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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, November 25, 1912, Image 1

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M?'iflrl?
ffiritwttf
Vou LXXII..X0 24016.
r? ?i?? local ?now?.
I i.-rnnrruw. fair; north?,??! wind?.
NEW-YORK. MONDAY, NOVEMBER 25,
1915.-FO?RTEEN PAGES.* ? PRICE ONE eENT,pC,*0l,:??J^^
10
Bulgarian Troops Rushed on
Greek Transp:rts to Galli?
pot. Peninsula?Austrian
Cruiser Sails Thither.
DEFENDERS NOW STRONGER
Turkey Augments Her Forces
on European Banks of the
Famous Straits by Sol?
diers Brought from
Anatolia.
? cant? te Th? Ti ,i
l/ondon. Nov. 2.V- There is little or
M chantre in the situation at T?-hat ahi?
ja. It is, however. quite evident that
tho Turks ate readv \c> discuss the
terms for an armistice and it is ex?
pected that the plenipotentiaries O? the
two belligerents will meet to-day.
The international situation generally
is atill regarded as very serious in
Vienna, chiefly in <-onsequence of fats?
*ian preparation. It is assert?--?.! that an
important military council took plrue
immediately after the Csar'fl arm. ! at
Trarsko-Selo. but the ?rai. as Tar a*
1.? known, has not yet Signed the order
for the mobilisation of the two dozen
army corpa told of in yesterday's dis?
patches.
reparations f??r mobilization have
teen going on for a considerable time
in Germany, Russia and Austria ,?ml
th? official denials of the fact are mint?
mired by the further fact that a stri?"t
censorship is being; maintained on all
news of military movements.
A Rome message sent by mail to the
frontier, apparently to escape the cen?
sor, states that in an official ma_?n_g?
received from Vienna the determination
of Austria to fight rather than gtvs wav
ee the question of the status quo or on
the question of Albanian a'itonomy is
nequivocally expresse?).
Peaaimietic Turkish Report.
P ?ad Pa? ha haa presented a distinct?
ly pessimistic report to the Turkish
I 'nment on the state of the army
beabas1 the Tchataldja lines. He warn?
?.he Porte that the resistance to be ex
? ? te?l i rom the troops now facing the
Bulgarian army i'an only be shortlived.
If the enemy manages to brea?.
ritnongh ihe defences Fuad fears the
frorst, and d?v-lare? the fate of ihe
'! to i'e sealed.
A grave feature of the arar, news t?tV
dajr lies In the tension arising ont ?if
reported niohili/ationa by Auatria
Th?ea*>. H la aaid. will be completed in
four days. On the other hand, count
>aa Russian trains are transporting
T?en and war material westward. The
rength of elev.-t! Russian army ii.tp?
haa already been raised almost to a
footing, aa the time expired men
,nd reeervlats summoned t<> excreta::
for the last two months had Ml bee?)
disbanded. Moreover, one nrni\ >..ri
?nd one cavalry division have already
r\?en sent from the interior of Russia
<-> th? Auatrlan frontier.
It ia believed that the reason f??r
?heae somewhat showy mo\ ementa Is
Kuaala'a wish to raise her prestige with
the Balkan peoples. ?>r possibly tf?
?\?nge the diplomatic- defeat austalneil
kg Osval ?ehrenthal'a annexation of
Roani-. Other observer? think ahe I*
not attempting anything further than
?n intimidation of Austria in the lat?
iera diapute with Servia, which at?
tempt, ?ftlclal ? Irclea in Vienna aay,
tnuat fail, aa the Dual Monarchy Is
rrmly determined to Insist on its view
8arv>a Muat Reply.
-?' . will short'v be asked f?>r a
? rrply to the representations of
?*-. I :??nan finlster In Helgrade.
shoMd the answer he e'-aalve or >in
?stlafA tory, another but more em?
phatic Bteg ?ill be taken In *>igr?de.
'??tian??* ?*? third *-?e?. ?*??<?? H ? ?liimn.
This Morning*s News
LOCiL Tag?
?>'"? i?j.?,iv in Aaylnan lire. l
?Storm Dat i\-n-* <"H>. 1
Uw Mor?! Tone ?'aus? of On?ft . ?
