OCR Interpretation


New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, May 14, 1919, Image 11

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030214/1919-05-14/ed-1/seq-11/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 11

Miss Montague
To Be Bride of
Navy Officer
fler Marriage to Midship
snail Oswald Jimenis To
Be Solemnized on June 7
in Chantry of St. Thomas's
Miss Ada Phipps to Wed
^ill Become Bride of Silas
H. Wetherbee at Chapel of
St. Bartholomew's June 4
Miss Emily Trlplett Montague,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Meredith F.
, Montague, of 55 East Sixty-tifth Street,
trill be married to Oswald Jimenis,
Biidshipman, U. S. N., on June 7, in the
Hotel Bristol
129 to 135 West 48th St.
HIGH COST OF LIVING
MINIMIZED
WEEKLY RATES j
Double room, private bath, for
two, $21 to $35; with meals,
$45 to $55.
Parlor, bedroom and bath for
two, $25 to $40; with meals,
$45 to $(50.
One cool three-room suite to
sublet until October or Novem?
ber; 1W three, $40; with
meals, $75.
T. ELLIOTT TOLSON, President.
CHA3. E. McGINN, Manager.
I chantry of St. Thomas's Church. Miss
Anna J. T. Montague will be her sis?
ter's maid of honor and*the other at?
tendants will be Mrs. George English,
of this city, and Miss Genevi?ve La
Jhrop, of Virginia.
Edwin A. Jimenis will serve as best
man and the ushers will be Dr. Albert
0. Jimenis, William Triplett Mon?
tague, a brother of the bride; Reed M.
! Brown and Irving IT. Taylor.
Mr. Jimenis is a graduate of Yale,
! class of 1010.
Miss Adah Phipp3 has issued invi?
tations for the wedding of her niece,
Miss Alice Gouverneur Kortright,
daughter of the late Gouverneur Kort?
right, to Silas H. Witherbee, on June
4, in the chapel of St. Bartholomew's
Church. The ceremony will be fol?
lowed by a reception at the home of
Miss Phipps, 279 Lexington Avenue.
Mr. Witherbee recently received his
discharge from the army, in which he
served as a lieutenant. He is a son
of Mr. and Mrs. Walter C. Witherbee,
of Port Henry, N. Y.
Mr. and Mrs. Egbert Gilliss Handy,
of Hastings-on-Hudson, announce the
engagement of their daughter, Miss
Edna Dilworth Handy, to Reginald
Harrison Eagles, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Alexander Eagles, of Madison, N. J.
| Miss Handy's father is president of
j the Searchlight Book Corporation and
; Library Organization. She is a niece
of Vance Thompson and of the late
I Major Moses P. Handy, chief of pro
I motion and publicity of the Chicago
j World's Fair and special commissioner
of the Paris Exposition. Mr. Eagles
recently was discharged from the
chemical warfare service, in which he
served as lieutenant. He is a graduate
of Cornell University, class of 1915.
Mrs. Edward S. Knapp, of 31 East
Sixty-third Street, announces the en?
gagement of her daughter, Miss Mar?
garet Knapp, to Dr. Lee Hollister Fer?
guson of this city and Delaware, Ohio.
Miss Knapp's father was the late Ed?
ward Spring Knapp, of New York. She
w_,s introduced to society several years
ago and has been active in war work
and in the Junior League. Dr. Fer
j guson is a resident physician of the
Presbyterian Hospital and instructor
of medicine in the College of Physi?
cians and Surgeons, Columbia Uni?
versity. No date has been set for the
wedding.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Patterson, of
Wilmington, Del., announce the en?
gagement of Mrs. Patterson's sister,
Miss Janet Gordon Doremus, of Wil?
mington, to James W. Veeder, of Sche
nectady, N. Y.
Music
'Promising Barytot e Revealed
at Concert of Humanitarian
Cult at Carnegie Hall
The Humanitarian Cult at its concert
i last night at Carnegie Hall revealed a
; singer new to New York, but of a most
promising quality. He was Augusto
Ordonez, a Spa"nish barytone, who, it
j is understood, has recently been sing
j ing in Havana. Mr. Ordonez was intro
! duced by Mischa Appelbaum, president
I of the Humanitarian Cult, as the great?
est barytone in the world, which as
; sertion was distinctly not true.
The young Spaniard has a beautiful
i voice, and one of unusual uniformity
of timbre throughout its scale, b?t his
1 use of it was far from impeccable. At
: times he forced it to a marked un
; steadiness, and at others his emotional
: exaggerations were painful. His sing
I ing of Figaro's big air from "The Bar
I ber" was in places brilliant, but he
i has yet to learn the full secret of Ros
! sini. The "Di Provenza" from Tra
: viata he began very well indeed. Then
: his emotion overcame him and the line,
| both melodic and of taste, was broken.
Other things which he sang were the
i prologue from "Pagliacci" and Mana
Zucca's "The Star of Gold." Mr. Or?
donez possesses a voice both warm
and vibrant, but he lacks polish, taste
and a 6ense of measure. But he will
bear watching. The other musicians
who appeared at the concert were Miss,
Lila Robson, contralto, and Jan Chia
pusso, pianist. G. V.
