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The sun. (New York [N.Y.]) 1833-1916, October 03, 1912, Image 3

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THE SOT,' THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, WIS."
4 3
ft
(Oinil Ternm-lii Sn.vs Mission
aries Hnvc Fit-p Hand in
the Country.
JtKlMHITS KXACiGEIIATK!)
Japnn Enilonvorlnff to Haisc
Plane of Civilization,
He Says.
Si n't,, Coron, Sept. li. AutlliK upon
instructions of the Inipcrlul Japanese,
c,n i rmncnt, which In turn were given
urn Ills own request, made several
weeks iiko, his Kxcellency General
c mnt K Tcrnuehl, Governor of tlip civil
'iiuli and Commander In Chief of the
revi 111 Corea, will catfe to bo pub-
li il t i-morrow a denial of the
, mro that Chrl-jtliins nre persecuted
tiy his orders or Mutt members of the
i In- tlan churches ns stie'ii, or because
f Hull' creei I, nro hn ritsttoil by the
t M nepe authorities. The statement Is
.lil 'o be the llrst of Its kind ever
-mil b. authnrlty of the Government.
The siateinent further declares that
natty of the iiutr.'iRes nnil hardships
,M.''eil In the foreign press, parllcu-
i y Mint of China and of India, lire
iinlls without foundation In met, do-
ng a great Injustice to the .Inpancsc
i eminent nnd tieople and tending to
i mie a greater III feellnR between the
. In I'orca.
i I'int TVi-onchl's statement has been
Tieral liiys In the hands of t!ov
Mnieiit printers and Is to be Issued In
Miiese. Corran, Clilms" and KiirIIsIi
luiiruw. In Its preamble It declares
iv notice would have been taken
' i hose malicious accusations against
iitllcl.ils of the empire were this not
,i ne of such sadness and bereavement
" t I cannot countenance by silence
ar unworthy reflections upon the scr
n ' of his late sacred Majesty nor of
present' Illustrious Majesty the
M 'soda. '
The statement says In part:
It has been called to the attention
,thf Mich 'internment at Tokloandto
'h liilV
ii
Hastern countries, Including China,
!l nglmng and the Philippines, as well
u in the Clu Istlan countries of Kurope
.mil America, that sross misstatements
' fact Ii.im- been made relative to the
.im.lilstratlon of civil and military af
" 'n this political dtvison of the
rniplie. It woutl seem that the malicious
hialenn'iiis have made It appear as It
ii' ( mplre of .lap.m was conducting
a 'bin the borders of Corea a war of
"tl persecution upon the Inhabitants
ho have embraced the Western form
r religion, and It has been asserted
that the Government In Its ndmlnUtra-
'oii has shown Itself opposed to the
l hristlitn Chinch.
"These falsehoods hae been pub
llshed Industriously throughout the
mainland of Asia and It has so hap
pened that the present representative
of Japan's power In Corea, the General
Count Commander In Chief, has seen
with his own eyes tianslatlons made of
these false articles published In the,
press of .Shanghai, Hongkong and
Calcutta. I am of the opinion that
these same untruths have very likely
been repeated In the Journals of Lon
don, St. Petersburg and other cities
of Kurope and America.
"It Is not possible, neither Is It cnlld
for, that the Administration take upon
itself to particularize In the denial of
hese wilful and untruthful statement".
To the Government 1 have made ade
quate and detailed reply to such special
incidents as are alleged to have tuksn
place, and to rne that Is sutllclent. Hut
in fear lest it be thought I, as repre
sentative of the Kmperor, be buckwnrd
In asserting that which Is true and
denying thnt which Is untrue I rom
'TUtnd It to be known that neither with
the power, deslie. wish, connivance nor
i.inction of tho Government has any
tirrson or persons been prosecuted or
persecuted on account of any religious
. lews, beliefs or practices whatsoever.
the ortlcers of tho military secret servlca
nnd the police I could not learn of n
single arrest Mint litxd been mnde be
cause of the religion of the party. 8IIII
further I ascertained that the military
anil police olllclals huvlng charge of
Mich matters were Ignorant of the re
llKlous lews and practices of thi
greater number of the prisoners.
