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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, February 03, 1920, Image 5

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Budget Reform
For State and
Nation Urged
-
Umator McCormick Tell 8
Young Republican Club
at Fin* Post-War Dinner
i ??few System I? Necessary
'_
?i.Senator Mills Speaks
?avocates Reduction of All
<i;ate Elective Officers to
Three With Longer Terms
Modernization of fiscal systems for
L.M state and Federal governments
-u the keynote of the speeches d??
livr?e before the Young . Republican
Cub of Now York, at that organiza?
bas first post-war dinner, held at
?be Hotel Commodore last night. Sena
- v?A\V McCormick. of Illinois,
, ?lam?an of the Senates select com?
?itte? on the budget, pleaded for Fed
lrtl budget revision. Former State
fcnttorOgden l. Mills urged budgetary
?form and the simplification of the
??enunent of New York State.
On* of the most important results of
?fce war. Senator McCormick said,
would be its effect upon the fiscal
BolJr.es of a? nations involved. He
???dieted that Congress would cut ap?
propriation estimaes by $1.000.000.000,
?i? that it would pass some form of a
budget bill.
"Already," he said, "we see that the
utt itself and the economic burdens
which it has imposed upon society
tnuit energize public administration
Ja ?degree hitherto unknown, or society
?ill suffer incalculable lapse from its '
present leve! of civilization.
Make Executive Responsible
"Obviously," the Illinois Senator con?
tinued, "if we are to adopt for the
t'ni?ed States the budget principle as
Jt prevails throughout the civilized
word, so must we aiso adapt it to our
fifcu?ar Constitution. We must make
he Executive clearly responsible for
the a?grega'e estimate? submitted to
Congress we must make Congress
dearly responsible for the aggregate
expenditures authorized by law; we
p-.ust provide the Executive with the
lega', authority and the expert staff
necessary to restrain the hungry de
yirtaer.ts, ar.d we must reform our
legislative practice and our parlia?
mentary procedure to meet the end
irhich we have in view."
Pi^cussir.jr the exchange situation.
Senator McCormick declared that the
idea thai nternational agreement
or fiat might restore foreign exchange
to its normal balance was a "financia!
heresy." v
Ex-State Senator Ogden L. Mills
strong.y supported the scheme for re?
form of the state administration sys?
tem which will reduce the elective offi?
cers in th< state government to thn-c.
the Governor, the Lieutenant Governor
and Comptroller, with a longer term
for each There was no good reason
to expect a reduction in state expendi?
tures, in the face of the constant ex?
tension of the activities of the stat
government, he said, but the peoj>:t
had a right to insist on the proper ad?
ministr?t; or. of these expenditures.
"People to Blame"
"No one is to blame for the system."
Mr. Mills said, "unless it be the people
themselves. It represents in no sense
a logical plan, but a gradual growth,
anc that ;r functions at all?and it
does function reasonably well?must
be attributed to the fact that it was
pieced together to meet new demands
and situation: and has teen molded
by the very circumstances whose need.s
gave rise to the successive acts of
creation.
"From the standpoint of service the
government is reasonably adequate, but
irorr. the standpoint of economy and re?
sponsibility it is hopelessly deficient."
?
German Commander Goes Mad
LONDON, Feb. 2.?Colonel AvalorT
Bermondt, commander of the Russo
German forces which attacked Riga
during the autumn of 1919, has be?
come insane and has been placed in a
madhouse, according to wireless reports
from Moscow.
Roosevelt Calls Speech
On Navy 'Simple Truth'
Attempt Made to ?Vlake Sensa?
tion Out of Word "Unpre?
pared," Danieles Aid Say?
N?u> York Tribun?
Washington Iturran
WASHINGTON, Fob. 2.?Assistant
Secretary of the Navy Roosevelt to-day
Issued the following: statement regard?
ing quotations attributed to hint in his
Brooklyn speech:
"I do not like to allow to pans un?
noticed the report of certain remarks
made hy me yesterday in a speech in
Brooklyn. Attempt is made at this
time to make a sensation out of the
word 'unprepared.' What 1 stated was
the simple truth: That up to February,
H>17 in other words, up to the time
the German Ambassador was sent
home the navy was unprepared in the
sense that it was on a peace basis solely.
Under the law we could not increase
the personnel or spend more than the
regular appropriations. The navy was
unprepared solely in the sense that it
was on a peace looting. It was without
any question on a higher basis of ef?
ficiency than ever before.
''I did not state that I was 'opposed j
by the President.' What 1 said was |
perfectly true: That if the officers of
the navy and the Secretary and 1 could
have thought only of the navy and for- j
gotten the existence of Congress and
other relations with other nations the I
navy would have been mobilized and
hundreds of millions would have been
spent long before we got into the war.
It would be very nice, from the purely
military point of view, to keep the
navy mobilized at all times. Fortu?
nately, national policies and interna?
tional relations have always prevented
this. The President, I understand, did
point out that to mobilize the aavy
long before the declaration of war
would, quite naturally, be considered a
hostile act.