^E?SiGHANTINq:
ol"NewlorKI
f.-.-ji????
% QFoldeupheaBattt^
?Ten _Ro0m#28w.39aST.
JW 58 7.9/f Gree/eus *
tUNCH60? ^ DINNER OCK
Specfd/ty Game in Se&?on
32dSt.-BVa-|-33dSt
"Bre?K?ast-QVO
Luneh~ll:30
S3
?HE ORANGE AND BLACK TH? PIROUETTE
? XV. ?9th ST. PHONE CIRCXK 4388.
-W"?*kfa?t. Luncheon, Afternoon Tea. Pinne?
THURSDAY AND SUNDAY NIGHTS:
CHICKEN DINNER.
Deudo?? Home CooUln? Ootratown
BROWN BETTY TEA ROOM
8ATUKDAT. SOUTHERN WAFFLES.
147 Fuiton St. IVv 1 FUjrht'i._
tfc PICCADILLY. ?"?E^SMr*
Bm wentrl ait rrtenilon at Dm? abofo ad?1rea?.
Apw-al Cbt-_<?,i and Waffle Dinner rvvry Mornlay
an?) T>.?.rv|>? DelMoue home cooeln?
<ThMa$&<nkrt
22 Eaet 45th Street.
Luncheon 40c; Dinner 63c
MARY LOUloL launch r.r,c; Chicken Luniih 50o
THE ADELAIDE T^.-ij^oOc?Dlnne^tt.OO
Hotel Thorndyke Restaurant
(Under New Management)
? 208 WEST 66th ST.
'..nch, 60c; Dinner. 86o: a,l"o A. 1ft Cart??.
CHICKEN DINNEB WED. AND 8UN.. II.
MARY AUG?ST?TEA ROOM
240 XV. 72nd Ht. Tel. 868 Colomba?.
Breakfant 40c. Luncheon 50c. Te* 30o.
Dinner 90c. Also A la Carte Menu.
l.onrfrm
I :'i mTKKET.
f?a, Dinner, 81.00.
?1.15. 1-8 A 8-8.
,-t? r\rrv\c.
- UkMazgueE?e *&*a&k& -
Luncheon, 50c; Aftort.'Ooi, Toa, Dinner, 7Jo,
BpeeUI Chlekea Dinner Gun., Wed. ?nil Frl.
OPEN 8UN0AY8 I to 7 P. M.
The Patrie 246 W. 76th St.
Tea.
. Diener 8 !.?>-. innrhemn (50c. Dinner 85?.
Afternoon Tr?.
The Blue? Mushroom Tea Shop
34 SI(jBth Av?. Fellow feurth St.
?ii?J Turn to Left 3 P. HI.?12 p. M.
-. C?e_?l?t? v>? Flee Ce_,?._ 8n?j?l *_J?4?.
RUSSIAN INN ?&>^
f! W. mil W. A l? Cert? * Afternoon Tm.
Offrri Real
Food at m
Vtted Trice
?WSAKFAHT
UPTOWN BRANCH OF
THREE STEP3 DOWN. 34 W. 35 St
Luncheon. Afternoon Tea, Dinner.
Matilda Julien'? Tea Room?
I? W. 50TM ST. (PABL0H FLOOR.)
Unrhwn Hoc. 12-2. Afternoon Tea.
MRS. COPELAND
DOROTHY LOUISE l WKKT 8I> ?r.
W> ? inrtXi _ ? ?1 .. (2Pp L?Nl4kTa?5?
tea room aarb.&TSj'ttr ss.
18 E. 43rd St.
Next to /. ole. iftmhafloe
wrr>NF*?AY
LCNCHRON
CHICKEN DINNER.
AFTERNOON TEA
DINNER
ROOF TREE INN ?
m
W.28
%P7J//'/oAj^r(p9/n fifi rf/wrfoft/Wiu Vor/c. " j moderate pricp.3
- ? ?A8T 40TH ?T.
TC_ Haiewtn? Far* so? Meeert W*rth
91m ?uod*/ Might? far Olantr.
7St. A tIJ?.
DEW DROP i
T~?m ?? ? mmemm? i ??? i ?? ? w-__
Kte^ ?iS T/?~~?>J>s>e?AA* 2* ?A/T
UniahH, IJ te 8. 60s,
Dlnnar, 6:30 te 4, 78?, |
with Chl.ien er et???,
11.00,
Olte* Tm lita.In ?, IT,
Hmoklnir In the Con?
r
Tij ov^A-?m",it?m*rj pUee* o? !W Ywk, wJw* imtyi* _-w#ephew
?**. "__. i*?*'*' '? ??*-*?' tftHM ienril? the dSn.rimiM.iH, wlB ?Ht??'
?fet tbe?iMtbff T? Hmm" wdi Hm^t, W?dMt^ end fantiey.
