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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, September 28, 1919, Image 23

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VETERANS CICQTTE AND SALLEE TO PITCH FIRST GAME
Gleason *s Team Has Every
Advantage Over the Reds
Chicagoans Have Been Through World Series
lire and Have Balance in Every Department
but Pitching; Also Favored by Schedule
By W. J. Macbeth
"fahr eran ted in baseball," is an axiom made famous by
the iaJ?' Mai ?? mai y years president of the National League.
opos of the world's championship series.
A c!o?. - I may very easily dope either the Chicago White
Sox or the i Reds to win the impending classic of this banner
baseb.-iii vor. i : rids upon the partisan feeling?whether one
isa > ? or an American League rooter.
Ras. - ' ' i\ ?*
:ept o? ? '
... ...
? ?.:'??
?ox , Red
sh. K
the
?
i o?
pectacul
- .-?? ensembl?
i so n is p e p pe r j
: . - . ' :
- ? Gleason the
... . ? ?
e. from mein
-
ches I
? ' - . '
Reds Mcel Even ' risi
?
'
.
i G) >ii n t?
a : .
''.'.. ? i ? -
...
?
Cei ' ,'??..:
or,
? ?;,.. ? , .
'
;. I -, r
?.,. ? t ' to I
bul Hit'i)
? ? . - ting
teal
tgo ?
IOWl ? ?
I
noie
?
? ?? ?
did '' ? ? ? -
? . . "s e.- .
? ? ?
b a i a n c ? '?
Certa has more
It h?
tch 11
water co.?
Williams, a sout
r u 1 e t *?*. , her
ire ....
por ich ?'?'..'
I Bi
"?"
. il ast
ecomes necc3sa
" '
Ci -i * \M >o?.\ " Pitcher
Clcoti t pitchei
lOl
??tch?.r roduced
.- . .
f first tim?
t face
irst . ?? .
lloran tw II op
. ' ng battl?
?"- u the I
)Ut ten mol ? - . Red
( - ? ? chers
?
......
, , ..
'? ?? Red picket
me
.... Cincin
esa
?? : ? . ?...' a cuts
'irure .
la ?
!.. lie favoi Chi
"apii*. Oi, pra, .,
';:ii"r. ? . rhe Whit?
I ...,'.
ad
?'.ini;,.-. , ,
-'?ay.". nnot c nci ? ?
"{ ar"> ' Cicotte and
her two gan
occ? :
1 ? ? ' ? ? los? ' ? ' first two
ramea tnuts ou
o' the fire 11. ?a impi rat ivc for Cin
/*?/ Moran Entered
B?i> Leagues in 1900
PATRICK J. MORAN, manager of
the National League pennant
?inner-,, broke into professional
baseball through the Eastern
League. In 1900 he received hi-?
first major league contract when he
was purchased by the Boston Na?
tionals from Montreal. He caught
for Boston five years, and was re?
leased to the Chicago Cubs.
In February, 1907. Moran accepted
a contract to manage the small
Waterbury, ('(in.n.. team, but can?
celled this contract to take one with
' onnellsville, a month later. He
made another change the following
month when he went back to the
Cubs as a coach. Moran left Chi
? igo in 1910 and went to the Phila?
delphia Nationals, where he again
acted as coach to the pitchers, Me
was with Philadelphia when "Billy"
Murray and later Charles Dooin
managed the team succeeding the
latter in 1915. Ho won the pennant
that Mar. Moran was released by
the Chillies last year and signed
a contract with Manager McGraw,
of the New York Giants, as coach
for this season. Me did not join
that elub, however. McGraw permit?
ting him tti cancel his contract to
become manager of the lieds in
place of ? hristv Mathewson.
to win thi '? ' ' ; one at least,
Moi ?m'a only ap
. ? .- ??? lies ? pil h ing ta;
. ind ' ' - ' id -o ntage onlj so far as
.
I ?eve ' "?? icago will wii < le ?'
-?- ? ? n g . mes.
