OCR Interpretation


New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, November 11, 1918, Image 9

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030214/1918-11-11/ed-1/seq-9/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 9

appeal for Trade
Victory Over Hun
I By Defence League
Jooklet
Declares Enemy
Seeks to Regain His
Economic Prestige
United Action Is Urged
fetion Asked to Combine to|
Refuse Things Made in
Germany
part of its German boycott cam- ;
the American Defence Society i
Xtributing all over the country ?
Luanda of copies of a pamphlet en?
vied "The Fanged Dogs of Trade."
r-fabeth Marbury. president of the
* ?pa's National Committee oi the
S wrote the text of the pamph
? which ?lates, among other th,n?s:
.'\ow that victory has become a
,t'?intv the question of the hour is
" yor not we shall open our
!,,,; ro the tide of industrial inva
g already begun. The recent im
oortation of toys and porcelains from
??ninny is but the wedge. Cases and
??es ful' of merchandise are ulready
"led'and waiting on German sotl to
L their way sncakingly to tho
"-cited States at the very first oppor
''"?The dogs of trade aro silently
??siting their chance to prove more
dinning and dangerous than the dogs
of war. , , i
"Are we indifferent or are we ?
idiotic? ?
"Do we not realize that the destruc-'
tion of Northern France and Belgium
m not inspired by aimless wanton
je?i, but that it was to put these
?mit centres of industrial activity out
of business in order to stifle compe
?'tion to German labor and to German
wie? ^ ,_
"Shall we assist the enemy to re- i
?ter his wealth, to resume his trad?
ing ?nd to profit through the misery
of those whose hands we have clasped,
B brotherhood?
"The burning question now befoi'e
the American people is whether we
shall admit and distributo not only
lie toys manufactured in Germany,
eat every other damnable thing made
?y the hands which have murdered
women and children, the hands which
have committed every foul atrocity,
the bands which are still dripping
?with our nation's blood?
"Like the writing on the wall we
anist realize that this war of indus?
trial invasion will go on unchecked un
. ?ess every man, woman and child in
oar land unites in a second war; n
war directed against those dogs of
trade,
"Shame upon us if we forget! Shame
apnn us if we remain inactive! Shame
?pon us as a nation and as citizens!
"Shame upon us as shopkeepers nnd
traders if we throttle our patriotism
10 as to pile up our dollars, if we
?sell our birthright for a foul mess of
German pottage, and if, having sac- '
rificed thousands of American lives to
defeat the dogs of war, we shall now
, throw open our ports so that the d^gs
of trade may rush in and possess this
land, for the safeguarding of which
the flower of cur manhood has been
?.?ht?n?r and for which so manv have
? rlier??"
1 Married Again When
Deserted, Says Woman
First Husband Gained De
" fared Classification; Sec?
ond in the Army
'?Vrs.Ethel Goldstein McCann, twenty?
mo years old, who was held for exam?
ination yesterday in tho Tombs police
?art with the two youngest of her five
?hildre-n on the charge that she had
nro husbands coolly admitted she had
carried again after her first husband,
who had used her to obtain deferred
classification in the draft, had aban?
doned her. Her second husband, Will?
iam McCann, whom she married on
vctober 23. is now in the army, she
?aid, and added she hoped he returned
? safely, for he was kind to her.
, She was arrested Saturday at h?r
??me, 582 Grand Street, and spent tho
Bight at the Charles Street police sta
'ion with a nursing infant and her
'Mounter Rachel, two years old. In
?12, she said, she was married'to Sam
?oldstein, who was the father of her
?ive children.
Magistrate Mancuso was compelled
'tj send her two-year-old girl back to
the matron of the Charles Street police
station, as the woman's parents re?
used to take her, the Tombs could not
receive her, the Children's Society was
Prevented by an influenza quarantine
?m accepting her and Bellevue Hos
PHal only offered shelter to waifs.
Benefit Nets $42,000
General Bell, Job Hedges and
?andsStir Hippodrome Crowd
"America has established the fact
*J?| might does not make right but
?Iua;?8?"8 for th<> ri?nt makes
?'*"'? Eaid Major-General J. Frank
It ? k?vestertii'y afternoon at a bene
?} >n the Hippodrome under the aus
?<?8 of the auxiliaries of the 304th,
??k o?end 30Gth Fii>1d Artillery and
a.e 302nd Ammunition Train. The
"?M was to raise funds for Christmas
?eerf0r rc!atives and children of men"
: , f8"?- Tne concert ratted 842,000.
. Jo? E. Hedges remarked that "he
',?* sorr>' the world never will know
??u- Kaiser was thinking when he
pleated. "Not that we care," added
P* Hodjrea, "but as a mater of intel?
ectual exercise."
iJi<ira.lic artista on the programme
??duded Mme. Schumann-Heink. Ric
???S ?Mmc- Schumann-Heink, . Ric
g?? Martin, David Bispham, Leonora
'-?rite? an,j l>rivate p,.rcv Grainger.
?Tjnwt Irving Berlin sang. Hands
?"/' Totten, Fort Hamilton und
? -na lnf:iritry_Hand played.
Putsches Haus Changea
Name and Student Work
?j/fctalM Murray Butler, president
? Columbia University, has an
?Vi ? that in the future Deutsches
.-?mV ?itnerto the centre of student
[.,* ln German history, art und
Wk? ,; woul<i be known us Co
',, f i,tou,?e ?*nd would be devoted
aB)JBnh'rir''iR the Americanization
C yamn.e adopted by thu university.
*W*?5 W A- i''ri*un is to havo
<'T "Itho work
C?i'??'- * House wa? presented to
^??um* 'n m? hy p:'Jw?>r?i l) Adam?,
*a?* u,?LU!,? The chango in name was
*l hi? suggestion.
^ Sbei
ucfyow's
?U a*** Fourth Aveno?
Lieutenant Bert Hall Teils I
of His Experiences
at Rivoli
Every once in a while during the
performance at the Hivoli this week
Lieutenant Bert Hall, the American
aviator, who is one of the two surviv?
ing members of the Lafayette Esca?
drille, steps out on the stage and
teils the audience of his experience ?
en Pair. The speech is made just
after the fadeaway in his new picture, !
