OCR Interpretation


The sun. (New York [N.Y.]) 1833-1916, October 12, 1912, Image 1

Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030272/1912-10-12/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

WEATHER forecast.
wit.
: rain to-morrow: moderate
fa to south winds.
rts will be found on page 21.
1 TfrTiK
VOL. LXXX. NO. 42.
ASTOR ESTATE IS
$77, Bp NET
Appraisers List Realty, Ex
cept Khincbeck, at
SB2,850,000.
TAX CHECK 3,150,000
All But 10,000,000 of the
Total Will Go to
Vincent Astor.
$1100,000 IX ST. REGIS
Values Arc Higher by Mnny
Millions Than the City
Assessments.
On the basis of the payment of
the Col. John Jacob Astor estate
tax to the State Comptroller yes
terday the features of the pre
liminary appraisal of the estate are
as follows:
Net value of estate, J77.826.000.
Real estate, exclusive of Rhine
beck property, 562.850,000.
Art objects, statuary, bronzes,
fcc. $460,000.
Other personal property.$887,06S.
Personal property in St. Regis
Hotel, 5600,000.
Stocks, bonds, mortgages and all
other property, $13,028,035.
Residuary estate, all to William
Vincent Astor. $67,826,000.
The tntnt estate of Col. John Jacob
Astor will appraise at many millions
Ices than has been supposed.
This was Indicated yesterday when
a messenger from the otllce of Carter,
I.edyard & MItburn. attorneys for the
e.xocutors. went to the State Comptrol
ler's otllce at Albany with a check for
53,150,000, representing the transfer tax
as computed on the present estimate of
the value of the estate by the execu
tors. This amount of tax Indicates that the
executors have computed the net value
of the estate, after all debts, commis
sions of executors and other deductions
have been eliminated, at 177,826,000.
l'revlous estimates of the value of the
'.ate have ranged from KMOO.OOO to
!i ,'0,000,000, with the Astor real estate
frequently appraised at $100,000,000.
The tentative appraisal of the Astor
real estate, mude by the experts agreed
upon by Lewis Cass Iedyard, Jr., coun
sel for the estate, and John Qutnn,
Krlal counsel for the State Comptrol
ler, is $62,S50,000. This does not Include
the elaborate country place at Rhlne
lifik. which has not yet been appraised
by representatives of the State Comp
troller. vl Astor left all but'about $10,000,000
of his pr his son, William Vln
cent Astor, and the figures upon which
the tax payment Is based show that the
rrslduary estate willed to the eldest sou
Is valued at J67.826.000.
While the total outside estate Is so
much loss than wus generally supposed,
the appraisal of the real estate Is still
nuns million higher than tlio assessed
t ablation of the property on the city
tax 1'ouk.v 1'pon this point It was said
5 ( "erday Ht the nflice of the special at
t rney for the State Comptroller that a
i impails- n of the tax assignments leads
t' tli.: conclusion that the figures of tho
appraisers "in a considerable number of
envs exceed the tax assessments."
It was said that detailed figures as to
tb real estate appraisals will not lie
forthcoming until the State Appraiser,
J"hn V. ("oggey, begins his hearings
Into the methods by which the ap
praisers arrived at their figures.
It Is believed, however, that the totals
wi,; not be changed, since both the
State and the Astor executors have
ncre , to accept the figures of the ap
praivors ns conclusive. They will not be
-t irbd unless the henrlngs show that
appraisers have pursued erroneous
methods In maklnt; their calculations.
There were four real estate apprals
and the bulk of tho work fell to
1 !" rt :. Howling, president of the
( ' Investing Company. He appraised
w .at - tailed the llrst division, embrac-
t u ir.. property on Hroadway, upper
I ' ti'lvva and upper Fifth nvenue, and
h i i ent in them, lying roughly between
M"hso,i and sixth avenues. Mr. Howl-
.is tentative figures as handed in to
t ntinrnejs for the estate to enable
' mi ti compute tho transfer tax total
I , 'IQII,
1 i rem ! ,1. Ilamsey nf Crulckshank &
' appraiser of nil the West Side prop
i .in In. ling tho dock property, esti
t' i 's i lie value of the real estate In
t - -utioii of the city at $2,760,000.
aiMiie V. lU-khardt of Horace S.
F , A ! vvas mimed to value the Kast
f1 Me property. Including tho tenement
is holdings and parcels on the lower
J. it s.,o, and his estimate of tho value
' ' mi division of tho property Is
i' ' 'in oon.
T
' Uronx division of the Astor real
' was assessed by Joseph P. Hay
omp rises to a large extent unlm
I property. Much of It Is In the
amsiiriiluo section and was ap
t
t .
d at an acreage value. Mr. Day's
s total I.."i(i0,000.