Roush W as Formerly
Right Hand Thrower
ddii ?? who Cine n?l fans
? x pi cl vi ': be a n import a nt factor in
hi ;??>. .? world series game with his
vould o"' be playing
basebal laj but ? for an inheri nt
lovi ? .- game w hich nabled I m
Lo ove rcouu n ??< v? re hand icap some
? ? ig. V en Rot rst I ega ?
? < , ? ?? pr ifessional ' .. eba ' ho \.as
ai hi \ and a righl I in d th ow
Now he is an outfieldc r, coi
? , f lost ? cither
(irov .-. ? ? cl '..i'a.
. "? ...... was b r i I l - ? I
. ? . ? Roush's
?.'.?:, arm was broken. If didn't heal
hen thi cast '.sas taken
off Ron I found that his <?i m was so
\ ik thai ; '. -a . uld be i mpo ?ible for
n to ??'. er wh p t he ba ' across t he
1 a. .! wil h his old speed r i rst, he
lecided to quit ba-?< ba .'. but found
? . i easier said th ? With
? - n wea I her came the long
.-? ' hold of a bat and g ove, but ' he
; > ? arm had strcngtl i 'eter
mined not to lie kept out <.f tbe game
le? led to learn to throw with
his left hand Ii : k him a year, but
he stuck to it. Now he is considered
.ne of the greatest throwing outlield:
le, as riian;. National
Lcagui isi ' inners will testify.
Overall Hoot?* for Moran
Orvi? Overa ,vh? was a member of
fhe ? ? ii .' ?staff of tht faon us old
machine when Frank Le Roy
? wa9 at the helm, is rooting for
Pat Moran to win the National League
.- onship and then lead the Reds'
to n victory over the the American
League pennant winners.
HENRY KNIGHT GROK, captain and
third baseman, was born in Rochester,
\ Y.. on September 18, 1889, and re- '
id .:; Cincinnati, 'le began playing!
ball with O hkosh, Wis., in 1908. He !
joined the Decatur, 111., club in 1911,
but was sold in July to the New York
Nationals, who farmed bun out to
Bulfalo. In 1913 he was oMained by
Joe Tinker, then manager of the Reds,
in a trade of Groh, Ames and Devore
fot Arthur Fromme, and he has bee.'.
with the Reds ever since
ED d I'SH. centerficlder, the cham?
pion '? r- of the National League ...
H)17 ?J i 1919, was born in Oakland
City, In 1. May 8, 1893. In 1912 he be?
gan playing with Evansville and was
"? to - he Chicago White Sox,
i" whom he was i eleased to Lincoln
N'eb., ,r: September, in 1914 he joinc
the Indianapolis Federal League team
j and went to Newark when that club
was transferred. He was purchased by
the Now York Nationals whin the Fed,
eral League writ out of existence, and
was traded in July of that season to
Cincinnati with McKcchnie and Christy
Mathewson for Herzog.
SHERWOOD MAGEE, outfielder, was,
born at Clarendon, Penn., August 6,
ISS-! He started playing baseball in
1903 at Allcntown and was obtaim-d
by Philadelphia Nationals the follow?
ing season. He played in left field fur
the Phillies for '-.even years and led
the National League in batting one
?eason. In 1915 he was traded to the
Posten Braves for Whittcd and Dugey,
He remained until August, 1917. when
he was obtained by Cincinnati by the
waiver route.
A. KARLE NEALE, outfielder, was
born In Parkersburg, W. Va., November
8, IS?I3. He first played with the Al
toona club in 1912, but finished that
season with London in the Canadian
... le. Cleveland drafted him in 1914,'
bul he waa returned, and he went to
Dayton and to Wheeling, where he was
purchased by Cincinnati.
MORRIS RATH, second base, was
born December 25, 1887, in Mobeetie,
Tex. He first played baseball pro?
fessionally at Wilmington, N, C, in
[90S and at Lyncrhburg, Va. In 1909 he
was with Reading. He was purchased,
by :ne Athletics in 1910, going from
there to the Cleveland and Baltimore
clubs in 1911. He played with Balti?
more in 1912, and with the Chicago
White Sox in 1913. He was with Kansas
City m 191-4 and with Toronto in 1915.