Tablet foi Mis. Straus. 4
Tomkir.? Talk? About Pier?.4
''??? Hang? on Bronx County Hill... 5
Uimonets See "Our Wlvea". 5
(?aaabllcaa Speakers' Bureau. ?
Habbi laya Balkan War la 1'nrighteous 7
-"SWa Me?t to Help Brethren. 7
*h>W?-i7 MiiBion's Birthday. 9
Vr>* Heada Kxploration Paity. ?
?nan Memorial Held. 9
Ru? Rid? f?r Hyde Jurors.14
/Mayor? v, ?n Wear Tuxedos.14
r'"<? <?r Tuikeys Goes lp.14
Kidi>?p Ouardemaii and Wife.14
oaaramax.
^?-tlrcad Arbitrators Make Award? . . . 1
v-nfcir)?er? Gain Little by Award. a
I'ootbaH? Toll of Deaths. 4
-taken Town? Scourged. 4
'*i*???n Coi.fldent of Acquittal.A
hiriloma.y PacM*? 8??rrr.i--i>?t?. S
v-<tual Suffrage War's Cure. S
^?nkiii?f Ahu-.es Bared. 7
b?nitKiats Ji?.pr,r? for Tariff. 7
Many Plums for Democrats. 7
'??Ppf.intment of Htevens Urged. 7
?'itumiii- plot? \\ ?den.14
romazav.
i
'?imp.3
'^ndon ?Stock Market Outlook. 3
MiscEi.i,a-irous
^?W? for Women. g
W**th?r . '." ' -
?h,l>P?ng .)". " -
^ditorlti .. . *
?bltuarj/. !
l?andll
roamoa
'??t?re?t Shift? to Dardanelles.
8. Worker? in ?Cholera <"..n,
^haacl?! and Market?.'.'....
.13
R?*l Eataie
What They Say
of the Award
The engineers will be disappoint?
ed. They expected a great deal
more."?W. D. Carter, president of
the Brotherhood of Locomotive Fire?
men and Enginemen.
'Every detail was ?arefully
thought out and weighed in every
nspert before the ?ward was adopt?
ed."?Oscar S. Straus, first chair?
man of tha arbitration board.
"I beliov?? it should not be possible
for any body of employes to tie up
nil the traffic in the F.a*t l?y a
?ttikr Thf> public should l?- con
old rod. ?.S to the wages In the
award, they are practically thooc
paid on the New York Central aye?
t? in '?William ('. Brown, preetdenl
?,f the New York t'entrai.
'Tho :?v,ard will be hard upon the
rnnaller road? The nafortunata
par! of the matter is that aro hurt
now ?o ?:\rr> the ilomnnils of tl.e
firemen."?John D. Ken, vtco?
president of the Nssj Y?>rk. Ontario
it Western.
The Erie gives the aver-tie w?ch
paid ly the principal ronde." A
i r-tsraaontathro of the Erie.
Th? Tward is l?? cents ? day
bichar than now pai?l In freight and
1", eeatfl higher than paid in pas
OOngCT work. Roughly speaking, the
increass nsked by the sngineero
WOOld have amounted to I2&MM a
ysar, or II per cpnt. ' -Official state
mrnt of the NOW York. New Haven
I ft Hartf.?rd.
WHISKEY_KILLS BABY
Little One Finds Pint Flask and
Drinks It AU.
Catha?aO Parry, three years old, died
in Bollaras Hospital last night from
alcohol poisoning, after drinking the
contents of a pint flask of whiskey on
Saturday afternoon.
The child lived with her parents at
No. .'532 Fast 18th street. When the
?mother stepped Into the hallway, Cath
I ertao Investigated the contents of a
[ ?loset and found the whiskey, which
'? she drank. Mrs. Barry found the little
one unconscious. I?r. Schrocier was
- .nimoned and he used the stomach
!p::mp on tha child in vain. .Abe did
not recovar osnsctonaassn
ICROOK HAD SIX DISGUISES
! Clothe? Reversible. He Could
Change in a Jiffy.
Chicago, Nov. _4.? A hold-up man
; with an equipment of six disguises was
captured by dOtOQtlvos here to-day. He
< wore a cap that could be turned wrong
aida ??ut and cafried in his pocket a
similarly reversible soft felt hat. He
had on two pairs of trousers of differ?
ent colors and his coat could he turned
to show either side, so that he had only
I to *t??p into an alleyway for a moment
1 to make a complete ?hange in his ap?
pearance.