"'A Romance of the Air," based on
Lieutenant Hall's book. j
This picture is interesting mainly i
because one knows that much of what j
happens on the screen is true. It is ?
a story of spies and miraculous '
escapes, and even if Dulcinea did say i
it, "Truth is stranger than fiction."
Before we say anything ubout the!
picture we wish to give a vote of I
thanks to Edith Day, who play3 the |
American girl in Germany.
This is the first time we have seen ;
Miss Day on the screen and she is j
charming. At first you think that
she is not pretty, and then her firm
little chin, with a dimple in it, and
her straight, dark hair begin to at?
tract you and then you decide that
she is quite indispensable. What Miss
Day has is g .od taste and wonderful
screen personality.
The story begins when Lieutenant j
Hall has been slightly wounded, and '
being forced to bring his plane to j
earth inside the enemy lines he |
quietly changes clothing and identi
ncation cards with his dead adver- ?
sary and is carried to a German hos
pital to recover.
Here he meets Edith Day, a child
hood friend, and they plan to escape i
into France via the air.
AH would have been well if it had .
not been for Florence Bellings, the |
false friend, who persuaded Edith to ;
help her, too, to escape into France.
Of course, every one knows that the ;
part of the story is not true which says
that a Btray bullet ends the life of
Florence Billings and Franklin B.
Coates, a co-spy.
Stuart Holmes is the Archduke of
Moravia. He is also the arch villain.
There ?3 a man named Joseph Lertora
who plays Lieutenant Le Roy. Miss
Day was called upon to choose between
the two jiviators in the picture, and
s^he chose Lieutenant Hall. Wc know
of at least one person who would have
made a different choice.
Erno Papee conducted the orchestra
through Tsciiaikowsky's "Solonelle"?
"1815." as it is usually called. Gladys
Rice sings "Then You'll Remember
Me," from "The Bohemian Girl," in a
delightful manner. Greek Evans con?
tributes "A Son of the Desert Am I."
There is the animated pictorial, per?
sonally edited by Mr. Rothapfel, and a ,
picture called "Bird Studies," which 1
shows the domestic life of that wonder?
ful bird, the pelican, and other "rara
avises." "The Chocolate Soldier" Is j
played as a light opera number, and
the comedy is a Fox Sunshine called
"Mongrels."
Twelve times at the Rialto, yester?
day, couples decided to change their
seats, which happened to be in our
row, so that made twenty-four persons
who passed between us and "A Woman's
Experience." And, as one of them was
a little boy who forgot his cap, that
makes twenty-five.
The reason we comment on this is
because most people like to view the
feature picture sitting still. They
usually chose the overture for the time
to change their habitat and adjust any
other little matters. And yet, in spite
of this ingress and egress, we know
pretty well what "A Woman's Experi?
ence" is about. It is a story which
teaches that virtue is found in abun?
dance in the country and hardly at all
in the city. Perhaps that is the reason
we like the city so much better. We
always did prefer Salome to Elsie
Dinsmore.
And Agnes Raydant thinks that she
likes the city better, too, until she
spends a year there and finds her hus?
band ruined in business, in the hands
of a beautiful adventuress. Corene
Uzell and herself a party to the death
of Lord Sulgrave or at least an acces?
sory after the fact.
But it seemed to us that the author
had deliberately chosen incidents which
would prove his case versus the city,
for we know lots of people who have
lived right in New York for mere than
a year and still are just as good as
when they first came from Brooklyn.
But this was not the ease with Agnes
and George Roydant, and things finally
became so complicated, with Corene
Uzell writing blackmailing letter?, and
Robert Cain lying dead behind a screen
in Miss Roland's room, while her hus?
band explained to her in the fore?
ground that he. was ruined, that every
one thought it was going to be a dream
picture.
We fully expected that Agnes would
rub her eyes and say to George: "Oh,
what n terrible dream I have had.
Never, never must wo leave uncle to
live in the country alone."
Of course, it would not be fair to tell
how things do turn out; suffice it to say
that there is a fairly satisfactory ad?
justment.
Miss Boland is not quite so satis?
factory on tch screen as on the stage
because you cannot see her lovely
golden hair.
"A Womans Experience was taken
from the play "Agnes. It was directed
by Perry VekrofF.
Fortunately, the people were fairly
stable during the overture, which was
the symphonic poem "Vysehrad, and
also during the "Egyptian Ballet,"
which was played after the feature
picture.
Vincente Ballestu sanr an aria from
"Hamlet," Helena Morrill sane "I Love
and the World Is Mine." The comedy
is "Take a Chance," with Harold Lloyd.
At the Strand "Little Women" is the
feature. "Suspicion" and Charlie Chap****
lie Chaplin's "Shoulder Arms" are at
the Broadway. These will be reviewed
to-morrow. II. U.
Predicts Social Upset
Bishop Gore at Cooper Union
Says Changes Are Coming
A league of free nations founded on
impartial justice to capital and la?
bor must solve th_ future problems
of peace, said the Right Rev. Charles
Gore, Lord Bishop of Oxford, England,
last night at the People's Institut;', at
Coop? r Union? He predicted radical
' changes in Britain's social structure.
"Traf!?; unions will double in mem
I bership," he said. "Men who have done
: their bit for England in turn will de
: maud that she do her bit for them.
"Germuny must be punished, and
! when the Teuton mind has assimilated
the needed lesson the people must be
admitid into international fraternity."
Bishop ('ore spoke at Trinity Church
in the morning. At that service the
Rev. Dr. W. T. Manning urged his con?
gregation to recognize the vast impor
1 tanca of the United War Work enm
P8i*n< ,_
$663,558.02 Tax To Be
Paid on Douglas Estate
A transfer tax of f6G3,5_B.0_. the
largest recorded in Bronx County, will
be paid to the state to-day on the es?
tate of the late Dr. James Douglas,
pre-ident of Phelps, Dodge & Co., who
died lost July a Riverdale-on-Hudson.
The- value of the estate has been re
Dorted by Alfred B. Simon?, transfer
ax apprai.-r, as $lH.C:!5,7'Jj!._9 Among
Oxo ?__eU i? S.61.100 in Liberty b.-nds.