In ll'lti and 1917 he played with Salt
Lake City. Rath was in the navy in
1918, and joined the Reds last Bpring.
WILLIAM L. KOPF, shortstop, wa?
bern at Bristol, Conn., in 1893. He left
Fordham College in 1912 and joined
Cleveland, but was sent to Toledo, and
i the next year joined the Philadelphia
! Athletics, playing second base with
1 them in 1914 and 1915. He was with
Baltimore in 1916, coming to Cincin- i
nati the- next year, and in 1918 played
with Fore Rivor shipbuilding team;
and then went into the army,
JACOB U DAUBERT. lust baseman, I
was born ;ri Shamokin, Peen., April 17,
'->?"?. and I? ayed his first ball with the
K ne semi-professional club and joined
Ma ?.'ion, Ind., the following year. In
!,?? ?priog of 190S lu- went to Cleve
I; nd, hut was sold to Nashville in May.
'I ho next vear he went to Toledo and
Joined Brooklyn later in 1910. After
playing first base for Brooklyn for nine
vears, he was obtained last winter by
the Reds.
IVY B. W?NGO, first string catcher,
was horn July 8, IS90 at Norcross, Gh.,
und started his ba ( ball career with the
Greenville club ? f the Caro'ina Associa?
tion in 1909. The following year he
was sold to the St. Loui Cardinals,
where he remained i'-or four years. In
the winter of 191-1 the Reds obtained
Wingo in ti.'v.i?-' for Catcher Gonzales.
WILLIAM A. RARIDEN, catcher, was
b< i'. February 5, 1888 at Bedford, Ind., j
and hrnke into professional baseball
twelve ycai i ago witn the Canton.
(Ohio) Central League club, lie was
Bold in August, 1909, to.the Boston Na- !
tionals, where lie remained for four ?
years, when he jumped to the. Federal j
League in 1914, and played with Indian- i
apolis and later with Newark. After :
the disbanding of the Federal League
Rai den was bought by the New York
(liants, where he remained for the next
three years. La t wintei the Hods ob?
tained him in a trade fi.r Hal Chase.
LEWIN I?. DUNCAN, utility outfielder,
was horn at Coaiton, Ohio, October C, ;
1893, He started playing baseball with j
Flint, Mich., in 1.912, and was with that
team, Springfield, III., and in and ?
around the Central League until 1915,
when he was obtained by Pittsburgh
from Grand Rapids. T. e pirates re
leased him February (i, HUT, to Bir-!
mingham, where he played until pur?
chased by Cincinnati his', month.
HARRY I. SALLEE, leading star \
pitcher, was horn in Higginsport, Ohio,
Februar?, 3, 1885. He began his base?
ball career with uie Meridian club of
the Cotton States League in 1905,
finishing th?- season with t'-e Birming?
ham club of the Southern League. Ho
remained with Birmingham for two sea?
sons, being purchased in 1907 by the
New York Americans. In May of that
year he was released by New York to
'Williamsport. In the fall of 1907 he
was drafted by the St. Louis Nationals,
and pitched for the Cardinals for eight
years. In July, 1916. ho was sold to the
New York Nationals. M?.- had a great
year in 1917, winning eighteen games
and losing only seven. Last year Sal
Ice decided to quit baseball, and left j
New York in midseason. During the j
winter he was persuaded to play again,
and was obtained by the Reds.
Year of Great Upsets May
End With Moran Victory
Dempsey, Johnston and Herron Came Through
Unexpectedly, and the Reds Are Likelj to
Do Likewise Against the White Sox
By Ray McCarthy
Moat of the experts are picking the White Sox to win the world's
series. That is one of the reasons why I favor the Red3. This has been a
year of upsets. Go back over the records of sporting events since the
armistice was signed and you will see that nearly all of the favorites have
succumbed. Few figured on Dempsey beating Willard. Not many figured
Johnston capable of winning the tennis championship, and Herron wasn't
r ?rivtm a Irtnlr-'n fr\r fKa tvn]f /?-i-/vn:n Anil an if rrnoa
Listen to the supporters of the^
White Sox and you'll begin to believe j
the Rods have a lot of nerve in daring
to contend for big honors. Vou are j
made to think they will bo lucky to
score a run. All of which makes me |
think they will score several.
