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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, January 15, 1919, Image 11

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First Law of .
Assembiy Calis
On Wadsworth lo
Vote for SiifTrajjo
Resolution Passed With hut
Two in Negative aud Sent
to Senate; Mrs. Samniis's
Bill First to llreomo Law
? ' nee
AI BANY, Jan. I l. The Senate. after
a brief but pointed debate, passed the
resolution offered by thc woman suf
fragists, ca Lfnitcd States
Senators James W. Wadsworth, jr., and
Calder to work and vote
: amendmen
. i inly two
votes were recorded in the negative.
i v aimed i specially
at Senator Wadsworth, who ri L'u cs 7>
vote for 7 I amendment.
,-,ir John Knlght, of Wyoming,
voting against tho resolution. said he
<!ni so because he considered it un
hecessary, a similvir resolution having
been adopted by thc Legislature lost
vear.
Senator Hei i , M. Sage, of Albany,
who also .'"? ' olution,
wns to ii.''
the judgr cnt < ior Senator
from Xew
"That man is doing his duty 1
sces it," said Senator Sagi . "I b<
the majority of thc people in this
state bi '. lat hc is actuated in
all things by what ho regards as thc
best interests of the state and nation. j
1 regard it as little less than an in?
sult for this Legislature to instruct a
man to do what he belic u to bi
wrong.
Declares It Won't Change Him
"We are merely asking Congress to
decrcc thnt states that do not want
suffrage rhall have it. lt is no part
of our duty to to instruct
Senator Wadsworth to change his opin?
ion, when we know how our action will
not change him. Wc arc merely at
tempting to put him in ;. wrong light
before the people of thc state.
is nol n of suffrage or ant i
, 7;* a qui sl ion of I Iie con
man. We arc going
i .:: of our vv ay to offer a
or from this sti
.- r Frederick M. Davenport, of
Bull Moose candidate for
Governo . took h ue with Sen?
ator S . 77.1 to the act i m of
can Xational Commitl e
i Cl icago, which,
;?.- Senati r Davenport put it, veffy
:- and very firmly called the
of S ato - Wadi worth to thc
ment.
"There is no oifrr.ee intended or im
plied res olution," S* i a1 or
Davenport continued, "The resolution
is eminently proper. The people have
spoken. ft is now time for the rrp
to yield to the will of his ?
Tieople."
Other men i ed tl
ments cf Senator Davenport, and the
minority leader, Senator James A.
. sa .'; ? :.? resolution should be
adopted if for no other reason than as
an aeki lent of the debi of
gratitud of the state and
nation owe to the women for their work
in the war.
The resolution will come up for ac- ,
Monday night
and 7 s adoption by the lower house
is genei
This was not the only inning in which
the women scored 7 -day, however. To
one of their sex, Mrs Ida B. Sammi--.
Republican, of s , i ounty, goes
'
:
? ? .' m li
vv tn its applica
:ks. it
'
to the
>k similar action. It
.'ted to thc Governor,
the prcser.ee <
lers of the Legi ?
lature, ? Smith presented thi
he sigm d the act to
er.
? , ..- ,,
nizal ns, con
confere
Ihadneua C, Sw?
' ; . lead
era ol I
hc leg
' irther than
?r'. '-'?' leration.
I arrived ?
dicated
"?'-?ded ' "f working hoi rs
' :. employed by
puttlng
or . ,'.
of carr i :? through their
.i cei
tau, thal the Leg ? faVor
*b-y ?n faur mcai
Prominent Women in Delegation
The delegation was headed bj
?lary K. Iir. . ,. ,.,,,..
, Ti'n':'? i Leea
'. . Mrs.
'
-
Beard,
'-- ' . mers' Lci v n
?vomen'j* 1 ? ??,
- talked oti thc pro
'-?.<?? ..<?:!.
on companii i -.-. wdrk
r^.l1 n?ighJ* Sho "ai'! an >'
on th? h. fi. t. had proved that work
? had a bad moral eff, <?? on
U he < >. "thal
1919 Imtroducc
'"'";; :!s young as thirteen have been
j employed as conductors by the B. R. T.,
and that some <>f these young women
. wi re dope sniffcrs."
j When tho health insurance bill was
j being discussed Speaker Sweet cx
' ' ed tho opinion that with the com
ol prohibition tho health of the
pcople would bo such that health in?
surance would noi be necessary. Miss
Beard, however, insisted that with or
without prohibition there is great need
for legislation of this kind.
Both Speaker Sweet and Senator
IValtevs asked how thc manufacturers
state would compete with those
ol other places if loaded un with lejris
tttion such as tho minimum wage and
I health insurance.
"It has been t!;o experience.'' said
Mrs. Whitney, "that where ver modern
ition of this sort has been put
into force production has increased."
Mrs. Esther Chadbourn _aid an in
; vestigation just completed by th,- Con?
sumers' League, of which she is secre
j tary, revealed that most charity cases
in 1 n state were the result of tho lack
a'' n living wage.
"Industry which exists on labor , aid
;. >s than a living wa_. is not meeting
?hnrgc t," said M rs. Chad
bourn. ' The money is being made up
ntributions from the family of the
woman worker or by her friends, or by
public or private charity, or by the girl
herself in slow starvation."
IN urses' Emergeney
(louneil Organizes
To Conlinue Work
Its Activities Diarinj* Influ?
enza Epidemic Showed
Necessity for Such Asso?
ciation, Says Dr.Copcland
At :i meeting of the Nurses' Emer-1
gency Council, held at thc Cosmopoli-1
Club yesterday afternoon, called atl
the request of Commissioner of Health !
Copeland to discuss thc advisability of j
making the council a permanent organi
zation, a plan was adopted by a unan
imous vote. Likcwise, a tentativc pro?
gramme was drawn up, in which it is
planncd to coordinate its various ac
ties, as it dkl in the influenza epi
?. whenever an emergeney arises.