Noble Advice
Left to Nurses
By Miss Cavell
Farewell Letter, Written on
Eve of Execution, Made
Public Here, Reveals
Martyred Woman's Heart
"Duty Brings Happiness"
Refers Touchingly to Eight
Years She Spent in
Training Belgian Women
Just before Edith Cavell, the mar?
tyred English nurse, was executed by
the Germans she wrote a letter to her
nurses at the Ecole Belge d'Infirm?
i?res, in Brussels. The letter has just
been received in this country. In it
Miss Cavell mentions the eight years
in which she was director of the school.
In words surchargad with pathos she
utters her farewell. It is eloquent in
its testimony to the nobility of the
heroic women who fell a victim to Hun
ruthlessness. *
A copy of this document has been
hung in the living room of the new
Nurses' Home, 38 West Forty-eighth
Street, by the New York County Chap?
ter of the American Red Cross, togeth?
er with a photograph of Nurse Cavell,
whose body was removed this week
from its grave in Belgium to England.
She was executed on October 2, 1915.
The letter is dated October 11, 1915.
Urges Duty and Courage
The letter is as follows:
"Prison of St. Gilles, Brussels.
"My Dear Nurses: I am %vriting to
you in this sad hour to bid you fare?
well. You will remember that Septem?
ber 17 brought to an end the eight
years of my direction of the school. _ I
was so happy to be called to help in
the organization of the work that our
committee had just founded. On Octo?
ber 1, 1907, there were but a few
pupils. Now you are already quite
numerous?fifty or sixty, I think.
"I have told you on different occa?
sions the story of those early days and
the difficulties that we encountered,
even to the choice of words for your
'hours of duty' and 'of duty.' In Bel?
gium all was new in the profession.
Little by little one service after an?
other was established?graduate nurses
for private nursing, pupil nurses, the
hospital of St. Gilles. We supplied
the institute of Dr. Depage, the Sani?
tarium of Buysinghen, the clinc of Dr.
Maye, and how many are called upon?
as you may bo, perhaps later?to nurse
the brave wounded in the war. If this
past year our work lias decreased it is
due to the sad days through which we
are passing. In happier days our
work will renew its growth and its
power for good.
"I speak to you of the past because
it is wise occasionally to stop and look
behind over the road that we have
travelled and to note our errors and
our progress. In your beautiful build?
ing you will have more patients and all
that is needed for their comfort and
for yours. To my regret I was not al?
ways able to speak to you individually
? -you know I had much to occupy my
time?but I hope you will not forget
our evening talks.
"I told you that devotion to duty
| would bring you true happiness, and
that the tnought yuu huu uone your
I duty, earnestly and cheerfully, before
God and your own conscience, would
j be your greatest support in the try?
ing moments of life and in the face
of death.
"Two or three of you will remember
i the little talks we had. Do not forget
them. Having already travelled so far
through life, I perhaps could see more
? clearly than you and show you the
straight path. (
"One word more. Peware of unchar
j itable speech. In these eight years I
i have seen so much unhappiness which
could have been avoided or lessened
if a few words had not been whispered
here and there, perhaps without evil
intention, but which ruined the repu?
tation, the happiness, the life even of
some one. My nurses should all ro
flect on thai, and should cultivate
among themselves loyalty and esprit
de corps.
Never Willingly Unjust
"If anyone of you has a grievance
against me I pray you to forgive me.
I may sometimes nave been too severe,
but I was never willingly unjust, and
I have loved you all?far more than
you realize.
"My good wishes for the happiness of
I all my young girls, both those who have
[ graduated and those who are still In
I the school, and I thank you for the
courteous consideration you have al?
ways shown me.
"Your devoted directress,
"EDITH CAVELL."
The Dr. Depage mentioned in Miss
Cavell's letter is now in this country
to promote a plan for a memorial hos?
pital in honor of Mis3 Cavell and his
wife, who went down with the Lusi
tania.
"Noble Women," Says Physician
Dr. Depage is a colonel by military
rank and is head of the Belgian Red
Cross. He knew Miss Cavell well, as
the result of the eight years the Eng?
lish nurse spent as directress of his
hospital. It was to the nurses of this
hospital that the farewell letter was
written.
"She was a most noble woman," said
Dr. Depage yesterday. "I hope Amer?
ica will come again to the help of Bel?
gium in assisting in establishing a
suitable memorial to her Bplendid
spirit and noble patriotism."
1 Art
An exhibition of the work done by
students at tho New York School of
Pine and Applied Art is now open at
the school, 2239 Broadway. Among the
most interesting features are creative
studies for illustration. Other example*
of work dono there Include studies In
industrial designing, interior decora?
tion, costum*? designing and poster ad?
vertising. The summer eessfon of the
school, which will open July 11. will
include n new feature, a course In in?
terior decoration, particularly adaptted
for the designing of attractive apart?
ments for those of moderate means.
Beginning on Thuraday at Van
Brink's Auction Room?, 2100 Broadway
the est?t? of the Uto Wilfred A, Beau
oamp, will be ?old. Tho artioloa to be
disrxyied of. which are on exhibition
to-day, tnolcude broniep. vaiea and
courlosj boudoir, dining, living and re?
ception room furniture j Chinese and
Persian ruga and aeventy-flve oil paint
,ngD' ' ,
A la!? of rar? book? from London
}4tfc Street, ?near TMrA frrmm
Photo by Bachrach
Miss Forbes is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Forbes, of
this city. She will be married early
next month to Major F. McKenzie
Davison, son of Mrs. Carolyn S.