Two dotactlvafl saw the man go DS?
hind a building and turn his ?oat
?Hing side out and change his cap for
IhS hat which he took from bis pock?t.
H" was arrested as a auspicious char
B< IOC and the police found a woman's
handbag an?l a purse containing $1?!
in his pockets. He was identified by
one ,,f h is victima and confessed to
Dg up s?\eral women to-day.
HARVARD ANTICS CRIPPLE
Fraternity Initiations More
Strenuous than Football.
' "v T?U?raph in Tha? Tribun? 1
Boston. N.,v. 24 -Harvard has the
largest collection of cripples tn its his?
tory not ?h a result of football In?
juries, but of fraternity and club In?
itiation*. The candidate jH not al?
lowed to smile during the period of
Irntlation ?nd If a beam spreads over
lits c? untenan? | he |j, ? i.mpelled to
' wipe It off" h) brushing hit? face on
th' floor
He must hhIiii?- all members of tb?'
fraternity to which he aspires by thrice
falling prone upon the flour each time a
number appeais. A favorite, perform?
ance 1? |o balance ? bucket of wat?T
OS the forehead and kneel while bal
Hiicliig it. A dousing Invariably re?
aulta.
f-Yaternit v m? n an- not allowed t?
v.Hik npatalra during the lattiatoi
period, bul must crawl np on their
r.nem. Thojr lose th?-ir peroonelltl? n
and ??re called by th.' name of "Dubb."
As a tant of Ingenuity ami endurance
a long walk from a point abottl twen
t mil. s fron Harvard Bauaro is pre
sorlbad.
MAY GET BROTHER'S ESTATE
Camps Agreed That First to Die
Should Leave Survivor All.
Unit ford, Conn . Nov. _4. ?Nearly fif?
teen years ago Herbert P. and Edward
A. ?'arnp, brothers, with no relatives,
made an agreement that Upon tlM
death of one the one living sh??ul?l hOV?
the other's estate. Their father, A P
P. ?'amp, a rich real estate man. bad
jl?ft thon all his propc-rta. Hivi'lint; up
the last parcel of realty, H?rrberl P.
i want?"! it alono, as it aras choleo and <>f
certain value. Edward a., alwaya fond
l?,i a chance, said he would toss a ooln
I to determine. Horbort finally gav? Ed
! '...id $t;?.O"" and got a bargain,
Herbert P. Camp died ??I Waterbury
this ti ?mliig from Plights disease.
Hfa estate, if the pact has been kept in
his will, must go to the broth?-r. who
,.- living In the outsklris of Btajnford,
in modest clrcumstsncea,
Cciwar?! A. Camp wits well known In
tin- racing gnm.r at flheepehead an?i
j.ong Branoh twenty years ago ami had
;. profitable meat bualnaoo In Pulton
Market, supplying ocean liners and
larga hotels. But he didn't value a
fortuna as Herbert did, and most of his
money waa tool in the rarious financial
temptatlona which lurf good fellowa.
??Th? 'Affairs' of Anatol qlve a pl?a??nt
evening In the delightful Ut'le Theatre.
- Arthur Wnrren In Th- Tribune--Advt
IN RAILWAY DISPUTE
Engineers Get G?nerai Wage
Advance and Better Condi?
tions in Decision of Board
of Arbitration.
P. H. MORRISSEY DISSENTS
i_^_
j Finding Will Retard Progress of
Settlement by Umpires, He
Says ? Report Declares
Both Sides Should Yield
to Public Interest.
Fl n n TI)? Ti lb??? Pur?nn |
Waahtngton, Xm. 24.?Ending the
j wage dispute that threatened a strike
by 80,000 locomotivo engineers on flfty
I two Eastern railroads, the board of
arbitration Intrnated with the settle?
ment of the controversy announced its
award to-night, The engineers gain a
i partial victory in thHr demand for
more wages.
The Undings of the boar?! are practl?
cally ? Compromise, although ? gen?
