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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, November 12, 1919, Image 4

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030214/1919-11-12/ed-1/seq-4/

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a*?"'?**.^
Herald SquAr*. nrondwnj
34th to 35th St.
H'e Self Dependable
Merchandise at Prices
Lower Than Any Other
Store, but for Cash Only
Store hours 9 to 5:30
Follow the lamb
in its travels
between the
pasture and
the suit of
clothes and the
probability is
you'll find its
wool here.
S
1
PI
I
Ni
ft5"
i
When the subject of i
all-wool clothes
is discussed wc do
not feel at all sheep?
ish, as we might if
we tried to ram
down the throat of
the innocent public
the "cornering-the
wool-market" argu?
ments. Wc admit
that other clothiers ||
sell all-wool clothes, 1
but we'd like to see |
the shop that sells |
all-wool clothes at g
the prices of ours 1
i
I
without sacrificing
style or tailoring?
something?
l^ Men's and young
H men's suits and
overcoats here
i
I
7
|
are all-wool, cor
|| rectly styled, ex
g pertly tailored and g
l| priced lower than
H those in other shops.
I Suits $29.75 to $64.75 |
Overcoats h
$29.75 to $109.00 I
jujjj?Fifth l'loor. Front ,?
After wool comes
leather fc
in the order of things? r
for mett. We're as par- %
ticular about the leather |
that goes into our shoes |
as the wool in our "?
clothing, and as par- |
ticular about the lasts l]
as the patterns.
At $12.08 I
we are featuring a rich M
wine - colored cordovan M
shoe of selected leather p
and expert workmanship |l
that has met with the M
approval of thought- jj$
fully dressed men.
At $9.89
there are black shoes ot
vici kid or patent leather.
The kid shoes are par- ||
ticularly comfortable, ?
The patent leather shoes ,?"!
are further enhanced by ?
that mark of shoe-satis- ^
faction? ?
U.
?.
'?pArrToP^
Luxury tax included
in the prices above.
?TikCT*!?-?Main Moor Rntemiy
JW' S.Mh Kirret. (?, ,
rggJEfWWW^^^^
Washington
! Ignores Rain to
Greet Prince
Continued fron? pi?g?< I
! workers were standing on a, baggage
truck as the Prince passed, and when
1 they clapped be saluted throo times.
Perhaps a thought flashed across his
j mind of the work the Red Cross women
? were doing one year ago to-day when
i the Prince, with millions of men in
tho Allied armies laid down his arms,
the war being at an end. In any event
he paid particular tributo to the Red
Cross uniform on Kit.- way through the
cheering multitudes.
As the Prince emerged from tlje sta
tion there was a fanfare, of trumpets
from the waiting cavalry troops, and
the United States Marine. Band struck
Up "God Save, the King." Every army
? and navy officer came to attention and
I saluted, diplomatists remove,] their
1 silk hats and held them against their
left breasts. There was not a move by
any one until tho last rote had died
out. One of the White House limou?
sines drew up and the Prince, accom?
panied by Vice-President Marshall,
stepped in.
Thousands Line Avenue
; Other numbers of the. official party
followed in other machines, while one
of the crack cavalry troops of th??
United States army acted as escort,
taking the prince and his suite through
the Capitol grounds, up Pennsylvania
I Avenue, past the White House to the
] home of Perry Belmont in the fashion
? able du Pont. Circle district. The ruin
? falling on the hacks of the cavalry
horses gave the troop the appearance
of' coming vm tho avenue in a gray
cloud.
t Thousands of persons lined the walks
i of Pennsylvania Avenue, hundreds of
them standing without umbrellas to
get a glimpse of tli'* prince as he rod?-1
| by. They cheered him lustily and he
: courteously showed his appreciation.
When the Belmont home had be.en
reached by the cavalry escort the
horses were backed uri along tho curb
opposite. Each man drew his saber
and held it at present-arms, while the
j prince rode by.
Soon after the prince had alighted
and entered the home that is to be his
; (hiring his three days' stay in Washing- i
i ton the Vice-President, Cabinet ofPt- :
eers, General Pershing and Admiral
Grayson took their departure. The
prince began wandering around the
spacious rooms of the Belmonl home,
paying particular attention to the
c i-i paintings on the wall.