"Some exceptions to this getieial
statement must be noted, to wit: That
the Government olllclals did discos or
In several Instances, notably those ot
the Christian Girls School, the white
society ami the lie'dotig Church, that
native converts were In league ngnlnst
the Government, And further the fact
that a number of the prominent per
sons apprehended on charges of t.(,n
splracy were also prominent Corean
Christians had a tendency In certain
quarters perhnps to create the Impres
sion that the Administration pollco were
seeking out only malcontents who be
limned to tho churches of the mission
aries. "Another fact may be cited: Tha
Christina missionaries, who were nil
powerful In court and olllclal circles be
fore the mining- of the Imperial pro
tectorate, were obliged to fall from
their place of great Inlluence, for the
administration of Japanese law Is
neither n matter of sentiment nor In
fluence. I would not want to say
that the old Corean regime was handi
capped by the presence and Influence of
foreigners, for 1 hnve no relations with
that subject: but tho present admin
istration has its own officials for the
performance of certain prescribed
duties In certain ways nnd Is not In
dulgent to tho extent of iwrmlttlng out
side Interference.
"The administration has Its own
views as to tho proper methods to bo
pursued In the creating of peace. In
dustry nnd prosperity within the shores
of this pollttral division, and It has no
desire for the advice or Interference
from any channels other than those
purely official and superior.
Atisnrrn Crneltj- ('hnrico.
"It has been widely published and as
serted that cruel and unusual means
have been adapted by the administra
tion toward the masses of the Corean
people and that It was apparently the
desire of the Government to drive the
native Inhabitants from their country,
to the end that natives of Japan be In
stalled In their places.
"So far as this bare statement Is con
cerned 1 nm disinclined at first thought
til rrilintnn.inpn It with 11 r.nlv V.t
iovernment service In the political j for thp ake f the nalonal Veputa-
lull of Corea that throughout all j ,.m .. -.... H mnnln-m.n
among the peoples of the world I shull
make nnswer In these terms:
"First, Japan knows It Is her duty
to bring this political division up to n
worthy plane of activity and Industry.
"Secondly, she Is spending millions of
cold and the time of thousands of of
ficials, civil and military, to accom
plish this end.
"Thirdly, the nations are watching
carefully the progress of civilization In
Corea.
"With these three things in mind it
must be understood that unless the na
tive Corean Indicates by his ability and
enterprise his desire to keep nbreast
of the new order of things, which
means progress, he will have only him
self to blame if he falls behind.
"All civilized nnd progressive- na
tions have pursued In the past and are
to-day pursuing the same . ethods and
tactics. Gnat lirltaln sets a plane or
standard In India, Egypt and other
places; the French declare their own
standard In north Africa, tin- t'nlted
States In the Philippines, Germany, Bel
gium and Holland In their respective
possessions. The Inhabitants of these
various countries must rise to the mark
that Is set for them, not the newer
comers descend to the old level of the
natives.
"It Is precisely this In Corea: Th
Corean has been fur centuries satisfied
with things as 4 hey base been. 1 It-
has not as yet fulls awakened to the
needs and improvements of this day.
and he resents the Innovations and
changes that are being brought about,
or have been brought about. He has
been satisfied with the ss-ays of other
centuries, and when civilization attempts
to Improve his condition he believes Ids
personal lights nre being Infringed upon
"The political district of Corea Is a
large territory and Is capable of th.
support of many millions of people.
Hut the industries of the country must
be made In keeping; agrlcultuie must
be fostered and taught; highways and
bridges must be built, railroads and
mines must be put Into operation,
schools established, sound currency In
troduced, banking, commerce and ship
ping encouraged.
"These are the things Japan Is try
ing to tlo In Corea, svhat Japan will
do, Is doing to-day, And she Is not
putting her great enterprises Into op
eration by acts of petty cruelties ngaln.-it
Individuals. Nor by tho persecution
or persecution of nny religious sect, so
ciety or creed; but she Is applying the
same laws In all matters of civil and
military procedure that are found In
the original provinces of the emplte."