Davison, of Chicago.
began yesterday at'the Anderson Gal?
leries. The total for the afternoon was
$13,170.50. George D. Smith paid $1,650
for an excessively rare first edition of
William Cullen Bryant's "The Em?
bargo;" $490 for Claeszoon's "Voy?
ages;" $265 for a presentation copy of
Edward Benlowes's "Theophila;'' ?250
for a first edition of Chapman's "Th?
Iliad of Homer, Prince of Podts;"
$240 for a second folio edition of
Chaucer's works, and $225 for the
Book of Common Prayer translated
into the Iroquois language.
H. Counahan. agent, gave $325 for
Ainsworth's "Historical Romances;"
$360 for Burton's "Arabian Nights," and
$585 for an autograph edition of the
writings of Samuel L. Clemens (Mark
Twain). Other items that brought top
prices were as follows: Mme. de Main
tenon's copy of "Recueil d'Apophteg?
mes," J. F. Drake. $265; "The English
Spy," G. Wells, $200; The Works of
James Fenimore Cooper, P. M. Herzog,
$200. The sale will bo continued this
afternoon and evening.
Plays and Players
Will Morrissey landed in the U. S. A.,
after six months of entertaining the
men of the A. E. F., with just $8 in
his wallet. Two weeks after his arrival
he was $10,000 in debt, and had sixty
three hungry actors on his hands to
take to Hartford for an opening show.
IL * /~r? '
~~-X5A?
"The Overseas Revue" made good
there, worked its way West, and Mr.
Morrissey landed in Chicago out of
debt. Now he is starring in his own
show, "Toot Sweet," at the Nora Bayes
Theatre, and rides to the stage door in
a big limousine just as costly as the
one owned by his prettiest chorus girl.
The Duncan Sisters have made a hit
in "She's a Good Fellow" and were
yesterday given a two years' contract
by Charles Dillingham. Mr. Dillingham
announces that, starting with this
afternoon's matinee, the mid-week mat?
inees throughout th.e summer will be
at popular prices.
George Le Maire, formerly of the
vaudeville team of Conroy and Le
Maire, has been engaged by Florenz
Ziegftld, jr., to appear In the new
edition of the "Follies."
"Come Along," now at the Thirty
Ninth Street Theatre, will make a tour
of the South lasting over two years,
beginning August 8 in Norfolk. Elliott
Foreman, just appointed manager of
"Come Along," is arranging a special
performance for newspaper friends of
Bide Dudley, one of the authors.
Forty fair members of the "Good
Morning, Judge" company held a mass
meeting, at which they protested
against the tax on the cujp that chills
but does not inebriate. A committee
was appointed to have the tax on sodas
repealed. The meeting was held at
Fracheti's.
Last night was "Fliers' Night" at
"East Is West." The "Flying Circus"
attended in a body, headed by Major
Henry J. F, Miller, who has named his
'plane the Ming Toy, after Fay Bainter.
Herbert Fields, son of Lew Fields,
will make his stage debut in "The
Lonely Romeo," which tho Shuberts
will produce in Atlantic City in two
weeks.
Desiree Lubovska is presenting a
new dance as her contribution to faro
well week at the Hippodrome.
"Lightnin'," Winchell Smith and John
L. GoTden's comedy, celebrates its 325th
performance this afternoon at the
Gaiety Theatre.
A bouquet was presented to Eliza?
beth Brlco, of "Toot Sweet," last night
by a group of soldiers of tho 77th Divi?
sion whom sho had entertained '"
Franco.
IW?Smct?rb
rd.Week and
51111 Playing
_ To Capacity
Audiences from
toll.RM.
DAILY
Society Girls to
Sell Doughnuts to
Aid Salvation Army
This'Is One of Features of
Drive for $13,000,000
That Starts Next Monday;
Lassies Are to Fry Them
The humble doughnut, food hero of
the trenches, is about to make its
debut in society. Under the chaper
onage of Mrs. J. Borden Harriman and
a committee of society women,?assisted
by the Junior League Girls, the dough?
nut will invade the city on Wednesday,
May 21, under the slogan of "Dollars
for Doughnuts." This will constitute
one of the features of the Salvation
Army's drive for $13,000,000 that is to
be launched next Monday.
From Harlem to the Battery young
girls attired in Salvation Army paper
bonnets and wearing Salvation Army
insignia will confront the public with
doughnuts on all the principal thor?
oughfares. The Junior League will be
assisted by a large number of society
girls, some 4,000 in all, who will invade
Fifth Avenue, Broadway, the theatre
district and hotels, and will offer
doughnpte In exchange for dollars for
the Salvation Army.
RejrulRr Salvation Army lassies in
their overseas uniforms will sally forth
on moving floats, frying doughnuts as
they go while the society girls sell
them. Booths will be erected in all
the large hotels of the city and at
the Grand Central and Pennsylvania
Railroad stations to furnish all comers
and goers with a sample of the famou?
dainty that brought so much cheer to
the doughboys in France.