A resolution was passed in which it was
decided to ask ihe Xational League for
Woman's S^ rvice to keep its organiza?
tion intact for neaee work.
The NTurses' Emergeney Council was
brought into existence last October,
during tl e influenza epidemic, with
Miss Lillian D. Wald as chairman.
Win n the epidemic waned in November
and the immediate need was rcmoved
the council disbanded. The present re
organization moetingwas the result of
Commissioner Copeland's statement to
the chairman and members of tlie
Nurses' Emergeney Council, in which
he said:
"This organization must be looked
upon ;.; one of the health reserve
forces to be used in other crises that
may confront us. It would be most
unfortunate if you perrnitted this or?
ganization to lapse. It must be kept
intact for the public good. ,, . .
It, ought to be the pleasure of this
com.munity, as a memorial to the
splendid work you performed durintc.
the epidemic, to furnish whatever
means are necessary to continue, for
present and future needs, the Nurses'
Emergeney Council."
The work of the council is an
example of the speed and efficiency
with which Xew York can correlate its
forces in a crisis. It was brought into
existence on the afternoon of October
10, 1918, and within twenty-four hours
? ablished itself as a clearing
house for practically all organizations
ty, municipal and private, em
nur 3s or identified with in
ttrests closely related to this aspect
public'welfare. The work was
ted under the chairmanship of
s Wald, and with Miss Parmelia
Doty of Teachers' College as secretary.
Before disbanding the Nurses'
Council drew up a plan for
luenza clinics, which it sub
to Dr. Copeland and to tho As
0( tion of Ncighborhood Workers.
ordance with this plan. forty-two
for tlie after-care of influenza
I ? . .,- ? were cstablished under the
auspices of the Department of Health,
be coi nerai ion of the Association
of Ncighborhood Workers and the
Henry Street nursir.tr stati".
The Department of Health supplied
doctor and some nurses-, and where
tl . re were no nurses the Henry Street
ng Nur-.e Service met the med.
necessary, milk and eggs were
supplied through these centres to
lable to buy them.
Dutch Cabinet Supports
Woman SufTragc Bill
Passage ol' "Measure by Ilollanri
Parliament Almost Certain,
Says Dr. Aleil'a Jacobs
om 1 ir. Aleita Jacobs,
head of the Society for the Rights of
Women of Holland, that the whole
Dutch Cabinet is backing thc woman
i uffrage bill introduced by M. Marchant.
Du ?'? Premier pronmes immediate
consideration of the measure by the
Dutch Parliament, virtually guarantee
? ii tr its adoption since the govcrn
indorsement of the measure
this. Purthermorc ho declared
oon as tho measure was for
rilai'y pa '.I a new election should ho
held in which thc women could take
' hus making i he new Parliament
of the whole country.
One after another of the political
leaders of Holland declared themselves
?? women, right or wrong, until
ids an unusual chance of be
coming ii law,
Av, a reiiuit, Carrie Chapman Catt
i and tho woman nuffragists of Ameriea
? aro generously eabling sinterly good
luek notes acro.su thc Atlantic,
THE CLUB DE MONTMARTRE
BROADWAY AT FIFTIETH STREET
ANNOUNCE I IIE PREMIERE OF
MISS CRACE IIELD
THURSDAY EVENING, JANUARY THE
SIXTEENTH. AT ELEVEN O'CLOCK
THE CLUB DE MONTMARTRE HAS BEEN ORGAN?
IZED TO SUPPLY THE NEED OF A DANCING AND
'?I'PER CLUB OF DIST1NCTJ0N AND LIMITED MEM
BERSHIP. AND WILI. BE OPEN EVERY EVENING
FROM NINE O'CTOCK.
9PECIAL DANCES BY MISS CYNTHIA PEROT AND
rti, MR. REED HAMILTON.
VRCHESTRA UNDER .IHE. DIRECT ION OE EMIL
...Atl < OJ.EMAN.
iaBj.es MAY BT. RESERVED IN ADVANCE BY TELE?
PHONE CIRCLE2330.
CHARLES JQURNAL-MALLRE D'HOTEt..
ed by Woman
Suffragists Who
Buriietl Speeches
All Go to Jail
Throughout thc
remained silent.
Found (.uilly of Fighting
Fire and Given Oianre to
Pay Fines, They Decide
on Cells i'or Five Davs
New York Tn7n.ii/?
Washington Burrau
WASHINGTON, Jan. 14.?Twenty
two suffragists of thc Xational Wom?
an's Party wero found guilty to-day
by Judge McMahon, of thc Federal
Court, for violatinfj; park regulations
by lighting fires on government prop?
erty yesterday afternoon nnd last
night.
trial the suffragists
They refused to
plead. Thc only witnesscs were the
park policeman who made thc arrest
and Mr. Conkling, of tho chief engi
neer's office, who established that tne
property upon which the fires were
lighte> was included under the regula?
tion the women were accused of vio
lating. _
In sentencing tne suffragists, Judge
McMahon gave each tho choice of pay
ing a fine of $ld or serving live days
in jail. A il decided to go to jail.
Although sevi ral ol tlie women were
arrested twice yesterday, none was
tried on more than one count.
Fires were lighted on thc sidewalk
in front of the White House yesterday
afternoon to bu:n the speeches Presi?
dent Wilson made abroad. The fires
were set from a bit of the blaze that
has been kept burning since the Xew
Year's night demonstration. Thc oc
casion of yesterday's demonstration
was the peace conference in Europe,
scheduled to begin yesterday.
The arrcsts of the afternoon and ?
ninli attack made on the woman's party
headquarters at 6 o'clock ended tho
afternoon demonstration. Late lnst
night other fires were lighted on thc
sidewalk in front of the White llousc
and in Lafwyette Park, across the
street. Park policemen again arrested
tlie women, and many of them refused
to give bail the second time and were
locked up for the night.
At the opening of the trial this after- ;
noon applause greet ed the first of the
prisoners to be brought into court.