Mfifl
Plantation .Man a nor Murdered,
lint lr. S. Consul, Reported
Dead. Th Alive.
KKUX DIAZ IX UKVOI.T
Kv-Vresitlent's Nephew Joins
With Ajruilnr Against
Mndcro.
W.tsiiiNdios', Oct, 2. Another Ameri
can has been killtxl In Mexico. Theodoro
llaintii, United States Consul at Durango,
telegraphed tho Stute Department to-day
that Hubert h. Uussoll, an American,
was murdered on September 29 by a band
of rebels undur the command of Iaiis
Coso. Russell was manager of a hacienda
in the southeastern part of tho State of
Durango. This plantation is owned by
Allen 0. McCaiighen, tho United States
Vice-Consul at Durango, Karlier reiorts
from Mexico stated that McCaughen was
killed, but these were disproved later.
Troops aro now in pursuit of Paso and his
force.
A now turn was given to the already
serious situation In tho South of Mexico
to-day by reports of fresh revolts in that
region. It Is stated that Gen. Agullar,
the former Federal commander, has
wined out a force of nbout 200 Federal
soldiers at Tehuncan and that Gen. Felix
Diaz has taken up arms against the
Government in northern ,1'uebla, at a
plaeo called Zacapouxtla.
The significance of these reports lg
found in the fact that l-elix uiaz is wio
nephew of former President Diaz, and that
he is understood to be operuting In con
junction with Gen. Aguilar. Advices
received indicate that Gen. Aguilar's
force, which began operations In ,tho
State of Vera Cruz, M now close to Gen.
Diaz, who is In Puebla. an adjoining State.
Mexican Federals assert they wore
victorious in a skirmish which took place
in Canyon Aurua, near the line of tho
Mexican National Hallways. It is stated
that about Mo men were engaged in this
battle on each side.
Kb Paso, Tex., Oct. 2.-The heaviest
loss in the present Mexican revolution
In the north occurred in the vicinity of
tho Muwquez Mondny evening when 20o
were killed in a battle between rebels
nnd Federals at Aura Pass, not far from
Monclos-n.
The details reached here to-day: seven
Federal olUcers svere killed. There were
nbout 5oo men on each side, the Federals
being commanded by Gen. nianquet.
Last night the rebels retreated in the face
of the Federal reinforcements. The rebels
were commanded by Pnocunl Oro?co.
HOPE YET POWERS WILL
Con Ilium tow First I'tiyc.
ST. THOMAS SCHEME FAILS.
tlanlah I'nmimii)' llrllniullieii t'nn-
t'rsnliMi I lie iKlnnit' llnrlmr.
Sptruil (xitt .;i(cA to Tiik Srv
CornMUOKV. Oct. 2. The DanU1!
West India Company, of which Prince
Valdemar Is president, has relinquished
Its ninety-nine year concession for de
veloping the harbor of St. Thomas,
D. W. I., nnd reviving that port, it
still Intends to begin the work of Im
proving the lutrbor shortly and this will
be completed In time for the opening
of the Panama Canal. The company,
however, has postponed the establish
ment of the various proposed Industries.
The Issue of the capital stock of the
company svns a failure, as only one
fourth of the $5,250,000 offered was sub
scribed. It Is hoped to raise the money
elsewhere.
M laslonnrlrs Well It reels eil.
"The Japanese Imperial Government
rt' s not persecute or prosecute persons
'r their beliefs; neither does It, In
nv circumstances, permit or sanction
"i i' ti a man. a woman or a child, or
m number of them, may believe as
"iv will; hut if they net contrary to
i.i laws they nre subject to punishment
' .iec,,nlatiic svlth the penalties pre-
m i- lied
"'t is not In accordance svlth the
'.ith of hlstor.s to believe or assume
" 'he Japanese Imperial Government,
- sidi. Is opposed to the religious
"i - "i- church practices of the Chris.
