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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, November 25, 1922, Image 17

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030214/1922-11-25/ed-1/seq-17/

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^li Number of
December Notices
Lifts Cotton Tone
?y price? Are 17 to 37
poiirts Net Higher, Al
??ough Part of l-Mprove
jjjent I? ho&l Near Close
?,??? '?.s?**4* ***n December con
?Tw?terdA**-. ?mountin* to 11,400 i
* nt-Ut-d ^ b,?* S0 mUCh Under CX" I
***'*.m th**-14* '?'?e m?4r''*e''' received ? ;
f?rSt/u from which it -did not re- ;
W *"!?* .r although part of the im- ?
s* nt *?*? lost near the close.'
"*feS<!r>eS, nevertheless. sho*wed 17 ,
W ^?nW' net rise, and were only j
? points off irom the best of
j? *?*__,, .? ??he do?* wai? fairly bullish,
?*-5t*?J* ?oted th*t throughout th? day
?i It "*t[ rtMivinr by bulls, who ?old
?****_3ri*s? 2*-<-<*r>t l?*?'*1. w*? i" evi
* *S,?wrtl**rTnore pome of the Southern
?^J-Bterfd the Southern ?pot rnu.r
sf* J^deiivert?4*4 during January and
ja? WT.. t??e general ton? of the spot
"ttfi _'-,? hitter, with offerings rather
*_n_ n*a ""v*????_... _??_? '.. -.IT?.,
'^?'itwrti?ol ?i4--"- houses and Wall
i*** ?! ,m durin-r the first hour, in
?**"*"*_r?w ateadlness !n the stock market
?**? trftter ?P4" ''?"'*"' from the South.
?*??,'?!"-in the ?mail number of notices
lM??'*<\?. which *?*-"?*?*? Promptly
a littt If?lhe <,ay ,'xP?r*-? ?mount.
?""J-"*"*^ ?*?*?*"?*???'? d ?Pinners' taking? of
?* 44>. 2_S 417.i0*- hist week and 871,
***'?'"'? ??r ?d?1** *? th'' bullish serttl
?*' ' -i_i Wers, and It waa believed
*"SS_*# ?? 00t -??*????*?' to be much
**' fr****r- uniess Southern spot ofter
5*i*,f'Sioo:d 'ncreate
:Jt <_ -reported from New Orleans that
?ft*!?? were awaiting clearance for
?_??? and that export business was
*"??*m ?t interior points this season.
^-Tt> the ports. Dallas wirod that
*"1JX better spot demand existed there,
(j>tot ?oc!.?*- were ?o small ihat they
'*L? ?oon be g ??ne. The stocks at the
i*m l-iiing interior towns increased
%' iSiW bates this week, compared
j?? ta Increase of 35.OTO last week.
?, tru r.iy'. until the final half hour that
J'-jaloaillnif by early local purchasers
J-, ?D impr-sslon on the market, but
e? the ge'.i?at*k the demand appeared
i fiilrlv well distributed and from
??arces. Tho local market for spot
?mui steady and 25 points higher at
Jio sa!es were reported.
^trarfe of prices: Thur?.
Open High. l?w. Cloee. close.
15.27 25.62 25.20 25.48028.12 25.25
25.4 4 25.70 25.40 25 58025.58 25.38
26.38 25.38 25.37 25.58? - 25.40
Z7. 15.51 25.77 25.50 25.60025.86 25.46
? - - - 25.66? - 25.38
5? 15.38 25.67 25 37 25,49025.52 26.S?
E - - - 25.82?- 2*16
5.. 25.08 25.35 25.08 25.1701- 25.00
?.. 24.88 24.90 24.88 24.77? - 24.40
2? - - - 23.88? - 236?
?., 23 40 23.50 23.34 23.37? - 2S.20
W??rn Spot Markets ? Galveston
tttf, 25 points higher at ?5.68c; ?ales,
d?ales. New Orleans steady, 38 points
ft at 25 60c; sales, 2.300 bales. Mo
(ittady. 26 points higher at 25c; sales,
?kales* Savannah steady, 25 points
t?a si 25.25c; sales. 101 bales. Norfolk
wr, unchanged at 25.38c; sales. 227
August??, quiet, 25 points higher a?
?Se, sales. 336 bales. Memphis steady,
J-juvjed at 25.60c; sales, 3,000 bales. St.
i0 ?teady, unchanged at 26.60c; sales,
-Houston steady, ?20 points higher at
?je; sales, 1.463 bales. Little Rock
0?j, H point? higher at 25.75c; sales,
jiSales Dallas steady, 25 points hlgh
??24.8CC; sales, 3,635 bales. Mnnt
fistj firm, 19 points higher at 24.88c;
Si 17? bales. Fort Worth steady, 20
i higher at 24.80c: sales, 732 bales.
Cotton Statistics
Tester- Last Last
day. week. year.
Sweelpts... 45.188 ?4.855 23.J85
? - . 74,586 83.642 22,63?
?mrt season.. 2.045,605 1,869,643 2,244.412
it irtocks... 59.044 59,538 111,863
M itocks_1.196,878 1,194,687 1,465.329
i? receipts.. 43,527 42,387 16,817
'? ihipments. 55,499 40,949 19,026
? T. arrivals. 4.002 200 1,658
Urn-poo! Cable??Spot cotton quiet at 8
????ki advance ; middling, 14.80d. Sales,
UN t)?l*?; American, 3.000 bales. Im*
; :;i M.flOO bales; American, 3.000 bales.
?v.-irf?-ere du?-- 9t4 to 15 points higher.
>' opened qul-t but steady, at 10 points
?Iv?bc?, and closed very steady at 19 to
j v>\s,\* advance. Closing: December,
\i4M Januarv, 34.24(1; March, 14.95d;
Mit, U.H4*, July, 13.70d; October. 12.90d.
..?ascfctjtft*. Yarns dull; cloths mom de
.ii?nd. Th? l!.30d bids cabled to Liver
.-i'*..' fellows: I)?-c<mbir, 26.54c; January.
:Mt; Jfarch, 25.65c; May, 25.56c; July,
Cottonseed Oil
"Wit!*.-? of prices:
Thur.
Open. High. Dow. Close. close.
tot.... - - - 9.50?? 10.10 9.50
SW...,- 9.50? lO.HO 9.GO
????i, ?1.50 9.60 9.50 9.57? 9.58 9.42
?a.... 0 75 9.?2 9.73 9.76? 9.78 9-63
,%..,.- 9.86? 9.92 9.72
?*?-C_. 9.D8 10.C5 9.96 10.00?S10.?2 9.87
?prti...- 10.03? 10.10 9.90
It?.... 10.35 10.39 10.10 10.15tfine.18 10.02
,??..,- 10.20?10.27 10.05
Sugar antl Coffee
tawSnrar Futures?The range of prices:
Thurs.
Open. High. Dow. Close. close
?*>?... 3.91 3.92 3.90 3.91? 3.92 3.8?
Ja?....-3.75(5* 3.80 3.74
r-b. 3.52 3 02 3.52 3.53?- 3.64
?weh.. 3 51 3.62 3.49 3.51? 3.52 3.50
April,... -, ?_-3.57?- 3.66
*'??*>? ... 3.63- 3.65 3.52 3.64? 3.85 3.62
la?,... --3.70?- 3.68
?$.... 3.74 3.76 3.74 3.76? 3.77 3.74
i.V....- 3.80?- 3.79
S**t.... 3.84 3.86 3 81 3.85? 3.87 3.84
Coffee Futures?Tbe range of prices:
Thurs.
Open. High. Low. Close. close.
N'or....-@- 9.85
i*eo- 9.67 9.94 ?.?7 9.94?- 9.86
?L**""4.-9.83?- 9.77
Fob.....-,- .-. 9 -/sg,- 9.88
.'Fa-en.. iM 9 6-, 9 6Q y gl@ 9 62 g 90
?*??!... - .-9.47?- 9.46
? 9.33 J.35 ?1.31 9.32? 9.33 9.33
.. ?.- - 9.18 j- 9.19
?J.y---. 9.0? 9 Or, 9.06 9.06? 9 06 9.06
m....-_- 8.82?- 8.1)2
^P?**.. i.SC 8.60 S.60 8.60?-8.?I
-?-,-,- ?.
Country Produce
Ritter,?Receipts were 6,060 packages.
wan4.?!*}-, higher than extras, lb.. 63'^?
it' '?Xirii- '?'- score, 55c; firsts, 42',-j?
?K. ???rond?. 40?41c; lower grades. 38?
?c; centralir.-d cars, 90 score, 47'4*@48c;
??core, 45(5 4Cc; S3 score. 42?43'_c; 85
",'' ?*",**. 4(??41c; unsalted, higher than
-..r?!, 55g;.?;<?; extras, 92 Bcore, 64?
*??; firsts, 4 r. (5* & 3 o ; seconds. 42?43?ic;
?fftdes, 3914 ?41c; held creanrery.
-a* ?Jeoring, ^:\^r^i-r; extras, 46H ?
j!"*. Brats, -tl?-@4Cc; seconds, 3 9'?,?
"J??-. ?t?te dairy tuba, rtnest, 510620;
SfutT P-"1"1^. 46@50c; common to fair,
?!.**?c; ladles current make, extras, 37?
I;-?1-, firsts, 35?-4?36*t4c; seconds, 34 V, ?