Prince Receives Newspaper Men
A "fee minutes later it was announced
his royal highness would receive the
Washington correspondents. He en?
tered the room, smoking a cigarette, ;
and was introduced by one of his aids.
He seemed a bit embarrassed and spoke .
of the weather by way of opening the
interview.
"Your royal highness."' said ?'tie of
the correspondents, "one of the Ca?
nadian papers states to-day you arc
to return to Canada as Governor Gen?
eral of the Dominion."
A broad smile lit up the Prince's
face.
"The newspapers know more about
me and the things that are in store
for me than I do myself," he said with
a laugh.
British army officers attached to the
party said the report is entirely ui
founded and that the Prince intends
to visil all the British dominions.
"On leaving Canada," another cor?
respondent suggested, "von were quot?
ed as saying you regretted you could
not reply to all the friendly letters
you had received from Canadian girls."
\gain Ih? heir app; ren i miled good
natui -?<:'? .
Vi :e-Presid? nl Marshall was hosl al
a Mate dinner to the royal guesl to
: hi suite al the Belmont home.
The prince addressed the gathering
and the Vice-President responded to
the toast. Members of the diplomatic
corps, officials of the government, army
and navy officers and two of President
Wilson's daughters were among the
diners.
[?'oilowing the dinner the Prince visited
the National Press Club and held a
brief reception. At the club the Prince
issued nn official greeting to the peo
pie of the United Slates through the
press.
The mes: ige follow :
"I .-im very glad to take advantage
of the invitation of 11 - National Pre - i
i lub to send a few words of greeting
to the American people on my first
arrival in their beautiful capital. It
would have been a very great regret
to me had the President's illness un?
happily prevented me from fulfilling ,
my keen desire to visit the United
States this year, and for this personal
ruasen, as well as for much wider onefe,
I rejoice in his steady improvement.
Praises American Troops
"I know that you gentlemen of tho
national press are very highly trained
critics of public, writing and public
speech, and I am not. at all your equal
in that respect., but, happily for me,
what I want to say to you is easily said,
it is to tell tho American people
through you with what pleasure ! re?
call my visits to their gallant forces in
Europe last winter and how glad I am
now to be making acquaintance with
the great people from whom those
forces came.
"1 was able to visit several ?>*' your
divisions in France and Germany and
also the very smart Sixth Battle
Squadron which you sent to join the
Grand Fleet in the North Sea. Th i
spirit of your soldiers and sailors, offi?
cers and men, appealed to me very
strongly and made me wish to know
their country and their kin. The rapid?
ity of your organization, moreover, en
abled me to realize with what devo?
tion and what strength this mighty na?
tion can espouse a noble cause,
"Now that 1 am really here in the
United States. I feel that my anticipa?
tions will bo completely fullilled? Your
institutions, your ways of life, your
?..ras, are as democratic as ours, and
the atmosphere in winch 1 find myself
is the same Invigorating and familiar
atmosphere which 1 have always no
; ticcd in my American friends.
Thanks I'nited States for Hospitality
"1 thank you, gentlemen of the press,
j who command so vast a public and who
GIFTS for men?gifts I
that surpass in i
acceptability the conven- 'S
tional box of cigars and 'A
! possess such widespread power in tbo
? democratic English-speaking world, for
offering to be my intermediaries in con
! veying this short m?B?ago to. your fel
! low citizens in the United Status. I
i assure vou that I deeply appreciate Ihn
i hospitality of your government in in
I viting mo to pay this visit and in en
i tcrtaining me so well."
, Victory Unites
Us, Says Pring
Effect on Our Common
Aims Will Be Felt for
100 Years, He Asserts
WASHINGTON, Nov. 11.- Respond?
ing to a toast by Vicc-Presidcnt Marsh
I j\11 at tho dinner at the Bclmont home
i tendered him to-night by the Vice
President, tho Prince of Wales said:
"I regard it as a great honor, and I
am finding it also a great pleasure, to
j have been invited to pay this first visit
' to the United States. I wish, indeed,
| that the President, whose visit to Enji
! land last year I am so happy to be able
to return on behalf of my father, tho
' Kinp, had been with us here to-night.
