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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, January 11, 1920, Image 7

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Three Boys Conf ess
To Fiftv Fires for
Robbery Purposes!
Youths* Cangjht as Alarm ?
Rinp* Tell of Campaign j
of Arson and Theft in
Brooklyn for M o n t h s
Three boys. according to the fiolice,
sdniitted last night in the Wilson Ave
rue station. Brooklyn, that they had
*et at least fifty house? afire in that
1?orough. or jost across the line in
Qneens. in the last three months. The
boys were arrested at a tire at 4*i'2
Knickerbocker Avenue. Thev are John
Meyer, fifteen years old. of 144 No'l
Street; Charles Cappa, sixteen, of 21
Wilson Avenue. and Michael Dooley.
?fteen, of 50 Noll Street, all in Brook?
lyn.
They kindled tne fires. they said. to
faeilitate thefts from persons living in
;he houscs. As sooq as excited and
Vewildered tenants began to pour out
:he boys would rush in, they said, on
pretense of making rescues, and would
po through every apartment whose
door was unlocked.
Fires Always in Groups
The seri?s of blaaes mystified Fire
Marshal Thomns Brophy. They oc
curred in th*-ees and fours, always on
Saturday night or Sunday morning.
and always in groups. One week-end
they raighr be in Greennoint. the next
in South Brooklyn. After every fire a
small oi! can was found empty in the
.-?ellar. and if the damage was not too
ereat. there were traces of a heap of
oi!-soaked refuse near by.
For weeks Marshal Brophy's men
and detectives have ben assigned to
pecial duty every Saturday night in '
brooklyn to watch fixm alarm boxes
and unswer every call.
L;:st night the fires were in the
Ridgewood sectidn. There were two
acroas the line in Queens and one in
Knickerbocker Avenue and then came
the alarm for one at 462 Knicker?
bocker Avenue. Detectives Barry and
W oodle heard the tinkle of the gong
onthc ftre alarm box as it was pulled
open and ran for the corner. They
beat the engines to the fire.
Many of the tenants at previous
fires having reported the activity of
two or three youths in red sweaters,
V\ ocdle seized Cappa who, wearing
such a gartnent, was crouched in a
?loorway across the street from 462
Knickerbocker Avenue. Barry ran up
stair.:.in the burning house, encounter
;n? Meyer and Dooley ,also in red
sweaters, on the second floor. He ar?
rested them.
Woman Dnped By Touth
Mrs. August Hubscherman, jaintor,
of ;;02 Central Avenue, was called to
the Wilson Avenue Police Station. She
identified Meyer as a boy che had
ound in her cellar November 8 last.
The youth had told her that a gang
war, after him and Mrs. Hubscherman
ad escorted him to the corner for
protectipn.
On her return she found a heap of
inflammable refuse in the cellar, reek
ing of kerosene, and beside it was such
an oil can as was found at all the
msterious fires. There is a store on the
street floor of the building, and at that
mor.ient, as Mrs. Hubscherman sudden
ly remembered with a feeling of faint
ness, ninety-five gallons' of oil were
storod there.
"Don't you know that you might have
kiilecl people?killed children?" de
manded Fire Marshal Brophy of the
prisoners.
All three of the boys burst into
tears at this possibility, which ap
parently never had occurred to them.
Dr. Hillis to Quit
Plymouth Church
Pulpit, Is Rumor
Report Is Started After the
Treasurer's Report Shows
$7,000 Deficit Causerf by
Decrease in Pew Rents
After the annual repcrt of the treaa
urer of Plymouth Church had been pub
lished yesterday, showing that the
famoua old Brooklyn institution had ac
cumulated a $7,000 deficit during 1919
? rumor spread that the pastor, Dr!
Newell Dwight Hillis, probably would
resign. The rumor was given credence
by the assistant pastor, Dr. I. W. Hen?
derson, but the latter declared that if
Dr. Hillis did quit the pulr>it of
Plymouth it would be to take the plat
form in the interests of Americaniza
tion, and not because of the state of
the church's finances, which, it is
?tated, is due largely to steadily lessen
mg reeeipts from pew rent.