'??.lower gradps, 33?34c; packing stock,
*JLA?make* Nc'* 1- 34 H ?36c; No. 2,
""???o; lower grades, 28 0221)40.
rS*???Receipts were 1,861 boxea. Wew
?J? ?ate fiats June, specials, 27@27"^c;
r?!? run, 26@28%e; New York State
'.-? ireah specials, 26V4?27c; averars
Wis insln, do_ble Daisies. 26 Vi?
'-T-V-i-a Ve,. i'i,,LsleE. 26%?27c; Young
mfcR*t(:li1'-4 wer? 9.995 cases. Fresh
tm> * ext'1''4** dozen, 67?70c; extra;
J? nrsts. ?. F66c; firsts, 56?62c; sec
*fS *i??s2c: fresh and ht-ld, lower
Srjw@*10c; irado eggs. 26?30o; dtr
?iflj,'?* J. 2?-?-.'3c; No. 2 and poorer,
-?v? check"-. poor to choice, dry, 20?
t, L?'r'Ef?rator extra firsts, charges paid
..'? L * '?i4;'-s* ?l?3So; firsts. 28 H <$
-'?.aecondH and poorer, *-3@28c; checks.
n?t? ?'"?ndli-l. 20??22c: refrigerator
'-'?*_. ?**arb-- 32?42c; Faciilc Coast,
-Ijr'? ';thcr *-v'istern. 30r3 35c; refrlg
'"-:? ?? immersion proce-s, nearby
(??!?? Io?5?c; Pacific Coast whites, 42
J****t*rn brown and mixed, 33?
'a New Jersey hennery whites,
?*a%i?' t4:'"?s, 81? 82c; nearby hen
?i-\, ltPK- extras, locally candied, 82c;
-'?-%. *n<i l!*arby Western hennery
?Hfragc extras, 75?80c; extra
rtii4*-'' "r-'ts. 65fg(JSc; nearby
f ,. "' *'-> ?*?:-. hrsts to extra firsts, 66
_> ^ ta*.?iir KruAe*, 52? 63c; pullets'
? "r"?ed. small out, 53?65c; mixed.
? ?mall, <2@44c; Pacific Coast.
? ?jy-l**' "*i?"7c; extra firsts. 70?
I?-?. S5?68c; under grades. 66?63c;
^ ? trnall to medium. 42?54c; other
'?-"? Southern, gathered whites,
' ,. 1* ?T"-!4py hennery browns, ex
? ?sssoc. other nearby, hennery
? **? ?-xtrag. 72? 76c
?3t?t<u?_^. ,*?')'
"tf, nf7<?*rs"y Cants, |1.65? 1.60;
/'It:*.. ?2.25?ir2.35*. 100 lbs.. 81.90
*?-. l??'Afiia'*(i* *so *hs.. $2.85?3; 150
II? i?? 50L 165 lbs-- ?2*76? 2.90;
;?? \?. ,,lb8- ?2.35-:':?2.50; Pennsylvania,
ia*t"18 2.50; Virginia, bbl., $1.62
'lK?'.**'*2?'31.50; sweets, Jersey,
??C&61.15; Eastern Shore, bbl.,
<tv' W?fiT5c 'are and *4l*"'>,'an<1. ?*?>?
L-^tock. Meats, Prorisions
'*'?'? fair t Te*terd4'*-*'* Year ?if?.
^**To?ai- ???"????? ~#
.'?de? ib
T v':ai?. m?: ?084, -19 ?0**? ?"
?4E to pr?me.
^UiM ;*4*,* 7'.60?12.60 ?.50913.00
M
i^iK*?*-?-; 09? -20- ?"?
What Things Cost
Quotation? ar? cash prices in primary market? *
Commodity and ?mit. I?_m.s.?. .,__,_?
FOODS? v . _, IM'I-M 1i.-_an.-e.
2TA?__.? S::::::::- ?F" ?'_$ ?? ?S
o.t* <No. 2 whiu? _B. ?J "gt" "I* *9^?
??&?_?.ym ? ? ?s
SB rS__?.:r:. :?:. Ai V *? "S
??S??.*.:::.: 5i?- 8*!* : :i:
TEXTILES " *42!/?
Cation <m_ddHi.K ..pl_n_) Sh.257 ?M ?M, i4LI
Print ctom <3S.|?. ?*? r?.10 ,0 ??'* ?
Silk (raw, Kuuel Na. 1> Ik... S.38?* ?.s s sina _ut __?'___ ?'2?*
?J ?-*- ~?> ?. 1.40S?.? S3?SS 1a7:S ?S
St*?! MUtts (Pittefcarih) tan... 31.00 3? 00 ??an -____
asa?r;.?!*i ?? -t ?. ?
8Wfe~: ?* ir I ?
BUBBER. HIDES, ETC.? *"*
_._____"_ <?_____!__*_?"fc*lto> ?*???? JM"4 JM--. B4l/_ 1B-/_
HM?m (ealfritin., elt,) ? t. 1t Ib. 3.?O 3.W 10'S 2l?
Coal (fnrnac.) ?.n...... **M ?^ JJ? J g
to prim?. 10.
_.__.-,-_. v. ' ? ' * V ' ? *-?>?<??? ?.??s** 8,oe?ii.o?
Dresaed lamb?.
.,c"y. -?>.?0? .2. .17iS> .2.1
Hogs, 100 lb?- S.UQi.16 7.60?g.00
Dressed hogs, ba?
ta..0..'1' H\ ?.1<%-?.14.. .1314?.14-?
Fork, bbl. Ji.MiS'ae.OO 26.00S?25 26
Mes? beef bbl... 1?.00<_.1T.00 1.00?14.00
Dard, Middle
We?t, 100 lb?.. l_.S_ei_.3R 9.75 0 9.15
Union Pacific Attacks
S. P.-C P. Consolidation
WASHINGTON, Nov. 24. ? Union
Pacific Railroad representatives con?
tinued to-day under cross-examination
their attack before the Interstate
Commerce Commission on the applica?
tion of the Southern Pacific to retain
control of the Central Pacific system.
Much of the day was occupied by F. L.
Burkhaltar, assistant general manager
of the Southern Pacific lines, in a dis~
cussion of the results the Supreme
Court expected to have accomplished in
recently ordering tho dissolution of
the two companies.
Throughout the examination of Mr.
Burkhalter, H. W. Clark, counsel for
the Union Pacific, sought to draw the
admission that the court's provision
for common use of tracks, terminals
and facilities, even after separation,
prevented any financial risk to the
companies concerned or any weakening
of transportation machinery available
to the Pacific Coast communities.
Ralph Budd, president of the Great
Northern Railway, who was in the city
yesterday from Washington where he
attended the Interstate Commerce Com?
mission hearings on consolidation of
the northwestern roads, said thpt if
the commission consented to the
Northern Pacific, Great Northern and
Burlington merger steps would Im?
mediately be taken to bring about
greater unification in the form of a
.ingle corporation.
B. R. T. Net Increases
The October 'report of the Brooklyn
Rapid Transit Company showed net
income, after taxes of 1799,710, an in?
crease of $166,664 over October, .921.
October gross amounted to $8,004,046,
a gain of $208,135. Surplus, after
charges, was $259,828, an improvement
of $238,193.
Four months grois amounted to
$12,140,178, a gain of $838,881 over tho
corresponding four months of 1921.
Net, after taxes, was $3,270,896, an
increase of $106,770. ."Surplus, after
chargea, totaled $1,032,114, a gain of
$308,017.
New York Metal Market
Tin was quiet, but steady, with
| Straits quoted at 35.60@36.87-?ci
| Straits shipments, 35.75ii36.26c; stand
| ard, 35.50c, and 99 per eent, 36.37V_@
35.50c. Copper quiet; standard, spot,
November and December, 13.25(g.
13.62Vic and electrolytic, spot, Novem?
ber and December, 18.62H? 14c. Lead
firm; New York, spot, 7.26c, and East
St. Louis, spot, 6.86c. Zinc weak: New
York, spot, 7.22Hc, and East St. Louis,
spot, 6.?5@7c. The American Smelting
and Refining Company advanced their
price of lead from 7 to 7.10c, New
York; East St. Louis, 6.80 to 6.90c.
Prices of Wheat
Move Upward on
Foreign Advances
Talk of Liberal European
Buying an Influence;
Ci?se Is Unsettled, 3-4
to 1-8 Cent Net Higher
CHICAGO, Nov. 24.?Wheat moved
upward in price to-day, largely by way
of response to the course of values at
Winnipeg and Liverpool. The close was
unsettled, %c to l->ic net higher. Corn
finished unchanged to %c up, oats with
% to %c gain and provisions varying
from the same as yesterday's close to
a rise of 20c.
it waa an accepted explanation here
that advance? In the Winnipeg market
were due to attempts on the part of cash
interest* to get wheat to fill November
oontracta. Upturn? at Liverpool were In?
terpreted as the result of similar con?
ditions there, and v-'-ro given special no
tic? becaure of taking placo despite de?
cline? here yesterday. Talk of liberal
.European buying at the ?caboard tended
aleo to favor the bull edle of the market.
Beside? 215,000 bushel? of No. 2 hard wa?
taken here for export.