Ballin, Manager of
Hamburg - America
Line, Dies in Berlin!
Head of Great Steamship]
Company Was Former
Kaiser's Intimate
i
Fought With Tirpitz
Exploited to Germany's Advan- !
tage Secrets Learned About
Allied Shipping Before War
COPENHAGEN, Nov. 10. ? Albert i
Ballin, general director of the Ham- j
burg-American Steamship Company, I
died suddenly on Saturday, according I
to an announcement made in Berlin.
Death spared Herr Ballin, advocate
of unrestricted warfare and prohpet of!
a speedy victory for German arms, :
from witnessing the final defeat of the j
fatherland and the ignominious abdi j
cation of his intimate friend, the Kai?
ser. According to the meagre infor?
mation at hand, he died during the
hours the Kaiser was bidding his last
reluctant farewell to power.
As the head of the Hamburg-Ameri- i
can Steamship Company, and himself a |
heavy investor in ships then in neutral i
harbors for protection, Herr Ballin
early in the war was reputed to have
opposed unrestricted sinking of ships
lor the obvious reason that sooner or
later German ships would be seized to
replace the bottoms thus destroyed.
Later, however, he issued emphatic de?
nials of any such attitude. He ex?
pressed himself as highly pleased with
the progress of the illegal sinkings by
the U-boats and predicted a swift de?
feat of the Allies because of such
methods.
Herr Ballin long had had the ear of
the Kaiser, who accepted his advice
upon nil maritime matters without
question.
The director general of the Ham?
burg-American Line was born in 1857.
He was but twenty-nine years old
when ho became general passenger
agent of the Carr Line, then the Ham?
burg-American's most powerful rival.
He had grown up in the steamship i
business, having entered the service of1
his father immediately after his grad?
uation from the gymnasium in Ham?
burg.
His father sent him to England,
where he studied British methods of
shipping closely, incidentally obtaining j
much information that later was used
against the Allies in the war. The bit- |
ter warfare between the Carr and the ;
Hamburg-American lines continued j
until 1886, when the latter company i
absorbed its rival. But Instead of dis?
missing Ballin the Hamburg-American j
officials made him director general of j
the combined company, a position he
retained until his death.
Obituary
WILLIAM A. M'LOUGHLIN
William A. McLoughlin, secretary to
the County Clerk of Queens and a
brother of the late Judge James Mc?
Loughlin and a former city engineer,
John J. McLoughlin, of Jamaica, died
at his home, 71 AIsop Street, Jamaica,
yesterday after an illness of three
months. He was fifty-five years old.
He leaves a widow, two daughters and
a son.
WILLIAM F. GRIMM
FREMONT CENTRE, N. Y., Nov. 10.
?William F. Grimm, a former captain
of the steamship Merrimac, which Lieu?
tenant Richmond P. Hob*_on sank at the
tr^rance of Santiago Harbor, died to?
day at his home here. He was born in
West Brighton, Staten Island, seventy
two years ago, was in the transport
service during the Civil War and re?
tired from the sea in 1890. He had
been postmaster of this place three
times.
REV. DR. J. C. FERNALD
MONTCLAIR, N. J., Nov. 10.?The
Rev. Dr. James Champlain Fernald, a
Baptist clergyman for many years, an
associate edtior of the Standard Dic?
tionary and the author of many text?
books, died to-day at his home, 207
Lorraine Avenue, Upper Montclair. He
was born in Portland, Me., in 1836, and
was graduated from Harvard Univer?
sity in 1860 and from Newton Theo?
logical Seminary in 1866. He is sur?
vived by his widow, two daughters and
four sons, one of them an American
officer in France.
LEONARD C. M'CHESNEY
ORANGE, N. J., Nov. 10.?Leonard
C. McChesney. for sixteen years adver?
tising manager for the Thomas A. Edi?
son industries, died to-day of heart dis?
ease at his home, 170 High Street. He
was fifty-nine years old, was born in
Orange, was at one time president of
its Board of Education, and was, secre?
tary and treasurer of the Orange
Chronicle Publishing Company, His
widow, a son an'd two daughters survive
him.
CORNELIA M. ANDREWS
MONTCLAIR, N. J., Nov. 10.?Mr..
Cornelia M. Andrews, widow of
John R. Andrews, of Titfany ?fe
Co., died here to-day. She was eighty
seven years old, ami lived at 146 West
130th Street, New York City. A
nephew, Ensign Frederick Foote, of
Washington, i.s her nearest relative.
New Quarters Only "Dead"
A shiny new quarter that rings
"dead" is not necessarily counterfeit.
In fact, the chances are that it is only
one of the coins containing minute air
holes which have slipped past inspec?
tion tests of the mints recently. The
slight imperfection, invisible to the
eye, makes a coin "plunk" like dead.
The Treasury secret service recently
has received several of these quarters
from persons who believed they had
discovered bogus coins. In each case
a good quarter was returned and the
"dead" money sent to the mint.?Wash?
ington Post.
AMERICA'S FOREMOST THEATRES AM) nil's
LE^^.^'sjiV/lEI^"101* THE "SECTION OP
B'WA". and
50th St.
_IEvbb. at 8:00.
y?^j, SMOKING RESUMED AT
je-?> THE WINTER (?ARDEN
MATINEE TO-MOKItOW at 2.
82nd WEEK IN NEW YORK.
PI AYHftFKF ?'oat .Kth. St. Eves. 8:
opening TO-NIGHT ,-?,
William A. Brady Presents
JAMES WHITCOMB RILEY'S
OMEAGAIN
I
SHUBERT^M THURS. EVE.
WTNTHROP AMES PRESENTS
THE BCTi
Corned, by Robert McLaughlin
Written from the Folk-Poems and Hturlea
of the Hooaler Poet with
MACLYN ARBUCKLE TIM MURPHY
-^? CHAS. DOW CLARK
ANTOINETTE WALKER
HENRY DUFFY
JAMES BILLINGS
MARIE TAYLOR ?
THE BLUE BIRD! ^
By MAl'RIC'K MAETERLINCK
SKATS NOW ON SALE.
CENTRAL gft.-8oB,w-K,_t *%& ?&?\!