I .mi nut of such authority that
'i 1 spenk for my Government un-
" iciitij upon such a matter, but
" in m myself well within official
ivi if I assert that Government op
' "ii to the Christian religion nr
ii" religion that does not actu-
niliet svlth the laws of the State
ir be known within Japanese
'i i"iis. Christian missionaries,
. iindlcal and lay, hasp been ever
nnil to Japan nnd hnvc found as.
" and adherents among the Jap-
I'i'.ple. They have likewise been
'i lived In Corea, many of them
'li Protectorate established by
' tierlal Government. They will
to be ho received and kindly
- i o long ns they may confln
ii lilugs to matters of morality
' '"in life.
i.i' In en chat god many times
n- i ne past few months, or since
Vi'iil arrests, that a greater num-
' i'ie prisoners on trial or awaiting
num. i inn for political offences nro
'.an converts, This statement,
ipon examination I found to ho
Mie basis In fact, ss-as followed
-i. 'i ei wholly untrue, I, e that
" 1 "f i heir chinch nftlliatlons these
""i. weie arrested.
'i..s last Is without a semblance of
I did not know, had not Inquired
"I did nut care nbout the religious
li nr the many persons svho ss-ero
- tamed to answer to charges of
i ."ii of the civil or military laws,
' t has nes or appeured to make
'i Terence as lo svhat a person's
f f if ihnl person's actions are
wf'ii Ms en according lo Christian
ii is what ono does, not what
I'roclmnntloll In lie Spread,
Count Terauchl's proclamation Is to
be sent brondenst throughout Coren, At
tho present time nntlse Christians in
all sections of the country nro. on the
border of panic, owing to the large
number of arrests that have been inadu
among the converts in connection with
the conspiracy (barges. The snrlous
missionaries svlll be asked to read the
sintiment to their congregations nnd
at the same time Corean and Japanese
religious leaders svlll be commanded to
read and translate tho ss-ords of tho
Governor-General In all districts of tho
kingdom
So great bns been the agitation caused
In all parts by the statements Indlcat
Ing a state of religious persecution In
the land, sanctioned, If not actuallv
commanded by the (iovernment, that
local clashes between sects of Japanese,
Corean Shlntolsts and Christians have
been very Infrequent, In some Instances
resulting In fatalities. In the larger
cities and towns the authority of the
military hns been sufficient to main
tain order, but In many of the remote
parts, to which the police system has
not ns yet been extended, ilots mid
encounters between races and creeds
have been so numerous that whole
neighborhoods nro In a state of con
staut unrest.
i'i.asiihs mom tiii; t:ni.n,
LISBON A rloun nutl.rrnk nf plngur
h ii en nrr'il hi .Snur.i, mi I in- lUml uf
Tel.'flia, rjpll.il nf Die Ariiicn.
I'A HIM Tin- Prfiu'li (tovrrninrnl hnnnreil
.SmTlrun mulplurH liy liujlnif the mn rblr
bum nf KilKKril Turk, by Andrew O'l nnnor
nf Mjuii liusftl. The hunt In tu lie ' 1 .1 I
111 Hi" i.ux-Mil-i'jur Knlliry
1.0NION-lt l rpirtfil hr Ihni
This company received Its concession
from the Danish Government Inst Jan
uary. 1 1 proposed to fit up the harbor
so that It could accommodate the largest
ships afloat. It also planned to con
struct large docks, shipyards and ss-aro-houses
and make the port the Interna
tional commercial shipping centre of
the West Indies. Danish financiers had
great holies of the success of th
scheme.
DANISH MINISTER SAILS.
Dr. rtrini ItetiirnltiK to Olfl Post at
Wnnhlnutiin.
fperml lafjlr IirhpMch tn Tn Sex
I.0.SP0.V, Oct. 2. Dr. lirun, who was
recently reappointed to Ills old post as
Danish Minister at Washington, sail
for the I'nlted States to-day to take
up his post.
HARRY LAUDER IS ILL.
Scfitllnti ("oinrillnn 1 Snffrrlim
Prom n Painful I leer.
.r""'' fable Pr'pnlch lo Th Srv.