"It is perfectly true that later on I
took the chance of authorizing certain
large expenditures for guns, etc., be?
fore Congress had actually appropriated
the money. The money came along
later, however, and the technical
illegality of my set ceased to be a
matter of serious import."
Hart to Leetnre at Sorbonne
CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Feb. 2.?Albert
Bushnell Hart, professor of ths> science
of government at Harvard University,
has been appointed Harvard exchange
professor at the Sorbonne Universities,
France, for the first semester of the
next academic year, au announcement
to-night stated. Professor Hart will
succeed Professor D. Henry Yeomans.
Lord & Taylor
38th Street ?FIFTH AVENUE? 39th Street
Store Hours 9:30 A. M. to 6 P. M.
Women's
Tricolette Hip Blouse
For This Anniversary Sale
$13.75
THIS jaunty hip length Blouse, as illustrated,
is a slip-on model, with round neck, smart
self tie, short sleeves, embroidered at the hip
line with wools of contrasting colors.
"-?
Coral, Flesji, Bisque, Navy, Belgian Blue,
Also in White and Black
? _ Third W'""?
Tiffany & Co.
Fifth Avenue & 37T? Street
Fine China Plates
Minton Cauldon Copeland
Crown Derby Doulton
""Sills Slocking" Republicans'
Ball To Be Held Thursday
The Republicans of the 15th Assembly
District, known as the "Silk Stocking"
or "Diamond Back" district, will hold
their annual entertainmentand ball at
Palm Garden, Fifty-eighth Street, near
Third Avenue, on Thursday night. The
district includes Manhattan and Forty
seventh Street to 100th Street. William
Chilvers is the leader and .Mrs. John H.
Iselin, the associate leader. A partial
list of the box holders for the ball in
chules :
Winthrop Aldrich, Otto T. Bannard,
Charles L. Bernheimer, William Bondy,
I Lauren Carroll, Justice Frank J. Cole
: man jr.. Mrs. Walter Damrosch, Mrs.
Lewis Delafield, Justice Edward K.
[ 1 inch, William ,W. Hoppin, .lohn H.
Iselin, Justice Philip J. McCook, Colonel
| Grayson Murphy, Judge Charles C. Nott
jr., Mrs. Douglas Robinson, James R.
' Sheffield and Charles S. Whitman, for
! merly Governor.
Procter Will Lead
Gen. WoocPs Forces
In Campaign Fight
Many Women Given Places
on Committee That In?
cludes Col. Roosevelt;
Could as Eastern Manager
CHICAGO. Feb. 2, -The organization
of the Wood National Campaign Com?
mittee was announced to-night at Wood
; headquarters, as follows:
? William C. Procter. Ohio, chairman;
, James J. McGraw, Republican national
j committeeman of Oklahoma, vice-chair?
man; Fred Stanley. Kansas, vTce-c?iair
I man and Western manager; A ' A
I Spragyie, Illinois, treasurer;' H. C.
| Stebbins, of New York, Eastern treas
? urer.
^ Executive committee Norman J.
Gould, Eastern manager; Thomas w!
! Miller, assistant. Eastern manager;
George H. Moses, Washington and
Southern manager.
; Genera! committee- Allen R. .laynes.
; Republican national committeeman of
Arizona; H. O. Riirsum, Republican na?
tional committeeman of New Mexico;
Will C. Conk, Republican national
committeeman of South Dakota; Gov?
ernor J. A. A. Burnauist. Minnesota;
Governor Henry J. Allen. Kansas; w'.
H. King, Republican state chairman of
. Smith Dakota; Gustaf Lindquist, Re?
publican state chairman of Minnesota;
Frederick M. Alger, Michigan; Mr*S.
Douglas Robinson, New York.
Miss Harriet E. Vittum, Illinois;
Miss Maud Wetmore, Rhode Island; Miss
Julianna Cutting, New York; Mrs. W,
W. Morgan, Kansas; Miss Grace Dixon,
, Illinois; Chase S. Osborn, Michigan;
; Senator George H. Moses, New Hamp
? shire; Colonel John C. Greenway, Ari
i zona; Irwin R. Kirkwood, Missouri;
j Harold M. Sewall, Maine; William H.
; Runyon, New Jersey.
Governor O. H. Shoup, Colorado;
; Thomas W\ Miller, Delaware; Gover?
nor Peter Norbeck, South Dakota;
. Theodore Roosevelt, New York; Carl
', E. Milliken, Maine; Herbert S. Hadley,
Colorado; James R. Garfield, Ohio; E.
C. .Stokes, New Jersey.
Tax Exemption Urged
For IntangiblcPersonality
Commission Fixes the Assessed
Value of Real Property ?n
1 State at $12,703,024,301
ALBANY, Feb. 2.- The State Tax
Commission in its annual report, sent
! to the Legislature to-night, urges the
amendment of the law so as to make
all intangible personal property ""cx
empt from taxation. It is also recom?
mended that tangible personal property
either be classified and taxed at a uni?
form rate or be made exempt.