Judge McMahon announced that thc
room would bo eieared if there was
further demonstration. Several suf?
fragists in the audience applauded thc |
next entrance of prisoners. They were
ordered out of the courtroom and told
not to return. I
'Watch Fire" Tender
Speaks Here To-day
At Break fast Party
The Xational Woman's party will
hold a conference breakfast to-dav at
12:30 at the Holland House, at which
Mrs. M. Toscan Bennett. of Hartford,
Conn.. who has just been released from
jail for burning the President's |
speeches, will speak.
"We are fighting and will continue j
to fight so long as it may bc necessary !
that the day of the realizatioU of '
democracy may soon dawn, not only in
Europe, but here at home as well," i
said Mrs. Bennett. "We mean to keep |
the democratic faith, even as our men
are keeping it."
Mrs. Abby Scott. Baker, political!
chairman of the Xational Woman's j
party, will report. on the meeting of
the women's executive committee of the
Republican Xational Committee, which
she has been attending, nnd the gen- I
eral political situation.
Mrs. John Winters Brannan, acting
chairman of the Xew York branch, will
prcside. Reservations can be made by !
telephone at state headquarters. 13 \
East Forty-first Street.
Among the guests will be Mrs. O. II. j
P. Belmont, Mrs. Ella O'Gorman Stan- '
ton, Mrs. (i. Childs, Mrs. Frederick.
Ackerman, Mrs. John Rogcrs, jr.. Mrs. :
William L. Colt,. Mrs. Myron C. Taylor
and Miss Vida Milholland.
Mrs. Hay Says Republican
Heads Seek Sane Progress
Woman at National ('ommittee
Meeting Asserts Bolshevik
Principles Strongly Opposed
Being one of two women to act as
proxies and attsud the meetings of the
Republican Xational Committee held
in Chicago, Mrs. Mary Garrett Hay had
an intcresting story to tell yesterday
regarding the proceedings and how
they appeared to a political newcomer:
"What impressed me most was the
progressive, up-to-date Americanism
shown by the men from difl'ere'nt parts
of the country, the fact that they are
alcrt and alive, keeping up with the
great issues of thc day and ready for
change if it is for the best. While
there is a decided sentiment against!
Bolshevik principles, there is an ear- i
nest desire among those leaders of
their party to stand for progressive
measures that are safe and sane.
"Their attitude was shown by thc
fact that the presence of women as
proxies was taken as a most natural
thing. The suffrage. resolution pre-:
sented by Colonel William Boyce j
Thompson and unanimously adopted
indicated their up-to-the-minute stand.
lt read:
.I'ho Republican Xational Commit?
tee, in meeting asscmbled in Chicago.
on January 10, reiterat.es its bclieT
in th*- necessity for Ihe enfranehise
iiicnt of thc women of America. and
therefore calis upon th" United States
Senate for thc immediate passage of
the Federal suffrage amendment, and
further calis upon all Iegisiatures to
stand ready to ratify thc aineiidment
when presented.'
"Two other facts besides the pro?
gressive spirit impressed me. These
wero thc sincere sorrow felt, by all
over tho death of Colonel Roosevelt.
and Ihe facl that Mr. Hays is tho real
leader of his party."
Suffrage Plea Defeated
CONCORD, X. II., Jan. 14. The
slate Senate to-day, I.', to fi, voted down
th" resolution passed last. Friday by
the llou.se, requesting Xew llampshirc
reprosentativos in Congress to voto for
the Federal equal suffrage amendment.
w'j-ffiw'.'-y'i'.w'i
vffOBffl SEN5ATIOWAL:-.''-?'?,'
1,^ IGfe.SKATlNG STARS
./? ,. twice niotmy .,.' 'io ,vo <.? ino
14tb Strtct, near Fourth Avenue
D
raina
'Woman in Room 13" Ha?
Thrills in Plenty at
Boolh
By Heywood Broun
"Thc Woman in Room 13" is an in-!
IgeniouB and enthralling melodrama. It
has thc atmosphere and the incidents
j which make the best of our murder j
I trials interesting. These are mystery.
circumstantial evidence and scandal.
The play departs from thc melodrama
tochnique of the last two scasons by
j allowing the audience to know more j
j than most of tbe characters in the
I play and at least as much as the best
i informed some little time before the
end of the play. There is no lack,
! however, of surprising twists and turns.
Perhaps the best. tribute to the skill
of the playwrights lies in the fact that
any brief synopsis of the plot would
seem fearfully complicated, and yet
: everything is developed with perfect
clarity in the play. Perhaps an excep?
tion should be made against the last
act, which is by no means as exciting
as the rest of the plav and leaves one
: or two questions of fact and motiva- :
tion confused. But by the time the
; last act is reached so considerable a
contribution of thrills has been made;
that complaint is ungrateful.
i Me understand that the greater part
of the play is the work of Samuel
| Shipman. Max MarcLn is thc collabo-j
nitor. This is thc third play b> Ship?
man now in Xew York. lli.i technical ]
skill showe to better advantage in the '
present piece than in either of the
others. Virtuosity more nearly an
swers all requirements in melodrama
than in any other form of dramatic
entertainment, unless it be farce. Close
observation of character and any con
vincin. philosophy are not, needed. They
would be in the way. "The Woman in
! Room 13" has neither. The characters
, are :is interesting as needs be, but
not one becomes so engrossing for
. what he is that attention is distracted
from what is happehing.
As a matter of fact, with a few ex
ceptions, the folk of the play are not
jan admirable lot. The stage is fairlv
cluttered with mastcrfui men and
yielding women, but they keep mov?
ing so fast that nobody has time to
like or dislike them. Will Paul be ac?
quitted of the murder? is the question
j besidc which every other consideration
I seems trivial. Even the manners and
morals of the crowd arouse only pass?
ing attention. We were surprised for
instance to learn how freely business
men tell their salaries before company.
| It is not tho custom among newspaper
and theatrical circles with which we
are best acquainted, or if any mention
\ Of the weekly wage does creep in it is
softened by an optimistic inaccuracy
which banishes bad taste.