1 twin c llolston of Hurand-Ruel ft
ippr.iiser of the paintings, engniv-
niii'.iMrcs, statuary nnd bronzes
In
hn1
AMnrs Fifth uvenuo resident'
h! Ithlnebei'k home, gives ap
I'r-.v.ii!rtt. u $tf,o,onri as their value.
Hei.mml,, II. HerlK of Herts Hros. ft
' " made a final appraisal of all
'tie .i or personal property at 832 Fifth
e nrt at Rlilncbeck and his total
I' tfli;r. This Includes tho tanestrles
J1" other iiersonul property In tho
'"- not inriNded under tho deslgna
' n if objects.
y "im K. Kiuipp, chosen to appraMe
All
i Astors property In the Hotel
Continued on Seventh Page.
NEW
REGISTRATION 18 LIGHT.
City Shows Palllna- Off In Spite of
Population Increase.
The registration for yesterday, tho
first day of this year, was lighter by
far than It has been for several years.
It showed a notlceaMe falling off from
1908, the last Presidential
less of the Increase. In population, which
experts figure should amount to about
8 per cent In x-otcrs.
The total for the five boroughs was
190.161. Of this Manhattan and The
Uronx registered 108.09S voters, as com
pared to 121,852 In 1908. rtlchmond had
4,188, nearly one thousand lighter than
In 1908, while Queens hm! 1R!e .
compared to 14.620 In 1908. The total
ror Brooklyn yesterday was 74,009; tho
first day In 1908 was 84,326.
The figures helnur lnl la,n i.,i
... ..... ciibllUU
districts In Manhattan:
MANHATTAN AVIl Till- iimiiT
Am'v . First l)y ' ! ,
n!t. Inia mil mm Innn inn.
1 en
2 no
2175
17(17
213
2130
220(1
201 B
2IM
2010
:ms
2374
227S
34IH
SOM
2101
38(18
2135
4770
2181
2828
2489
7S25
1742
2837
2873
2101
188 i
34M
3717
3720
M'J
S2S7
MM
4001
1. W4
IftM
2327
1471)
1843
1072
1744
1842
1M17
1J
2017
20M
INV7
20M
2. V10
IM4
2418
1M4
3281
10.VI
2827
2(68
5277
1.130
2173
2031
1818
1433
2174
3214
28M
130
2378
4029
3828
l87n
2227
SOTO
2384
3163
1439
3178
1347
3080
1238
2884
2177
3332
3378
3188
3138
3088
2928
444
2042
4839
3183
4082
3142
9U
2234
437
2804
3910
2201
4238
3138
3030
8371
3011
3O02
4843
2170 2309
2.V10 K8J
17M 1841
2377 2412
2032 21111
2IVM 2183
s ..
s ..
B ..
7...
...
a...
10118
1W8
1W
2247
2401
1089
2311
3170
2070
3118
2007
3923
2218
3801
2371
84V)
1378
2757
23.V)
2288
1407
2033
3842
3247
Mil
2048
4188
3038
1S71
21X11
1970
2IS2S
2718
2304
2885
3V,2
2134
3371
2101
4I.X5
2527
3024
2488
S083
1830
2H30
2308
2398
1707
31193
3W1
3473
3309
3280
4683
4M7
to ..
U...
it...
14...
IS...
IS...
17 ..
IB...
21...
1 .
24 .
2..
27..
IS .
29 .
30..
St..
12 .
SJ..
34 .
U..
Tolnl... 108393
82348 P8037 101034
318008 32C280 343320
301148 322243
124832
370272
348822
Tottl rCKls
Total vote
DHOOKIAW ItECISTItATION.
Am'r
Dill.
4
r iibi nay 1 .
lBia in ti 1910 toon 100ft
. 2773 2339 2823 2S94 3870
, 19UI ISO! 1979 2330 2934
. 2134 1811 2032 2438 29SO
. 2488 22X3 2317 2107 3398
. 3710 3138 3384 3434 4319
. 2731 2343 2332 27U2 3020
, 2179 1930 212T 2249 2839
, 2198 1930 2018 2293 2980
, 4334 3829 3809 3988 4028
, 3133 2S73 3083 3497 4220
. 3377 2682 3031 3303 3980
, 4108 1387 3911 4143 4138
, 2167 18U 1K8 2003 2141
, 2142 1931 2013 20311 28 SI
, 2483 2134 20X) 2mrl 7998
, 4937 3784 4127 4043 4989
. 3825 21 19 3272 3313 4392
. 3931 4.131 4839 4833 4903
. 2238 1908 2013 2228 2341
, 2728 2319 3385 2813 3857
, 1783 1119 1594 1899 1330
. 3879 3210 6339 3809 8281
. 4270 364) 3133 3322 3774
8402 81283 63031 70013 81328
, 740U0 231493 228813 233289 241V)
. . . . 216712 213371 319193 238481
10
1 ...
20 ....
31 ....
22 ....
23 ....
Totsl .
ARRESTS IN FAN CROWDS.