Mrs. Sidney Borg will be in charge
of the teams. Miss .Slarcaret Wheeler
will be in charge of the Stage Women's
War Relief workers, who will contrib?
ute their share of effort to the cam?
paign. Mrs. P. Pennington will head
the speakers' committee, which will
furnish speakers for the rallies in the
Liberty Theatre on Monday, Wednes?
day and Saturday. Mrs. William A.
Campbell will be in command of fed?
erated and non-federated club workers.
Mrs. Paul Foster will take care of all
indoor booths and Mrs. Nicholas Brady
will superintend the work of carrying
the campaign into the movie houses.
Help!
By Evangeline Booth i
?TPHE only help that is of any use
??? to the helpless is that kind of
help which enables the helpless to
help himself.
By this kind of help you decrease
pauperism; you avoid the encourage?
ment of laziness, and you create in
the man that greatest opponent to
despair, and the greatest of all aids
to uplift?his self-respect.
That is what the Salvation Army
did for between 18,000 and 20,000
men every year previous to the war;
by not only giving men work, but
by finding the position most suitable
to the man and the man most suit?
able to the position.
The Salvation Army $13,000,000
Home Service Fund campaign, May
10 to 1M3, has help for its motive
power.
Girls' Clubs Called
Aid to Efficiency
Mies Virginia Potter Urges Bet-4
ter Hotels and Other Help
for Workers
Club work among women is so re?
cent in its development that training
and organization are necessary to
bring it to a state of efficiency, says
I Mi3s Virginia Potter, who has devoted
i years to work among young girls. Yes?
terday the National League of Women
: Workers, of which she is treasurer,
? acting in conjunction with Columbia
? University, started a five weeks' course
? in organization and leadership of girls'
| club work.
In 1885 Mis? Grace Dodge founded
| the League cf Women Workers. Miss
| Potter was her secretary and in 1897
i she was elected to the presidency of
! the New "?ork League, a post which
she held until last year. She was
? largely responsible for starting the
Manhattan Trade School, which wat
taken over by the Board of Educatior
in 1911. She was one of the founders
of the Virginia Hotel and the Depart?
ment Store Education Association. Ir
1916 she presided over the Women'!
Democratic Committee. She is super
intendent of a large apartment housi
in New York City. In addition t<
everything else she was one of th?
most ardent women workers in the re
cent Victory Loan drive?serving a
iepresontative on the trades commit
tee, which embraced schools, hospital
and women's clubs.
"There are now 1,000 members in ou
New York League, 3,000 in the stat
and 15.000 throughout the country
says Miss Potter. "The club is for th
development of social, educational an
recreational opportunities for womei
and the increase of their power fo
?service. There are some twenty of ou
clubs in New York now and we hav
plans for opening two more almost in
mediately. The essentials for th
work are first rate rooms, a live grou
of girls and a community that wan?
our organization."
yE W V O It K ' S L E A I) I N <;
EMPIRE
WILLIAM
GILLETTE
THEATRES AND SUCCESSES
?SARIilK'?
BEST
COMI'.DY
ps. at 8:20.
Sat., 2:20,
DEAR
?RUTL'S
LOOK NO FURTHER when In
search ol Charles DIIHnyhams
New Musical Comedy Succoii
"She's a Good Fellow"
"?I ASP POPLXAH PRICE
?LUD?. MAT. TO-DAY.
Nights, ?00 Good Seau 7Do, $1.
C0I?H&HARR1S S?J?
BIGGEST 5UCCES5 SINCE
MHE flERRY WIDOW
T
HENRY MILLERS *,*?.*
, Ev?> ?30 Mats lliur.t & Sib S30
?n M?C>:Pil.yiJFtfQRt.EANS J
-^
IftMft?fPP '5-fest4?3bN<?ar Bw*y
LvrnUAvKu Rves?iOHals.'WMtSati?O
H05T FAKINATINp MY5TCBY PlAY EVER WRITTEN
?J
E YPCSIW! West 45th Rt Ewnlnpra at S:30.
blVUUlTI Mats. To-mnr'w anfl Sat., 2:30.
DAVTT) BEI.ASCO Presents
DEI ACPn Wast 44th St. Kvenfnus at ?<:20
DCUHdbU Mats. To-mcWw and Sat., 2:20.
DAVID BEI/ASCO presenta a comedy of Irish Ufe
Dark Rosa'een
GOOD ORCHESTRA SEATS AT $2.00
ffttof West 4Sth f-'t. Evks. 8:20.
iUK? POPULAR MAT. TO-DAY.
>rtMTOWX ?/irh MR.I MRS. CO&URN
NEW AMSTERDAM *f? ?.?
MATS. TO-DAY and SATURDAY, 2:15
KLAW & EQLANCER'5
MUSICAL
COMEDY
THE
1,000
LAUGHS
MU5IC BY VICTOR HERBERT"
IIo O'CLOCK!?
s* itrtuT mo' ' ?
ON
'I'M I
IF
tlmitod Engagement WltL ROGERS
FOLLIES BALL NEXT SUNDAY NIGHT.
