla living tubercle
bacilli which have been rendere I
bSBSt olellt.
ANGOSTURA BITTERS lends dellelous
flavor lo/Brspe-frull and jellies.- Advt.
WILSON'S VICTORY
MORE SWEEPING
Gets New Hampshire from Taft, Kansas
from Roosevelt and May Take Illinois
?Has 422 Electoral Votes.
TABULATION OF VOTE IS SLOW
Women Gain Suffrage in Four States, Lose in One?
President Optimistic Despite Defeat, the Colonel to
Try for Third Term Again, and Wilson Faces
Trouble in Washington ? Socialists
Gain and Lose.
Analysis of the nation's vote for President on Tuesday occupied
the attention of most men and many women yesterday. No direct
line could be obtained on the total vote cast for each candidate, but
enough was gleaned from the figures to show several important and
striking features.
Woodrow Wilson's victory, it appears. assures him 422 electoral
votes, with the possibility that Minnesota may swing to the colonel's
column. The New Jersey Governor took the ten vctes of Kansas
from Roosevelt, and in Wyoming it is possible he may get the three
votes from Taft.
South Dakota, which elected five Roosevelt men, must be placed
in Taft's list, for by an ante-election agreement their ballots in the
electoral college go to the President. With Idaho, Utah and Ver
mont each giving four, that brings the President's total up to 17.
Roosevelt followers suffered a scare when the complete Illinois
returns came in, and it is far more than probable that he may
lose the delegation of 29. The only states apparently safe for the
colonel are Washington (7), Pennsylvania (38) and Michigan (15).
The vote in Michigan has not been tabulated fully, but the colonel is
twenty-odd thousand ahead.
WOMEN WIN IN FOUR STATES.
Women won the right to vote in four of the five states where ?
constitutional amendments were submitted to the people. The vic?
tory of the women was complete in Kansas, Arizona and Michigan,
and late returns from Oregon indicated they had succeeded there also.
but from Wisconsin came returns showing the decisive defeat of the
equal suffrage proposal. In Louisiana the right of women to sit in
education and charity boards was defeated.
Another interesting feature of the election was the holding of
state governments in several states by the Republicans, though
Wilson won the electoral vote. Rhode Island, Minnesota, Kansas
(apparently), Wisconsin, lowa, South Dakota and West Virginia all
named Republican executives. In Massachusetts and New Hamp?
shire the legislatures remained Republican.
The Democrats, in the widespread victory of Tuesday, have
secured control of the United States Senate, but it will not be settled
for a day or two how large their majority will b?. In many states,
where counting still is going on, the control of the legislatures is in
doubt. Democratic Senators appear certain as successors to Re?
publicans from Colorado (two), New Jersey, Delaware, Montana
and Kansas.
SOCIALISTS GAIN AND LOSE.
The Socialists made a surprising showing in many respects.
They gained heavily in Philadelphia. Chicago and Pittsburgh, Cali
fornia and Nevada, but suffered losses in their star bailiwicks, Wis?
consin and Schenectady, N. Y.
In Wisconsin Representative Berger, the only Socialiot in the
House of Representatives, was defeated, with a number of other
officeholders, and in Schenectady, N. Y., where the party had elected
almost a complete local ticket at the last election, practically all of
its candidates were defeated.
In New York State Governor Wilson's plurality ran over 200,000,
whlle Mr. Sulzer led him by about 1,000. Their pluralities were:
Wilson, 204,363; Sulzer, 205,675. The entire Democratic state ticket
and two judges of the Court of Appeals were carried into ofnce. The
Legislature and the Congress delegation were heavily Democratic.'
PRESIDENTIAL PLURALITIES BY STATES.
STATES. Wilson.
Arizona . 5,130
Alabama . 80.000
Arkansas . 47,000
California . 12,835
Colorado . <7,000
C-mnecticut . 6,343
Delaware . 6.500
Florida . ".000
Georgia . 50,000
Idaho .
Illinois . .____;
Indiana . 128000
lowa . 13,000
Kansas.?
Kentucky . 104.175
Louisiana .? ?
Maine . 2 500
Maryland . 54,443
Massachusetts . 18.'40
Michigan.?
Minnesota. 2,000
Mississinpi . .?___S
Missouri . HJJJJ
Montana . 17,160
Nehraska . 35,000
Taft. Roosevelt.
-Plurality, 1901^
Taft. Bryan.
1,958
23,000
86.906
2,944
44.660
2,943
16,459
179.134
10,731
74.439
36,007
31,584
605
110,423
159.809
86,'42
49,066
30,255
20,450
30,721
8,38;
54,610
Nevada
2,742
New Hampshire . 1.823
New Jersey . 38.753
New Mexico . 3.85U
New York . _??
North Carolina. 60,000
North Dakota. 10.000
Ohio . . 134.169
Oklahoma . 30,000
Oregon . 5'???
Pennsylvania . ?
Rhode Island . 2.544
South Carolina. 50,000
South Dakota.___.
Tennessee . .JzXX
Texas . 186,050
Ut*h .
Vermont .
Virginia .
Washington . ?
West Virginia . 15.476
Wisconsin . 30,000
Wyoming .
629
3,007
19.494
82,759
202,606
5.000
924
28.073
5,000
23.000
24,795
69,591
24,481
329,001
19,236
27,270
18,627
28,056
47.371
26,451
31.115
5,928
55.924
4,102
437
22.058
11.889
58^25
17.287
211,636
30.373

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