Three nf Seven l'rtionrra Supeelrit
of Ilrlnc the "Itnaalan Trio."
Six men and one woman, picked up
by detectives In the crowds outside the
I'olo Grounds yesterday afternoon, were
taken to Police Headquarters last eve
ning for finger printing purposes. All
were found In tightly wedged groups of
fans going to and from the game. Capt.
Foye and n squad of detectives got them
In a hunt for pickpockets.
At the Eighth avenue elevated sta
tion at 155th street after the game the
captain noticed a man with a small
boy In his arms whom he had pre
viously observed working his way
through crowds. With him were a
man and a woman. Stories of the
"Russian Trio," a band of Kast Klde
pickpockets, had reached the police, and
Foye ordered the arrest of the three.
All were Russians. They said they were
Solomon I'acter, 44 years old, a baker,
of 84 Pitkin avenue, Brooklyn; Nathan
Moskowltz, an auctioneer, of 71 Kast
100th street, and Mrs. Luby Goldberg,
a boarder at Moskowltz's house. It was
Moskowltz who had the boy In his arms.
The police say the prisoners at first
denied that they knew one another,
but admitted later that they were ac
quainted. Impressions of their finger tips at
Headquarters did not disclose that they
had police records. They were sent to
thn night court as disorderly persons.
The child was taken to tho Gerry
society rooms.
CAM0RRA WITNESS KILLED.
Itnllnn Mnrilerrtl While TnlMng tn
Woiiihii on n HrmiLlyn Corner.
Frank Ue Nlco of 2S I'nlon street, a
young Italian supposed by the police to
have been a witness In the Camorru
trial, was shot early this morning whllo
he was talking with a woman at Union
street and Fourth avenue, HroolUyn.
He was standing on tho corner with
the woman when a man drove up In a
taxlcab, stepped out, and putting a re
volver to Do Nlco's chest tired one shot
He dropped to tho pavement nnd tho
other man, with the woman, Jumped
Into the taxlcab and drove away, Ue
Nlco was taken to the Holy Family
Hospital and died there. He had ftiOO
In his pocket.
Thn police learned that ho camn to
this country only a short time ago,
They are looking for a countryman of
his who came over on the samo steamer
and who has been boarding near him,
Rnlir lllr nl ClirlsleiilnK.
.lust ns Father I.enhardt of the. Church
of the Immaculate Conception at Melrono
avenue and ISSth street named her fourteen.
das old baby Peter, Mrs, Mary t'ololin
screamed and filiated. ,h Mio fell some of
her frlendi seized the baby, which was
found to have died In Its mother's arms,
The cause of the death was marasmus.
Mrs. t'olohau live at 26.'. (iardeu utreet,
BUUn Island.
YORK, SATURDAY,
HEARD BECKER'S
THREATTO KILL
Defence Witness Swears Lieu
tenant Said He'd "Croak"
Rosenthal.
WAS TALKING TO ROSE
Luban Tells of Overhearing
Four Gamblers Plotting
Murder.
LEWIS AGAIN IDENTIFIED
Austrian Snys He Saw Whitcy
Pump Load Into Gambler
From Automatic.
I.leut. llecker and his lawyers were
struck with amazement and their plans
wero disordered late yesterday after
noon when Morris Luban, a witness on
whom they had depended for testimony
that ho overheard Rose, Webber, Vul
lon and Schcpps plotting tho murder
of Herman Rosenthal and threatening
to kill Becker If ho Interfered, swore
that he heard llecker, In the steam
room of the Lafayette llaths two or
three weeks before tho murder, up
braiding Rose and threatening to kill
Rosenthal with his own hands.
"1 know It's tho last of me," whis
pered Lubun to a court attendant who
had observed his trembling and his
fright, but there was no tremor In h)s
voice when he looked steadily at llecker
a few minutes later and testified:
"Mr, llecker said. lf that
Rosenthal Is not croaked I will
croak him myself."
It was the most telling feature of a
day that had gone steadily against the
defence.
The first witness, Thomas Ryan, a
chauffeur, had blanched under tho vi
cious looks shot at him by the gunmen
at the bar and had said In a voice
barely audible thut he couldn't Identify
them. Giovanni Stanlch, an Austrian
of good birth, cultivated manners and
keen Intelligence, had not been terri
fied by the black looks of the gunmen.
He had looked full In the face of Whttey
Lewis (Frank Muller) and named
Whltey as one of the four whom he saw
shoot Rosenthal to death. And then
come Luban, fearful and shrinking at
first, but gaining courage as he went
along, and not .only Identified all four of
the gunmen and Shapiro, their chauf
feur, but delivered against Uecker tho
first testimony connecting llecker with
tho murder.
Gunmen Hull at Wltne.
When he walked to the bar of the
court and stretched out iil hand toward
the gunmen their voices suddenly shat
tered the dead quiet of the court mom.