The corporation income tax will
amount to $32,000,000, and franchise
and gross earnings taxes to about
$13,000,000. This total of $45 000,000
is to be assessed and levied against be?
tween 00,000 and 70.000 corporations.
Total assessed value of real property
I \^TRIJCK$J I
p| The Mack Truck stands squarely upon ?B
M Its record off past performance? And ?p?
i| the Mack reputation looms bigger each ??1
M year. Hence we say "Performance im
|| Capacities 1% tona to 7% tonm H
I ?f?Ki^rioNAL Moro^ co. ?1
m 252 W. 64th Street. New York Citv 13
I "PERFORMANCE COUNTS |fl
in the state is fixed in the commission
report at $12,703,024,301. Personal
property other than bank stock is as?
sessed at $432,653,512, making a total
real and pers -nal property assessment
of $13.130.6*7.813. The net increase in
the assessed value of real estate over
1918 is $380.873,977. T
^^^^^^iSS^E?m^^^^^^m
ESSEX
MOTOR
CARS
In Performance as in Style
Essex Truly Leads
Its 50-Hoars at Top Speed Endurance Mark is Unmatched
But That is Proof of Only One of the Fine Car Qualities
Essex Brings to the Light Car Field
Thousands at first bought the Essex,
knowing nothing of its greatest quality.
Perhaps no one expected great endurance in
a light car. Perhaps its dynamic perform
ance appeal swept aside the natural caution
buyers feel about the durability of any new
car.
r..
* More speed they found. More power?
quicker acceleration ? finer hill - climbing
ability, and such riding ease as they had
never known in a light car.
I These tilings the Essex established
quickly. A ride was sufficient. It left no
vestige of comparison with former light car
performance standards.
1 Such attractions were irresistible to those
who knew former light car limitations.
But only time or abnormally abusive
tests can prove car endurance.
It Won on Endurance
Minus Useless Weight
Now Essex has met these require?
ments. Not only have more than 24,000
owners proved its dependable, punctual re?
liability and freedom from repair and re?
placement needs. Essex has set a new
world endurance mark of 3037 miles in 50
hours. It is the only official test ever made
of a stock car, driven at top speed for 50
hours. Counting other tests, the same Essex
stock chassis travelled 5870 miles in 94
hours, 22 minutes, actual driving time,
averaging more than a mue a minute. Of?
ficials of the American Automobile Asso?
ciation supervised the test and certified the
stock character of the Essex chassis in
every particular.
And another Essex stock touring car set
a world 24-hour road mark of 1061 miles,
over snow-bound Iowa roads. Not a single
adjustment or tire change was made.
Surely such endurance proofs must re?
double the value ofyEssex in the eyes of all.
It proves Essex a car you can buy to
keep. It means the day is past when one
need look only to large, costly cars for dis?
tinction in power, speed, reliability and
comfort. It means the retention through
years of those wanted car qualities of per?
formance and uninterrupted operation, even
after hardest service.
The Essex requires little attention. The
longer your acquaintance with it, the
greater will be your esteem. Every sense
of pride and satisfaction that comes with
the possession of fine car performance and
quality that yields to none, is yours with
the Essex.
Size Now No Bar to
Supreme Performance
But the most important diff?rence is re?
vealed only in action.
Even before its official records of endur?
ance it had become famous in all sections
for the way it out-performed many notable
cars. It holds hundreds of local records fbr
speed and hill-climbing.
Perhaps you have ridden in the Essest
If so you know its appeal. And you under?
stand the pride owners manifest.
They regard it with real affection, the
confidence men reserve for merit.
You will never class the Essex with other
light-weight cars. For one thing its appear?
ance instantly stamps it superior. You
recognize the finest unholstery, fitting! and
details that can be put into a car.
See Why Essex Made
a World's Sales Record
Pew care to extend the Essex to top
speed. But it is good to know almost limit?
less speed is yours when wanted.
Moreover, Essex power means accelera?
tion. It gives Essex right of way every?
where. It means that every performance
is met at half effort?thus accounting for its
long life.
These are reasons why in its first year
Essex set a new world's sales record with
more than $35,000,000 paid for more than
22,000 cars, in its first year.
This year it will be even more difficult to
supply the Essex demand. Thousands
waited last spring. Many were disappointed.
Yet at that time Essex had not given the
conclusive proofs of endurance, k now
holds. You will avoid having to wait fay
making your reservation now.
Hudson Motor Car Company of New York, Ina
BROOKLYN, N. Y.
14*1 BEDFORD AVE.
NEW ROCHELLE, N. T.
WHITE PLAINS
IM-1MI
BRONX, N. Y.
PUUNFIELD, N. J.
?0-192 Im* Fnmt S*r*?t
NEWARK, N. J.
SS? BROAD STREET
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