Word that a projected loan to Germany
had apparently met with defeat fallad
to check the ascent of the market, being
offset by persistent gossip about other
rlans for financing European purchase of
!nlted State? surplus food product*. In
addition, primary receipts wsre less liberal
than of lato, and Minneapolis stocka de?
creased 70,000 bushels for the week, the
first reduction in months.
Grain Prices
.VTieat
Teetsrday's Previous Year
close. closo. ago.
No. 2 hard_$1.35% $1.84% Jfl.21
Chicago?Range of prices:
Wed.
Open. High. Low. Close, close.
Dec. 1.17% l.if 1.17% 1.18% 1.1??
May. 1.16% 1.17.4 1.16% 1.17% 1.I6?4
July. 1.17% 1.08% 1.01% 1.08% 1.07%
Corn
Yesterday's Previous Year
close. close. ago.
No. S yellow..$0.?1 $0.90.4 .0.70
Chicago;
D-oomber.70% .70% -60%
May .70% .70% .55%
July .69% .69% -
Out?
Yesterday's Previous Year
oIobo. close. ago.
No. 2 yellow..$0.64 $0.63% 50.43
Decemb?r.43% .4. .33%
May.43% .42% .8SV_
July.39% .3?% ?
Bye
Yesterday'? Previous Year
close. close. ago.
No. 8 wh.,f.o.b.$1.0B% $1.02% $0.94%
Flour and ..leal
Yesterday'? Previous Year
close. close. ago.
Sp. pt.$f!.76*| 7.26 $6.75_i? 7.25 $6.75?. 7,25
Corn'l. 2.104, 2.?0 2.10*?_ 2.1{0 1.60(0' 1.70
Rye..., 5.26'if 5.60 6.25? 6.60 6.26? 5.(6
i p?an..$1.600.1.60 31.60$>32.00 26.00? -
London Metal Market
LONDON, Nov. 24.?Standard copper,
spot, ?61 15s; futures, ?62 15s. Elec?
trolytic, spot, ?60 10s; futures, ?70.
Tin, spot, ?174 18s 6d; futures, ?175
15s. Lead, spot, ?26 5s; futures, ?26
2s 6d. Zinc, spot, ?36 2s 6d; futures,
?34 7s 6d.
Stock Suspended
By Exchange Day
Following Listing!
Action on North Ameri?
can Oil Shares Re?
sults From Wide Dis?
crepancy in Prices
The shares of *the North American
Oil Company, which were admitted to
trading on tho Stock Exchange Thurs- j
day morning, were summarily suspend-'
ed from dealings yesterday by the gov?
erning committee, who met immediately
-after the close of the stock market.
This action, taken on the recommenda?
tion of the stock listing committee, re?
sulted from a wide discrepancy be?
tween the bid and asked prices of the
stock compared with Thursday, when
aetual sales took place between 29 and
32%.
Attempts to sell the stock yesterday
brought out the fact that at times
there were no bids in the market, while
offerings were reported as low as $10
a share. A statement issued by the
Stock Exchange listing committee said
that every attempt had been made
shortly after 10.o'clock yesterday to
get in touch with the officers of the
company with regard to the collapse in
the bid price for the shares.
It was further explained that the
company's application to have its stock
listed was approved in thirty-five let?
ters of commendation, a number of
which came from some of the most
prominent financial institutions in this
city.
"As far as the opening price of the
stock the day it was listed is con?
cerned," the statement added, "none of
the members of tho listing committee
had any idea that it would open at 30,
The committee tried to get in touch
with officers of the cofnpany, but with?
out success."
It was stated that no action had been
tnken with regard to Thursday's trans?
actions, when 1,400 shares were sold.
It is believed, however, that these deal?
ings may be canceled.
Rollins, Kalbfleisch & Co. acted as
specialists in the stock, but none of
the partners would vouchsafe any In?
formation as to why there were no bids
in the market at times yesterday.
Cameron N. Pulley, secretary of the
company, said he believed that some
confusion had arisen over the exchange
of certificates, due to the similarity of
rame of one of the subsidiary compa?
nies with that of the parent company.
No dealings in North American Oil had
ever been recorded on any other ex?
change, but sales in North .-.merican
Oil and Refining on the curb Thursday
ranged between $2 and ?8 a share.
These shares nre exchangeable on the
basis of two for one of the holding
company.
According to the statranent submit?
ted to the Stock Exchange, the com?
pany is a holding concern with
2,000,000 shares authorized, of no par
value. There were 856,580 shares
listed, with permission to add 483,093
shares on official notice of issuance in
exchange for shares of subsidiaries.
The balance sheet showed that the
company on September 30 had only
$25,023 of working capital. Inventories
were valued at $62,805. Earnings last
year, before interest charges, depletion
and depreciation, were equivalent to 80
cents a share.
Officers include Clay J. Webster,
chairman of the board; Charles F. Col
cord, president: John E. McDonnell,
vice-president: David I. Johnston, vice
president, and Charles B. McCluskey,
treasurer.
Would Alter Insurance Laws
Ten insurance men were named as a
committee yesterday to draft suitable
changes in insurance laws in order to
permit fire, marine and casualty com?
panies to write other kinds of policies
than the class their charters specifical?
ly call for. Francis R. Stoddard jr.,
State Superintendent of Insurance, who
appointed the comittee as the result of
a conference with ofRclftls of leading
companies, said that he did not believe
the time was ripe yet for altering the
law so that companies can handle all
kinds of insurance.
It is the object of the State Insur?
ance Department to make it possible
for companies to furnish coverage re?
quired by present business develop?
ment without breaking down entirely
tho barriers which separate the differ?
ent classes of companies.
Markets in Other Cities
Baltimore
Bond?
S*le. Open. High. Low. I_ast.
$3000Cosdan ?s ....110 110 110 110
1000 Mac D S _?. . . . .5 50 .& ?5
1000 Mon V?l 7s. . . . 91$.i 98% 88% ?8%
1000 Norf P Tr 6s,. 88 H 88% 88 H ?SU
4000 Nor Cent 6a A. .8% 98*14 98% 88?
2000 do 6s B. 611.4 9&% 98% 98 H
loooo Power 6s. '49. .108% 10??I 108 102
1000 do 7?, '31_107 107 107 107
1000 Union tno 4?... 55% 65,4 *??>% 65%
Stock?
38 Arundel . 40% 41 40% 41
1 Ben Com. 88% 8.V_ 83% 83%
ISCoal . 97 97 97 ?7
4 C & P pf.108 % 108 % 108 H 108%
162Citl_en?' Bank. 44% 44% 44% 44%
lOComl Cr con... 67% 58 67% 88
17 Bait H Mill?... 22% 38% 28% 2.%
40 Mer Bank_ ?1 21 ?1 21
leOMfrsFinSd- 27% 27% 27% 27%
169 Md Cas .110 HO 109 10?
10 Mt Vernon pf. . 68% 56% 66% 68%
392 New Ams Cas.. 46 46 .6 _6
16 Pa Water -306% 106% 106% 10. %
16 Pub S Bid? pf. ?9 99 99 9?
12 Power 7? pf. ..108% 108% 108 % 1.8%
25 do com .10?% 109% 109% 109%
18 Nor Central.... 21 81 il Si
SUSP.149 14. 149 14?
30WBA. 18% 13% 18% J.8%
Boston
Mining
276 Adventure ... $0 50 60 60
25 Ahmeek . 87 67 67 67
60 Anaconda .... 46% 46% 46% 46%
100Arcadl?n . 2% 2% 2V4 2%
HBInscham . 18% 18% 18% 18%
163 Cal & Arta_ 63 53% 53 53
65 Cal Hecla.270 276 270 275
200 Carson . 6% 6% ? % 6%
1?6 Copper Range. 36% 37** 36% 37>4
245 Davl? Daly.... 2% 2% 2% 2%
100 Eaijt Butte.... 7% 7% 7% 7%
240 Franklin . 1% 1% 1% 1%
50 Indiana . 26 25 2. 26
225 Island Creek.. 10? 103% 108 198%
15_Ceweenaw ... 1% 1% 1% 1%
l.I.aka Copper.. 3 __ 3% 8% 3%
75 Ml ehI?an . 2 2 2 2
85 Mohawk . 66 66 ?6% 66
26 New River_87 ?7 8T 87
70 Nlplssin? . 6% 5% 6% 6%
60 North Butte.. 6% 8% 8% I
20Ojlbway . 1% 1% ?K
90 Pond Creek... 18 It 17%
4 QUIncy . SI 81 81 81
20 Shannon . ?7 67 ?7 ?7
3 OKt Mary's Ld. 38 3? 38 38
40 Sup Copper... 3% 3% 3% 8%
300 Sup * Boston. 1% 1% 1% 1%
100 Trinity . 1% 1% 1% 1%
if S Smelters. 36% 36% 38% 36%
18 do pf. 47% 47% 47% 47%
60 Utah Apex- 3 3 3 3
40 Utah Con?- 2 2 2 2
6 Utah Copper.. 61% 61% 61% 61%
625 Utah Metal?.. 1? 1? 1 l?
15 Wolverine .... 7% 7% 7% 7%
Railroad?
23 Bo? A Albany.144 146 144
105 Bost Blev. 81% 81% 81
2 do pf.100 100 l6o
3 do 1st of...118 11? 118
2$ do 2d pf-101% 102
100 Bo? & Maine.. 19 1?
16 do pf. 23% 28%
10 Conn & Pa?? pf 7?
21 C J 8 pf. ?I
70 Easter. Mas?. 21
10 do pf. 6?