They railed against him. They
mouthed and mumbled. The voice of
Lefty Louie Hosenlierg rose to a
screech. He was protesting against thy
method of Identification. And when
Luban had named them one by one as
old acquaintances be had seen at tho
murder all save Dago Frank Clrotlcl.
who.se name l.e didn't know but whose
appearance gave him no doubts the re
tainers of the late Jack Zellg bad lost u
measure of the defiance and contempt
liousness that have marked them. As
for Uecker, the sweut was streaming
down hi. face. He seemed to have aged.
Kecowilng from the shock of Luban's
direct aid whi.ily unexpected testlmmiy
against l.ecker, John F. Mclntyre, his
lawyer, tolled for hours to destroy its
effect. He labrred to discredit the wit
ness. He fought to bring out that
Luban was A forger, a gambler, a
ne'er-do-well, who had bargained with
the defence I'efore turning to the Dis
trict Attorney. Over and over again
the lawyer drove Luban over the trail
of his Mory uf tho Uifayetto Haths
meeting between Uecker and Rose and
the story of the murder Itself. It was
all to no purpose. True or false,
Luban's testimony could not be broken
down.
There could hardly have been more
rensatlonal episode nf a great murder
ttlal than the appearance of a witness
who told a story directly opposite to
what the defence expected he would 'II.
Luban nnd his brother .Incoh luid been
In the Kssex county Jail In Newark
since August 12. They wero charged
with being members of a gang of
forgers. One such charge had broken
down previously, but they were rear
rested. They say that the revival of h
old charge was brought about by friends
of flecker, who wanted to keep them out
of this State, and they went to the Ks
sex county prosecutor with that story.
Heard I.iilmnn Could 4'lrar llerUrr.
Ho communicated with District At
torney Whitman, who promised the Lu
bans that If they would tell the truth
In the Decker trial he would do what
j ho could to help them In their own
I case provided they were Innocent nf
I forgery. Hut meanwhile counsel for
I the defence had heard that thn Lubans
could clear Uecker. A private cletec
tlvo was sent over to Jersey to ques
tion them. Ho came back under the
Impression that the brothers would be
effective witnesses for Uecker. Mr. Mc
lntyre had received letters from one of
thn Lubans saying that thn charges
against Uecker wero a frnmoiip. And
then Mr. Whitman produced one of thv
brothers, wliiise story was a shock "to
tho defence.
Only tho long drawn out cross-examination
of Morris Luban prevented Jack
Rose, possibly the most Important wit
ness against IJeut. Meeker, from being
a witness last evening. Rose was called
to the witness chair nnd sworn, but
when Justice Goff was Informed by
counsel that two hours at least would
bo required for tho direct examination
nnd threo hours or more for the cross
examination he put off the questioning
of Rose until this morning at 10 o'clock.
Rose entered the court room as cheer-
Continued on Fourth Page,
Continued on Fourth iW U22 Coroner .eas ed Mr. Btaley OacW w 2St2"2- W- figSS
OCTOBER 12, 1912. Copiriphl, 1912, til (As Sun Pel it liny run! i'uIi!(Mii3 Attoctatlon.
TELLS OF T. R. AID TO HARRIHAN!
Attorney Prelum Merger ftnlla
Were Cnllnl Off In ltlO.1.
Los Aniiklks, Oct. 11. Attorney
Joseph H. Cull of this city, formerly
special counsel for thn United Mates In
the so-called "Harrlman merger suits,"
to-day gavo out a statement In which
he declared that Judge Robert H. Lov
ctfs testimony beforo tho Henato In
vestigating committee Wednesday re
garding tho dismissal of the suits was
"wholly unwarranted by tho facts and
untrue."
Call makes public for the first time
letters sent from the United States Attorney-General's
ofilco at Washington
ordering the dismissal of the Govern
ment suits to dissolve tho merger of
tho Southern Pacific Railroad and the
Central Pacific Railroad in 1905 follow
ing tho raising In October,, 1904, of thn
$250,000 Republican campaign fund by
K. 11. Harrlman when Roosevelt was a
candidate.
Tho Government's failure to have tho
merger dissolved, Attorney Call asserts,
meant millions of dollars to Harrlman
and his associates. Thursday's papers
quoted Judgo Lovett as testifying that
the merger suits were dismissed In 1890.
Call says they were dismissed July 10,
1905.
UNI0NISM IN THE CHURCHES.
Problem nf Labor Presented Under
ItrllKlnna Annplcea.