I confess the dope doesn't augur j
very well for the Wildmen. When |
these statisticians finish their work j
next week they will have shown where
the Chicagoans are so much superior j
to their rivals that Cincinnati hasn't i
a ghost of a chance.
Gives Reds Good Chance
That's all very well on paper, but
playing games on paper and playing;
them on the Held are quite different.
I believe the Reds have a chance, an
excellent chance, and what is more 11
look for them to come through and
land the honors.
My judgment for so thinking is not
Lnsed on ligures. Statistics, to my
mind, are not worth a fig in the base
hail worth They sometimes help one
to gauge tho ability of a player, but
they tail to show Lhe real worth of
any performer?-and they are very de?
ceiving in most cases in diamond
doings, i favor the Reds wholly from
observations; fron? what I saw of their
play as compared to the Sox this
season.
The first trip tho Beds made through
this part of the country they looked
no better than any other club in the
league, and not nearly as well as the
Giants. When next they tramped
through this city they were an entirely
different ball club. It was as though
a miracle had been wrought. The
minute the boll rang for the game
they were off.
They put the other team on the de?
fensive from the start. They rushed
the attack and once in motion shifted
their tactics like a prizefighter shifts
when he has his opponent slipping.
They bunted, they sacrificed, they
played the hit and run, they ran bases
with thoir heads up at all times, they
stole bases when it came time to steal
? -in short, they neglected not one
opportunity to advance runners or to
m runs. And all the time their
defence was as strong and as steady as
the United States army. Small wonder.
I thought, they are grabbing so many
victories.
Pitchers Show (ri> Well
And their pitchers! How they had
improved! Sallce, Ruether, Filer, Ring
and Luque all showed excellent form,
especially in their last tour of this
section.
Now as to the White Sox. The. are
a smart, hustling ball club. The play?
ers are on their toes every minute and
have plenty of punch. But the White
Sox looked no better to me in August
than they did last May. The White
Sox are not as fast on the bases as the
Reds, and this I believe to be as much
as BO per cent of a team's attack.
Comparing Gleason and Pat Moran
admits or shows nothing. Both are
great managers who have reached their
objectives. Comparing players doesn't
How the Players
Divided the Money
Winning Losing
Yr. ?;. Players'share. Player?'share.
1903..3 Boston.. $1,182 Pittsb. . .$1,316
19C5..5 N. York 1.142 Phila.... 832
19<~6.6 Wh.Sox 1,8/4 Cubs... 439
1907. .5 Chicago. 2.142 Detroit.. 1.945
19C8..5 ChicuKo. 1,317 Detroit.. 870
19^9..7 Pittsb.. 1,820 Detroit. 1.274
1910..S Phil?. 2,t62 Chicago. 1375
1911 .6 Phila. 3 654 N.York 2.436
1912. 8 Boston.. 4,C2? N.York. 2,566
1913 .5 Phila.. 3,2-*6 N.York. 2.164
1914..4 Bootun.. 2 312 l'hua. . 2,031
1915 .5 Boston.. 3,780 Phila... 2,520
1916..5 Boslon.. 3,919 B'kl-rn. 2,334
191/. .6 Chicago. 3,669 N.York. 2,442
1918.6 Boston.. 1,102 Chicago. 671
moan a great deal, cither. It is the
team that counts.
Ho*w does the nine act aa a whole?
That's the big question. If they are co?
operating and playing together aa a
unit, with plenty of confidence and
speed, tbcv have an excellent chance to
win, and I believe the Reds are that
kind of a team, more so than Lhe White
Sox.
Ticket "Scalping'*
Being At temp led
Bv Cincinnati Folk
CINCINNATI, Ohio, Sept Ke
ports received by interna! revenue
officials to-day that "scalping" on
world series baseball tickets is being
attempted here caused the detailing of
several deputy collectors to the task
of obtaining evidence. Under the fed?
eral law tile ticket speculatoi is am
able to arrest unless he fulfills all the
requirements by being properly
licensed, paying the war tux aim mark
ing the tickts.