640 do pf B. 68%
282 do tnitt ctfs 37
40 Maine Central. 45
280 N T,NH_H. 21%
10 OJd Colony_ 80
160 Vermt & Mass 97
Miscellaneous
26 Am A?r pf.... 59% 68%
82 Amoskeair _110 110% 110
100 Am Pneu. 3% 8% 3%
10 Am Sugar pf.._?7 107 107 107
761 Am Tel * Tel.122% 122% 1?3% li2%
12 Am Wool pf..108% 10?% 109% 108%
20 A? MeUJ .... 14 14% 14 14%
60 Bo? Con O pi..107 107 107 107
IS Booth. i% ?% >% |%
60 So? Max Pet?. 16 15 16 15
86 Eastern S 6.. 83 88 ?S 83
ll?_D_l?on . ......176 IT? IT? l??
21 Elder.10 10 10 10
17%
40 ?alv Houston.. 30
105 Gardner. ?V4
4? Gray. 10
6 Greenfield . ... 19
6 Hood. 47',4
110 Int Cornent . . 34
57 .T T Connor ... 25
160 Libby. 74
Opea. Hirt-. Low. fuant. I
m V.
. 87
- 68*4
. 1>H
. 24
. 83
8
.117
. 60
? 19V4
.165
. 80
.107
44
411-4
30
9%
10
19
47 V,
34 V?
26 y*
7 Mi
10 %
87
694
12 4
25
84
8
117
50
3SM
165 Vt
80
26
32 %
16 Loew
7 Mass Gas . ...
63 do pf .
26 Mex Invest .
29 MiS6 Jitv Pow
14 do pf .
70 Nftt Leather
1 Now Eng Tel
50 New Eng OH.
219 Orpheum ....
100 Pac Mills ...
15 Plant pf .
162 Swift.
96 Torrlngton . .
1? Vn Drug 1st pf 46%
100 United Fruit..161
665 United Shoe
30 V 3 Steel .
168 Ventura . .
36 Waldorf . .
276 Waitham .
46 do pi . 12 V,
510 Warren.25 H
20 do 1st pf . .. 3 4
Bonds
81000 A G W 6s- {14
5000 Carson HU? 7s. 97
3000 Mie? Riv F Es. 93
5000 Swift 5fl . 96
13000 Warren B 7??. 107
2000 West T St ? 5s. 95 9
Boston Curb
Bid. Asie
Alpha.32
Bay State G 7
Bohemia . . 70
Bos & Ely..66
Bos & Mont 6
Calaveras . . 2
Chief Con... 4%
Cn Copr nw. 3V+
Crystal new. 1-flr
Denbigh.6
Ragle Bbell. 2
Bure Croes. .24
30
94
9%
19
47 ?_
34
24%
7-rV
10
37
li-?
24
83
7%
117
50
litt
3 65
80
30
9%
9%
19
474
34ty
254
7 A
10
87
?94
il?
24
83
7%
137
50
Xf M
165
80
1074 167 1074
444 48% 44V?
46% 46% 4*14
361 151 161
41V4
10374 103% 102% 103
264
3rl4
2 4
1???
27
34 y*
614
97
93
96
107
13
8
80
69
7
2*?.
6$
!
7
2
28
2?
32V4
24
12
25%
34
51V4
87
93
96
106
96
Bid.
3?
32%
24
12
?6
34V?
9T
63
96
10?
96
Gadsdep
Hoina.3
La Rose ... 15
Majestic . . . 6
Mutual Div. .28
Nixon .... ?
Oneco .... 20
)5vn Metais..?
Texaua .... 4
In Ver Ext.26% 26
Yukon .... 65 70
^slc.
80
5
20
7
30
4
30
S
<
Chfcaffo
?ates.
60 Am Rad pf ..320
110 Armour-pf ... 99 H
162 Armour Leath. 124
6 do pf . 87
SCen III P S pf 92
226 C?I C _ C R K 6H
150 Chi Elev Ry pf 6 4
230 Common Edl .13?
6 Concum pf . .. 86 4
3900 Cont Motors .. 104
26 Crane pf .112
15 Deere pf . 72
150 Kfirl Motors .
20 Fair pf ..103
20 Gt Lakes D .. 88
426 Godchaux . ..
200 H Oossard . .
300 Hupp Motors.
126 Inland Steel .
171 Libby
Open. High. Ijow. Last.
120 120
99 H 99 4
124
87
92
?%
6
1
87
92
6-4
120
994
124
87
92
IM
4 ?4
13?4 1364 1364
' 6?V4 66
B
10% 10%
1114 Hl4
72 4 7?4
12
274
22 4
43
1%
165 Mld West Util 46
do prior Hin.163% 108% 1034
29 %
60
600 Moni Wttr? ..20%
77 Nat Leath new 7%
3416 ?Pig Wig . ... 4?
46 Public BervlCe.lOS
76 do pf . ?6 4
16 Quak Oats pf. 97%
526 Keo Motor? ... 18%
7? Stand Gas ... 18
160 do Pf . 49
J410 8t?w War _67
S6? Swift & Co ..107
?66 Swift Int _ 3?
60 'J H Thompson 49
2136 Unit Carbide . 68
120 ?n Ltally.. iS
70 do ?f . 7T4
90 Unit Pap?r ... 16
10 U 8 Qrv Pf ..106 4 106 4
86 W?b?. 62% 62%
187 ?Wri*l?y.11? llj
16 ?Yellow Mfg .162 182
7? -?Teilo*** Tagf .. 76% 71
{?16?J0f)O Corn ?di ???i0 f?9
8606 Com El 1st 5* M ?<
8 nies.
1600 P S N III
2000 Swift 6s ,
?Ex-divldend.
Open. High.
6s. -2V4 93%
...96 9? -
Low. Last.
92'_. 82 H
96 96
Bid
CJev Ry. . ?6
Firestone.. 70
do pf 6a 97
do pf 7s 88
f?oodyear.. 9
Cleveland
ASk.
74
loo
?o
11
Detroit
1200 Chsr Iron pf.. 2
322$ Cont Motors. . 10%
10 I>et Edison...110%
25 Hall Lamp Co. 27%
226 Motor Wheel. 11%
200 Nftt Grocer... 6%
500 Noble Oil pf. 58
925 Packard . 19%
25 da pf . 92%
150 Paigr. . 24%
1.6 Parke Davis.. 136V.
400 Reo . 18%
..26 Tlmken Axle. 30%
10 do pf . SO
Philadelphia
300 Am Qap . ?1%
100 Am 8lores . .16?
81 Erie Lisht . . 26
86 Eleenlohr _78%
198 In? Co N A. . 40%
150 Lake Superior. 6%
76 Lehigh Nov. . 72
420 Phl'u Rap Tr 88%
102 J'hll Co Cu pf 41%
640 PhIJa Blec_ 31%
147 do pf. 31
76 Phlla Tractlqn 66%
66 Tnth Nt Bk W 28
2S0 Uni Oes Imp. 49%
120 do pf. 66%
20 Union Traction 41
10 York Ry pf.. 35%
Bond?
$1000 Am G ft El 6s 87%
2000 Ei ft P?o Ct 4s 68
4000 PhiJa Ei 1st 6s 99%
7000 Phlla El 6%s.l00%
3000 Phlla Ei 6?.f .304%
Ooodyr pf
Peerless...
Sher Will.
do pf. . .101 104
Bid.
25
?4
.7
Ask.
27
66
29
100'
104<
87% 87%
68 68
99% 99%
100% lOO1*
104% 104%
Pittsburgh
200 Am Vit Prods.. 8 8
170 Ark Nat Gas. . 8% 8%
100 Con Ice. 5% 6%
186 do pf . 32 32%
170 Ind Bwg com.. 6 6
.86 do pf . 10% 10%
lOMfrs Light_ 56% 6?%
10 Ohio Fuel Sup. 59 59
146 Okla Nat Gas.. 22 23
24 Pitts PI Glass..187 187
600 PHts Mt Shas. 24 24
76 Pitts Oil Gas. . 9 9
200 Salt Creek Con. 10% 10%
33 West Air Bke.. 95 95
10 West Penn_ 32 32
Montreal
Abltlbl P ft P. ?3% 63%
Asbestos Cofp. 66% 66%
Belt Telephone.Ill 111
Brazil T L ft P. 43% 44
? Em cum 1st pf 7?. 67% 67%
do 2d pf 7s. 27% 27%
Brompton Paper.... 2?% 34
Can Car * Fury pf. . ?2% 02%
Can Cement. 75% 78%
MtJ L 11 & V Cons.. ?9% 98%
Quo Ry L H ft P- 22% 23
Spanish River. 90% 91
do pf.100 10.
Steel Co of Can. $9 69
Rlordon Pulp ft Paper old com.
do .
do .
8
8%
5%
32
6
10% 30%
66 Vi 56%
59 5?
8%
6%
38%
22
387
24
2 2
111
24
9 9
30% 30%
96 96
12 32
63 63%
65 86
111 111
43% ?3%
?7% 67%
27% 27%
83% 34
??% 62%
75% 76%
?*>?% ??%
2_% 23
?0% ?1
100 100
$7% 67%
Bid. Ask.
6% ?%
60 70
7% ?
Toronto
Bid.
Atla? . . ..10
Ballsy . . . .?