Labor unions have been asked for
some time by the churches to cooper
ate. For the first time unions have re
sponded this fall nnd have begun a se
ries of educational meetings Intended
to make Christian people better in
formed on worklngmen and their prob
lems. Moving pictures and lectures nre the
features. Tho American Federation of
Labor, the Federation of Churches and
the National Child Labor Commission
are Joining In the work. The lecturers
are provided by tho unions. The series
began last week In three Catholic
churches In Brooklyn nnd last night In
the Catholic Church of Our Iady of
Good Counsel, In Kast Ninety-first
street, Manhattan. Next Monday night
there will be a lecturo at St. John's
Catholic Club, In Fiftieth street, fol
lowed by lectures at All Souls' Episco
pal Church, Haxlcm. October 16; at
Christ Congregational Church, Bronx.
October IS; nt tho Union Methodist
Church, In Forty-eighth street, October
26. nnd at St. Stephen's Catholic Church,
In Kast Twenty-eighth street, Octo
ber 31.
Secretary Brady of the Central Coun
cil of Labor said after the lecture last
night:
"Why do we go Into the churches nnd
their parish houses? Because for years
the churches have been Inviting us to
do so. We want to see whether Un
churches will rise to the occasion."
LOST 60 FOUNDS IN 50 DAYS.
Thl' What Mariiuartlt's Partner
Snym (irnerr Did lt)r Panting.
Gustuvp Mnrquardt, a wholesalo grQ
ccr at Liberty avenue and Vermont
street, Brooklyn, was so rotund two
months ago that plain speaking neigh
bors said he was fat, very fat. Not be
ing tall his breadth was all the more
noticeable. It was Inconvenient fur Mr.
Marquardt In getting around not to
speak of hot spells.
Kven his old friends have difficulty In
recognizing the grocer when they meet
htm nowadays, Tub 8iw Is told. The
rotundity has disappeared as If It had
been sliced off and hi clothes flap
around him like a battleship flag. He
Is thin, very thin, but he does not look
111.
A partner of Mr. Marquardt revealed
the secret last night. Just about two
months ago the grocer set out to break
the fasting records, says his partner.
He stopped eating.
For nearly fifty days he took nothing
but a very little water and an occasional
glass of buttermilk. Yes, that's what
his partner says. Nearly fifty days.
He weighed a little more than 225
pounds when he started, and at the end
of ten days he weighed 20S pounds. At
the end of his fast hf tipped tho scales
at 165. The story Is that his family and
friends persuaded him to stop nnd the
fast wus broken n week ago.
TWO DIE IN SUBMARINE WRECK.
Sailors Were Asleep With Short Air
Supply When l)lntrr Cnntr.
For.T Watsonviu.b, Cal., Oct. 11, John
Rchroeder and K. Turcett, United
States sailors aboard submarine F-l, are
dead and tho little sea fighter Is pound
ing to pieces In heavy breakers off shore
here as a result of slipping her moor
ings, crashing Into a pier and drifting
out of reach of assistance.
Submarines F-2 and F-3 and three
other United States vessels which have
been manoeuvring here for Wntsonvlllo
carnival crowds are standing by help
less as their sister ship Is somersault
ing In only twenty-five feet of water.
The two sailors were nsleep on board,
with only enough nlr supply to last till
morning. The hotly of Schroeder camo
ashore before noon. How It escaped
from the airtight submarine Is a mys
tery. VICTIM DYING, STALEY HELD.
w Yorker Arrested When VIhIHiik
SI nn Ills Auto Injured,
Mnrcellus Staley, president nf thn
Staley Klectrlc Klevator and Machine,
Company of 145 Prince street, wns nr
rested yesterday by Coroner lies of
Westchester .county on a chnrge of the
reckless Driving or an autotnobllo on
South Broadway, Yonkers, last Sunday
afternoon, when It was found that John
Minns, .6 years old, or 69 In Sice ave.
nue, Yonkers, who wns hit by tho ma-
chine. mlKlil not live through the night.
Mr.'Staley got nut of his machine nnd
assisted the man to his feet after tho
accident. Kunns said mat hn did not ;
believe he was hurt much and returned .
to his home on a trolley car.
Yesterday Mr. Staley went to Yonkers'
to see how Kuhns was getting along.
Ho said that he Intended to pay tha
mnns dqftor bills nnd do whatever else
was necessary for him. Ho found that
Kuhns was worse,
When Coroner lies learned that Sta
ley was In town he ordered his arrest.
The Coroner released Mr, Staley jn
i,0B9 tall,
Marshall Held and Lieutennnt
Commander MiihUh Are
Missing.
WIRELESS SEARCH FAILS
Warship rnahlo to Find Clue
in Delaware Bay or
River.
Plnt.AniaritiA, Oct. 11. Aviator Mar
shall Karl Reld and a passenger, Lieutenant-Commander
Henry C. Musttn,
who started In n flight from Capo May
Point nt 1:42 o'clock to-day, are miss
Ing nnd arc believed to have been swept
out to sea.
The men started In n hydroaeroplane
for League Island Navy Yard, but were
never sighted after the slart. A search
of Delaware River nnd bay failed to
show nny trace of tho men or machine.