We do not intend to imply that all
the characters are unsympathetic. We
did not like thc hero very much. and
yet we managed to work up u consid?
erable interest in his fate after the
villain had been shot. This may have
been due to the fact that thc villain
was just a little more evil than usual.
The adventuress also wetjt to extremes
by wearing very much less than is ex?
pected of adventuresses. Here, too, the
policy of keeping nothing from the
audience seemed to be followed.
The many complications of the plot
are introduced in an orderly manner.
This is perhaps the secret of the amaz
ihgly iine tcchnique which has goiv
into building the play. It is this which
prevents confusion and disaster to the
understanding. The method is very
like that of a skilled worker in salad
dressings. Each ingredient comes in
at just the right time.
A good cast succeeds in bringing out
all the values of the play. Janet
Beecher. who is chiefly responsible for
preserving a necessary sympathetic
interest, is particularly good, but
Lowell Sherman and Kenneth Hill. both
arrant villains, are also valuable in
promoting thc evening's entertainment.
Miss Fay Wallace contributes an amus
ing bit, and Will Deming ar.d Gai]
Kane should also be mentioned. De
Witt Jennings deserves special atten?
tion, for he does a tr.ulitional police
captain role in tine, vigorous fashion
and participates in two of the most
exciting scenes of the play.
"The Woman in Room 13" is so good
a melodrama that it would deserve
praise in any theatrical season, but il
is more welcome than ever just now
after the long series of spy plays. in
which everybody turns out to i>e some
body else. The characters in this play
stay put and since they are placed iii
situations which make for excitement
and interest, that is an admirable
quality.
A sale of rare books from thc stock
of Robert H. Dodd was concluded at
the Anderson Galleries yesterday af?
ternoon. For the two sessions, com
prising 4S" itcms, $6,423 was realized.
George D. Smith again bought several
rare volumes, among which were the
following: Forty fragments of
ihh nmoii, priiiien io_o, ior
... a map of excessive rarity, "De
scription de la Nouvelle France," 1632,
for $200; "The New England Prinicr,"
177.?,, with woodcut of George HI, for
tlfifl ii rwl "Tli? Alinvirriti-i I 1 'rs i-l f ?1 i ,, "
17/.?, with woodcut. ot ticorge III, ior
$160, and "The Aboriginal Portfolio,"
by J. 0. Lewis, containing eighty por
traits of celebrated North American
Indian chiefs. for S127.
S. L. Monson was a keen biddcr at
thc first session of lhe sale and paid
$360 for "Poor Richard, 1736," hy ISen
jamin Franklin, and $157 for it rare
almanac of the year 1770, with engrav
ing by Paul Revere.
The American Art. Association sold
by auction yesterday afternoon colored
fishing prints, mezzotints and line en
gravinga from thc collection of thc late
Charles Roberts, of Philadelphia, and
others. A collection of stipple plate
portraits by D. Edwin brought $85, thc
liighest price paid, from Max Williams.
A colored lithograph, "Trout Fishing,"
by W. Gauchi, brought $60 from Ken?
nedy <? Co., and "Punt Fishing." by the
same artist, also went to Max Williams
for $56. The procceds of the sale were
$2,066.
Higher prices were fetched at. thc
evening sale of cngravings. ctchings
and drawings by noleil artists. from
various collections. "Olga IL," an etch
ing by Anders Zorn, brought tho higli
est price of the collection, $440, from
M. Knocdler & Co. Tho same firm also
purchased "Old Man with Divided Fur
Cap," nn etching by Rembrandt Van,
Rijn, for $430, and an etching by
Chnrles Jacque, entitled "La Bereorie,"!
for $1*0. F. Keppel * Co. paid $220!
for an ongraving, "Virgin and Child," by
Martln Schongauer, and an etching bj
Rembrandt Van Rijn of "Christ Preach
ing" brought the same price from F.
Mcder. Tne Erlch Galleries obtained|
an etching hy Sjr Francia Seymour
lladi'ti. entitled "The Three Sister;,"
for $130, and "Lo Petit Con?eil," en
ffraved by Janinet, after the painting
by Lavraince, also went. lo F. Meder
for $115. Thc sale realized $1,060 for
its 164 itemn.
German Theatre to Reopen :
Lexington Avenue Play house Is
Leased for Foreign Company j
German plays are to be renewed in
New \ork. Announcement was made!
? istecday that the Lexington Theatre, I
at Lexington Avenue and Fiftv-first'
Street, had been leased by the Chris?
tian Producing Company, the former
lessee of the German Irving Place The?
atre.
Both the Irving Pl_ce an_ tho y.rk
villc theatres, where German plays
were produced, suspended last summer,
owing to the war. The opening date
Lexington Theatre has been set
for .March 10.
Plays and Players
Cosette," a new play by Edward
( larke, with Josephinc Victor in the
leading part, v. ili bc seen here late this
month.
William and Gordon Dooley, who are
now appearing at the Century Grove,
\i di have impor ant nV.es in the new
W int ?:? Garden extravaganza, "Mont'e
Chi isto, J r."
M.axwell Parry, wiiose pantomime,
"Stingy," is on Stuart Walker's open?
ing bill at the Punch and Judy Theatre,
was a young aviator who was killed in
action last summer.
"Everything," the Hippodrome show, i
celebrates its two hundred and fiftieth
performance this afternoon.
Frisco, of jazz-dance fame, will play
a part in Arthur tlammerstein's next
musical production, "Thc Slumber
Party."
A epecial performance of "Tillie" will j
be given at Henry Miller's Theatre to |
men in uniform on Sunday night, under i
the auspiccs of the Stage Women's
War Relief.
Otto Haroach, Abe Levy and Rudolf
Friml have joined forces to produce
"The Little Whooper," a musical com?
edy founded on Louis Alien Browne's
play, "The Bigamist."