Chmbr? Fri. 1
Oonlaga? . . . 1%
Crown Hsv. 26
Grt Nrthn ..?
Gold Reef... 1
H_rgr?v_s...?
kol)in?er. . 11%
Lake Shore. _%
Mng Crp Cn V.
Ark.
25
1
6
2%
30
a
4
8
12
3
1
I Bid.
Newray . . ..20
Ptrsn Laka-.io
Pore Crown.20
Pore Tsdl ..-_
Pore Imp . .?
I'm E Do in? 5
Tck Hgh?.. .86.
Tmnki.ni . 20
Thmp Kr t . 1
.Vn.aplka .. 5
West I-ome.lt.
Aak.
M
25
8
3
15
10ft
40
6
15
20
Automobile Plant
Schedules Better
Than Anticipated
Large Companies Report
Great Increase in Dealers ;
Truck Makers to Launch
a National Campaign
Ap?elo! Dispatch to Th? Tribune
DETROIT, Nov. 24.?Though busi?
ness in the latter part of the year is
showing considerable decrease from
tho earlier months, most of the im?
portant automobile companies in the
district have already passed the pro?
duction marks they had set, and out?
put in these late days represent net
gains over early anticipations. Com?
panies with adequate closed body sup?
ply arc still meeting ? large immediate
sale demand, and arc rounding out a
very satisfactory production schedule
with cars for early spring demand.
_ _More Dealer?
Reports of large companies on
denier organizations show tremendous
increases in number over those of a
year ago. During 1922 the policy of
opening up territory to many repre?
sentatives has been steadily noted as
taking dealers away from the smaller
companies, and the reports for the
year show how heavy these inroads
have been. '
Truck companies in the specialiied
unit field working with manufacturers
of special parts are preparing to make
an aggressive effort to obtain a larg?
share of the business now opening up
in the truck market. An orgnnizatior
comprising the larger truck companies
and parts makers was perfected this
week which will launch a national cam
paign to illustrate the advantages ol
this particular type of vehicle in trans
portation service and will work tc
bring about a much higher class 01
dealer representation.
Predict Keen ?Competition
A continuation of keen competitor
in the automotive industry during 192;
will strengthen the well-established
well-financed and well-managed com
panics, but will put many of th<
weaker ones to the final test.
This is the outstanding conclusion o:
a survey just completed by the Moto:
and Accessory Manufacturers' Associa
tion among its 423 members, who an
the principal makers of parts, unit
and equipment for the automotive in
duntry.
Unremitting vigilance in grnntini
credit, optimism tempered by cautioi
and prudence qualified by forwar?
looking faith in tho dynamic progres
of the automotive industry?these ar
salient ideas stressed by the director
and financial executives who sent thei
views to M. L. Heminway, general man
ager of the association.
Representing the vehicle manufac
turers, A. R. Erskine, president of th
Studebaker Corporation, said:
"The outlook for 1923 in respect t
credit, finance and sales is most en
couraging. I believe the volume neu
year will equal if not exceed this year.
"In general," says G. Brewer Griffu
manager of the automotive departmer
of the Westinghouse Electric an
Manufacturing Company and a directo
of the association, "we are watchful]
optimistic regarding the, automotiv
vehicle business for 1923, as the gei
eral business of the entire countr
promises to be better than during 192
"Dealers must be careful not to ove
extend their credit capacities by sal?
on too low initial payments and t<
long time payments, if the support <
the local banks is needed or expecte
There is a danger to the dealer in sel
ing cars to 'good moral risks' who ha?
no fixed income, unattached real e
t?te or anything beyond a small sala?
or wages. All paper taken by deale
should have at least one good indors
ment."
According to many repr?sent?t!4
parts manufacturers, 1923 will be tl
final test of financial strength for sma
automobile manufacturers.
Business News
Primary Markets Show Little
Activity as New Season Nears
*>
Wholesale and Retail Dis
tributo? Reported To Be
Carrying Light Stocks;
New Styles Are a Factor
Local wholesale markets continue to
show lessened activity, which is partly
a seasonal development, nnd to some
extent believed due to the unsettled
.trice situation. Buyers who arc in the
market are generally indifferent to
talks of further advance?, nnd display !
an attitude of preferring to be snort!
of merchandise rather than to pay the
prices that prevail for many commodi?
ties at primary sources. Out-of-town
wholesalers are particularly inactive at
present, and, according to reports
.eaching the market here, are carrying
small stocks. Retailers are believed to
be in much the same position. This is
taken as an indication that the mar?
kets will be active shortly after the
turn of the year. In turn the future
buying policies of the wholesale and
retail distributors will depend largely
upon the buying temper displayed by
the consumers once holiday shopping
is out of the way.
Current wholesale trade is compara?
tively inactivo in the major textile and
apparel lines, but last-minute holiday
demands are keeping up a brisk busi?
ness in novelty goods, jewelry and
other lines that appeal to Christmas
shoppers.
The feeling that style changes in
spring merchandise will be marked also
has some effect in delaying forward
commitments from the retail merchants
at this time.
Commercial Credit
The commercial money market con?
tinued fairly active and firm. Com?
mercial paper is discounting at 4% and
5 per cent in the local market, with
higher rates prevailing in other money
centers.
The American Acceptance Council
yesterday quoted the following dis?
count rates on prime bankers' accept?
ances eligible for purchase by Federal
Reserve banks:
Bid Ask
30 day? .4V_ 4
60 days.4V_ 4
90 days .4V. 4
120 days .4V4 4
150 days .4V_ 4V4
Call loans against acceptances, 4"i
per cent .
? ?
Failures Increase This Week
Despite -the improvement in general
business the commercial failure rate
continues high. A 80 per cent increase
is reported in the number of failures
this week, compared with last week by
Bradstreei's, who place the number of
defaults for the week ending November
23 at 497, compared with 378 last week,
367 in the like week a year ago and 200
in 1920.
R. G. Dun & Co. report 436 failures
this week, against 431 last week. The
Pacific Coast showed a large increase
in defaults, the report adds, with 57.1
per cent of tho total number of fail?
ures, involving liabilities of $5,000 or
more in each case.
To Hold Dry Goods Meeting
The National Retail Dry Goods' As?
sociation will hold its annual conven?
tion in this city on February 7, 8 and
9, Lew Hahn, managing director, an?
nounced yesterday. The convention
usually brings between 1,000 and 2,000
dry goods and department store owners
to the city. Further plans for the con?
vention and the selection of a hotel
will be announced later.
Wool Strong at London
LONDON, Nov. 24.?The market at
to-day's wool auction was strong.
Prices of the best greasy 66-58 entire?
ly recovered yesterday's losses, and are
now fully up to the October levels.
American buyers paid 10 per cent
above October rates for all superior
slips wools grading above 48s. The
highest price paid for 56s halfbred
lambs' wool was 27d. Similar halfbred
9 '?" . . "*""? .""
I- ' ' "' ' " ' ' " .I
Disparages Raw Silk
Shortage Predictions
Talk of a shortage of raw silk in
Japan is discounted by T). E. Douty.
vice-president and general manager
of the United .States Testing Com?
pany, Inc., who yesterday returned
from _ stay of seventeen months in
the Orient.
"This year's supply of Japanese
raw silk for export," he said, "will
be made up from four sources:
First, the holdover both in the form
of raw silk and cocoons from last
year; second, the raw silk produced
from spring cocoons; third, the raw
silk reeled from autumn cocoon?,
and fourth, the raw silk normally
consumed by domestic weavers,
amounting to about 30 per cent of
Japan's raw silk production, but re?
maining thus far almost entirely
unconsumed because of the collapse
of the habutai industry and the
closing of. many weavihg plants.
Add these four sources together,
taking into account the fact that
both the spring and autumn cocoon
crops were good and that one of the
statistical bureaus of the govern?
ment reported that 7**_ per cent
more seed cards were hatched thi**
year than in any previous year and
I believe there will be found an
many bales for export as in any
previous year. There may even bo
more, since the high interest rates,
the difficulty of obtaining credit and
the generally nervous industrial
condition in Japan at present are
going to discourage carrying over
more than is absolutely necessary
in the face of world-declining
markets."
L__,
combing wools brought 23*>-id to 24d,
West Australian new wools formed the
chief part of to-day's offerings, which
totaled 12,998 bales of Colonial wool
? ? ? .
Cromwell May Have Substitute
The governing committee of the
Stock Exchange has taken official
cognizance of the repeated absence of
Seymour L. Cromwell from his duties
as floor member for the firm of Strong,
Sturgls & Co. by permitting him to
have a substitute while away from
New York. Mr. Cromwell, president
of the exchange, has spent a good
part of his time recently in other cities
expounding the functions of the ex?
change ana the efforts it is making to
eliminate spurious investments fron:
the financial markets. The governing
committee has. adopted an amendment
to the constitution of the exchange
which allows a partner of the presi
j dent to transact business on the flooi
? for the firm in the president's absence
-?
Stock Exchange Firms Want
More Latitude in Advertising
Member firms of the Stock Exchang?
who are subject to its regulations gov
erning advertising are becomine mor
outspoken rejjardlng the strict censor
ship being exercised by the committe
on business conduct. This oppositio:
i has recently taken a form where it i
I expected that a petition will be pre
i sented to the Exchange asking mor
I latitude in the matter of publicity.