London, Oct. 2.--Harry Lauder, the
Scottish comedian, Is suffering from a
painful Intestinal ulcer.
A specialist has been consulted.
dei'lailng extreme satisfaction svlth the
mobilization of the entire army.
A late despatch fiom Belgrade says
the Catholic Albanians base separated
from the Mohammedan Albanians and
are forming separate bands. They base
proclaimed King Nliholus of Monte
negro their sovereign.
The cabmen of Constantinople, who
have been on strike for the last few
days, returned to work to-day so as not
to embarrass the Government. They
sent a deputation to the War iltlce
ottering the use of their horses and cabs
for transportation,
Train service from Constantinople
Into Hulgnrla has stopped completely.
Passengers on the last train to reach
Constantinople from the Itulgarlan fron
tier report that they heard firing.
The Turkish press Is eager for war
and Is ardent in siippmt of the tiovei n-
tnrnt.
The Turkish Cabinet to-day appointed
Abdullah Pasha comtnander-ln-chlef of
the Turkish forces In the llulkans. Spe
cial prayers aro being offered for the
Sultnn throughout the Mohammedan
ss-orld.
An extraordinary session of the Llul-
gnrlnti Sobranje has been culled for
Saturday, the purpose of svhU'li Is to
sanction tho declaration of martial law
and approve tho necessary expenditure
for the mobilization of the army.
The hope that the representatives of
the Towers might Intervene success
fully was greeted In Sofia to-day by the
receipt by tho Ambassadors of duplicate
notes. These notes asked that the Hal
knn Stntes and Turkey b allowed to
settle their dllllculties without Inter
ference; they stated Mint It ss-as not nn
attempt to stenl territory for which the
States nre uniting, but, because of high
handed and cruel methods which Tur
key has been using In Macedonia
toward Macedonian Christians.
Officially the frontlar mobilization Is
only n demonstration, but In reality It
is looked upon ns n serious preparation
for war. Greece In particular has
many scores to settle svlth Turkey,
and other States are not lacking In
bitterness.
Greece Is holding a number of Greek
vessels nt Plneiis, and has already char
tered one of them for the transporta
tion of troops.
The Greek Government to-day pur
chased four torpedo boats svhlch svere
under construstlon on the Mersey for
the Argentine Government. One of the
vessels Is ready to sail and the others
wlli be completed svlthln a fesv days.
The Turkish embassy and tho Bul
garian legation here have been svlth
out direct news from home for twenty
four hours.
Although diplomatists heie received
the report of actual violence svlth In
credulity, the belief of business men in
the tenseness of the situation Is sliosvn
by tho fact that Greek vessels svere
practically uninsurable to-day at
Lloyd's. The rate on Hiltlsh steamers
ss-ns 20 shillings nnd on German and on
Austrian vessels 50 shillings, but busi
ness was practically at a standstill. The
Hamburg underssrlters are cancelling
war risks, leaving the policies valid for
two weeks. The premiums on war risk
policies nre 23 per cent, higher than the
old ones.
Paris sends the first glimmer of op
tlmlsm. While the wnr fes-er Is under
rated, It Is thought that financial con
siderations svlll prevent an outbreak.
There Is a European control of some
loans to the Balkan States, and In some
proportion the netunl revenues are In
the hands of International commissions.
It Is pointed out that the rates at sshlch
the Balkan allies would haso to lm(rnsv
In war times would be prohibitive.
Premier Polncare's Wislnesday after
noon weekly reception of the Ambassa
dors In Paris was unusually animated
and lasted from 2 -.30 until after C
o'clock. The Husslan and Austrian Am
bassadors had h long conversation, and
the Turkish and German Charges d'Af
falres talked at length with M. Polncare.
King Nicholas of Montenegro ad
dressed n large crowd In front of his
palace at Celtlnje last night and said
that the mobilization of the troops did
not mean war. Police are guarding
the Turkish Legation at the Monte
negrin capital against vlnlenc from ex
cited citizens.
The Italian fleet continues to manoeu
vre In the ,i:gean Sea, but nothing
Is known it any landing having been
made or other action taken.