I have followed his illness with tho
| deepest concern, and I associate thysolf
'. most earnestly with the hope of his
fe?low countrymen that he may soon
1 be restored to health.
"Tho United States has recently
! lost one of its noblest, citizens in
' Theodore Roosevelt?a man, a sports
! man and a force. All who knew him
' feel the poorer for his los.;. Your
: President is revered far beyond tins
country's shores, and the great world
; is as deeply affected as his own peo?
ple by his absence from active polit?
ical life. I was happy to hear a better
; report of President Wilson at the
White House this afternoon, and hope
'to see him before i leave Washington.
Canada Shares With U. S.
"This is Armistice Day, arid it is in?
deed a happy coincidence to have been i
invited to-night to meet, the represent?
atives of so many countries what
were gallantly allied in tho great |
Struggle and gloriously associated ill
victory. ! am particularly glad lo be
able to greet his excellencj the French
Ambassador, Monsieur Jusserand, pre-'
eminent among the- diplomatic repte
sentatives accredited to this great
capital, iust as his country, La France
immortelle, was preeminent among the
Allies.
"As you know, 1 have recently lv-n
traveling in Canada, and 1 am tbo '.
richer since that three months' journey
by a"wonderful experience. I come j
here, therefore, not only as an English- !
man and as a representative of the
British Kmpiro. but. also as a Canadian
who is as intimately and personally
concerned as you yourselves in the lift
of this North American continent. The
Bril ih Empire is held together by the
com mon aims ?i nd the united scnl
ment of five ister nations, all of which !
are devoted to the same cause of dem?
cratic self-government. But Canada
shares with the United State's the j
splendid territories of this rich conti?
nent.
No Physical Barrier
"She is divided from you by no
physical barrier, no military line, no
frontier other than a boundary guaran?
teed by international law and t?ood v ill.
North of that frontier we cherish our
British institutions, our British form
of freedom, our Brit a h allegiance to
tho King. South of il you cherish
equally the institutions into which the
American citizen is born. The forms
aro different, but tho human aim of
both systems of government is tho
same.
"It sooms to mo that this example
of nations living sido by sido in a
spirit of political tolerance and human
! liberty is entirely incompatiblo with
! the militarism which threatened Europe
in the great war, and is thus a living
: example of tho great, principles for
! which we gave our best in that terrible
; ordeal. . . . As the representative
I here of the British Empire, an?! nlso
I I hope I may say as a friend and
great admirer of tho American p?jo
ple, I reflect with pride that our
"Common victory was a victory for
the ideal to which wo with our instl
: tut ions and you with yourn have given
practical shape upon this continent for
a hundred years."
Vice-Presi.dent Marshall in proposing
tho toast, also referred to Armistice
Day, and in doing so deprecated that,
"around the world some have only dis?
carded the sword to pick up cobble
stones, and they throw then? indis?
criminately, hoping to hit an enemy,
careless of a friend, and utterly indif,
feront as to the innocent bystander.
Snioo11 )?rn ies 1,200
English Girls Are
Mormon Converts
Story Recently Published
Biner! y Denounced by
Senator; Colleagues Join
in Repudiating Charges
\-t- York "Trift uno
I* ankj.ngt.cni Bureau
WASHINGTON, Nov. LI. -Declaring
he had broken his customary silence
regarding the Morman church in or?ler
to speak as a member of Congress.
Senator Reed Smoot, of Utah, denied
vigorously this' afternoon a story
printed recently under the pen name
of Win,fiel Graham that 1,200 English
girl converts to the Mormon Church
were to be sent to this country. The
story charged that these girls were to
come over to practice polygamy in
Utah, anil the hope was expressed thai:
the United States would deny them
e . i ranee.
"I want, the people o? the United
States to know thai so far as the Mor?
mon Church is concerned polygamy is
?lead and the scandalmongers will have
to I'ukI another bobby to vide," said
Senator Smoot. "I know of no people
who responded more gloriously to the!
war. both in giving of its youth and in'
pledging its money, than did the mem?
bers of tho CUurch of Latter Day
Saints. 1 am making this refutation
of the slander that the Mormon Church
is importing the English girls al the
request of the Salt Lake Commercial
Club, three-fourths of whose members
ni e outside the .Mormon Church."