"There is absolutely no basis for the
impresaion that Dr. Hillis may resign
because the churchthas a small deficit,"
said Dr. Henderson. "Whoever create'd
that impression is a vicious enemy of
the church."
Dr. Henderson then said Dr. Hillis
had received an offer to tour Michigan
giving lectures. Dr. Hillis could not be
reached personally, though a statement
was issued in his name saying that a
committee was now at work preparine
a review of his pastorate, covering t'hl
last twenty-one years. Dr. Hillis took
cnarge of Plymouth January 18 1899
n?.? peT>al?nual report the treasurer!
? * * Reimer. sai<i the church's re
ceipts for the year were $50595 and the
expenditures more than $57,000. He
added that unless the congregation
found means to rectify the present
situation there would be a deficit of
more than $14,000 January 1, ig??i
Loans from members of the congrega?
tion have been negouated, Mr. Reimor
also stated, to cover a deficit of $3 000
in 1918, and a note for $4,000 to the
Xassau N'ational Bank of Brooklyn falls
due February 20.
Mr. Reimer went on to say that
Plymouth Church has spent money lav
lshly, "often foolishly," in the past and
suggested that a policy of rigid -econ
omy might save the church from the
necessity of selling a few bonds it
holds. an expedient which, he declared
would only atave off the inevitable for
about three years.
* ~-"
Secretary of Millionaire
Vanishes Like His Emplover
TOROXTO, Jan. 10.?The mystery
surrounding the disappearance of Am
brose J. Small, a millionaire theater
owner and promoter, was dcepened to
day when it was reported to the police
that John Doughty, who had served
eigr.teen years as Small's secretary, also
was missing.
Doughty was transferred to Montreal
when the Trans-Canada Theatre Com
pany purchased Mr. Small's interests.
He returned to Toronto at Christmas
time to get some papers for the manager
of the new company and telegraphed to
Montreal on December 26 that he was
too ill to return. He has not been heara1
from since.
New Volcano in
Mexico Showers
Death and Ruin
Rebels Among Sufferers by
Eruption of San Mignel
Crater; Villages Wiped
Out; Dead Strew Streets
MEXICO CITY, Jan. 10.?Flames are
still being emitted by the new volcano
at San Miguel, in the western part of
the State of Vera Cruz, according to
advices received here last night. It is
stated that volcanic dust has floated
as far as Coscomatepec, about twenty
miles east of the new crater. Every
village in that vicinity has been de- i
stroyed, while l|va and floods of con
taminated water from sources opened i
by the recent earthquakes are floodingi
the district near the crater.
Refugees from San Miguel confirm !
earlier reports telling of numerous
deaths from falling buildings and
poisonous jjases. Rebels who had their
headquarters in that region have suf
fered severely, both from casualties
and from loss of suDplies, it is stated.
First accurate reports from Couztlan
were carried last night in special dis
pathces from Jalapa quoting Dr. Garcia
Luna, who had just Teturned from j
Couztlan. He said he had counted sev-'
enty-two dead and one hundred injured
in that village, and asserted that the
roads .between Couztlan and Quimixt
' lan were destroyed.
Jalapa reports that other travelers
| arriving there say the village of Bar
| ronza Alta, near Couztlan, was almost
1 destroyed, with ftumerous victims. In
Jalapa itself 95 per cent of the build- j
mgs were damaged. Water service :
there is limited to two hours daily. ;
vera Cruz authorities hope to maintain i
the present suppiy for eight days, by'
which time. it is hoped, the water of j
the River Jamapa, which supplies the i
city. will be fit to drink. Recent vol- I
canic dis:urbances have rendered this '?
water uniit for use.
Relief measures for 'quake sufferers
are progressing rapidly. 200.000 pesos
being subseribed by the employees of ?
the Xational Railways and more than
600,000 p?sos by the army. Each sol
dier contributed, and the" officers sub- j
scribed amounts larger than were j
given by privates.
General E. S. Greeley Dies
Noted Civil War Veteran and
Banker Is Dead
XEW HAVEX. Jan. 10.?General Ed
win S. Greeley. who was brevetted a
brigadier general in 1865 for meritori
ous conduct in action, and one of the
best known bankers in Connecticut.
died to-day, in his eighty-seventh year.