St, Petkhsuiko, Oct. 2. Sympathy
with the Slass has been sliosvn here by
Russian officers deluging the War Of
fice svlth requests to be allosved to per
form volunteer service svlth the Servian
and Bulgarian armies. All these ie
quests have been refused.
NEW YORK GREEKS READY.
BANDITS SCARE WORSHIPPERS.
CtKer Siniilli Church nnd At
tempt tn Klllllllli Rich Man.
Mahriii, Oct. 2. While the population
ot Castllsahor svere attending mass to
day four bandits armed svlth blunder
busses entered and threatened to shoot
any one svho moved.
They then went to the choir gallery
with the Intention of kidnapping Manuel
Valles, a wealthy Spaniard, svhen n
Civil Guard captain of the name of
Garcia, svho svas In tho church, fired
his revolver.
The bandits fled. The Chll Guards
nre pursuing them.
SPAIN SEES GENERAL STRIKE.
Try In
1'iiiUn. that makes nlm amenable
lawn
' with l hose published statements
me I ordered thnt nn Investl
H in- made among the total of
! -"tiers confined In the various I.ONIK1N - It l rpirtfil h'r Ihni i lie
I I fir.n nnH I rl 1.1 On. I ll.,.l inn m I Hi k l'rtr h" 111 Ill-fOllat ItlB 'h
I WI1IDPSP limn linf i v-mv,i n muni
tion In a cnnreifnr, th purpne ni wnirn
I In to pre" Chln fnr lh pnymtnt or th
150.000,000 Boxr iDacmnltlri.
I a'f of them, 151, svero native
o the Christina religion. Hut
ninst careful Inquiry among
I'nrllninrnt Will tloet In
olre Problem,
P.AIH-KI.ONA, Oct, 2. Premier Canalejas
to-day consulted svlth Kennr Maura
on the question of summoning Parlia
ment for the purpose of devising an Im
mediate remedy tn he utilized In case
the threatened general railway strike
should materialize,
It svlll be Impossible lo maintain nn
adequate train service In Spain If the
strike, nosv confined to a few districts.
becomes general.
KING IN AUTO ACCIDENT.
lelur lliiiiuiiiiiiel nnil neen Have
er .Narrow r.enie,
Siirrial Vtible llopntrli In Tiir Srs
ftoMH. Oct. 2. - An nutomoblle svhlch
svns cons eying the King anil Queen
f i om Pisa to San Itosson- to-day col
lided svlth a trolley enr
The promptness of the i hnuffeur of
the nutomoblle and the molorman of the
trolley car In applying the brakes di
minished the shock and prevented a ser
ious accident.
1,000 to I. rave Tu-ilnj fnr Allien
(I I hem Will I'olloss.
The Greek newspaper Fnnhellrnic pub
lished yesterday afternoon the royal
decree commanding a rally to the colors
for the apparently unavoidable conflict
in which Greece and the Balkan Slates
will engage with Turkey. It ss-nsn't
very long after flin papers had begun
to circulnto through tho Greek neighlxir
hoods that evidences of widespread in
terest in the Balkan situation inadu their
appearance.
In tho streets and shops and particu
larly in the employment agencies groups.
of men gathered and talked. On would
read a few lines and thou nil would Join
in nn enthiisinstio discussion, to bo in
terrupted only by a further reading.
The newspapers were soiling fast anil by
8 o'clock men and Ixiys were climbing
the two long flights of stairs up to the
publishing officii at 20 Vwoy street lo see
if they couldn't find a low more copies.
S. A. Xanthaky. the editor, said that It
was his busiest day in some time.
When ono circulated through tho Wash
ington street quarter or along Sixth
avenue between Twenty-sixth and Forty-
Ltnrl Btrootw and hero and them button.
holexl somotxidy that looked as if he could I
speak back as svou ns iiiko tu a nit or the
hnglish langungo he lenrned that there
is hero a suro enough fooling that some
thin? is going to happen in tho south
eastern corner of Fairopo, F.verywhere
could be got declarations that tho call
to the colors would not go unheeded.