ALICE BRADY
Returned t *? the Spoken Stage In
FOREVER AFTER
FORREST ROBINSON
i MADELINE DELMAR
I SCOTT COOPER
I HARRY REDDING
ERVILLE ALDERSON
! PA^-Nr. fiiea.. B'way and 30th. Evga. 8:1V
; v"r^Jli''-'.Maiiiieos Wednesday & Sat. 2:15.
MERRY MUSICAL ROMANCE.
5th ST.
Tlica.. n*r B'way. Era. 8:3?.
Matinees Wed. and Sat. 2:30.
THE LONG DASH
Pnmorlv il Bt- K of B'?ay Kve?. 8.10.
1/.III.U, Mal3 Thursday arid Sat
JOHN n WILLIAMS Presenta
_.__. | oscar H H
45th and B'way. Kvs. 8:15. j Wilde's WW
Wed and Sut., 2:15. ? Greatest Comed)
11
S^?LITTI E SIMPIICI??; ""c ^eii^Aa^?i
11 ' "*-** | LI I I IL UI1V.I MU? I I R0|anil WMt'8 Thrlll-t of Thriller?
48TH ST _
S 'P 8 -t?TYPPWW* FTTa
i!4Jj^If?lfiill?LUM
with MARY NASO
HUDSON a^^ved6 .nd^at" s'^ I "? ?? W ARHfiR m
LOliS MANN & SAM -lEttVAR? ! Sleeping Partners
?? "FRIENDL? ENEMIES"
J ??BIJ0UMaaw^^*Bg??i3?b|%
?H.B.WARNER ?n w?h IRENE
B0RD0N1
S CRTMA
.??THE
RIDDLE
WOMAN
?LTING3,
West 42d St.
Mats. Wed.
BROADHURST 'M^?SXVS
NORA BAYES, ""*
lu a Musical Ploy. , ?-Kbl
JOHN BARRYMOR?
Tolstois "REDEMPTION
SI. Kvs S.30. Ury. 40.
Weil, ami Hat.. 2:30.
HAMLET
PLYMOUTH THEATRE
with WALTER HAMPDEN
SPECIAL MAIS. Nov. 15 and L'2 at
MARJQRIE RAMBEAU
In "WHERE POPPIES BLOOM."
?4 I nlMP ATRF West 48th St. Evenings 8:30.
B LUN?ALKL Mats wed and Sat, 2:30.
44TU ST.
Tliea., lust W. of B'way. Evs. 8:15
Matinees Wed. and But.. 2:15.
BOBERT
n.
Prices 25?
MANTELL
?N.OTHING BUT LIES.
_ RICHELIEU
50c. $1.00, $1.50. Boxbs ?2.00.
Rf.f*lTI-I ?8th, West of Broadway. Eves. 8:30.
OXJKJltn Mntl!u.?9 v\>d. and Sat., 2:30.
New?cfmX.er's BE CALM CAMILLA
"Is best performance and brightest
play In town."?Tribune.
HOOF CENTURY THEATRE AT 11:30.
CENTURY GROVE Ml?!-*Vi-"T
BEAUTIFUL GIRLS 'N* EVERYTHING
Bmile with Lovely MOI.LIE KINO
? TM.A.3_a
Special: Afternoons Tlmrs. & Frl. at 3.
ISADORA DUNCAN DANCERS
AND GEORGE COPELAND 1IANIsr
PRICES S',.50 TO 5uc.
MA2JNE ElllMISkiw* , j i .HUBERT-R1VIEAA E*?t?"S_.*&.'?t
i??3 "
IBEtcs. 8:30. '??'^
I Matinees ?_ ?*v
Wed ?S: Sat. -M-Jtu*.
If you buy In advance choice
Kent? for all performance,
may be bad at the bov ollice.
LOEW'S 7?h AVE. C"&.^??VS__
"OH, BOYS"
Highest Prl.e Orch. Seats $1 Evgs.
Guy Bates Post the Masquerader
I7ITI T??N *6th St., W. of B'way Eves. 8:31
{-UL.lt. 1*4 jIa.a Tuday & We(, (p0p )_ o.-,
A STITCH
IN TIME
I Happy
Play,
J ?with?
IRENE
FENWICK
METROPOLITAN
OPERA
hoi ;sk.
OPENING TO-NIGHT at 8, Samson et
Dallla. Homer; Caruso. Couslnou (Jiew).
fiothler Relss, Ananlan. Coud., Monteus.
Ueil ??t S Aitliv. Mualo, Homer, Criml
?.new). Montesanto (.new). Didur. D*Angelo, j
C'otid Moran-oni.
I'luiri? at 8:16. Daughter of the Regi?
ment Hempel, Howard : Carp!, ?cottl. Pap!.
l-,l (ll ?> Forza ?1?-1 Dcwllno. PonselU?
(new) Gentle (new), Caruso, Do L?ea. ?
Chalmers, Mardones. ?'unit.. Papl.
Sut Mat. at - Thais. Parrar, Bra-lau,
Dia. Couzlnou. Rotjiler. Cond., Monieui. j
Sit Eve it 8 (75c to ?3). Double BUI.!
Cavalier?? Busticaja. Easton, Feriali AU
housa Chalmers PagUacel. Muzlo, Kings?
ton. Scottl, Had:?. Cond., .Movanzonl
Next Moi at ?. Tosca. Parrar? Crlml, ?
Scott!. MaS^.ANCom.?,NMora3n|on(.
FRENCH THEATRE"--K, Co!omh;er '
V ::-,ll?Si. I'.v8 15. MlsTli.i.Sat...l5 |
VJ Thl-Weeh i "'?*?' Voll* dti Bonheur"
"" lUblo Bill ' :",i' "t'ralnqii.bllle"
51)0 to $-. Satnrilay Night 1\ .miar I'riis?. |
METROPOLITAN ?"Sf-?
To-morrow Nifiiii ??,\
GALA CONCERT ORGANIZED BY
McCORMACK
"I he Singing I'ropbct of Victory"
Associ?t'd with Mr. ilcCormaok
?ill be
MAGGIE
TEYTE j
THE EMINENT SOPRANO and I
.LACQUES
Aeolian Hall, Tom? ?v-i_1_:.1?',3*9*1 JJow'
N. Y. CHAMBER MUSIC SOC.
of Piano, Htrltig a:??i Wind Instrumenta.