Exchange firms, although reticen
I about making their views known, ar
j known to favor advertising methods b;
which they will be able to compete oi
' more equal terms with non-membe
; houses, who are free to place large dis
| play cards in the daily papers an?
financial periodicals.
Miscellaneous Markets
Public Utilities Securities
Bid. Ask.! Bid.
24 ?Colo Pi... 20
96 <io pf. . . 90
140 C P A R L 2S
100 | do pf. . . ?6
Adl P ? I. 21
do pf. . . 93
Am L T. .137
do pf. . . 9 7
A G & El..180
do t-f... 441*4
Am P A L1.10
do pf.. . ?7
Am P Utl. 16
do pf. . . 35
Appal Pw. 24
do Df...130
CarPR A L 55
Cntl |5ta E. 9
do pf. . . 70
Cities Svc.185
do pf... 09 Vi
do bk ah 19'?
do7<T> dbB124
46
134
20
20
40
27
10
74
1S7
Ask.
!DABGI_7pf 24 2S
TXt&E I", pf I? 90
IE B A 0 pf 98 100
|Km DE pf 70 76
?EO&F 8 pf 89 94
Fdl L * T 48 80
?do pf.. 73 74
G S_ 6-* pf 68 76
IGAB8 7 pf 69 79
?Nor Sta P 3G 99
do of. . . 92 96
Rep Ry L IS 16
69 .4 do pf.. . 40 44
19HlSo Cal T?Jdl-5 107
? i do p?. . .122 125
? Sta G & E 18 20
94 I do pf... 48 SO
do S% E1?21. 10514 .ToEd T-pf 89 93
?Jo pf BB 66*4 6714 U L A Ry 67 70
6*4 do lut pf 77 80
- W: tn Pw.. 39 42
do n pf. 84 86
Bonds
do ?... 91
do S% El
do pf BB
do pf B.
do e_n o. 65
do stk C.135
A Q * E 6a 98
AmP?_I. 6s ?|
Appl P *-,. 87V.
Chrel I. 8s 9514
Col Pw 68. 90
100 i El Paso 6a 77
96 Mt C P f.n. 86 V4
?9 .1' .''-A R 6s 9 4
9.'.W G J 8 ..J0_
92 IWls Ed 6? ?9
5.
1*4
10O
New York Bank Stocks
Am Exc . ...290
America, . -213
Battery . . ..135
Bowery -4*5
Bway Cntl.. ?
Brvant Pk...l_3
Brcnx Ntl . .165
Bronx Boro.125
Btch A Dry. 130
Centt Merc...210
Chase.333
Chat ?t Phe.262
Chelsea Ex. .103
?""hern!-a! . ,
City.
Coal A Iron
Colonial
Columbia . .
Commerce. .
Cmmnwlth .
Contntl ...
Corn Exc . .
Cosmpltn.. .
East River
First Nati.
300
21!)
112
14|
1.6
530
:, :t ;',
200
325
. 225
298
215
.130 140
.460 472
, 85 ?
.175 ?
1220 1230
.02
Fifth Ave.
Fifth Ntl .
i.ni-fieia . .
Gotham . .
Greenwich
Hanover. .
Harri man.
Imp A Ti-dH..
Industrial,
(rvlhg Ntl
Mnnhttn C
ftfctj & Met.
Mutual .
Ntl A inn
N'w .Nthrlnd. 125
Pacific .300
Park.460
Public.340
.Seaboard. . .325
Standard. ? ? 230
State.320
23?, Ward ...260
Ontd State? .162
Wshg Ht? ..209
YorkviiJo . . 480
.1650
.105
235
180
265
.660
375
soo
.180
.240
.388
.403
.?50
205
187
3.5
?10
200
250
294
413
150
135
335
300
Trust and Surety Compane?
Alliance . . .103
Am Surety... ?7
Bk *N Y ATr460
Banker? ... 369
Bond A Mtg 270
Bklyn Tr C..466
Cntl Union ..418
Columbia . . 310
Commrcl T. .110
E--.ir.tr*' Tr ..29?
Enult Tr . . 214
Fimr? I. A T600
Fdlty Int ...204
Pulton.245
Guaranty . . 226
Hudson. . . . 199
Kins? Co .. .750
Lwyrs Mtg. . 154
Lwyi? Tl:le..21C
Manu-Ctn
Metrpltn. .
Mtg Bond
Mut TW..
.N't! Surety
N Y Truat.
_. Y Title..
People'?, . ?
Realty Asao.160
Title Guar ..4 35
i: S M A T.. 310
U S T Ouar..ll0
U S Trust. .1140
WpfMC-iatr. . !45
West TI A Tr.190
.260
300
.118
.115
. fil.
.350
.194
360
Insurance Companies
Am Alliance.290
City N York.190
Cmmnwlth. .300
Fdl A Phe... 97
Franklin ... 95
Globe Sr. R. .1800
Grt Amn .. .305
BOO
Hanover ... S2
Home.470
NM Lib .2e*
Niagara . . . ,190
?(Stuyvent ... tb
\V eslchestor. Sa
L'ntd Stated. 50
.!>
112
126
130
215
355
200
lui
446
220
126
1170
90
200
76
43
Steel and Ordnance Stocks
Colt A. 24 26 ?NileB B P. 54 67
Ea?t Steel. 20 30 j do pf... ?0 96
Here Pwr. ?5 105 fflcov Mfg..3?0 3*0
tlopf... .102 105 Woodw. . . 35 45
(Win C nw 15 25
Tobacco Stocks
.?Me A* P1J6V4 11?
do pf.,,100 ?61
!P R A T.. ?5 75
?Unvnl LM17
Am Ctr_ 7_
do pf... 62
AmAF nw ?6
?GWH-1..170
do pf...114
J S Young S?
do pi. . .100
76
94
96
17*
116
100
106
do pfa.i?. 16.u
Ex dividend.
Chemical Stocks
Am Cyn... 23 26 /Ivy SoJvay 25 50
do pf... 57 60 Mere C pf 70 74
Ca??in Cp. 40 4C (Merrlmao. 90 04
?lu Pont... 13 14 Mulid <_?.. I* Si
Oi.*.?.IU...130 1? I
Standard Oil Companies
Bid
Anp-lo Am 19
Atl R??..1S0O 1
do pf...137
Born?-! Rot*.500
Buck I* L. 107
Chosb Mf..216
Uo pi.. .112
Contl Oil..144
Cro? P L.. 3S
Cumb P LI60
Bure PL. 8 7
(i 8 O pf n.106
do pf oldlOO
do com. 58
HmO ? R.?2.S
I11,P Line.37?!
Irtip O Lt..3 11
Ind P L..104
Int Pet Lt 21
Maar Pet. 230
Ntl Trim. 24%
N Y Trns.204
Nor P L. .319
Ohio Oil..230
Asked.
19 %
350
119
610
3 0.1
225
116
147
40
356
99
110
112
60
236
173
312
107
21'
236
25%
208
122
293
Rid.
Pa Mex P. 18
P O & O. .?"56
Pr.il P L. .?-tO
Solar R?B.S60
.Sou PL.. 99
Sou Pa O.170
8\V Pa PL 64
3 O Cal.. 112%
?S O Ind. .13 3%
S O Kan. .650
?8 O Kv. .IOS Vi
a O Neb. .180
?S O N J.189
do pf. . .117
9 O N Y...620
3 O Ohio. 6 80
do pf . .119
Swnn & F 30
Cn Tk Cr.110
dr, pf. . .108
vacu ou...610
Weh"/ Oil. 25
?Par |2ft.
Ai'-.. '
22
665
3Q1
370
101
175
66
113
333';,
?fiO
109%
180
191
119
630
540
1?0
82
113
112
635
28
Miscellaneous Oii Companies
Atl Lobos. 6 Vi
do pf. . . 20
BrAniO I.t 35
?Ojtf O t?p 51%
Merr O Op 7
Mtn Pr Cp 1?%
Mutual r>. 10%
S C Cn OH 10%
7*4
30
37
52%
7 Vi
17
11 Vi
11
S Ck Pr A 10%
Pap Bf Co 3 H
vit D & I. .26
HONT w I 43%
SONJ n wl 38 %
"' O n wl. 38%
?Par $25.
10
?*%
.:*. ?
44
38%
3S%
70
62
14%
48
S%
Miscellaneous Oil Companies
?- D L & W.102 106
88 Draper C.l?5 172
16 Intl SU pf.101 104
63 Lh VIv 3 C 78 60
4 Ntl Cskt.. 75 85
?5 Nt Lcrc pf 80 85
102 N P&Ty pf 98 102
80 PaCl & Ck 6 2 55
103 Phelo? D.160 17?
100 Hyl Bit P.122 ?
140 d?J pf. . . f?S 101
12 S C H L. . 83 88
60 "Sim-rer. . .112 116
118 8tLMR?_ P 36 40
108 Vf & P... . 93 95
155 Til? . . ..380 400
97 "Ex dividend.
Atlas PC
A D T N* J.
"Am Lt...
do pf . .
AmTlid pf
Am Typ F 62
do pf. . . ?8
Bush T pf 75
do lu'. pflOO
B B Spl. . 97
Bab -fW.137
City Invst. ?8
Cr W . 50
Child? Co.llt>
Cellulo?d..103
Cntroleum.150
do pf_92
Sugar Stocks
Car Sugr... 13
Cntl Suif.. %
do pf. . . 2
0 Affuirr?. 77
FJrdo new 77
17 (Federal ..105
1% National . 101
5 Ni Nique..176
78 (Savannah. 37
78 I do pf... 9?
110
104
Certificates of Indebtedness and Unit?**
States Treasury Notes
Month.