KNICKERBOCKER 5SJVS? ?
Evenings 5:1.1. Matinees TO-DAY and Sat. 2:lr,
JOHN CORT'S NEW MCBICAL COMEDY
nrrnirefi
LIGHTNIN
?nlCTV B'way. 40th St. Mats. TO.DAI .
"Hit I I Evelines at 8 SO WeH. H Frl.. 2.3:1
SMITH-GOLDEN SUCCESSES
3 WISE FOOLS
CRITERION $l?50'Mat. TO-DAY $1.50.
Eygs. at 9. Mats. To-morrow, Friday
& Sat. at 3. Saturday A. M. at 11.
TONY SARG'S WONDERFUL, UNIQUE
In Thackeray's "THE ROSE & THE RING'
PUNCH & JUDY^Jf^Vw9:?
LAST WEEK
Last 4 Matinees
Last 4 Nights
NORMA TALMADC.E
In "THE NEW MOON"
Mni'l? HcnniHt Comedy
B'wiy 49'"^5t HI VOM ORCHESTRA
~ - ALL COMEDY BIL?.
Mariruerlte Clark,
Charlie Chaplin. Mr. ?
Tima>s Seuar? Mr?. Sidney Drew, Orch.
BENT PHOTO I'LAY OF THE YEAR
Enjoy Music and Song
rh you ?ear the tribute palfl to
The Salvation Army
Speakern?Qov, Alfred I_, HmWh, Oen,
rorneliua VaiulerWIt, Jtnn, ('..arien fl,
AVl.ltiiiu.ii, Commnn?ierI.vun(fellne Booth
nn?l thu Rev, 11, Perelra Mumlee,
Jtfadame M.iri? Piinilclluti, dramatlq
soprano, i?. Metropolitan Opera llousa
sensation, will nintf:
r>l_n<>!> Camll|orl will loail tha
People's Liberty Chorus
of 1,600 vol?:ea,
Madison Square Garden
Puttdny, H???) ?', M., May irt, tutu,
No ufntranoe Fee - No ?qollecUon,
Ticltelq (in applluatlon,
H. Ai Campaign Il?;i?l?m.irt?rs,
#80 JPtfth Avenu?, N_w Tora,
AEOLIAN HALL, mangm,
St, Ignatius Loyola Chancel Choir.
TICKET* (NO WAR VAX) ?S-ft.M-91.
COLUMBIA ISWlAPtrXtitfr
UAlif-IS. THhJATRW, 4.<Jl ,St.. Went of
nHllllIO J3wuy. TWICM BVI-RY DA
Mute, 8:20, ?5-600. Evif?. 8:20, S5o-*l.OO.
"lwsT?ewyor?Ttheatre ?o.'a
Cont. 11 A, M, to 11 P, M, Roof to \ A. M.
??AUCTION OF SOU La"
Leew's Amcrioin Roof ^8tCui',?BH5
STAN STANLEY ifaS?
AND 8 OTHKit BIO ACTH I t6. 35. MJ
PB. f. KEITH'8 MAHOt EKITA SYLVA
A I ? C F l^Tll DIVISION BOYS
A L. l\ V E. , h, ?|>CTT_NO IT OVER'
K'ivriT A 4.-Hi ??
?Ut.. Dat'y, M Jl
DOLLY CONNOLLY, ote.
ami ALAN BUO?Kf?,
1
'WS| * ??a HI
& LIEUT, OITZ-Sil?-E,
Doyle A IM-on, Jimmy
Hus-ey, Myer* it Noon.
HEATS
?OW
ON
flALH
FINAl, 00N0EBT OF SEASON fey^
GALLI-CURCI
t'HST P HOG HAM.
text Sunday Aft.
HIPPODROME, SUNDAY ?VR? HAY~~tfl
YSAYE & ELMAN
POPULAH. ?EOUI
HIPPODROME/)?
On the Screen
"Broken Blossoms," Beautiful
Screen Play by Griffith,
Score? Triumph
"Broken Blossoms," which opened at ;
George M. Cohan's Theatre last night,
is the most beautiful motion picture |
we ever have seen or ?ver expect to
see.
If we were a director we should givo
up all idea of ever being original and
spend the rest of our time trying to
make something as nearly as possible
like this wonderful, fragile thing that
David Wark Griffith has done.
For the last two years we have seen
at least one picture a day and yet,
la3t night, we sat on the edge of our
seat, one hand grasping the arm and
the other crushing a wet handkerchief
r.nd trembled and grew hysterical over
what we saw before us.
While we always have been devoted
to the pictures, we never really liked
them nearly so well as the spoken
drama, but surely "Broken Blossoms"
could never be done so appealingly in
any other medium.
Such photography we did not dream
existed! It was soft and laay and
blue and roseate and?but what is the
use? No words can tell anything about
the picture.
Lillian Gish is "the girl," for
, "Broken Blossoms" is taken from "The
Climb and the Child." by Thomas
Burke. Miss Gish's work is so tender,
yet so convincing, that there comes a
time when you just can't watch her
any longer. The tragedy of it is too
great!