OrciinlwUon o! Sololata. Carolyn r.ecin?. ntr.
COLUMBIA S .75- 'PX\ SIS'
GOLDEN CROOK U?AW?l.
PllANCE'S GREATEST VIOLINIST!
(Courtesy Chae. U Wrgner. London!
Charlton. D F VfcSweeney
and Music League
I TICKETS $1.00. $1.50.
$2.00, $:;.oo $5.00
(NO WAlt TAX)
NOW DN BALE AT
I METROPOLITAN Oi>.
! HOUSE ?OX OFFICE
AUSPICES ALLIED
THEATRICAL
MOTION PICTURE
AN? MU&IC TEAM.
Lutherans Here to
Effect Merger of
3 Dominant Bodies
Amalgamation of Units
Will Involve Membership
of 1,600,000 in U. S.
Three of the oldest bodies of the
| Lutheran Church in America, repre?
senting a baptized membership of
1,600,000, will give up their separate
entities and become united at a con?
vention to open here to-morrow morn?
ing.
The new organization, to be known
as the United Lutheran Church of
America, will be made up of the Gen
? eral Synod, organized in 1820; the
j General Council, organized in 1S67, and
j the United Synod South, organized in
I 1864.
j To-morrow morning's sessions will
! convene with the three ruling bodies
? meeting separately to complete their
corporate lives. The General Council
I will meet in Trinity Church, the Gen?
eral Synod in St. James's Church and
the United Synod South in the Church
. of the Advent.
Thursday morning members of the
three synods wiJl go in solemn pro- ;
; cession to the Holy Trinity Church ?
i for holy communion.
j The first meeting of the united or?
ganization will be held Friday morn
? ing in the auditorium of the Engi
! neers' Societies' Bui.ding, in West
I Thirty-ninth Street.
i The unification movement, it is
pointed out, does not mean the com- '
plete loss of the entities now making
up the Lutheran Church in America.
The situation is summed up in the
: following statement issued by the com?
mittee in charge of the new organi
; zation:
"Indications are that the divided Lu
| theran Church is drawing together for
greater common action. There is every
indication that the Lutheran situation
will resolve itself into three great
?groups representative of the linguis
1 tic and racial as well as the doctrinal j
? interests of the Church in this coun
? try. At tho same time there is every
! indication that these groups will act
I in many thi.igs in common. It means
I that Lutheranism in America is becom
I ing a national force that will have to
! be considered most seriously in the re
! ligious work and future of the coun?
try."
A rally was held under the auspices
1 of the Luther League in the Church
! of the Advent last night. Dr. A.
? Steimle, chief speaker, indorsed the
1 proposed amalgamation.
Music
Brilliant D?but of New Vio- !
?inist, Mme. Guilbert
and Others
The large audience which gathered j
at Carnegie ilall yesterday afternoon
upon the occasion of the American j
d?but of Raoul Vidas, French violinist. !
did credit to its appreciation of musical
artistry by the warmth of welcome it ac- !
corded him.
It discovered in him a violinist who '?
will make his contemporaries, even in
the first rank, look to their laurels,
if he maintains the high standard which
his playing yesterday revealed. He !
came not as the heralded product of
a master's hand, but as an artist stand- I
ing upon his own merits for recogni?
tion. That recognition was not long \
delayed.
Boyish in appearance, but with a
certain dignity, entirely at his ease, but
without bravado, before his programme ;
had progressed far he showed himself i
a well grounded musician and an artist !
of sensibility.
Seldom has a newcomer received a i
more enthusiastic reception. He was :
welcomed with vociferous applause and
shouts of approval.
Mr. Vidas has to a remarkable degree
the essentials of the violinist's equip?
ment?an agile left hand, flexible and
admirably controlled bowing, sureness
of intonation, pleasing tone, of fine
sonority in the lower register, clear?
ness and brilliance in the upper, dis?
tinction in phrasing and warmth of feel?
ing tempered by good taste.
His performance of Corelli's " La
Folia," variations on an air of baffling
simplicity, with which he opened his
programme, proclaimed him at once a
musician of parts.
Other numbers were Concerto Russe,
by Lalo; the Andante from the G
minor sonata of Tartini; Wienlaw
ski-Thibaud Salterelle, which he re?
peated following a round of applause
for Mr. Thibaud, recognized in one of
the boxes. Intermezzo by Rauol La
parra, who also was in the audience.
Prelude -Allegro by Pugnani - Kriesler
and Jota Navarra by Sarasate. In all
these he showed mature powers, poise
und range of expression.
At the close of the programme he
added a number of short pieces, even,
at the insistence of the encore-seekers,
appearing acain after the stage lights
!?ad once been extinguished. He was
ably accompanied by L. T. Gruenberjr.
We feel safe in predicting that the
future holds much for this young man.
There "were two recitals in the
world of song yesterday. Miss Lydia
NEW ?OKK'S LEADING THEATRES AND SUCCESSES
EMPIRE ?ro*dway a,Hl 40th fi!- EvKS- 8:20. i
Mata. Wednesday and Sat.. 2:20. |
I VKI1, In c. Haddon Chambers'
\U?? SAVING" GRACE
GLOBE & Ci.46(VhoPst> f^.? ?;?S:
SAM UARDY and DO?LE & DIXON
in "THE CANARY"
RFI ASPO WEST 44 ST. Evenings 8:20
DLllft'3v'u Man. Thursday and Sat... 2:20.
TO-MORROW NKIHT nt 8:15 SHARP
in "TIGER ! TIGER lw^ajgj; ?
COHAN & HARRIS. ^J?^t?
tio?t" F?sctnahnd riys-tery Pl?v cverWrirten i
OIia?lE&OEBB
Hundred? Turned Away Every Performance.
MATINEES WEDNESDAY arid SAT. 2,-15
In the Whole History ?if the
World There Never Has Keen a
Tim? When Joy and I .in lit -
Hearteduess Should I'revail to it
(?renter i: tient Thiiii To-day.