?Porpmber.
"December.
t*-mb?-r 16 4%
?March _ 4%
May 20. 4%
?June . 3%
?September 3%
?Juno . 6*1
?September. 6%
P. Ct. Y?ar
3% IPS?
4%
Bid.
3 0?'
loo loo-"?
10'.?.02 100. Oi
Appro-.
Ask Tie.?*
1922
it a i
1923 100 100%
1923 100.30 100.3t
1923 99% 100
1933 9?H 99%
1924 101% 30?
1924 103A 101?
3925 10')^, 100H
1926 99% 9?%
1??!?5 100% 100%
192? 98% ?9%
?Acceptable in payment of Federal tax?t
on the dati? of maturity.
?December..
?March ....
?September.
***
**?%
4?
4'i
3.35
3.OS
3.33
4.03
3."5
3.90
4.41
4.43
4,46
4.4?
4.49
4.48
New York State Bonds
Form, Rate, Maturity. Bid.
Inter 4%*, 1971.106ty
do 4%3, 196?.,.10S
do 4%-t 1?65.105
do 4%?, 1983.104%
do 4%s. 1967.104%
1972.101 %
1966.100%
1994.300%
1962.100%
19?0.100%
1960-1930.....100
93%
>?%
Ask. Yield.
103% 4.22
do
do 4 %s,
do 4% a,
do 4%?,
do *%?,
do 4 ??* S,
do 4s. 1959.
do 4?, 1968.
?1%
4?, 1967...,
Res 4s. 1955-1956
do 4?. 1936
Inter ?i%s. 1964. .
Coup 3%s 195$. 83%
Bee 3%il, 1950-1964. 39
do 8%a. 1940-1950-4.25
do a"%s, 1923-1980.4.35
Reg coup (*?rl?l) 4Vb?.
19?3-'32 .
?7%
?8%
4.30 4,08
Form. Rate. Maturity. Bi<'-. Ask. Yield.
Reg coup (serial) 4 Vis.
192S-'Sl.4.30 4.05 -
New York State Rend?
Issued in co_pon and legt.t.red form.
Not Interchangeable. Coupon bond? res
later, ble
Canal A Highway 6s,
?'-?.-?.-it. -.4.15 3.95
Canal A Highway 6?,
I .9.l-'4. .4.15 8.96 -
Canal A Highway 5a,
l?44-'70 .4.15 3.95 -
Canal Imp 4Ha, 19?*-11114 113-4 3 33
Highway Imp 4*_s, 1*63.111% 113% 3.3.
Canal Imp 414?, 1965....107 309*. 3 80
Highway Imp 4Us, 196..107 10914 J-"
Barre Can Ter 4*4?, '45.103*4 106 3.85
Highway Imp 4?. 1967... 10214 104% 3.78
do 4?. 1980-1992.102V4 104V4 3.7*
do 4s. 195? .102V? 104V> 3.7!*
Canal Imp 4s, 1987.J0214 104V4 3.73
do 4e, 1980-1.62.102-. 104*. 3.78
Palis I B Park 4s. 'RI_l__ii 10414 3.78
Barge Can T 4?, 1942-'46.1091. 103 3.80
Federal Land Bank Bonds
Form. Rate. Maturity. Bid. Asked. Yield.
Inter 6s, 1941-'31.103V? 103.4 4.43
do 5s, _943-'31.103 j (.3% 4.46
do 6?, 1933-'23. 9S\ l.OV. 4.42
do 4>4?, 1942-32.10_vt !flO% 4.12
do 4%?. 1.39-'?4. 3314 1*>0% ?-?-'0
do 4Vj_. 1 ?:.8-:_3. ?9.? 100 4.-0
do 4>?s, 1937-22. 99% 100 4.60
do 4V4?. l*37-'2i. 9?V4 -0? 4.66
Joint Stock Land Bank Bonds
Bid. Ask. Yield.
Joint Stock Land Bank
5... 1S51-'_1.100 193 4.60
Joint Stock Land Bank
.'?.-,_. 19SI-1831.103-4 10514 4.7*
Joint Stock T.and Bank
5?. 1939-1924. :>9V_ 10014 4.?
Chicago Jilnt Stock Land
Bank .%'_. 1851-1*31.. .1??% .06Vi 4(1
Chicago Totnt Stook Land
Bank ._, 1937-1946. 9.<4 106*4 4.ft
Chicago Iclnt Stock Land
Bank .">., J 951 -1931.I02V4 103V4 4.?4
Chicago Joint Stock Land
Bank 5s. 1-62-19?2.302H 10314 4.?.
Short Term Securities
Siourlty. Rat*. Maturity. Bid. Ask. Yield.
Ali,.? .-,. o >__. .it, 1925.lu. s 10. ?4 5.70
do "s. 1933.:.10514 19?*-4 ?-J?
Am Cotton Oil ?a, 1924.. 97% tt% 6.90
Am Lt A True 6?. 11*25.. . 100% 101 _.?0
Am Sumatra To 714?, '-?5. 9714 ?.'4 3.16
Am T A T 8_, 1924.10?,% 101 5.05
Am Thread Co 6?, 1?.8... 103V. 10314 6.4*1
Anaconda Cop (s. 1*29... 100*4 100% 6.32
do -a. 92:?........102% 1?..', ?...
Ang-Am OH. Ltd, 7V4?,'36.103 103% -10
Arm A C<> con. 7?, 30...10414 104-*, 6.20
B A O R R col ??, 1924,. 99',. 100-4 (.80
Bell Tel Co o? Can 7?, '2510?14 103V? B.3?
Beth Htoel con 7?, 1923.. 104 Vi 105 -
do 6?, 194?. 98 V4 39 6.03
Can North Ry 6?, 192?... 96% ?i? 6.-0
do 5,4.a. 1?S2 . 93 % 100-4 -
do 5Vj_. 1121. .?% 100'? 6.41
do 6?, 1924.10014 10014 t.id
Canadian Pao 6?, 1.1?...101 10114 MO
Cen Arg-iUin. Ry 6?, '27. 9 414 95 7.20
Conn <-?? of J. _ 7?, 1922.180 I0OI4
Cop Sxp Asm 8?, 1924.. 101V. 102 6.30
?lo 8?, J.::5.1__% 104 ?.16
Cudahv Pack .5 H ?. l?*"? ? ? ?3 14 G.OO
do 7?, 1113.10114 101*4 110
Fed Sua Ref ?a, 1924-J.6014 10114 6.4?
Gulf Ol? (a, 1923.100'* 100*4 4.90
tdo T?, 1*33 .103% 104 -?
Hock V?|l?y ?a. 1934.... 100 100% ?80
Interboro conv Sa. 1823.. ?6 97 ??
X C Ter Ry ?_. lf-2.100% 101 M0
Kenn*tott Cop Cor 7?, '30.10. % 10S ?4 #1!
at- (..i? Lt lot ref 7a, '29.10014 lOl >4 ?70
Lib. McN is. L la, 1 ?31.. 10114 102 4.7?
Morrl? A Co 7V4?, 1930., 106 10814 6.(0
Ntit'l Leather 8?, 1S26.. 101 101V4 7.3?
.'?eat* RocbucJt ', .. 1923. .. 1.0114 101% 6.36
Sinclair Cr O Piif 8%?_'26. 97% ?8 14 8.3S
?loa. ?Shel-ield 8 I So. 1929 ?7 8. .2
Solvay A Co ta. 1.?7....105 10? ?.61
..th'n Bell T oen 1a. '?.103% 103 5.71
itf U D ?tur 5V?_, ?*i.I.0% 190Vi 5.0?
8 O of X Y J?. 1??8-'|1..10314 110 -?
do ?14?. 1*33.,.106*4 10?% *?<
Swift A Co 6a. 191*. 93% 94% t.il
*?o 7?, 1831.,.10.% I?*.. * II
Vacuum Oil Co ?_, 1*3?.106% 1.7% *.fC
va-Caro Ci-em 6?, 11*3...100% 100H ?*?*_
?Oftiled for payment at 1.3% Februar*
1$, im
fCalled for payrn?-.*. at 103 .4 February
1. 1933.
Porphyry Copper Mines
Make Better Showings
Utah Report? $ 1.04 a Shan /or
Third Quarter; Ray Con
solida >-d Has Surplus
The reports of four porphyry coo?
per mining companies covering oper?
ations for the third quarter of the
year shewed good gains over the pre?
ceding periods.
The Utah Copper Company showed
a total income of $1.6i>5,622. e**u?va?
lent to $1.64 a share on the $10 par
value stock, compared with a total
income of $764,i.1>8, or 43 cents a
?hare, in the preceding quarter. For
the six months ended with Septem?
ber total income was $2^?9320, or
$1.47 a ?hare.
The Ray Consolidated Copper Com?
pany for the quarter ?howed a sur?
plus of $?7,800, equivalent to 4 cents
a share earned on the $10 par stock,
compared with a deficit of $247,867
in the preceding quarter. For the six
months ended September 30, 1922,
deficit amounted to $190,067.