? ral sdvance of arages and better work?
ing condition! are awarded. Tki
award is signed l.y fiae members of the
board, P. H. Iforrlaoejr, former pi an I
master of the Brotherhood of Railroad
Trainmen. submitting a alissent iiif?
opinion in which he ? laims that th?
result will have the eiTeet of retarding
the progress of arbitration of Indus?
; trial disputes <?n the railroads.
Tho settlement of the. controversy re
flOCtS credit ?in Dr. Charles P, Neil!
: Coa-U-hetoner of Labor, and .fikI??
i Martin a. Knapp, of the Commer?a
Court, who onorcloed their friendly of?
! flees at the critical Mage of th?' dlSpUtS
and doubtless averted a strike by per?
ruadlas the railroad oftii'iais and rep
reeentatlveo of the engineers to sob?
mit the matters In dispute to arbitra?
tion after mediation had failed.
Public Had Most at Stake.
in its declatoa the board h??i?is thai
the public, arhich had no volco la th?.
controversy and no choice bul to al ci?
by the decision, hail mOTO al stake than
either engineers or railroads. Tlie n -
? port emphiisl/as the aeoeOBlty of plan'i
to safeguard the public against the pos?
sibility of a future strlk??, ?h"se eonae?
Iquencea it depicts In sombre ?."in,
adding:
it would or difficult t?i Saiaggarate the
aerlouoo??? r?< such a eetomlt) li 1*
safe to ??? tb,T tti* tsrg?? nt*???? r,r "??
I _?t wo ?Id !)ii?i theii ?apply a,f many
1 articles of food ? thausted within s
??if so Important a commodity as milk
? they would hat? no more than ? ?lay's
supply. If a strlkr of the chano ?er las?
, ?d for only a singl?? Waok the etirTertiiK
I would he beyond our power ?if den? rlp
tlon The IntereOta of th? public so fur
exceed those of the POTtlOS t.? a enntro
rerey ?s t?? rondei tiie for mor pero
mount To this paramount lnt?r?al both
tha railroad operators *n?i the ??aploye?
; hoiild submit
"it is the belief of tb?- board," con
lin?es tb?1 decision, "that In the lasl
analysts the 01 Iv Solution Is to qunlit
the principle o.r free contract In the
railroad service"
General Increase Not Warranted.
While the award lacroaOOfl wages on
some railt??a?ln ami for some classes ?>f
soi ike, P ("?ids thai ? general Increass
on all roads is not warranted. The
award dates ha? k to May 1 and Will
; hold for one y?Hr ft'?in that date Mr.
I Morrlssey, ropreoeutlng the ongtneera,
has already Indicated doubt as to Its
j renewal in the past, with several
notable exc? ptions, the OOntiaotS be?
tween th. ?*r,a?is ami the engineers have
been renewed annually.
The attitude of the railroads, as out?
lined in a statement to-day by Presi?
dent Daniel WlUard of the Haltlmore A
?'?hio Railroad, who represen??-d the
railroads on the arbitration board, i?
likewise indefinite as to the future.
"Mv aCOOPtanCO <>f the award as a
whole does not aignifv my approval of
all the findings in detail," ?aid presi?
dent Wlllard. Me added that "a!
though the award i? not stich as the
railroads had hoped for," nor such as
they felt was Justified by tha facts,
"they BOW accept without question the
concraaien whloh was reached."
Grant? Increased Compensation
In Its award the board grants eortgla
Increased compensation and improved
and ?uniform rule? of service requested
by the engineers, but holds, that a gen?
eral in? ?-ase of wages on all road? Is
n?it warranted upon the basis of the.
evidence presented.
The board found that on some roads
and (or certain ?lasses of service the
ICompensation wus too ?mall, and there
foi ??: introduced into the award th?
principle of a minimum wage for tli_
tntlre district. The award, which dates
bach tO Muy 1 last and Will stand f??r
lone year, settles the most' important
| American labor dispute submitted to
I arbitration sime the anthracite coal
j strike in 190-.
In its report the board suggests the
I creation of federal and state wage coni
' missions, which shall exer? Ise function?)
regarding labor engaged upon public
?Utilities analogous t<> those exercised
[with regani to capital i>> the public
service coassalooloni already in exist?