ALL THAT IS JOYOUS AND
LIGHT-HEARTED, ALL THAT
IS GAY AND LAUGHABLE
IS GUARANTEED IN
KLAW & ERLANGER'S TIMELY
MUSICAL COMEDY TRIUMPH
ATOP NEW AMSTERDAM THEATftE.
ZIEGFELD MIDNIGHT FROLIC
OPEN AM, TEAK. PHONE BKYANT 210.
i I YrFIIM Wc3t *Mh st- Evenings ?t 8:20.
. lilVtUlll Mailneea Thurs. and Sat.. 2:20.
DAVID HEL.ASCO Presenta
DADDIES
GLORIANN A; CRITER10N>"?-'>",h.i, a ?ia
-?EtMNORPAINTER
I inCDTV West 42<1 Street. Evening? 8:15
LlKLKil MaUneae Wed. and Sat., 2:13
The n?lnbow Division of Musical Comedies
'Best dancing show on the boards."?Eve. World.
^3W!SEF?01S
GEO.rr\lS A M T?BA., lt'y & 43d St. Eve?. 8:30.
M. CUnArJ Bry. 392. Pop Mat. Wed.. 2:30
Henry Miller'sTHEAT^ West 43 St.
NE-\T SALE NOW.?Mats. Thurs. & Sat.
BEGINNING SATURDAY EVE., NOV. IG
HENRY MILLER i lD "DADDY
RUTH CHATTERTON LONG LEGS"
?LIGHTNING
4f GAIETY. Evs.8:30. Ma*?.W?d..lSat., 2:30. V
fnnT West 48th St. Evenings 8-30 'LAST
IAJI?1 Matin?es We?.!, and Sat., 2:30 jWEEK
Johh Curl's Musical Comedy Triumph
FIDDLERS THREE
Next Monday, "THE BETTER 'OLE."
7th Av.. 4th St. Eves.*:30
& Sat., 2:30,
Mr.
LEO
D1TRICHSTEIN
ed. and Sat., 2:30.
in "THE
MATINEE
HEUO."
Moves Next Monday to Cort Theatre.
U ??y, OU Ob. ?I8, -ou su *i
Mats. Tdm'w & Thii?., 25-S?c
?iliSooN .?"Watch Your Neighbor'
MadisonSquareGarden
33rd Annual
Exhibition
TO-DAY
Trotters, Hunters,
Ponies in Harne??,
Saddle Hort.es anil
Jumpers
ADMISSION $1.00
Box Oitice Phone
4540 Madison Square
CARNEGIE HALL. 67 St HS? COLORED
VIEWS
MOTION
TRAVE?TALK8" IB PICTURES
rr SUNDAY EVES. AT 8:30
J MONDAY MATS. AT 3:01)
TARIS, 1918.NOV. 17-18
WARTIME FRANCE.NOV. iM-VI?
WARTIME ITALY.DEC. 1-8
LONDON, 1!)I8.DEC. 8-9
?MiTl.MK ENGLAND.DEC. 15-16
COOltSE SAXE CLOSES TODAT, $3.$4.$S.$2.GO ?
SIJS'GLE SLATS ON SALE TO.MOUKOW. |
A DRAMA OF TO-DAY
"SUSPICION"
AND THIKD TREMENDOUS WEEK OF i
In "SHOULDER j
ARMS"
_T 41ST _.
Cui.Umious Nfjou lo 11 P. M.
MANHATTAN opera house! i s.15.'
Matinees Wednesday and Saturday, 2:16.
in "THE AUCTIONEER"
Prices 25,- to ?ISO. Wed. Mat. 2?c. to II.
Always 500 Orch. Seats at II.
EDDIE FOY and
The lounger Fovm
Mile. PAULE CLERGW?
BEATRICE HERFORD
BESSIE CLAYTON I
PB. F. KEITH'S i
AL ACF?
B'way and 4T St. j
Mit. Daily. 25c-|l i and The Cansinos.
Ri
KEITHS! "AN AMERICAN ACE"
1VERSI0E 1 ?KI ? K BAKER, ?d Wk.
B'wa? aud 36ib St. ? Dunhar's Grenadier GLrU
IV Of I "Ar? KOMAXCE OF
1 V ULI THE AIR." ?.vith Lieut.
B'nay. 49th St. Bert HhII ? Edi?li Du v.
20 M,cox? $1 RIVOLI ORCHESTRA
-??unal Arnenrajie? Ueut H?J1 Eterv Perf.
?A I TtfllMABY BOLA?iO in~"?
4 *m mA m V, Woman's Experience"
"Times Square.! Vincente Hull caler
!0?30??0. RIALTO ORCHESTRA
"Every Day
I(t a
Holiday
at the 'Hip.' "
?N. Y Sun.
j Mat. Today 2:1S ?j ?
I BKST SEAT? vl.l
EVENLNUS AT 8)3.
HIPPODROMEi
N.Y.
SOCIETY ^
WALTER DAMROSCH. Cowl':
Carneffte Hall, Thurs. Aft., Nov. U, at 3
fiffix GARRISON
SYMPHONY. "HAROLD IN ITALY," Berlioz.
MOZART, Kelley, CESAR KRANCK.
Seats at Box Offlee. George Bogle??, Mgr.
PHILHARMONiO
SOCIETY OF NEW YORK
JOSEF STRANSKY.Conductor
CARNEGIE HALL
Next Thiir.Evg.at 8:30. Next Fri.Aft.at 2:30.
CUailwick, Dvorak, R?ger-Du< asse,
l Vllliers Stanford, Debussy, Tchaikovsky.
' Subscription and single tickets now at
Box ?alce. Felix F. Lcifels, Mgr.
RULLMAN'S
(Established IS 12;
Theatre Ticket Offices
Metropolitan Opera Subscriptions
At Box Office Prices
130 West 42d St. Ill Broadway.
LOEW'S KEW YORK THEAfRE * '|003(f
Coat. 11 A. M. to 11 P. M. Roof to 1 ?. M*
HAROLD LOCKWOOD In 'PALS FIRST'
Loew s AffltrJwn Ruf gS?^^
"AMERICA'S ANSWER" ,?"J*?*
.?., . i . ?L - . -,. Keserve.l
'Mism* America'A:7 oth. Big Actsig?, 35, 50.