AMERICA'S rOKEMOST THKATKES A
LEE & J.
winter garden ,;y.'irrL YT'
C*NTURY^ROVE RIWof CENTW.T TttEATRt
pTstuwiojil ,,Aj0
#1?IRL<S_&>
P L A Y H 0 U S E 4!? iv,!^r^
MATINEE TO-DAY, 2:30.
IP-RMflAtlYl
EXTRA MATINEE TO-MORROW
48TH1 ST THEA., 17 of B'way. Ergs. 8 30.
*J1* Matlnees Tluirs. nml Sat., 11:30.
REPUBLIC ffi __?__,"_-_*_.?! SiS
19 __ *J__1
Mats. To-day and sii:
^MB_fvNARDRlOU,5MANN
LITTLE THEATRE ?f ^ $?%
MATS. TO-DAV & SATURDAY, 2:80
( A LITTLE JOURNEY
wl'h Kste'lle Wlnwood & Cyril Kcightlej
WHITES1DE
Matlnees To-day & Sat., 2:30.
,? LITTLE BROTHER
. h TY'RONE POWKR
39th ST. ?:.,-;
MATIN1 i: TO-DAV AT
KEEP ',ro YOURSELF
\ tomi:dy t lassic:
No?Baye8^V4Mtt^?*?^?w
SMORA BAYES ,'Amiffn^
THEATRE
columbus
>-.-. - . _- CIRCUE.59!_r
SOCIETY AMEKICAN SINGEKS
THREE COMIC OPEFlA (1EMS.
^'tW gondoliers
; t FRA DIAVOLO
'''wilii Orviile llarrold .v Blanca b'aroya.
,,1?,,: MIKADO
Ij^FRENCSI THEATRE v?Z Colombiei
CHATTERTON
Saturday Night I'op. Prlceg.
AATli <?'?' Tlioa.. nr Broadw.y. V.vge. 8:15
..in Ol. \|?; To-daj juul Saturday, - 15,
UTTLE SIMPL'ICITY
SMARTKKT MUSICAL SHOW IN TOWN,
mTf-Ttll 4Mli. W ot B'wny. i:>, 8:30.
?JV??J Mat-i To day ai tl Sat.. 2:30,
11 B. WARNER in j with IRENE
Sleeping Parlners I B0RD0N1
PLYMOUTH ZzZ'^Z^Z^I,
JOHN BARRYMORE R^a
IM \ MOI i II THEATKK?HPKCIAL
1 Hl MT., ".:'?'?(?? & SAI-. 10:30 A. M
"Kflblly th? tmitnie evrnl of lhe drn
mtillc year." Loum \ . U. Kue, World.
Shubert-Riviera Zr:.ZZ%,'r
HlBllMl I'i ? ' > ? i". Evs . 11
MA Y T ITV. F i!|.?;v vvooo, wtllias
/. I 1 I 111 L Mililtis. Mclvln Stokca.
LAST
4 DAYS
Ol THK Sl XSA1 ION \l.
I'KTI KK THAT ALL NK\V
\oi;k is TAL.KI.Na Alliil I,
Carncpie Hall, TONIGHT at 8:15
SCHOLA CANTORUM
Kl'l'.T BCHIXDLER, Cohdudot
SPANISH IOI.K KONOS
(Elizubctlinn &Indrigulti und Houmlelayi
.Music of Oie Ilulinri Kenuil innnre
I'urt Soukh l>.\ Lco OniMteln
ll'crey Ornlncer nnil Ilulfour Onrdnrr
,loi>,l: Lumlirrt Murphy, Tenor.
,. s:: |o 7i???. on P.ln ?' 11..i Oflli'8 Now.
'v.IEtm ?
Popular Mat. To-day, 25c to $1j
TiiriM ^g^JL_?%-?V^' 1 J| .Nrw.-ai. Comedy
THK VOICB OF McCONNBLl?
25o. to $1.00. A trw frmit Urrh. M?_I.h at Jl S0. |
tt-t. Ev., .lan. "5--M?rJorlo 1(iuUv'>u?Eyrs of Yuulli ;
Berkshire Striug Quarlet Gives
Evening oi' Chamber Music
at Aeolian Hall
An evening of chamber nnisic by the
Borkshire String Quartet was the at
traction last night at Aeolian Hall. This
organization has given a good account
of itself in the hearings which it has
had in Xew York during the last two
seasons, and its work last evening
showed that it is building well for its
future. The members are Hugo Kort-:
schak, first violin; Jacques Gordon,
second violin; Clarence Evans, viola,!
and Emmeran Stoeber, violoncello. They
show enthusiasm tempered by musical
insight, and havo progressed far in the'
difficult art of playing chamber music
effectively and interestingly. Their,
work was excellent in rhythm and in
tonal beauty and nuance, except that n
little more warmth and smoothness
could b" desired in the firsl violin.
The programme introduced a
work by a New Yorker of Polish birth,
Tadeusz larecki, a quartet which won
tho prize of $1,000 offered by Mrs.
Frederic S. Coolidge at thc Berkshire
Festival of Chamber Music held al i
Pittsfield, Mass.. last summer. It
shows considerable skill in polyphonic
writing, its chicf beauty lying in its
rhythms and harmonies rather than in
the melodtc ideas of which they are
built and contains :i grood deal of repc
tition of effects. [I ;: music ox mooda,
which ebbs and fldvvs without evident
purpose, in which tho sequences seem
fortuitous rather than incvitable.
In the second movement, described
as "tranquille et mystericnx comnio un
reve," there are passages cf real beau?
ty. The other numbers were the Haydn
Quartet in G minor, with which the
programme opened, aml Borodin's
lovely quartet in A major, with which
it closed.
The audience was of good si/.e and
discriminating in its applause.