The speculators, according to the re
ports received at the internal revenue
office, have had advertisements printed
and are distributing the tickets from
certain places. August Herrmann,
president of the Cincinnati Nationals,
said a record of every ticket sold i ? y
the club had been kepr, and it will '? .?
possible t?) trace the speculator with
out difficulty.
Drawings for reserved seats for me
games in Cincinnati, which began last
Monday, will continue at the Cincinnati
club offices until midnight to-night, or
u'it il all reserved seals for th? lirst
three games will have been disposed of.
Wilnur, Lucky Fan
U'iibtir Hagan, of Clnrksvillc Ohio,
was the lucky man whose name was
first dtawri in the allotment ol the
Cincinnati club's world's series seats,
John Heydler fishing his name out of
the enormous stack of 200,000.
Hatting Marks of
Big Series Rivals
CINCINNATI REIH
riuver * I**>9. H. AB. II. ?. PC.
Koii-Ii, of.129 ' 490 6!) 158 .822
?i-riili, 3b. 120 440 71? 185 .307
Pinher, p. 2'. 15? 10 i? .i?'!
Kller, p.::7 ?!* in 25 .281
Daubert. lb. 18? 521 7? 11 : .273
Mi OKtl, C. ,..'.. 7". Ml .10 65 .270
Kopf, ??. . . 132 493 '.I 133 .270
Ital h. M?. 134 520 7r> 13? .263
Kiirthir. p.. ..40 91 8 23 2253
Duncan. If. 27 75 7 19 .253
Scale, rf. .. .13? 501 4H 120 .241
Smith, utility . 25 33 7 S .243
-elircllitr. utility 17 50 4 12 .240
Main .-, o.f. 55 159 11 115 .'220
Rarlden, c. .73 212 Hi 45 ,212
Iti-essler, p., o.f fin ICI II 34 .207
Sullee, p.2H 70 4 13 .180
I.nque, p.31 32 8 ? .150
King, p. .... . 32 ?1 3 7 .115
CLUB BATTING
o. *u. k. u rv.
Cincinnati. .... 138 4528 581 111?? .205
CHICAGO WHITE SOX
Timor & Pou. (.. AB. lt. II. PC.
Mnrpliv, o.f ... '2H 26 fl 12 .402
.fuel.s,,n. rf. .. 1.17 514 70 170 .348
E. Collins, 2b 137 512 Sa 165 .323
l.ribold, !f II'? 127 RI 12R .300
Weaver. 3b. 13? 558 ?s 165 .200
l.iu-.l I. II?. Ill 420 53 124 .2'?5
M, Mullin. utility *s 162 27 17 .290
St htilk. o. 129 893 5*1 ! i I .283
K?lsch, t r. . 134 194 ?1 138 279
.1. ( ttlliti-., utlity 57 ??il 17 11 .273
RisberK, ss, 1 I ?'? 399 47 100 ,251
l.tiin, r. 25 54 ? 13 .'.". t
Korr. p.3? (Il il 15 2.1
Citut i. . p. ... 38 97 ? IS .18 I
Kaber, l>. _ 25 54 X lu 185
Williams, p. ... 40 i><> H? l? ,Ki7
Jamen, p. '2ii 39 4 ? .154
I.owdennllk, p.. S? 34 1 1 .118
t M Ii BATTING
<;. AB. K, II. P< .
Chicago 137 4529 ?315 1292 .285
Boston (.11 u 1rs Have
Escaped Shut-Outs
in World's Series
l'iie following table =howa shut-outs
in world's series between the National
and American league chan
lining pitcher and i core. A Bos
toi club has never suffered a coat of
ka somine, though the Red Sox have
taken part in twenty-six trames and
the H tit - t-s in four.
The Phillies and Dodgers also
escaped the brush; each team played
ir. only ?vr game- :
' I? ?
Dinet : Bosh n ? . Pittsburgh,
1 lineen, l?o: ton, ! ; Pil Uburgh, ??