And Richard Barthelmess, as the
Chinaman, does the most beautiful and
delicate work of his career. Donald
Crisp is "Battling" Burrows, the un?
willing father an? the torturer of the
girl. "Battling" is "as much like Bill
Sykkes as may be, with something
thrown in for good measure, and the
death scene is done in the same way
we saw it done in "Oliver Twist." He
strikes, but you cannot see the blow
fall. The violin gives a strange, weird,
almost grotesque wail, and the little
blossom lies broken at last.
And the speedy death of "Battling"
by the hand of the Chinaman seemed
terribly inadequate.
Another thing which Mr. Griffith has
done is to keep the story a simple tale
of a few people. It is told exactly as
it would be in a book or on the stage.
There are scenes between Mr. Barthel?
mess and Miss Gish which last for
several minutes and nothing at all hap?
pens to disturb the tranquil beauty of
th'-nt?rot ev?n f title.
The story is so simple that it needs
no comment. It ?3 short and ineffably
sad, but when it was over we wanted
to rush up to every one we met and
cry: "Oh, don't miss it?don't miss
it! " And we hope Mr. and Mrs. Mc
Adoo and Nazimova and all the other
celebrities enjoyed it and wept over it
as we did.
The picture is preceded by an overt?
ure in which the characters are seen
on the stage in a beautiful Oriental
setting. The only thing that we ?vouli
change would be the elimination of all
reading mater between the stage pro?
logue and the picture. Why cannot
this all be told on the programme"
Mr. Griffith refused to appear until
the people refused to leave the theatre,
and then he spoke only a few words,
thanking them, and also the people
who had contributed to the success of
the picture. He seems a very modest
man! H. N.
LAST SALE OF THE SEASON
<*?*?*??**
It?KKKSSESOCIB ?Sgffl ?* WK.?X
AT UNRESTRICTED PUBLIC SALE
Tomorrow (Thursday) and Friday
Afternoons and Evenings
at 2:30 and 8:15 P. M. (
An Extraordinary Collection of
Rare and Beautiful I
Japanese Color Prints
'By The Great Masters
BEI??G TART II. OF THE COLUSCTIOIf
OF THE CONNOISSEI'K.
Judson D. Metzgar
MOLINE, ILLINOIS
ON ?FREE VIEW 9 A. M. to 6 P. M.
The Sale Will Bo Conduct?* by
MR. THOMAS E. KIRBY
Assisted by MR. OTTO BE UN ET
AMERICAN ART ASSOCIATION
Managers,
e. 4 and 6 East 23d St.. Madison Sq. Sonta,
War Heroes Will Pay
Tribute to Dumb Aid?
The New York Women's League for
Animals, of which Mrs. James Spay?*
is president; Mrs. Frederick W. Vg.n
derbilt, Mrs. M. Orme Wilson and Mrs.
Lewis Gouverneur Morris are vice
presidents, is giving a "Memorial Horte
Tag; Day" Tuesday afternoon. May 80.
It is in commemoration of the p?*rt
horses, dogs and pigeons took in the
war, and will take the form of a spe?
cial reception at the hospr-a! and dis?
pensary, 350 Lafayette Street. Ta?
money raised is to go for the summer
watering stations for horses establish?
ed by the league.
Among those who have volunteered
their services for the afternoon are
Mrs. MiViie Maddern Fiske, Blanche
Bates, Julia Arthur, Elsie Ferguson,
Billie Burke, Grace G. Drayton, Mapa
Zueca, Father F. J. Duffy, Lieutenant
Gitz-Rice, Major Reid Blair and Col?
onel Willia*u Hayward. A feature of
the afternoon will be the presenta?
tion of dog hero medals.
-1-1?? . .
Fur Workers' Strike Ends
Undor an agreement whtch provides
for a forty-four-hour v?ek and in?
creases in pay which, tftk??n together
with the shortened working waek,
mean an advance of 50 to 60 per cent,
in labor costs, the two months' strike
in the fur-dyeing and dressing plants
in Brooklyn came to an end yesterday.
A few of the workers returned to their
tasks yesterday and the remainder are
expected to begin work to-day. Four?
teen Brooklyn factories were affected.
The agreement was entered into be
! tween the Associated Employers of
! Fur Workers and the two locals of the
| International Fur Workers' Union
| largely through the efforts of J. H.
i Bleistein, president of the Fur Mer
I chants' Association. Mr. Bleistein ia
j named chairman of a conciliatory
j board to be composed of four represen
j tatives of the workers and four em?
ployers.
AMERICA'S FOREMOST THEATRES AND HITS UNDER THE DIRECTION O?
LEE & J. J. ?HUBERT
WINTER BARDEN
B'??ay and SOtli St. Evgs. at 8.
Matinee TO-MORROW at 2.
A C7arnival of Travesty In
? Act. and 16 Scenes
"The world's greatest enler
.ainment."?Charles Darn
ton, Eve. World.
Monte Cri to, Jr.
Astonishing Ass'mblage of Arlsis
A D?AMOND MINE OF
ENTERTAINMENT
THE MflST BKAI'TlFt'l.