17 I. T. I
IM) II1TS UNDER THE DIKECTION Of
J. &HCHKKT
I PI TJNP.F W?t 42<1 Sl Kvenlngs r.t 8 80,
LL.lll*iUE, TO-NIGHT, 8:30.
EEmiiimi
EIRST MATINEE SATI KIlAY.
: COMEDY^-s1 :;r,i,: To-morrowEv.8:30
7 )::]X-1 j THECL1MAX
| < "l'i:. ' with ELEANOR PA1NTER
?JU*JinniiS'|. MATINKK Tn MAV, 2:30.
ASTOR *5tn <"1'1 Broadway. Erenings Sl"
ttOiUB. MaUneea .,.?.,;.,v and s,lUlru,;y> ?. j
IS
With FAY BAIXTER.
MOROSCOS.^SiS, ifo.
WIl.MAM TOM
courtenay j&l wsse
;: ,m; cappy ricks
Arthur Hammersteln'n 2 B'way Hit?
"SOMEBODY'S "WeETHEART"
CENTRAL S.*.^,*:'^1,^ :'
A^'K-:y>; ?;;?:?; SOME TIME '^s'
CASINO g;x?T?-V&aS?: VM:
rUIIDCDT Vest 44th St. Tel. Bryant 8439
70th TIME. MATINEE 1O-0AY.
QCI WVN TUeatro, Wcst 42 St Evp 8 30
OtLYtltl Matlneca To-day and sm , 2:30
JANE COWL
THE CROWDED HOUR
MAXINE ELLIOTT'S, Wcst .,9th St.
TEA for 3 c
l-'.YPS.
8:30, Matlnees To day and Sat
? V?ir 42*1 St . West ?! B'way Kves 8 "
LYKlU M.,... To-day and Saturday. 2:t:0.
Rolon-l U'i-9 '? Thiilier 61 I'linueri
Not n __ Uie Soasouj
War I'lnv fV7Ti''?:V4
nrTTjTi
Mats. To clay &? Sat.
ith RICHARD BENNETT. Rth Monlh.
BROADHURST5Jife^.?"; -!
;'?-- MELTIN6 OF MOLLY Wlt&^w'
OODLES Ol' LAUGHTER.?,
PRINCESS
s: ,rtr ? & Bright**! f)U
of All Princess 11 \\.
Musl. al Su.is .. ?
"BETTER THAN '014. BOY.' "?N. V. Herald.
W1I.IIAM I ONGACRB
W ...I aq,i, s:
:;
C0LL1ERUES
?'NOTHING BIJT "??*-??*
, ,,. " - ;o. Matlnees TO-DAY aii 1 Sal
FULTOfT L: V .,; ,
"RIDDLE: WOMAN"
with A. B. Anson, Chrystal Hcrne
Leo Baker. Albert Bninhin.
LOEW'S 7th Ave. ^V^J'^A^
ii v "UNDER ORDERS"
l v li Wood
' prCSe!
Aeolian Hall, Eri. Eve.. .lan. 17. at R:ir.
P1ANO-ORUAN RECITATr? SAHA
SQK0LSKY-FRE1D
(BTKINWAY l'l.'vM i,
(arncRie Hall, Sat. All., .lan. IS. 8:30.
ONI.Y BONG RECITAT. IN N. V.
EFREM ZIMBALIST J?
Mme. Gluck's accdmpanlmenta. (Knabe. Plano)
gjU Carneffle llull. Sat. Aft., ,l?n. 25,at2:30
I'l.VM > RECIT \ I. IOSI.I
7 'M !3 VT"**. kwc ? m m. m, u ffit!
CENTI'RV THEATRE. 1AN. 24. AT 1 :.!0
Aiivniii-.. Orders l>v mail ?3.00 (no tax) to
ln.nl. I Frohman, fiyceum Thi itn Ri v,i7ir
BOX ol''l''H'K S'AI.7 BEUINS MONDAY.
PB.F.KEITHS .1 \< iv NORWOHT1I
ALACE & /r,"
?;w*,?n,h"i i-.i'^iE,c;i:\v,To,.s; ;-.'ii;
Mul rially, ? ' I Kill ?? 7>a KIIkh fui ;.. .
||% 9.f.KEITH'S I I'livllls I Rtinnov
KlVFKSlDEl NeiN""-!'-'"" 1 .V ti.-ni
iVIVLIVOJUL Slnrmeln SKlir-, * I)n\lil
H'wav & Oiltli Bt. I BchoOler. l.xlell & Mni'j.
COLUMBIA. IVvviiy nnd 47lli. Tul,-.i Daily.| Pop
ALL NEW BEHMAN SHOW. U'cla*.
BUY IT : O DAY IF YOU HAVE NOT YET READ *
The Four Horsemen
the Apocalypsc
IT IS ONE NOVEL YOU MUST NOT LEAVE UNREAD ?
."'??, t 1.90 'fiosi'/tpe extra). At tll boeku .\ay l I from
E. P. DUTTON & CO., 681 Fifth Ave., New York
Opera
Rimsky-Korsnkcrff's opera pantomine '
"Le C'oti d'Or" ("Thc Qolden Cock"),
will have il ; fir ?'. p< rformi
Metropolitan Opefa House ?
tfonday evening. 1 I
wil] li ? Mi i. Garrisi n, ' i
SundeliuE suul Mi -si - D dur,
Audisi lian and Anamtvn, with
Misse i Galli nnd Smith and Messrs,
Bolm, Bartik and Bonl prin?
cipal dsncers &nd pantomimi&ts. Mr.
Monteux will eonduct. "L< Coq d'Or"
will b. preccded by "Cavallcria Rusti
cana, ' sung by Mmes. Mustio, Fcrini
and Mattfeld and Mes.rs. Crimi and
Montesanto. Mr. Moranzoni c
The ? i ras of next ? ei k will
be "Manon i? -i..nt." Wednesdaj
.: 7 : '"':?' - '. c la (lornarc," Thu
evoninjr; "I. . :7 ? ? ? ." for
ihe lirst tim? Amerit . even
injr, wil
Mellish, T .