?saca, Tbs representative <?f the engi
IBeers ??n the board. I\ H Mon Issey,
illeeontod from this ?uggeetlon, which,
he said, in its effe? t virtually meant
a ompulsory hi bit ration and was wholly
Impracticable.
Th? Important Recommendation?.
Following are the more Important of
the board's awards and the rOtHJSStS of
(he engineers;
in poaaanger servie? a minimum wag.?
was granted uf U- f??i Is? miles or les?,
i ??Dim? r?t oo ??a un,i page, fourth rolumn.
THE FRAMERS OF THE ENGINEERS' AWARD.
.Members ol the Mib-eommittec of the arbitration board.
?
DB ?mai;i.PS R. va.v raja??-,
STORM DANS ANO
1 DRENCHES THE Cn
Sweeps Into Jersey, with Hea\
Rains and Brilliant Elec?
trical Display.
HARD WINTER PROPHESIE
Houses and Streets Lighted i
Nearby Town? and Chickens
Go to Roost in Suburbs
at Midday.
Coaning up from Hi?- n??rtp. .?*.t \.<
?enlay morning with ctotjds <?' ink
?utsai aad rumbling of thunder ??i
Ich ?>f lightning, ;? ?-torni .-?w > , t . i
! Manhattan Island, ? r.?? fj th.- Ii ..!-?
itit?. .New JarSSJ ?mi there n . nt |l
f??r. e i:, i torrential ?i"wn|,??ir. Ht
t\v?.?-n rsajonndlng claps o? thundoran
vivid elsctiic diaplaga, tain aad anil f?
I with Isrrlfic far?oe for m>r? than la
? iiour^. when thr. siomh had sahatii la
1 it? strength m this rejemn it contin'ie
"s snward awasp tanrnrd th? aotitl
weetern i???rt ??f Near Jsrsey, pn ala
1 ??m t.? <?.? neat Asburj Park.
in tii?- c.-iriy moralag tii<- tempers
i i .? ?rag *--1 iff i. ii'iitly ??ilil t?> w.irran
| POOPla in belle?, ina that 111?- titsl s I ) ? > '
of Hi? i"-.isnii was sbOUl t?> i.CKin. Th
xky Waa a leaden ?ray Sttd the win
blew la fitful guata, Tins iras bus
?'rede.), about 10 O'ClO? k. by ?i f?-\v BfN-?
tiling drops ?.f I.,in, a i ? ?unp.-ii
iii'i'-a. ix iiari;ii<'s<s. Than, altn??*t !>??
fore psopls In Ihe streets couM realla
It. the st?irtn broke with hu?I?I?-ii t ? i t" >.
The \-, itifl ill'reassd t" a gale; the rail
feii with tmpicai Intensity, aad doaf.'u
inK thuii'ier- ?ai?? ?i?M?,iiate.i overhead
while l??ng, jagged streak? ?<f llghtnini
momentarily Illumin?t??! th?- pall OVSff
hanRtiiK the rity.
Rising swiftly from the general dl
rei-ti.n of I^uig Tr-luwl Hound, the storn
passed ,,\er Manhattan island at ai
angla, being most intense nt the ?onth
ern extreniii .-, where lightning bolt?
?icro frequent. The fifty-foot tlasrpol?
on th?- National Biscuit I 'ompanv'i
building, at Ninth avenus and l."itl
street, was struck l?y lightning an?
shutt'-reii into many piscas, sltbougt
no 'lainage was done to the building.
The waters of the Hudson WOtt
whipped int.? wiiit?-i spB during tl,?' pas
sage of the storm, Sttd \ess?ds pl>inu
' up ami flown and SCTOBS the rtvST arar?
' hard pul to it to wenth? r the stiff op*
position offi'ie?. hy r?mbaftng lids ami
a had.
Within s fan minutas after the ?down?
pour had buffeted itself against Man
aattan tsla?d, daylight v>;i* almost
blotted out. ?-ttre.-t? ?is, automobil?-.??
and ferryboats lit their lamps, and in
thousands of hoii?.-s an.I aparttmtiM
UM electric lights were turned on. The
entile ?ity appeal?-?! t?. be enshrouded
In night.
The Palisades were hidden from th?;
view of thtise in this ? ity, ami th?- ram
fell most lieaxlly in Hie New Jersey
sections. Kngh-wooil. Ua? kensack, l.e
onla, Patarnoa and oth?-r nearby town?