PARK .T1***"1- c'o!,'in,bu.*, c2rcto *'d ?5th S:r?"
tftnn LveniDgs S:1S Matinee Saturday 2 15
(Society of American Slngtre 0Bira Co?ni<iu?
3 Gilbert & ?Sullivan Comic Opera?
To-nitto. Tu**? snd ^^WKAD0
E&^xU. PIRATES OF PENZANCE
Thursday NW ?md S^rci? p,NAF0RE
AEOLIAN HALL, This Afternoon at 3:00.
bCCORTOT
Alfred famous French pianist
Tkts. $2.50, 32. SI./WJ, ?1, 50c. Stein?i?y Fiano
Princes*. Theatre, To-morrow Aft. at 3.
JULIA HENRY
Song Recital. Seats $2, II, at Theatre.
Aeolian Hall, Wed. Aft.. Nov. 13. at 2:30
Violin Becital
RICHARD
Seats 11.50, $1, 75c. at Box Office.
CZER WONKY
STRAND
"LITTLE WOMEN'
Soloists, War Review
'ji?HKI'WmT.''*7 STRAND OBCH.
Ferguson, who appeared in the after- |
noon at the Punch and Judy Theatre, i
has been heard here before. Her vocal|
equipment is very limited, though her !
lower register has considerable beauty. j
Her chief virtues displayed yesterday '
were taste and clarity of diction, and !
these in the thrice intimate surround- j
irgs of the Punch and Judy brought !
pleasure in snch songs as Home's >
"I've Been Roaming" and Ho'm's '
"Tous deux." Her accompaniments !
were sympathetically played by Walter
Go^?e.
The evening concerts, which took
place at the Maxlr.e Elliott Theatre, j
was given by an awist of a very dif?
ferent calibre?by Mme. Yvette Guil- I
bert. There is but one Guilbert.
Charles Gounod once declared that
Mme. Guilbert had created a school,
and he was rieht in al! but one par- ?
ticular. She did create a school, and j
she has had many pupils?but. alas, no |
graduates! That there may be at
least one such must be the hope of all
who love great art. Last n?ght she
was especially delightful in the
Parisian satire of Louis XV. These
gay, cynical, heartless bits of post
Rochefoucault philosophy she gave as
only she can give them. Between her
numbers Miss Emily Grosser played
on the violin.
The only orchestral concert of the
day was that of the Symphony Society,
in the afternoon, at Aeolian Hall. The
programme wat the same as that of
the Carnegie Hall concert the night
before. The audience was largo and
enthusiastic.
Danes Here to Give Dinner
In Honor of Prince Axel
Two hundred persons are expected to
attend a dinner by the Danish Club of
New York at the Hotel Majestic Thurs?
day evening in honor of Prince Axel of
Denmark, a cousin of King George of
England, who is in America on a tour
of inspection of munitions plants.
A feature of the dinner will be filet
leviathan, or whale steak. Prominent
Danes from other cities will be present
to make addresses.
Cast Chosen for
French Fund Pageant
"Peace With Victory" Will Be
First Performance for the
Benefit of Wounded *
The American Fund for French
Wounded has planned a benefit for the
evening of November 24 in response to
the appeal by Andre Tardieu for Amer?
ican assistance in reconstruction work
in France. It will be the first such en?
tertainment given by the fund, and
will be called the "Peace with Victory
Pageant."
Mrs. Benjamin Guinness is to stage
the pageant. French sailors are to par?
ticipate, as will Leon Kothier, Mme.
Louise Homer, Yvette Guilbert, Resin?
Gills, Andrea- de Segur?la, [rene Bor
doni, Tavie Beige and the Luteee Trio.
Mme. Frances Alda will sing "Victory.'*
In the cast thus far announced are
Mrs. M:tchell Henry, Miss Genevi?ve
Clendennin, Miss Marian Tiffany. Miss
Marjorie Curtis, Mrs. John Wane
maker, jr.. Mrs. Gustaros White, Miss
Frances Fairchild, Miss Marian Mc
Keever, Mrs. Phil.p Benkard. Mrs. Her?
bert Shipman, Mrs. Felix Double day,
Mrs. Lydig Hoyt, Mrs. Percival Far
quhar, Miss Marie Doro, Miss Dorothy
Norris, Mrs. Walter Brooks, Mrs.
Charles De Loosey Oelrichs, M re. Cor?
nelius Hoagland Tungeman and Miss
Kathleen Nesbit.
-. . .
Relief Workers Arrive
AN ATLANTIC PORT. Nov. 10.?On
a French liner arriving today were
Miss Florence Schofield, Mies Ellinor
Fell and Mrs. G?raldine Jarvie, mem
bers of the Committee of Fatherless
Children of France, of which Marsha
Joffre is the head. They have com?'
here to lecture on the needs of th<
French widows and orphans and t?>
raise funds to carry on the work.
-ALL FOR ONE, AND ONE FOR ALL
?-THE-?
ALLIED THEATRICAL MOTION
PICTURE AND MUSIC TEAM
WILLIAM FOX GEORGE M. COHAN
Chairman Associate Chairman
HEADQUARTERS 110 West 42nd St.
PHONE BRYANT 99 20
ANNOUNCES KO 11 TUB
UNIT
Y.M.C.A.?Y.W.C.A.?Nat'! Catholic War Council-Jewish Welfare
Board?War Camp Community Service?American Library Association
?Salvation Armv
A SERIES OF STIRRING BENEFITS
Tickets for these events will be sold at box office prices at all ticket
agencies and hotel stands. No war tax.
TWO GREAT WAR RELIC EXPOSITIONS
1st Field Artillery Armory
68th St. & B'way, Manhattan.
23d REGIMENT ARMORY
OPEN TO-DAY AT 2:30
rONTIMOlS DAILY THFKF.AFTKK TOR 8 DATS?*r_0 to 11 I\ M.