Arden ar.d \;
Didur. Rothier, I.atir. mi, Bada. Itois?,
I'all riiiii ' ;io and Ananii .1. M r.
Monteux comlucting; "Elisir d'Amore" i
ul tl--1 Saturday matinee, a:ui "Lucia"
Saturday nijrht at popular pri.es, with
Mmes. Garrison and Ljrener and Messrs.
Martinelli, De Litca, Rottiier aVid Bada,
Mr. Papi conducting.
Efrem Zimballist, \iolinist, will play]
at next Sunday's concert. Mis. Marie
N K \V V O K K ' S I.K A I> I N O T I
cmriJXC M.,,i,.,... TODAY and Sat.. 2:30.
WILLIAM
GILLETTE
. VRKLK's
BEST
itSMED.
1)LAR
BRUTUS
u liUnil "Vck" aml "ttnnty" and
Daddy Long-I**." you'H lorp
j PATRICIA
COLLINGE
MILLF.RS ;,
1 hur. * Sat.. - 15
Evgs 8:2!) Matliio. TO-DAY ? Saturday, 2:2?
THK Ll "TL I.II'IT.K I'l.AY
THAT TLKNS 'IM AWAY
(.LO. M. COHAN as llit' Prinee
lyceum vz/':'- .K,,..:r:;',^"t _*$ ':
DAVID BELA8C0 Frcsenta
FRANCES STARR
111 1 1ULI\ . 1 IVJttV . , , , , k
KNICKERBOCKER JZ"rtl''
EvK*. K:!7,. Mats, in-iiin \ Sai "li
JOHN CORT'a \!:\V MU.l'PA. COMKDY
"WELL HdliTII LlSTENIN'i Ml
AM) LOOKINO AT."?V.\e. IVorld.
! *'?fiif?etter'?
.?> w^MP.tMRS. CO_,UPJ"3
Cohan&Harris fffi V* *' JZ __S
I'OI\ :,(!<? to S1.50 MAT. TO-DAY.
r1o#r- MsrtnatinA MwiVij Pl*y Cver ?WfTen
.1 away at every ixirformanre.
ETHE CANARY
"IT'SABIRD"
SANDERSON-CAWTHORN
Sam Hartly. Po;'l? &. Dixon. Maude Eburne
aml The Famous filobe B.auty Chorus.
l'OS'll AK VHU '.. MAT. TO-DAV.
METROPOLITAN OPERA
lo-ni<)lit at S:!' Marta. !!? mpi . V . l_
?iv.. Didur Ma a i-sta I'imd.. I!
Thurs. ai S II Tabarro, Suor Ar.ifliea a ,
nir.nnl Schlcchl. Karrar, MueIo, Kastoi . Crtinl.
Un Luca, Monli ? r. ??. I'oi ii Mi ra
Kri. ,.: - 17i Oberon. p , < lemlt Martinelli
\ ? ??? ? K - '" ii i i ond . Uodaml.y.
Sat. .ii 2. Cri'.plno e la Com&.-e. liemm Bi i
!nu: Reottl, < lia mers, SpftUi ' Papl
Sat. ni S. .-; oittl perfonuanco Le Prophete. MilT.lo,
Matxenanrr; Caruso, ftothltr, Dl__, Bcfalegel, Mar
Juiiea im..7. 15 lai .'?'.
Next Mon. .ii v Cav. Rustlcana. Mur.Io: Crlml,
Coq tl- Or. Uarrl
ilc lus.l'.raslau Dlaz.Dld. H ":. i I
Wi-cl. at 8 IS. Mr.non Le%caut. A..U I'erinl;
Martlni 111, l>e Lucn B ,;.' .i I'nnd., I'..; i
UARD.MA.N l'iAMi l BED
New Vork's T
CAPTAiN CARPEHTER, V.C.
Or II. M. S. "VIMIK TIN 1."
THE RAID ON ZEEBRUGGE
i! . . iwn : ?!..?
Orcati sl N7 ...il I-:>;i?:.,11 i.i ih.. War
I1KM.IT! OOVEK I'AIKOl. HM?
K.T.r A.iit m-.vI Xathanlrl l: i ....-, l>r.-sldlng
Seala U to ...? .-' \... .. . . H \ Ofll i r
ffi m J. B. Pond Lyceum Bureau. 5U i: ',. i .-;i
SlH IETY OF NEW N OKK
JOSEF hTRANSK..Conductor
< A it \ L (. I i; II A I. I.
Tnnl'w (Thlir.) Lv., K:30. \\l. I'ri. \ff.,7':P,0
HEETHOVEN.S.nd Bym
KACHMAX1XOFF."Isle nl the Dead''
WAl.NLK .'Sounda of :i.. Fort m"
l'rciud'6 "TrUtuii." O'vertnrfl "Tuiinliuii.cr"
Sunday Afternoon, Januarv l:Y. ni 3
TCHAIKOVSKY-LISZT
"Pathetlqtie"?Seoond Khapsody .
Ticketo at Box "ilii?? . V- ..-. !7 Lelfel's M?r.
PUNGH & JUDY if.'.k.^Sr"^
GTUART WALKERD
CJi P O R T 1-1 A Nl t-AU .EA6O Isj Q
(T0-NI6HT AviKiion.?? -si'in.^"' '{
l AT H:'M). Lord Dui "Th,- C
1 ???: ' ? Lnug-htrr of Tne God*.'' '
LEXINGTON THEATRE *l?*- ?""
POSiriVILV I.A8T WEEK *'"
ATTA BOY xviu,
CAPT. FRANK TINNEY
"Ati? 11 ?how.' v v lYlbuna
rBICES ?.",?<? TO sj.im. NO VVAJJ T\X.
Miilliiro To-day ltest tieata $,|,tK?.