The air craft should have been re
ported nearlng the city less than two
hours after the start, hut ns no word
was received Lleutenant-CommandT
Mustln's brother, Harry Mustln, started
tho Government wireless to searching
for the missing airmen.
The torpedo boat destroyer Bcale, the
fastest ship In tho navy, was reached
by radio for'" miles below Wilmington
on her way to the navnl review In New
York. Sho i" ordered halted and
started n search of the river nnd bay.
She also got In touch by wireless with
several amateur stations along the
shore, but was unable to pick up nny
word of the men for whom she was
searching.
Later In the evening the Beale com
municated with tho navy yard again
and announced that Held and his pas
senger were apparently not on bay
or river and that no word could bo se
cured of their having put to shore on
either side. Mrs. Mustln and the Lieutenant-Commander's
brother thereupon
started preparations to have other naval
boats sent down the river, and the wire
less was put upon the scent agnln.
Search among all the pilot stations
along tho Delaware Bay and river failed
to give any clue to the missing men
and it Is feared that with the northeast
wind they may have been carried out to
sea. The navy yard here has used the
powerful wireless apparatus at Its dis
posal and everywhere the answer Is,
"No news."
At 9 o'clock the Navy Department
ordered out Its boarding boat to go
down the river and meet a tramp
steamer that was coming up the river
at tho time the men left Cape, May
Point, but after they had met the steam
ship at Quarantine they flashed back
word via wireless thut nothing had been
seen of tho hydroaeroplane.
Kven If they survived, the men must
be enduring terrible hardships, for thn
river Is twenty-six miles wide at this
point. If any trouble occurred with
the mechanism they would be compelled
to swim thirteen miles to shore.
If they should have mastered this
feat they would be marooned upon some
of the marshes all night and must slay
there until daybreak or until some ves
sel comes along to tako them off.
It Is reasonably certain nt this hour
that no steamer has picked them up, for
the wireless has been In range of every
thing In the bay as far down as the
breakwater, nnd every ship has reported
that they saw nothing of Reld or Lieut.
Mustln.
Shortly after C o'clock Reld's mech
anician, who remained In Capo May, ar
rived hero. He stayed In Cape May for
several hours and says there Is no pos
sibility of the nvlators having turned
bark, as the hydroaeroplane left safely
and was well out of sight and up in the
air at tho last they could distinguish
with the glasses.
Officials at tho navy yard say that
they will hope for the host until day
light, ns they do not think that they
will hear any more lo-nlght, for all In
coming and outgoing vessels have been
spoken.
At 11 o'clock the Delaware Breakwa
ter life saving station reported that
they had seen nothing or had not been
able to locate Reld or Mustln. Life sav
ers have gono out In tugs from the
Breakwater nnd are scouring the bay
In the hope that some tidings may still
be had to-ntght of tho missing men.
CAR HITS AUTO; ONE DEAD.
Thomas HngRlns Killed at Harrison
Vrrn Others Injured.
One man wns killed nnd two were In
jured last night nt Harrlson-on-the-Sountl
when a trolley car crashed Into
an automobile owned and driven by
Daniel W, Mnloney.
The necldent occurred while Mr. Mo
loney, who Is a wealthy horseman and
real estate operator, was turning his
car around In n dark section of thn
highway near tho foot of a steep hill
on which a New York and Stamford
electric car was descending. The trolley
struck thn machine and threw the driver
and Samuel McCandless nnd Thomas
llugglns, his guests, Into thn roadway.
Hugglns landed on the rails nnd the
car wheels passed over his body, caus
ing almost instant death.
During the afternoon Mr. Maloney
took Mr. McCandless, Mrs. McCandless,
his wife, Muggins nnu anotner lady, a
relative of the McCanillesses. for a rlile
t0 Sea Cliff, L. 1. They crossed Long
island Sound on tho ferry to Oakland
Beach last evening and started for
Mamaroneek. It was only several mln-
utes previous to the accident that the
two women were left on a corner a
short distance from tho smnshup.
Mr. Maloney was thrown In tho high-
way and received two broken ribs. Mr.
McCandless escaped with -i-k nnd n
severe shaking up. Muggins's homo was
In Harrison.' jt.d ho was una visit
to Mr. McCav&t.Wts of MamnfencCk, who
Is his uncle. The body of Hugglns
was so badly wedged under the electrlo
car that the wrecking crew was sent
for and the car had to be Jacked up
SHIPS WORLD OVER GET SCORE, i
Uncle Sam Sends titrrr Play llrond
cast h- Wireless.
Nonrot.K. Vn.. Oct. 11 With nenlul
telegraph wires looped to the navy yard
from the Postal unit Wi.utr.rr ltnlnn
Telegraph Companies here and several
wen operators on Hand, I'nclo Sam
sending every detail of thn chum
onshlp baseball games to enlisted men
i tho navy who rn on ships nt sen.