1 wt-re deluged with rain and hail, and
trolley and electric light service I.?
I ween many hfl these places was put
out of busine?,? temporarily. In main
?asea passengers were stalled mon
' limn an hour when the lightning struck
the bio? k mkii??i aystem on Iks trolley
lines.
The Orange? in Darkness.
The (?ranges seeme?! to be spe? ial ol>
fscts of attack OU the part of the atona.
Tcli-giaph ami telephone line? were
rendeixl useless, hailstones as large as
pigeons' ?-ggs fsU to the street, and
streets ?rara turned into xniall riVSTfl
bacaugs ??f the blocking <?f the storm
sewers,
Chief of !'"li? ?? Drahsll of Orange,
seeing Uta dangers arising from the ill
pervading ?larkneas, ordered tits mu?
nicipal lighting aystem to start ihe,
i ..nt iniii-il ??? ??"'?iii'l |H?e<*. ll,i,,l niliiinn.
P. H. MOBTU88KY.
*
iETTOR'S CONVICTION
MEANS STRIKE IN ITALY
Laborers Awaiting Outcome of
Minder Trial?Oiovannitti
Named for Deputy.
Not u Tha Boclallot Union
I ti)?' ? amlidai y for the
I 'hamIn i of Deputies Of Arturo i.iovan
i iiitti t?> repreaeni the constituency of
Carpi, Provlnea of htodena, which seat
ils now vacant Oiovannitti is now on
trial, with Joeeph Bttor, al Balem,
\i on the charge of murder com?
mitt? ? during the Lawrence strike.
Til?- Bxtremlata are making eft.?its,
through tin- inllui'ii? ?? ??t public ??pinion.
to Induce the Italian government to
bring prsgSUrO on tJi<? An.? rienn gov?
ernment t?i protect tho rights of the
i??? prleonors. ii is announoed that if
Qrlovanntttl and Bttor am oonvtoted I
general strike will BO proclaimed
throughOUl Italy. Hugli s movement,
I however) hsa been a failure In the pa?t.
The "Corriere dttalla," commenting
on th?' case, says It hopes that the Ital?
ian government ?ill do its duty and
prevent tho United States "from com
mining s repugnan! Injuatice."
HOBBLES 5,000 YEARS OLD
Women of Crete Also Aped
Men, Explorer Says.
?iiv Talasraph t? Tb? Trlbaa? I
Philadelphia, Nov. ti. i?r. Ddlth M.
i la ii. who has charge of tha ? icavatlona
in ?'rete for the I'niwisity of FVnnsyl
\ania. and who is bore to deliver a
? ours, ?.t i? torea on the work befdra
unlveralty ?lasses, declares that th? ?x
cavatlons so (nv made show that the
wofni'ii Of five thousand years ago wore
hnbble skirts, tight OOroets ami man?
?iMi collars.
Dr. Ball also declares thai ancienl
Creta had reached ? rerj Mgh plane of
?i\dilation. Tin- oit> bad a drainage
system whleh compared favorably with
any present day drainage system.
"lOxiavatlons on the island," said Dr.
Hall, "will bo .Materially assisted by
the Balkan war, since under the Turk?
ish regime the excavating Is hampered
bj .1 gr?ai deal of red tape."
G. N. OFFICIALS KILLED
-
Purchasing: Agents Pinioned
Uuder Automobile.
' lt. Pauli Nov. -'* Howard Jamao, at?
[rooter of purchaeea, an?i s. n. pieehner,
purchasing axent of the (Peat Northern
Hallway, wem instanti?. ?uied te?day,
when t'.??(i- automobile turned over on a
?Uep grmda, about cttrht miles north of
this ?Iiv Mrs. Pieehner, Mis? James.
daughter of Mr. Jain.'s. and Miss Kliza
: both Mann seeapod Injury,
Moth men were planed ondcraesth the
| pas chine, and atore dead when it wa? re
moved.
Thar,ksgivinn Day at Atlantic City,
gh nain via Pennsylvania Kail
r"J?l. lb turning Speel il Train will leav?