WOMEN IN THE WOULD.
MOROSCOrr^To-m'w Eve. W
? ?QHFTTU ?Affljf
A New Far?-e Comedy by Paul M. Potter.
Elizabeth Brice " 'Toot Sweet'
Musical WMjg_fllled jvlthjlr!? \nd lnjear.
5B?8IR?I
Et.8:I5. MU.
Wed. & Sat.
Wa Musical . ,.t.....
Cuiaedy Hit. I HA.__t
WSSSSM
,,^-*?i_/MTUfty GROVE ?OOP Of CtWTBRV T?ATRt
.??sR? MIDNIGHT WHIRL
Vs* AT Itja-A SZHS>(*TlOH'mtit COL 6600
Math To-day and Sat
COME ALONG
?I AVUnilCC W. 48th. Evgs. at 8:30.
PLA 1 HUUdt Mats Today & Sal.. 2:30.
GARRICK ?nJw'ul?*?
Eva, 8:i0. Mat?. TVm'w 4 Sat.. 2:30.
"Theutrt- Guild presenta Krvlne's
JOHN FERGUSON
"Gripping drama pplendidly
acted. Draiiiatlc treat of ?ca?
non."?-Eve. Sun.
"Brilliant performance. Not
to be missed."?Times.
"A really notable play."?
World.
"Th?j most interfisting night of
the year in the theatre."?
Eve. World.
A BREEZY, BUOYANT, BUBBLING MUSICAL OUTBURST
T "V/ |~_i 1 /^* i World: "It has effervescence, gsyety and sparkle"
LI THE LADY IN RED
42d St. & Broadway
Eve. 8:15. Mat. 2:15
First Mat. To-day.
With Adele Rowland and Distinguished Cast.
Herald: "It raises the buoyant spirits of Broadway. Hadiates vitality."
Bun: "It moves unflagglngly ; flows melodiously."
Eve Sun: "In notable for its dancing, it will charm. Remarkable chorus."
IT MOVES WITH THE SPEE.: OF A TORNADO
Rroadhurst MH,', -?..mom
Etes. 8:30
A Sat.. 2X0
5?
"39 East
Rachel
"rothers'
Nov. est Comed
?th Henry Hull and Constance Blnney
PARK
Eft?. 8:15 Mats.
Tuday 4 Sat. 2 OS.
A new noioedy
IT HAPPENS
I EVERYBODY
Tn da> 4 Rat.. - 30.
???k A LITTLE JOURNEY
With Cyril Kelghtley and Ethel Dane.
DnATU -? ?.th. W. of B'way. B?s. ?:34.
DUUI n Matin?. To-day and S&L. 2:30.
By
WM; I.E
BARON.
?The Best Farce of the Tear."?Herald.
?ATM ?T ??"" ? "t B'*r?r ***? ?:?
?ft If! O I s Mau. To-day ?ad Bat., 2:U.
I LOVE YOU
Season's
Breeziest
Musical riaj
48th ST.
^keltfromMt*
Theatre. E. of B*?ray. Ere?. f.W.
Mats. Tt>-morrow and gat, ?.?0.
TOBY'S BOW
With NORMAN TREVOR
REAL COMEDY
at the COMEDY THEATRE
41st (St., Near H'wuy.
Hvs. 8 -.30. Mate. To-m'w ?fc Sat.
COME-ON CHARLEY
PLYMOUTH ?M-JL
of By. Bryant 7814.
T'lur.Afist. ?i?.
iOHNa,.d BARRYM?RE' ij?
f
RI I?.IT Thee,. 44. W. of B'y. Pr. S.-M.iUst 6
DIJUU yaU To-day and Pat.. S .30.?Times.
FOR DiANA
with MARTHA H?DMAN
With AKTMVR BTBON
1 Marear.! l-AWKKNCE
FREDERICK I'EKBY
?no ?3Wor_ at
EAST is WEST
Wim FAY BAijVTClt
ASTOR *W3fi?. A-t-m
EI_C_C__{E___I_CE
Best- Play Since fetd in Full ?s? -CM?/
DC) unut TMeAT^e -<6h? 3t-E<?r
rULlvHN Mat? Today P..p ULSat. il?.
Qli?/er "forasco. WWIwmd Po??*
PLEASE GET MARRIED
with Imp.I Vue? ?na Edith Ut.anmo
REPUBLIC
?d St, Ere?, at 1:3ft,
TV day and 3?.. ?:S<5.
THE
IM ROOM Jl
FI TIM fil! S^ i2'1, ^ ETOClnss HtA
K.-.I It-UK. Via?.. Txt-r ?rv,v> ? S*t. 5:50.
'M MABELS ROOM
GREENWICH ?/Jfi?
iftii, j|,??aiue (Subway W Cm4bU>v
SHAKUNTALA ??*.?-?.
_.?.??'? l'l *!__,
HUDSON K^?;^ |S
SAM BERNARD & "?"? MANN
BaiillJLVii?H?lia
MARYPICKF0RD
it? ????Mr l,ask?<JU*?~
?TR.V N UORf U KSTRA
?mr^H."?!

xml | txt