The Nevada Consolidated Copper
Company showed a deficit of $124,278.
compared with a deficit of $144,415 in
the previous quarter. For the six
months ended September deficit
amounted to $268,693.
The Chino Copper Company showed
a deficit of $47,.,23, compared with
$126,131 in the preceding quarter. For
the six months ended September deficit
amounted to $173,454.
? ?
Business Troubles
Petition? In Bankruptcy
The following petitions in bunk nipt dr?
iver? filed yesterday In the United States
District Court:
MAHLER ?ft KIRCHENBAUM?Involun?
tary; bakers, 1108 Washington av., th?
Bronx.
IRVINO SHOE 8HOP?-Involuntary; 77
2d av.
L. & S. LEATHER GOODS CO.. INC.-*
Involuntary; 465 Broom? si
MORRIS ZEIFF?Involuntary*, silk Job?
ber, 7 West 27th st.
WIESEN'. GARDNER & BRO?Involun?
tary; 89 Bant 9th ?t.
BENJAMIN LASKER ? Involuntary;
cloak* and suits. 122 West 26th St.
IRVING SHOE SHOP?Second involun?
tary; 77 2d ??v.
STAR DRESS MFG. CO.?Involuntary;
122 West 26th st.
Re?-?|-es-? In Bankruptcy
The following receivers in bankruptcy
were appointed yesterday In the United
States District Court:
Arthur Y. Dalzlel for Louis Taub, fruits,
with bond of 31.000.
Samuel Hturt* for Isaac Busch, cloak?
and suits, 125 Dlvialon ?t.. -with bond of
31.000.
Walter L. Bryant for Arrow Fur Co.,
Inc., 342 "la av., with bond of $1,000.
Joseph T. Stearns for Benjamin Lasker.
cloaks and suits, 122 W. 2?5th st., with
bond of ?2.000.
A. Welles Stump for Welsen, Gardner St
Bro., furrier?, 30 E. 9th st., with bond of
$1,000.
Schedule? In Banki-aptoy
The following schedules In bankruptcy
were filed yesterday in the United States
District Court.:
LENA KROTMAN?Furniture, 3S62 3d
v. Liabilities, $16.223; ?siets. $2.015.
POKRESS HAT CO.. INC.?Millinery. 3
East 37t.h st. Liabilities. $95,650; asset*.
$16.000.
GORDON _ FATONE?130 W<*>?t 25th at.
Liabilities. $43,902; ass?*;?, $26.946.
Judgments Filed
In New York County
The following Judgments were filed yes?
terday, November 23, the first name being
that of the debtor:
Auirenzucker, Jennie?N J Fein
berg . $347.90
Aron, Samuel?E Winter. 7,139.75
Boehler, Rudolph C P?? M Kalb
et al . 264.20
Belford. Meyer. David and James
(Meyer Belford & Sons)?Na?
tional Cash Register Co . 450.63
Barror-k, Benjamin?M A Emer
Mng. 101.78
Berder. Harry?S Koshitz . 492.03
Beekman - William Street Cor?
poration?E Brass . 1,706.52
Boehner. Benjamin L?Sinran
Bros, Inc . 1,404 31
Boreck, Foileck or Frolie?Inde?
pendent Fruit Auction Corp.... 706.50
Bellas. Hess & Co, In?.-?J P?tro
celll. 661.?7
BlacUman, Frank?M MlchetetU
et al. 281.17
Brandman, George C?J A Bern
?tein et al. 270 51
Blschoff, John?M Lehman et al. 226.33
Bowen, John De K?27 East 83d
St Corp.,. 1,201.9$
Burslein. Sani?S Feller . 215.7*
Cohen, Samuel M. an?l David
Feldman ? Commercial Ex
change Bank . 459.18
California Soda Fountain Supply
Co, Inc?Aldrlch Mfg Co. Inc.. I99 97
Coopermar, Samuel?I Lerner. . . . 630 72
<;ozzens, Leonard?C J Edwards. 723 38
?"leak. Anton?M Grubick. 17".16
Commodore Fat Rendering Co,
Inc and Emil Kahsne?I. Aienky 3 4*-o 82
Cohen, Isl.lor (Wllbert Waist Co)
?R Waldman. 4017t
Chalmers. Charles E?J Duane.. "R0.00
Consol I, Alfredo?C Simenne ... 100 20
Cohen, Charle??H ! Id ret b Var
, ?J?_- i*o. 235.30
I'oscher, Alfred C?Crane _ Clark 164.34
Fliitbush Title & Marble Work?,
Inc, Sam Ring and Jacob Bab
?t***-?J B Owens . 1,051.40
Gottfried. Felix?Lawrence & Co... 232.50
Green. Hyman, an.l Philip Her?
man?V Beiden . 304.60
Gold, M!cha?*l?Barclay Itealty
_ Co. 145.70
Gorjnley. Chas J -Park ft Tllford 156.43
(jiddess Undergarment Ce, 'mi?
A 1) Button et ?i. 138.41
Globe, ?.ine?Western Union Tele?
graph Co . 243 ?0
Htalt-y, Patrick J?-Contractor?-'
Trading Co, Inc. 255.65
House, Wm A?Travelers inr Co. 124.50
j How?. Sam?Dazian's Theatrical
' Emporium . 6,813.90
j Burkina. Catherine C, and Killer
Harkinc?V S Lipp. 1,036.70
| Johnson. Geo W, and Robert M
j Stillman?H A Tuiler. 748.36
! Kohl. Morris-?! Gfoetzinger. liri.69
Krels. James?A Con?.);-?. 635.85
! Katie, Bertha?W?iol Novalty Co,
Inc . 113.45
Kaoane, Emil?I? 1'aris. 1.447.45
Lehrer, Jacob?J Garoer et al... 200.40
Mundt, Bn?ll C G. and Otto Bren?
del (MunJt _. Brend'e)?J C
Gismon-1 *? Co, Inc. 919 17
Levy, 1 ?v-d i??United Ciliar
Store? Co of America. 176.50
Lu.'iing. Henry?Lou?? n?)s?-:rc &
Sons, inc. 554.30
L 1> 1., Inc -B Meyer et al. 126.50
LlibiiiHli, Louis?Harry S;?!-. aek,
InC . 181.70
Lee, Richard L?J Dllion. 169.54
Liever, i^ots?Fidelity & Deposit
Co of M?l. 1,025.00
I Locke, .Margaret (.}?G L Mc*Eli***y
et al. 250.18
Morgi nsceln, Herman: Charles
Sab?? witz, Max looker and
West lean Coal Co, Inc?Slate
Mercantile Co, Inc. 651.40
Moore, Clan-nee A?A D Ttoomp
Bon . .. 1,223.63
MclJirmott. Thomas F?I L
Weaver . 242.72
Mendlo witch, Jacob?Underwrit?
ers' Service Corp. 282.20
Nelson, Morris ? Travelers' ins
Co .,. 14?. 85
Nlssenewltz, David?I Solowery . 58t>.26
Napolitano, Jos-cph?I? Browr . . . 963.16
N ?" P-:troieum Exchange, Inc?
Arn.Tican Multlgraph Sales Co. 274.60
Odaa. Huioert G?N V T? lephone
Co . 118.37
I Pullman Co?R C S KeM. 196.10
? i'urcell ft Uilfeather Corp?A P
Dlmst Co, Inc. 300.79
i pulis Stores, Lie?N Y Cintrai K
R Co. 698.34
i ?-'ame?Same .?. 603.70
i Polllo, Dominlek?B Pr-. genzer. . 596.70
! Rosenaiock, ESrneat?R K Roaen
stock (costa) . 248.18
? Richards, Willis B?E G Brook
! inati . 1,042.52
Rostir?an, Samuel-?S Svar. 21.101.10
? Romury. Alfred J?T M McKee.. l.r>5fl.S8
i Roller. Karl E?B F Roller. l.L'36.47
?Schw?rt?, Geo I?J H White_ 1,283.05
| Schwarte, Louis, and Morris
Welsbrot?Star Enj-raving Co. S5O.?0
Septoff. Louis?A Rusch et al... 125.il
Schenectkdy Tlte & Rubber Co?
Pennsylvania Rubber Co of
America. Iao . 1.072.14
{Shapiro, Louis?J H Kahn et ai 81*6.20
aimons. Harry {Clothing Designer
Cq)?J Brauraan . 1.082.20
Service Launch Cop?Travelers'
Inauranc? Co . 260.14
Safety Motor and Freight Corp?
M Ucldateln. 14.926.45
Santoro, Alesiio?M P Tribuno.. 668.87
Thomas Emery J?D B Luckey
?t al .,. 6.103.01
343 Fifth Avenue Theater Co,
Inc?Travelers' Insurance Co.. 163.35
TrackWsa Transportation Corp?
M Jiatrlsl? . 1,706.S3
30$ West End Avenu? Corp?P
Schmidt. 645.20
Texas State Oil Co. Inc?M lu
Said-man et al . 681.37
Tilmar Catering Co, Inc. ami
Harry Cahane?.?Standard OH Co
of New York . 1,456.13
13 S Shipping Board Emergency
Fleet Corp. and United Ameri?
can Line?. Inc?T Shea . 1,29?.67
Vog?), Morris?C Mellen . 1?8.33
Upmann, Hi-rmann. and Albert
<H Upmann & Cot?Willich &
Co, ???. 21.934,16
World Hat and Cap Co, Inc?
A Altman .,. Hi 43

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