At tho office of tli Greek Consul -Gen era I
at S3 South William street It was learned
that 1.000 Greeks will leave this morning
on tho steamship Macedonia, sailing
for I ho Piraeus and that the majority of
these are young men responding lo the,
call of the sovereign.
BULGARIANS HERE TO AID.
Broadway
at 34th Street
Beginning Today, Tenth Anniversary Offering of
Men's Fine Silk Neckwear
at extraordinary savings on ordinary prices
J The 13,200 silk scarfs in this great neckwear event have been
furnished by three prominent makers who supply our regular neck
wear stocks, and who have made these very liberal concessions on
the theory that one good turn deserves another.
Men's
Silk Neckwear
value 55c
at 28c
6,000 silk scarfs in
the representative
styles ot the season.
All large open ends, in
plain colors, effective fig
ures, and the newest com
binations. In fact, all the
new Fall patterns, in the
following colors: Navy,
brown, royal, tan, gray,
hello, purple, and green.
A wonderful selection of
designs, and a saving which
is big enough to warrant
consideration even on the
purchase of a single scarf.
Men's
Silk Neckwear
values 1.00 to ZOO
at 58c
6,000 all silk scarfs
that arc the acme
of good values
! There arc the latest
striped effects, scores of
exclusive patterns in fig
ures, and a brilliant assem
blage of colorings that arc
solid but never plain. Re
gal repps, soulful satins,
artistic armurcs, supcrsmart
surahs, gentlemanly grcs
grains, and in fact all of
those rich and fashionable
silks which are considered
attributes of dress.
All Silk
Knitted Scarfs
values 1.50 to 2.50
at 1.08
1200 knitted scarfs
that arc the biggest
values ever knitted
J From a maker who has
a reputation for the finest
kind of knitted neckwear,
and they arc worthy exam
ples of his art. These .scarfs
arc accordcon or two color
effects, with knitted cross
stripes which show both on
the knot and below it. Col
ors arc blue, tan, gray,
hclio, purple, red and green..
The values arc clean white
all through.
Mens Mocha Gloves
value 1.50
at 1.15
Cj The Mocha glove is in a class by itself.
Every season it grows more popular.
This year you cannot buy it everywhere
even at 1 .50, though today you can buy
it at 1. 1 5 at Saks'.
3 A real Mocha, too. Not a number
two company playing the provinces.
But a fine, genuine Mocha, bluish
gray in color, and soft as the down on
a woman's cheek. Stylish, distinctive,
suitable for day and dress wear, well
made, comfortable, serviceable, the
equal of kid, and superior to suede.
Avoid Mochas of a pink-and-whitish
cast. They arc as an Oriental rug of
fered on the verandah of a Summer
hotel. Get the blue gray Mocha, and
get it now at Saks' while the price is
low. Regular and cadet fingers.
Men's Silk Hose
values 1.00 to 2.50
at 65c
I This silk hose is one of the most fa
mous brands on the market. But the
makers have scruples about advertis
ing it at sale prices, so we will leave it
to you to discover its identity, while
we talk about its merits.
I Made of all pure thread silk, with
high spliced heels and double soles and
toes. Some are just plain silk. Others
arc hand-embroidered in the instep.
Still others have hand-embroidered side
clocks. All have silk or lisle soles.
Blacks and whites by the hundreds, and
a host of smart colors, including tan,
navy, gray, purple and green. Soft,
lustrous and beautifully made. You
never in your life had a more profitable
opportunity to stock up with silk hose
of these qualities.
Men's Raincoats at 8.75
actual value 12.50
you certainly have the best of this rainy-day argument
3 When you buy a raincoat at Saks', no matter what you pay for it, you are
buying the best raincoat value the town affords. You can bank on its work
manship and rainproof qualities, and nine times out of ten you will find that
it costs less at Saks' than elsewhere. All of which is by way of introducing
the rubberized raincoats in this anniversary sale, for they are regular 12.50
garments, and marked at 8.75 for this sale only.