Mlm'i? City at t?ii? p m Sundav. r?e
???i"'?i I Parlor cars and dining' car
is I? '
DANIEL WII.LAHD.
olio gI
OPERA IN ENGLISH
Ready to Erect New House if
Directors of Metropolitan
Give Their Consent.
' IS BOUND BY CONTRACT
Hopes They Will Agree, as Hi3
Project Would Stop Plans Two
European Managements
Have to Invade N. Y.
Oscar Hammerst'dn is preparing to
build .1 ne-w grand o??era house In this
. ity for the production of opera In
Kngllsh. He n only awaiting the con?
sent of the directors of the Metr?poli
tan Opera Company before starting
work on the new building. The consent
of the Metropolitan directors is neces?
sary before Mr. Hammerstein ? an give
grand opera In New York City, nw ins?
to th.* agreement mads with the Metro?
!..<?ititn ?"pera Company at the time tha
Metropolitan bought out the Manhattan
opera Company two years ago.
Bj tills? agreement Mr Hammer??!, in
i..?i;n<i himself not to give grand opi ra
la WSW V??rk city for a period of ten
?years, receiving as compensation nearly
Sl.mMXiltN). Mr. Hammerstein said last
night that the English opera would not
be given at the Manhattan Opera
House, but In a now builiiing he would
ere? t near Broadway. He .said he saw
no reason why tho Metropolitan c'l
rectors should object, as the opera at
the new hoUSS would be at popular
prt<CSS and would not conflict with the
older institution.
"I am ready." he said, "and eager to
give ?rand opera in Kngllsh, and Iha\e
lucked out a site on which 1 *hall build
an ? pera house. Of course, I must first
obtain the consent of the Metropolitan
dire? tors. 1 see no reason why they
should refuse, as the new institution
W'itild not conflict with them.
The performances will be given en?
tirely in Kngllsh. and the priest will be
popular?from .SI down. N?-w York
DSSdg a new ??pera house. The Metro?
politan Is altogether too small to sup?
ply the demand. Hundreds of persons
wishing to purchase Uckstl are turned
away SSCh night, as the subscriptions
practically ?ell out the house.
"A vast number "f i eopk wish to
understand the words whkh are sung
and will not go to the theatre if they
are not able to understand them. This
Is the public for which I will build my
! opera house. It iies with the Metropoli?
tan company to chow that It Is a great
power for good In the community. It
will. In addition, de?troy any danger of
opposition. It is well known that two
Important Interests are conalderlng giv?
ing grand opera in N'ew York at the
present time, ?m? ot theae is a great
Italian publishing house and (he other
a Russian impresario connected with
the Royal ??pera at Hi Petersburg.
i myself received a proposition from
one of these Interests in which tiny
wished me to assume the directorship
of a new opera house. 1 was aOBBpSilsd
to reject the proposition beiause of my
agreement with the Metropolitan Ojiera
Coaapaay. If my new houae is estab?
lished It will effectually prevent either
of th?s?- Interest.? from entering the
field.
"I see no reason why, for its own In?
terests, ihe Metropolitan opera Com?
pany should refuse me this ? ?msi nt
?. ?
BUSINESS MEN OF NEW YORK
S?jjuiil order The Journal of Commer?a
delivered at their homes every business
morning. All new? stand? keep It. b
cents par copy.?Ad\t.
600 IDIOTS FLEE
1I???ILI.E FIRE
Brunswick Home for Feeble?
minded Children Burns While
Insane and Sick Rush
About Grounds.
ONLY ONE KNOWN DEAD
Water Pressure Insufficient to
Force Streams Higher than
Second Floor?Attendants
Brave Flames to Carry
Out the Helpless.
One life was lost an?! ?h? llvoa of
more than six hundrci Other?
saved With difficulty as a result o? i
fire that destroyed two buildings of th ;
BrUi-WIIch Home for Idiotic and Peel '
i Minded Chlldmt, at AasUyvtlle, I.
[aland, yeeterday afternoon, The ? :'"
Victim of the flam?s was PritS M??n
i dray, thirty years old, who was s? en to
run bach into one of the structures
I when it was in daman
The fear that the blaze WOUM spread
to other buildings of the laetltution
threw the patients and attendant ,
?a frenzy, which was augmente?! when a
: was learned that, because of an insuf?
le ient preeeurc of water, th<^ Brcmci
were barely able to rea?h th?^ BOCOnd
story ?>f the annex, where the I : i
? stalled.