S mater Henderson, of Nevada, echoed
Senator Smoot's praise of the moral
standards and patriotism ol the Mor?
mon . ayiag he knew of h ;?? ttlcnjcnl
of ' m in his own state. Senator
Thomas, of Colorado, and Senator AsV
urst, of Arizona, also addressed the
Senate with praise for the Mormons.
supporting Senator Smoot's contention
that the proposed migration from Eng
'?? :n I for polygamous purposes was un?
true.
O'Mal?ey and Buchler
Swap Their City jobs
Edwin ?'. O'Malley, former Deputy
Commissioner of Public Markets, rook
ofiice yesterday as Third Deputy Com
Superb Luggage
lOU are invited?so far as luggage is concerned? le
put all your travel problems up to the various Chas. W.
Wolf Stores. An unequalled selection among exclusive,
correct, cosmopolitan stylos. Durable materials; thorough
workmanship. An expert sales service. Very reasonable price;.
TRUNKS?Wardrobe. Dress, Steamer models,
$21) to $300
SUIT CASES?Fitted or unfitted, $?0 to $400
TRAVEL BAGS?Fitted or unfitted, $t0 to $.100
LADIES' HAM) BAGS and Purses. $.1 to $150
MEN'S BILL FOLDS und Purses, $2 to $75
ACCESSORIES OF TRAVEL and smart stay
at-home refinements ? Dressing Cases, Um?
brellas, Leather-Leased Clocks, Sewing Baskets,
Flasks "-nd Carafes, etc., attractively priced
r
15 BROADWAY
30 BROADWAY
22 CORTLANDT ST.
NLW YORK
102 NASSAU ST.
>8 C0RTLAND1 ST,
|?|^ CHOCOLATE ]^^
PZYVE a rich, natural (??l
vor that sends you back n?j ; |
)re. M I
?911
^?\ ' SB
i IDEAL COCOA & CHOCOLATF. CO., N. Y. Jj&aHS
misolonor of Charities, while Rabbi
Samuel Huchler, former Third Deputy
Commissioner of Charities. wa.i being
sworn in us Deputy Commissioner of
Public Markets. Mr. O'Maltcy was
ousted from his post in tho Markets
1'opartmont by Dr. Jonathan C. Day,
the commissioner. Rabbi Duchlers
transfer makes two clergymen in tho
Markets Department.
It is understood Mr. O'Malley will
do the purchasing for tho Charities
Department, lio established and con?
ducted tho school sales iitations, where
almost $3,000,000 worth of army foods
wore sold. Ho ?s a resident of Queens
and was one of tho organizers of the
Business Men's League, which backed
a business man, Preston B. Lynn, fot
Mayor, shifting this support latei,
with Mr. Lynn's consent, to the can?
didacy of Mayor Iiylun.
Rabbi Buchlor is chairman of the
executive committee of the American
Jew;-): niinir.terj. Ho attained promi
neritv in February, lOUi, wb-ni he re?
plied to an attack by Mayor ('nynor on
"certain kinds of foreigners." Ho re?
signed from the pastorship of tho Peo?
ple's Synagogue sDparently because of
his interest in politics, which was said
I to have given offence to some of his
i parialiionerc. Many of his formel
I flock joined hi? New People's Syna
I gogue. which he established a short
I i inte later.
? I Sentcnrefl lo Die
NegrocH Mimt I'ay Penally for
Arkansas H i ?>!.<*
HELENA, Ark., Nov. 11.?Judge J. R,
Jackson, of the Phillips County Circu't
Court, to-day sentenced to electrocu?
tion at Little Rock eleven negroes re?
cently convicted of murder in the. ftrit
degree in connection with the riots of
Octoucr last.
These Paris Mini?is Not On Sale Until To-morrow (THURSDAY)
franklin $imon & Co.
A Store of Individual Shops
Fifth Avenue, 37th and 38th Streets
PARIS?4 Rue Martel
LONDON?*29 jewin Crescent
j PARIS MODELS
From the Late Fall and Winter Paris Openings
At Extraordinary Price Reductions
ans
o e i \if owns
ff\Jo
One
One
One
One
One
One
One
One
One
One
One
One
One
Actual Cost lo Land $172.50 to $884.00
EVENING gowns radiant with
beads and aglow with color,
frocks of rare grace and charm, f?a
metallic embroidery, aglitter with
also afternoon gowns and tailleur
unt their Paris origin.