General Greeley went to war as
lieutenant of a local company which he
organized. He returned as a brigadier
commander in 1865, ?nd probably out
lived every other Connecticut man who
attained that rank in the Civil War.
After the war General Greeley made
railway and telegraph supplies, and his
company struntr wires for the opening
of the World's Fair at Chicago.
The gold key with which President
Cleveland opened the fair was given to i
Mr. Greeley.t This same kev was used '
by President McKinley to open the St. |
Louis exposition, and it was used to
transmit Chauncey M. Depew's mes
sage around the world, a distance of :
24,516 miles. in 2TV3 minutes.
Baadad baga ? both m,
ported and American
made?are olfrrrd at tOi;o
to JJH% laaa.
Leather hand bags. fitted
and plain are sbown at
dtacountaoftOe~<. to JJ,'-arc.
Chi0on and moire velvet
? at |
leaa.
baga are ftere at prict
10*r to33)i'
Sale of
OVINGTON Bags
IN six short months.
Ovington's has ac
quired an enviable repu
tation for bags.
For only the smartest
have been shown and
the prices have been
sensible, as Ovington's
prices always are.
Now, however, even
these smart bags are
offered at 10% to 33lA%
less; all are included?
none are reserved.
OVINGTON'S
"TheGiftShopofFifthAve. "
314 Fifth Avenue, near 32d Street
BONW1T TELLER 6,CQ
QJur cSpecialty <SAop <JT OnyinatiortA
nrTH AVENUE AT 3S? STREET
HAND MADE LINGERIE
AT DECIDED PRICE REDUCTIONS
of French and Philippine Origin.
An Especial Featureof the January
Sale of Disiinctive Undergarments
FRENCH ENVELOPE CHEMISES
Formerly 13.75 9.75
Hand made and hand embroidered, of fine
batiste, trimmed with Valenciennes lace and
ribbon.
PHILIPPINE ENVELOPE CHEMISES
Formerly 9.75 5.95
Hand made and hand embroidered, of sheer
batiste, Valenciennes lace and ribbon garniture.
FRENCH NIGHTGOWNS
Formerly 13.75 9.75
riand made and hand emb'd, of fine batiste,
square and round necks, lace and ribbon
trimming.
FRENCH NIGHTGOWNS
Formerly 18.50 14.75
Hand made and hand emb'd, of batiste, straight
and Empire models, lace and ribbon trimmed.
HAND MADE, HAND EMB'D SETS
French Undergarments of Voile Trippe
NIGHTGOWNS.Formerly 22.50 18.50
CHEMISES. .Formerly 18.50 14.75
DRAWERS.Formerly 18.50 14.50
HAND MADE, HAND EMB;D SETS
French Undergarments of Crepe de Chine
NIGHTGOWNS.Formerly 37.50 29.50
REGULARCHEMISES. .Formerly 25.50 22.50
ENVELOPE CHEMISES.Former/y 28.50 23.50
DRAWERS .Formerly 24.50 19.75
CORSET COVERS.Formerly 26.50 18.50
SILK PETTICOATS 6.95
Featured are petticoats with jersey silk tops
and deep flounces of taffeta silk or satin, with
narrow fine pleatings. Also satin petticoats.
CORSETS & BRASSIERES
Very Excepiional Values
Hip Confincr Corsels . . .' . . . 5.95
"Bontell" Corsets with special elastic arrange
ment to hold corset below waistline; included
also is a copy of the widely favored "Bontell"
Model No. 625.
"Bontell" Satin Corsets.6.95
Very low top; long straight skirts.
Flesh Twill Bandeaux.1.25
Silk shot twill of very durable quality; ribbon
shoulder straps.
Lace & Ribbon Braweres.2J95
Combtnation confiner and brassiere; made en
i tirely oi altemating banda of lace and ribbon.
i*
BONW1T TELLER. &,CO,
?%* <SpecicU&/ <5hop of Ortymatloft^
HED1 AVENUE. AT 5S? STREET
Continuation Monday
CLEARANCE SALE
WINTER APPAREL
The Entire Stocks Withoul Reserve in Women's
and Misses' Winter Apparel are Included
NO C. O. D'S. NO EXCHANGES. NO CREDITS. NO APPROVALS.