As each detail Is reeelvorl liv tnln.
graph at the navy yard It Is sent broad-
isi over i no sea ny tho Government
'Ireloss station here.
The Norfolk wireless stntlon Is said to
nve the strongest liower of nnv In the
Government service nnd has sent mes
sages as far ns San Francisco without
nny rcluy.
L. F. L0REE THROWN FROM AUTO.
Itnllnnr President's Machine lilts
C'nrh In Station,
Leonard F. Loreo of West Orange,
N. J., president of the Delaware and
Hudson Railroad, wns thrown out of his
nutomoblle at the Lackawanna rail-
road stntlon to-day while hurrying to
catch n train. A friend with Mr. Loree
was also thrown out and both landed on
their feet, neither of them being In
jured.
When the car started to make the
turn nt Kssex avenue the front wheels
lost their grip and thn ear went almost
straight Into the curb. The nolsn of the
Impact was great enough to attract tho
attention of pedestrians for a block
either way, and a crowd soon gathered.
PRINCE MAY GET A DIVORCE.
George of Bnvnrla t'un't llnvp Mnr
rlngr Annuled Is Itrport.
Sprclnt Cable Dtipatch to Tun Six,
Mdnich, Oct. II. Tho -notorious rup
ture lietween Prince Georgo of Bavaria
and Ills wife, tho Princess Isaliella, is
now tho subject of an announcement by
tbo Uhamlierlain to tho Regent. This de
nies emphatically that grounds exist
ror nullifying tho mnrriago and adds
that if tho marriaeo is dissolved it can
only bo dono by divorce. The announce
ment says:
"It is true that there has been from
tho lieginning a profound incompati
bility between the couple duo to thediffer
cneo in their characters and marital rela
tions havo lxen utterly destroyed." The
couplo were married In February, 1912.
Tho Princess was formerly Arch
duchess Isabolla of Austria. Sho left
her hustiand soon after their marriago
and returned to her father in Vienna.
It was said recently that the father of the
Princess had applied to have tho marriage
declared void. She is 23 and her husband
32 years of age.
ROCK CUT HIS JUGULAR VEIN.
Palrrxin Man Killed In Strrrthy
Slonr From Rlast.
Paterso.v. N. J., Oct. 11. Whllo walk
ing along the street to work this noon
John Westervelt, 50 years old, was
struck by a Jagged stone weighing less
than a pound. It severed his Jugular
vein and he died soon after. The stone
came from u, blast on the Passaic River
falls.
NEGRO GIRL STRIKE BREAKERS.
Hide In Anion In Kast Side Dress
mnklnir Factories.
Negro girls wero employed as strike
breakers by Kast Side dress manufac
turers yesterday and transported to and
from the factories In automobiles.
The colored girls enjoyed It until they
were surrounded by mobs of strikers or
sympathizers, who tried to attack them.
One or two of the pickets, who were
more disorderly than the rest, were ar
rested and locked up In the Delancey
street police station.
BABY TO RECONCILE FRENCHES.
Daughter Jnlla, Who Kloprd With
Chauffeur, Soon to He Mother.
Nkwport, R. I Oct. 11, There are,
rumors here that a reconciliation Is
pending between Mrs. Jack Geraghty
nnd her parents, Mr. nnd Mrs. Amos
Tuck French. An heir Is expected In
the Gernghty family soon and this Is
expected to be the means of bringing
about the reconciliation. Tho maid for
Mrs. Geraghty, who was employed at
the French household beforo Mrs. Ger
nghty's elopement, hns returned to Mrs.
French's employ, according to report.
It Is said that Mrs. Geraghty's family
have recently sent her some useful gifts.
HOOKED AN 18 POUND LOBSTER.
Monster Caught ar II r Had an
0)trr for n Corn on line Claw,
None nf the fishermen of Long Island
Sound remembers n bigger lobster being
caught In those waters than the on
pulled up on a blackflsh hook yesterday
afternoon by Ralph King of 5 Franklin
nvenue. New Rochelle, who was fishing
for blackflsh with John I, ,Klng near
Huckleberry Inland.
The lobster measures thirty-three
Inches from tho end of Its feelers to thn
tip of Its tnll. Knch feeler Is seventeen
Inches long. One claw Is sixteen Inches
long and twelve Inches In circumference.
Tho body measures fifteen Inches
around. It weighs eighteen pounds. A
young oyster wus growing on ono claw.
24 CONFIRMED IN PRISON.
Kpturopnl IlUhnp, Assisted hy Suf
fragan, llnpllnrii Convict Converts,
Pnit.AiKi.riiM, Oct. 11. Twenty-four
convicts at the Knstern Penitentiary
.were confirmed here to-night by Bishop
Garland of tbo Protestnnt Kplscopal
Church, All the men had been con
verted In the prison chapel, and at an
Impressive service which nttended the
ceremonies, the prisoners sang "Rock
of Ages," Nearer My God, to' Thee,"
"Jesus, Lover of My Soul," and "My
Faith Looks Up to Thee, Thou Lumb
of Calvary,"
Tho Bishop preached tho sermon and
was assisted by the Suffragan Bishop
ana otner clergymen
diocese, who administered
Hi
i ann ninnr ciprcvmpn nf tha i um.m dwivi Tail lain tn nutinuiaiaM
PRICE TWO CENTS.