ADMISSION 50c. AT K-TH?.R ARMORY
WAR TROI'HIKS FROM KT0ROPKAN BATTLKFI FLITS OATIIFKK1) FOR -.IK
V. s. COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC INFORMATION.
FTuts arid IX'tflJlo.l Exhibits showing how ?>ur boys ar. looked after by tlie ni..>v? or.amraMon*
daily program foam res, band concert.. Allied Army Costumes?Drills?t'ommunity Blngera
Speakers?Pageants and Dams?.
THESE EXHIBITIONS AKKORD EMP1/0YER8 OF LA-tOE KOWKS A\ <.I'l*on
TTMTV TO SECl'KE TICKETS IS' LOTS PIIOM 500 TO 5.000 F?"l TTTBIR BM
PliOYEES AND IN THIS WAV DOINO A PATRIOTIC SERVICE PURCHASES OK
T11IS KIND CAN BE ARRANGED THROUGH ALLIED TEAM IIKAIxU AI'TI.KS.
METROPOLITAN
Tc-msrrow Night
8:15 - .
SEATS NOW SELLING
GALA CONCERT
ORGANIZED BY "THF;
PI'.UI'MKT OF V 1CT
.Mr. .McCorrnack will ba
fgie Teytc gs
Jacques Thibaud
FRANCE'S GREATEST VIOLINIST.
Courtesy of Cha?. L. Wa^ncr-Loudon Charlton, D. F.
McSweeney and The Musi?- league. BEATS ON SALE
OPERA HOUSE BOX OFFICE.
PRICKS: $100. ?1.60, $2.00, ?3 00, 15.00.
POLO GROUNDS
Saturday Aft.
Nov. 16, at 2 P. M.
PRICES SI 8t 83
FOOTBALL
PRINCETON vs. CAMP UPTON
DRILLS OP PRINf'ETON AND CAMP UPTON SOLDIERS
MILITARY BAND CONCERTS AND THRILLING
AVIATION BTI.'NTS.
HOTEL
AST0R
SATURDAY
NIGHT
NOV. 16
STARTING
AT 10 P. M.
TICKETS
$10 A
PERSON
THE VICTORY BALL
A g'irgiKru? ereilt thftt will onr-shadow ?_iy ??imrltv bcJi
?ver given AHMT?NAVY?OPERATIC?THKAT?!? AI. -
MOTION PinrilK AM) CIVILIAN ORGANIZATIONS
ARE COLLABORATTNO TO MAKE THIS THE CROWN
LNU EVENT OF Till; DRIVE,' TICKETS, ?10 a Perwn.
PATRONESSES
M&x'ne Elliot? Mltri
JuneEifldge Fiorer-ow Moot?
(JeraldUlc Karrar Nalrnora
Pauline FrederUk Mary Na?h
Irene Ken nick
Ixila -labor
Mary Gerden
Grace Ge??rge
Etelyn til i.eH
Dorotby Green
Mrs. Bel
Ethel Banymor?
Htllle Rurke
Thoda Rara
a;, e Bradjr
Mildred A<lam_
Julia Artbur
I ?IV l?a n'?-r
Nora Rayes
Irene Bord?n!
Tarte ???-Ice
Wllda Bennett
Alexandria ?'arnale Violet Bernini
Ituih Cbatt?rt'iD Peggy llyla?d
Ina Clairs A os Joyce
Marguerite Clark
Desalo ?.'layt?n
Mirlan] f >,opejr
Ja? e i ni
?la?., : Uawn
ttosii-a Dolly
Yan I Dol y
Mablo Normand
i. **!f- l'alnter
Mary Plckford
Marjorle Rarnbe?.
? '.-e.
Lillian Ruandl
A.i Haggln Mary Ryan
Julia Handerson
reoj
Norma Talniad?.
Bertha Kallsh La.rette Taylor
A.'jiiette Kellermann Ollre Thomas
M-dx? K. /.riedy Lenore Llrlc
A';na I-ntticr Charlotte Walker
Juila Marlowe Fran-?. W?i?t?
Mae Man Peggj Wood
< ..ra KlmbaJ] Vonr.?
MADISON SQ.
GARDEN
Saturday Night
Nov. 16th.
PRICES: ?1.00, ?2 00. ?3 00.
?..00. ?7.00 and %?!0 00
Seau on Sale Wed., Nor.
13th, at MADISON
SQUABS GARDEN and ALL
TICKET AGENCIES.
Chas Harvey, Wm. Gibson. Joa Humphreys and As?
sociates will present a military concert and a
BOXING CARNiVAL
In which the ?tars of the pugilistic world will (five the
best thry have. You remember tb? .bow they ?a-e f<-r
the l: ' r >?? ? This record will bemitdone. Th?- ?;
lng commute? in charge- will donaie the entire pro
cceds to the United War WorK Campaign Fund.
Benny Leonard
Jack Britton
Joe ,1? :>netto
V?.
Kid Norfolk
I r.ir.l. - ? L.I.ihan
Vf?.
Barney Adalr
Beiinic \ -.l^.ir
Vf*.
I'o Johnson
Johnny Dunu're
\?.
Joe Willing
Jim Coffer
\ a.
Clay Turner
Willie Juekw.n
\f.
.".Idle U allft'-e
Frank:? liurne
?i v
K. O. LKKer
METROPOLITAN
OPERA HOUSE
Sunday Night
Nov. 17th.
PP.ICES: ?2.00, ?3.00,
?4.00. ?6.00.
AUCTION SALE
To-Morrow at 3
Cohan &. Harria Thea
The National Association of Friara Annnun?
??.'i AU "-lar
Triar M.but Oe?. M
Ravmond Hitchcock
AI .Toi?nn
DeWolf Hopper
Sam Bernard
Ln?ils Mann
William Collier
Frank Tinney
Irvinp Berlin
Andrew Mack
Jan??** .1. ( or heft
Joe I.ertorn
Eleanor Painter
Other? to Be Announce?
The Frlprs will donate
Lev Field?
.Toe Weher
T>nn?M R^an
I.eo D'"-?' h?te*jj
Cyril Mande
Will Re-rer*
John Chn-Ie? Tbomrm
Ooyle ?t Olxon
Joe Cavit horn
F-' Wynn
Mitrl
Frank Raeon
'..s t?:

xml | txt