Women's Tailored & Fur Trimmed Suits
Women's Tailored & Fur Trimmed Coats
Women's Wrap Coats, Capest Dolmans
Women's Afternoon & Evening Wraps
Women's Day Frocks & Evening Gowns
Misses Tailored & Fur Trimmed Suits
Misses' Tailored & Fur Trimmed Coats
Misses' Duvetyn & Velveteen Frocks
Misses' Day Frocks & Evening Gowns
BONWIT TELLER ?,CO.
HEDi i^ENUE. AT 33? STBEET
JANUARY SALE OF FURS
At 25% to S3lA?/o Reductions
Trim'd Marmot Coats I 15.00
30 inch long box models, made
from selected skins.
French Seal Coats. . . 135.00
30 and 36 inch long full flare
models, of dyed coney skins.
Taupe Nutria Coats .190.00
30 inch long trotteur models.
made from selected pelts.
Hudson Seal Coats. . 225. 00
30 inch long model, of dyed
muskrat. shawl collar, flare sleeves.
Taupe Nutria Coats. . 225.00
36 inch long full flare model,
with girdle to match.
Trd Hudson Seal Coats. . 245. 00
30 inches long. of dyed muskrat,
contrasting fur collar and cuffs.
Scotch Mole Coats. . 265.00
30 inch long full model. made
from fine selected pelts.
Nat'l Squirrel Coats. 350.00
30 inch long, full* loose, box
model. in clear blue skins.
Tr'd Hudson SealCoats. 395.00
36 inches long, dyed muskrat,
contrasting fur collar and cuffs.
Scotch Mole Wraps. 450.00
43 and 45 inch long, voluminous
models of selected skins.
N^
c'rfc
BONWIT TELLER &,CQ
FIFTH AVENUE AT 06? STREET
Present Individualized Types in
SPRING FASHIONS
??
"TAe Complete Feminine Wardrobe from
Millinery to Boots, the Underthings
and the Important Accessories of Dress."
FOR EVERY OCCASION, FOR EVERY ACTIVITY?FOR
SOUTHLAND AND NORTHLAND?FOR WOMEN AND
MISSES WHO DEMAND THE UNUSUAL & EXCLUSIVE
FOR A JOURNEY
BY LAND OR WATER
If southward lies your trail?to Florida, California, Havana,
Porto Rico?a tailored suit in the new Spring silhouette inter
preted by Bonwit Teller & Co. tailor craftsmen is "comme il
faute" together with a complementary trig hat, a blouse, the
proper boots, and of course a smart, swagger top coat. If the
luxury of'a yacht is yours, the correct costume is provided in
this most inclusive assemblage of highly specialized apparel.
FOR THE SOUTHLAND
BY DAY AND BY NIGHT
Original expressions of the mode in delectably damty frocks?
hand made of French origin or of Bonwit Teller & Co. design
for the morning stroll. Bathing frocks, costumes, capes and
accessories for the beach. Exquisite lace and printed chiffon
frocks for the afternoon fete in the Palm Groves.
Formal evening gowns and wraps for the club and casino affairs.
Sweaters and separate skirts and delightful hand made blouses
in many charming versions. Pastime and sports apparel for
every form of outdoor activity. And in each instance the mil
linerj', boots and accessories for the completion of the costume.
THE VOGUE OF WHITE
WHITE is a dominant color for Southern wear in frocks, gowns.
blouses, sweaters, skirts, suits, coats, millinery and footwear.
FOR THE NORTHLAND
ITS SNOWS AND FROZEN LAKES
i
Does the Call of the North lure you to its hearty outdoor sports?
skating, skiing, tobogganing, hockey, ice-boating ??the special?
ized department of Sports Apparel presents the types that have
their practical use for every sport function, developed in attrac
tive fabrics and colorings that lend to, rather than detract from,
feminine charm.

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