LOEW'S NEW YORK THEATRE * ??'?r
'I"- 11 A M ' ll V ?I Ho.f\0 T \ _L
b. W. Grimth ? "Tr.o Greaiett Thln^ ln Llfr.''
Lcsw'. Arowican floof &? ZZu'J:^
Billy Klni & < .... \lolin_ky. AllC,
J.M>|ltitnr Diivis ..ll.?. "Nil," H,?en(l|
VrbilCkle in "(ninpinj: Onf."lW. 8. '..'
\L01 IAN If Ml . !l||s AFTERNOOK i.l |
PIANO
REC1TAL
M_l. UuLin.fi &. Jonvs. Kt. intfVy Pliu
Paula Pardee
rlimumi!Miiii!ii!;inuiiiiimiMi!iiiii5'~
1 JAN V. CHELMINSKI'S |
E 1 rttrst P'irtraits if ???
I PERSHING. FOCH. =
= JOFFRE and HAIG. Etc. E
~ i ?! I al I ht ~
| Kleinberger Galleries 1
riHIItlitUIMUIilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllK
Sundclius and Paul Althoaae -iv<\ Jott4
Mardones will sinje. Richard Hagcman
?i.i.
"Oberon" will be y\ i n \N i di
cveninp-, January _".'.
Hutjiers Alumni to Mecl
The PCevv York A .
'.' i7. .m
at !>?? mon i< ?' i
tion. Gtto 11. Kahn v.
Man.'*
Plans fi
?len of the fifty-third anniversary uf
Rutger i on 1-. bi ,;..i?>? 10 al o h ill bo
? ed.
i'l-etv. a-nong the Rutgera alumni tH>
army has drawn r generals
and one brigadier. Fifteen <>f ita giad
uates were V.illni in battli .
t le- poet, ,i oj ce K ilraer.
E A T R 1 *
A N l> Sill I. <>11'4
NEW AMSTERDAM ,V Jf*. *?
MATINEE* TO-DA1 nnd NAT *-I5
HEARTY LAUGHIER
AND GAY SONG MAKE
KI \\V A IK! IV(,IH\
?l vi or MIRTII mi.l Mi | oiuy.
THE GIRL
luiiui'ffli'i;]
THE BESI MUSICAL COMEDY IN TOWN!
, AIDP NEW AMilfcHDfeM THtAT**F
AIN'T IT A GREAT * GLOniOUS R r I NO
_NDJ4CHE Ti;>'ET PPv. ..(-?,.
90CI.0CKREVUN
8MIIW6HTFRDLIC
? '
?AMO A-WIHtil S1i!?-(,f '
WfiSEFOOLS
CRUTMONi.7.^^
VANDERBILT
EM1LY tii N I ILE
STEVENS WIFE
fW A DD!C
inMnnio vi ,v
| Popular Price Matinee TO-DAY
The Big Sensation of
Psychic Mystery Grip:>
New York! Follow thc
Crowd to THE INVISI
BLE FOE?"Thrills that
bile to ths marrow.'
Dorothv !>.x.
L IRPRTV LA8r ?
l,l^.^l\ II i ,, TI?tS
Tlie Kalril.ou Di?U on ??: Mu?
GLORIANNA
NEXT MON. NIGHT. Keat-4 To-inorrm*.
VIU lli
I! 71:! 7 ' ID A N 'fi
( OMEDlfi ERAXCAISK M. \ ?? *, I n , s
THE MARQUIS dc PRIOLA
STAND ARO 'v,
"SEVEN DAYS LEAVE"
( AHNFlilK II Ml? MON IVI . .1 V \
L:, CASE
Carnrgle llull?Tiie?dii> Evening. Jan. :M
IIIM1U lii lb I il L L
"
MUSEUM OF FRENCH ART
Iieniii Institute In Uie United Slaifs
599 RfA Avenve (48A St)
Loan Exhibition of French Art
IVrioiU nt l.niiU \\ aml Ii.iii^ \V|
Daly Except Sunday*? 10 A. M. lo I
Admisuon 50c. Saturday. frrr.
Januai
Carnegie llull. Tliars. Aft., .Inn'y 2?. at <v
Aunpice': Soi <?:>? (or Prevcatiofl ?*?
and ir itef uf Tubi rculosia, Im
RACHMANINOFF
<n INCERT ? IF MESIC P* 'K l'i ' I
Cl .i nd Boxen on
'! t. Regis. Bala
n C A. Eliis. Blelnway Piai
Suriduy Aft., I'rl). t, :it ? uniecic Hall
PH1LHARMONIC
G R AIN G E R
lli* only pubiic ii|.|i-iii-iMlrr
in N.'vv \nrk tius truoo
. ThurMlay Kvs;., .lan. 28. Frldnt \fl...l.tn Ii
Al CAHNKtilK II \l I Hith li?.
PHILHARMONIC
HEIFETZ
AEOLIAN ll\II. -.n*. \n.. .la,, I-* al 3.
PI VNi> Hl ? | l VI <Me>iiiw,t> ;
LEGINSKA
llii> WaBMMM iMDMfHl F
'
il VUM I*" "Thr- Sltvfr Kin.
|5\v,v 4^~M 'TATAtlNA' ? Pr\im>?
'W-50-Witj-ti; imiil.l OR< IIESTRA
IALTO l-AUUtii iRrniRiiK
TirW^TV-VT^ ': "0u, "' lh* S".?d0?."
i!J^XJtu?Jz* a
3 5O&0
fll
ATTHl
I XlM Ti. tlM I 1,V
? 77' -
IXU? AT fl I
Rl \l H. UKt III>TRA
'I .-vr .? ,.-?| (hf(n ,
|i?ti<! ? lir.rlv Uufttl
'?"t??(ii| t<V?
**?niif;(ir\n.''
?,cjrfli?PBORflPlL
M \iv ,l M wi i?v
lll "!>!IJ l>li-,||H,
Ei?wi
v|R\v!?OKvll^TK.V.

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