Ho sene?
?.: . . lu t fork ; Philadelphia 0
Rend? r i hiladelphia, 3 : Nt ? Yt rk
M ... ?. ,n, Nt ? York. 9 : Philad? Iphia, ?j
MoGinnit' Ne v York ; . Philadt Ipl ia, ??
Mutht wson, New Y rk : . Philadelphia, 0
A . Whit?? Sox, Cube ?"?
Brown Cubi r
i 07
It. an .?. t ??icago, 2 , Detroit,
: Ifig
Brow n ' hicago, .' D< troit
Overall ' hicag? : . Di roit,
: ion
\lullin Detroit, B . I'ittsbui ?/?? ?'
?ttlams, P?ttsbu gh, s Detroit,
1010-'l .
Sio ?i ut outs
, ?? 1 3
Mathews, i ' s York, : Philade ; his.
1914
?Ik?:.-,. Boston, I . Philadelphia, u,
1915-M6
No chin-out?.
1917
l'.--iit. n, \, - 's rk Chi ;.-?..
.....'??': ; I I.jo,
....
R itl . Bo ??? : < hicago, 0.
'? auiihn, ' hicag? . I ; Bi stoi 0
Results and Other Data of Past World Series
Year Number
1903?Boston.
1905?New York.
19C6?White Sox.
1907?"Chicago.
1903? Chicago.. .
19C9?Pittsburgh.
1910?Philadelphia.
1911?Philadelphia. .
1912? ill >ston.
1913?Phil-id.-iphia.
"914?Boston.
1915? Boston.
1916? Boston.. .....
1917?Chicago.
1918?Boston.
?I if,t game tie,
Biggest
Total .Sin?lo lirons
of ?.amt-s Wim. Attendance. Day. Kcceipts.
6 Pittsburgh . 3 100,429 18 801 $50,000.00
4 Philadelphia. 1 91 ?723 24.992 68 435.00
4 Cuba . 2 99,945 23,257 1C6.550.00
4 l)?troit_....... ? /8.C68 24,377 101,728.50
4 Detroit. ...... ' 62,232 17,760 94,975 50
4 Detroit' .'.'. ... 3 145,295 30.915 183.3C2.50
4 Chicago.......... ' '.24,222 27,371 173,930.00
4 Ne? York .._ 2 '.79.351 38 281 342.364.50
4 New York. . i 252,(037 36.502 190,881.00
4 New York. 1 151.000 36.896 325,980.00
4 Philadelphia. 0 111,009 35,529 225,739.00
4 PhUad.lphia. 1 143,351 42,300 320 361.50
4 llrooklyn. ' 162 859 42.620 385.590.50
4 New York. 2 186,654 33.969 425873.00
4 Chicago. 2 123,483 27,054 179,619.00
3-3, twelve inning?. fSecond gam? '??? 6-6, eleven innings.
w
ning
Players'
Shr-.re.
$1, 182.00
20.545.86
25.051.28
32.960.C1
27.5iJ8.95
40. 154..94
47,443.17
76.745.37
88,5 ?.02
? . I5 '. '
73 139.45
.... , j .
97.7-J?.4'
?> ' '33.15
20.857.43
Losing
Players'
Share
?J316 00
6 848.31
8.350.42
21.973.38
18.445.97
26.769.96
*:.6;3.76
,-",1. 16 1.24
59.:-:s.e,3
,4.1 5 19
48,759.63
57,9e ; ?.:-'
65,170.58
?1.155.-13
16.435.15
Club
'm? tiers'
Share.
$34.170.03
62.493.30
36 622.2c
39.363.03
1C2.547.35
77,510.07
180,217.44
295,143.40
?3 218.30
813602
143,425.80
184.1C4.00
230,401.62
92.129.40
National
Commis.
Share.
$5.000.00
6 840.77
10.655.00
10,172.85
9.437.55
13,330-25
17,398 00
34.236.25
?*" C83.60
12,497.51
22 579.90
32.-1 16.15
38 559.C5
42.587.80
17,961.90
Careers of Cincinnati Regulars

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