J Made of imported Paranietta, all seams cemented and strapped, and de
signed with Raglan shoulders. Swagger, rangy, roomy, rain-resisting gar
ments, which the wise man will acquire while the other fellow is thinking it
over.
Others
Some llrtiirulnir t'litlit.
ScnillnK Wnr Kiiiiila,
A meetitiK w held at the Unitarian
Homo at. 3 Morrl street Mb! nicht by the
Bulgarian-Macedonian League of New
- i. . ul,inr what net inn to take as
i, .iiin Minuuiiirn thev received
yeMerday from the central committee at
Hofia which read: -Menn an huik
and Macedonian to Sofia."
Ahout peventy-flvo Bulgarians from
this city and tho tturronndinK towns
were present, ami many 01 mem ut...
., i .nt: itiirn tn tn event
llieir wllllllKllnr hi , , ,
of war with Turkey. Others oald they
i . m. n 1mm thplr
wollin cenn coniriumimir. ..
country. nlthouKli they would not be able
to no t'licmt-elveB.
ITALO-TURKISH PEACE?
(neon firmed IleimrU Come I'rnm
Vienna nnrt 'onnlnntlniple,
.ijio-ial fable Hapalch n Tim Srv
London, Oct. 2. Reports here from
Vienna and Constantinople aro to the
effect that pcaco between Italy and Tut
key is on the eve of conclusion.
The. statement are emphatic and per
H.Btent, but are wholly unofficial. There
w notliinB on tho subject from Rome.
FIRST CLASH AT VIENNA.
nrUlnh ami lluliinrlan HrerTlt
KlKht mi Itallrnad Station.
Special ftfile riespatcli tn Tin Scs
Virnna, Oct. ". Parties of Turkish
and HulRarlan reserves, who wero
leaving here to-nlnht, clashed at tho
rallwny station. The pollco separated
them.
The nelecntlons met to-clny nmld
great excitement, hut reassiirlnB state
ments which were muilo In behalf of
Count von BerchtoUl, the Minister of
KorelBn Affairs, to tho effect that tho
Powers were workltiK for pence, allayed
the anxiety.
Kmperor rrnncls Joseph paid a visit
to KlnK Ocorwe of Greece, which lasted
nearly an hour. Tho Austrlnn mon
arch Is credited with saying: "I hope
and believe that It will bo possible to
avoid war. Hope must not bo aban
doned nothwIthstandlnB the military
preparations."
Tho story that the allies are about to
send an ultimatum to Turkey Is current
here ns elsewhere, but cannot be con
firmed. Tho 'best Informed people say
tho ultimatum has sot yet been deliv
ered. UnmJN, Oct. 2. The newspapers
ascribe to Herr Klilerlcn-Wnechter, the
Foreign Secretary, a statement admlt
tltiB that the mobilisations of the armies
of Turkey and the allies had brought
wnr very near, but tho efforts of the
Powers toward pcaco would continue.
If, unfortunately, they should fall, Ger
many need not bo Immediately anxious,
as It was positively to be hoped that the
conflict would bo localized. Tho Minis
ter ascribes the panics everywhere lo
technical causes.
OARIBALLI OFFERS SERVICES.
Would Serve With Greek Array.
Khrillrr l.rarra Paris.
Tabis, Oct. 2. Itlccottl Garibaldi ha
offered to serve In the Oreek army. He
has nlrendy fouRht with the Cubans
and Venezuelans and served two years
In the Panama Canal labor quarters .de
partment. The Khedive of Egypt left for Cairo
to-day.
StoberW&fnicke
Office Eiipment
You rent the office, we
do the rest Our super
ior facilities for delivering rrom
Slock complete outfits ofoffice
furniture in uniform design at
prices which appeal are deserv
ing of your attention.
Efficient salesmen are at your
service if unable to call for per-
sonai inspection.
Ccsl no men than the ordinary Una',
New York Store at 380 Broadway
-u.. 'Phona, Franklin 3870
Dtikt, Chair, Table and FlHnK Cabinets in Wood and Steel
Also Sectional Bookcases
n

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