The inmates m the various bulldln fa
many of whom WOTO bedridden,
I terror strichen, and, despite their i h
cal Condition, many of ?hem dragg? ?
! themselves to the WtndOWS and tried ?<>
1 !eap t<> tho ground. It was ?In? ??n!; '??
the efforts of the attendants the I ?
failed in their attempt.
Patients Helpless m Bed.
It was about noon when the tire was
dtacovered hi one of the attendant-! In
I the ceiling of one of the rooms <?f tha
annex. He informed the superintend
ent, C. 1. Marhliaiii. Who SBVS ?'??
alarm, which quickly assembled nil tha
employes of th? Institution. 01 I
sixty patients in the building moro tin. .
a dozen were lying helpless or their
cota They were plched up, <-ots and
ail, by the attendants ami i anffed front
the blazing structure.
in the mean time the .?ix hundred
patients in the olher buildings ha?! be?
come wildly excited. Many ??i them
i broke away from th?' few Sttendsntl
, seat to wat? h them and dashed S-Odly
I about Some rushed from the building,
?and after getting outside mad?- f??r the
?annex. Several of thCOO, OS though
(ha inate?! by the towering flames that
by this time enveloped the annex.
dash? ?1 for the dOOTWaya
A force of employes on guard for .
such an attempt bad its hands full in
?drhlng the insane back from the Ida. -
ing entrances. Monrady, however.
i eluded Hi?- attendants ami rushed sp
. the burning staiiwa?. s. Two of the at
tenilants hurried after him. but were
driven back by 'the flames. Later
Moiuiray's charred body was teund
about twenty feet from the doorway.
In the excitement another patient
evaded the attendants and managed to
iget laaldo a smaii cor norm, net 1er
from what is known as the "boys' cot
< tage." This ? rib taught fire later and
? the plight of tin; insan?? man was dis?
covered. A ?log which the patient had
picked up in his flight was responsible
for the discovery of the man, the heai
causing the animal to give vent to
shrill barks. When the insane man
was dragged out he held the dog firm
graspeil in his arms, ami was in a high
: BtatO Of merriment at the antics of tha
animal and sight of the flame?.
Fire Reaches Boys' Cottage.
From the annex the blaze leaped to
the "boys' cottage/' only a few feel
Iaway. In this building there wer?
fifteen patients, some of whom had t<?
be tarried out by the attendants. S
I were taken outside, however, in goo?!
! time. These patients, with the other
rescued on?.-, were placed in other
buildings out of reach of the flann->.
In the m?.in time the alarm had be? n
'turned in by Dr. John F. Louder, one
; of the owners of Knlcfcerbocher Hal
?which adjoins the Hiunswi? k H??:nc On
the north ami we.-t. The Bremen re?
lapoaded promptly, but found the SUP
? ply of water inadequate to tight the
rapidly spreading names effectually.
I The Broman gave their attenthiu to
saving tho other buildings of the tost -
tutlon, and this after a bitter struggl
they succeeded in doing. The flame
at one time gave svMsnos of spreading
to Louden Hall and the Long Isla ni
Home. Another sanatorium n??ar by
caught Are, but the blaze was Sgtln?
guisheil without much damage. Th
patients in these buildings Ware < are
fttUy guarded by attendants and all es?
caped Injury. The employes of th. *??
two building? aided the work of the
firemen by forming bucket brigades.
which kept the roofs thoroughly wet?
ted.
In the work of getting the patient?
If rasa the two buildings which were de?
stroyed ihe attendants and ?.liizer.s wlio
J hud volunteered had lots Of trouble la
Ipreventing Iba Insane patients from get?
ting away from the place entirely. Sev?
eral of the patient?, while being led to
other buildings, bolted from the lines
that had been formed, and some wem
chased for a considerable distance befoi?
they were captured.
Attendants Worked Like Heroes.
it was at that thought that at least
five persons had lost their lives and that
twenty-live were missing, but after the
walls of the buildings where the Bra c? n?
tred had fallen a search disclosed only
the body of Mor.daiy.
According to Dr. Markham. the report?
submitted to him last night militated

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