Bulloz Model
Aline Model
Aline
Aline
Aline
Aline
Mercier
Mercier
Model
Model
Model
Model
Model
Model
Mercier Model
Mercier Model
Goupil Model
Jenny Model
Rolande Model
Cost lo Land
288.00
208.00
208.00
192.00
184.00
180.00
208.00
184.00
180.00
172.50
208.00
350.00
266.00
?New
95.00
95,00
95.00
95,00
95.00
95.00
95.00
95.00
35.00
95,00
95.00
150.00
150.00
One Rolande Model
One Bernard Model
One Madeleine Model
One Chanel Model
One Mercier Model
One Callot Model
One Callot Model
One Lanvin Model
One Cheruit Model
One Madeleine Model
One Agnes Model
One Agnes Model
One Poiret Model
^osl lo Lund
280.00
329.00
350.00
324.00
240.00
884.00
884.00
462.00
504.00
756.00
560.00
378.00
420.00
?Viitl 29 Oilier Models at Similar Reductions?
On Sale French Gown Shop, Third Floor
!No*
150.00
150.00
150.00
150.00
150.00
250.00
250.00
250.00
250.00
250.00
250.00
250.00
250.00
?>J
P a r
150,
raps
250,00 450.00 650.00
Actual Cost u> Laud $154.25 to $1430,00
INCLUDED are wraps for daytime or evening. Many are luxuriously
trimmed with fur, and on some models the sale price does not even
cover the actual cost of the fur.
One
One
One
One
One
One
One
One
One
One
One
One
One
Lanvin Model
Bernard Model
Bernard Model
Bulloz Model
Mercier Model
Cheruit Model
Cheruit Model
Bernard Model
Bernard Model
Beer Model
Bulloz Model
Suzanne Model
Lanvin Model
Cos! lo Land
256.50
189.00
179.00
216.00
154.25
208.25
202.50
338,00
272.00
224.00
240.00
224.00
624X0
Now
95.00
95.00
95.00
95.00
95.00
150.00
150.00
150.00
150.00
150.00
150.00
150.00
250.00
One
One
One
One
One
One
One
One
One
One
One
One
One
Lanvin Model
Georgette Model
Georgette Model
Cara Mod
Callot M< i< I
Madeleine 2 Todel
Lvladeleine Model
Poiret Model
Poiret Model
Brandt Model
Cheruit Model
Madeleine Model
Callot Model
Cost lo Land
598.00
390.00
360.00
390.00
806.00
858.00
845.00
832.00
768.00
624.00
897.00
1430.00
1320/! )
\mi 25 Other Paris Model? at Similar Reduction*
On Sale Women s Coat Shop, Fourth Floor
\o\\
250,00
250.00
250.00
250.00
450.00
450.00
450.00
450.00
450.00
450.00
450.00
650.00
6 0.00
Paris Suits and Three-Piece
One
One
One
One
One
One
One
One
One
One
\J
??
uimes
95.
>, ?
350.00
1
Actual Cost to Land $202.50 to $816.00
?N this collection are suits and three-piece costumes of handsome fab?
rics, some strictly tailored, others trimmed with fur. On some
models the sale price is less than the actual cost of the fur.
Bernard Model
Bernard Model
Bernard Model
Premet Model
Premet Model
Bulloz Model
Beer Model
Beer Model
Bernard Model
Tennv Model
Cost lo Lac
236.25
238.00
216.00
229.50
202.50
216.00
202.50
256.00
292.50
287.50
Sow
95.00
95.00
95.00
95.00
95.00
95.00
95,00
150.00
150.00
150.00
One BuUoz Model
One Bulloz Model
One Poiret Model
One Premet Model
One Patou Model
One Armand Model
One Callot Model
One Madeleine Model
One Callot Model
One Bernard Model
Cost lo Land
400.00
324.00
392.00
372.00
276.00
312.50
462.00
544.50
816.00
780.00
Ami 32 Other Models at Similar Reduction?
On Sale Women s Suit Shop, Balcony Floor
150.00
150.00
150.00
150.00
150.00
150.00
250.00
350.00
350.00
: ..00

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