WOOD WINS AGAIN
RED SOXJN LEAD
Giants Face Uphill Fight in
Scries Now Because of
3 to 1 Defeat.
TWO GAMES TO ONE
Dark Day and Fine Support
Help Smoky Joe Best
Big Jeff Tcsreau.
MANY SHINING PLAYS
Wagner Gives Wonderful
Exhibition of Work
in Short Field.
FLETCHER AND M UJIRAY VIE
Brilliant Fipldinjy Fonts Heiv
7.oj Scores New York's Run
In Roston To-day.
HOW TUB NKItlKS STANDS.
First kb mi- Ttirailar at Pol
(rounds, Srrr York, tied las
won, -I to !l. Pitcher, Woo
and Trsrran and Crandall.
Second same Wednesday at Fen
vray Park, Ronton. Tie same,
tn II, eleven Innings. Pitchers,
Mnlhrnson and Collins, Hall
and IlrUlrnt.
Third a-nme Thnrsdar at Fen war
Park, Rattan. (Slants won, a
to 1, ntchera, Mnrquard Bail
O'llrlen and llrdlent.
Fourth game Yesterdar at Pl'
Grounds, . York. Ited Sox
won, to 1. Pitchers, Wool
and Trsreau and Ames.
Fifth same To-day nt Iloaton.
The fourth call to arms In the grusl.
ling world's series of ball games be-.
tween the Giants and Red Sox At the
I'olo Grounds yesterday turned Into a
battle which was only a degree less
stubborn nnd trying than tho three
others. The Bostons were the winners
by a score of 3 to 1 the first game tn
which the victor- has had a margin of
over one run and success has now
perched twice on their crimson ban
ners. Two panics to one In favor of the Red
Sox and one eleven Inning tie Is how
the milling stands, and, behind though
they nre, the Giants are as combative
os at the outset or when they were one
game behind Just after they had lost the
first game. Whoever wins, whoever
loses, every game Is a fight to a finish
with them, nnd moreover they know
well that only that sort of fighting will
overcome the handicap In a serlej
against a club which Itself never leta
go. The Bostons are ahead, but their
heads are no higher than those of tha
Giants.
A gray, moist laden day was na
deterrent whatsoever In the rampant In
terest In the games, and no heavy field
could slacken the pace of or thick, deep
atmosphere sap the ardor of the com
batants. With the Boston star alwaya
In the ascendency yesterday the Red
Box were ahead all the way It never
was so far so as to permit them to feel
safe or relax for a single moment. They;
knew the mettle of their opponents and
played as hard to maintain their lead
as the Giants did to wipe it out.
Fast playing took place on a surface
not fast. Skilful manicuring of tha
Held had prevented It from being alowj
but the ruin had left It less lively than
before. The strife, however, went on
with undiminished energy and with all
of Its now accustomed closeness and
doubtfulness of Issue,
The Bostons got the Jump nnd won.
There were unaccepted chances for
double plays on both sides which were,
no fault of the players nnd which, had
the ground permitted the ball to coma
to the fielders a. trifle sharper, might
havo Improved New York's chances but
which would not have kept Boston from
winning. The Red Sox did well at
making the most of their scoring oppor
tunities, and, though bunching base hit
not as often as New York, dovetailed
lilts with battery slips of home pro
duction sufllclently to win. With a
watchful eye to openings they had tho.
wherewith In tho wny of hits and a
stolen laso to make tho most of them.
The (Hants gave stern chase. Held
back for five Innings by tho Joe Wood
formula of smoke arid curves, all tha
moro effectle on tho dark day, they
never lost heart and In tho sixth and
seventh innings they threatened a suc
cessful climbing of the Red hope's
frame. The Giants grouped five of nlna
hits In the sixth and seventh Innings,
but tho Boston genius of tho knoll,
backed by sharp support, was 'too ef
fectlvo for tho unceasing New York
efforts to reach the desired consumma
tion. Don't overlook that sharp sup
isirt. Wood, wizard though ho was,
would havo had a thornier path to
travel without It,
The Giants did Just what they did the
first time they encountered Wood. Thoy
mado moro hits than thn Bostons gath
ered ofT the New York pitching. Never--thelcss
tho Missouri magician tried
them sorely. Ho altered his system
somewhat from the first game. He did
more curving, he crooked the ball over'
the pentagon oftcner than he applied
straight speed, and with hts darting;
slants often had the New York bat
olthor describing sweeping area aad
meeting nothing or had tha New TarkV

xml | txt