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The sun. (New York [N.Y.]) 1833-1916, November 03, 1912, Image 2

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2 V
THE SUN, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1912.
burning villages along the railway lines.
Constantinople to-night Is a city of
Alarums nnd terrors. The Christians, In
fear of the shine of the knives of the
Kutds, who are swaggering through her
akuUdcrlng streets, are keeping to their
feomcs. Their only hope Is that beneath
the guns of the foreign righting ships
that He under Constantinople's minarets
they may find shelter.
British cruisers are on their way to
the Levant.
There Is a report that Turkish troops
drove 200 Ijulgnrs In one village from
which the Sultan's men were fleeing
Into a barracks anil there burned them
nllvc.
The commander of the Turkish bat
tleship torpedoed by the Greeks In thu
waters of the Gulf of Snlonlca Is to bo
hot.
AUSTRIA'S FINGER IN IT?
Trying o Mir I'll ttuiiinntn Aunlnst
llulRnrln. Is ttrport.
Special Cable Detpiltrh to Tun Sri
SoriA, Nov. 2. The newspaper HuU
Carta charges that certain circles in
Vienna arc making an effort to stir
up Rumania against liulgarla In or-
der to create a situation whereby Aui-
trla-Hungary alone would profit. I
As the trains filled with wounded '
came In long slow lines Into thU i
capital the realization of the fierce-1
ness of the fighting that has been going i
on In the valleys stretching from Adrla
noplc to tho Ottoman cupltnl Is seizing
hold of the people here. The most of
the wounded are literally hacked to
pieces with knife and I nyonct and terri
bly mutilated by the soft nosed bullets
of the Turk.
They tell of the uhameful rout of tho
Turks. How. throwing nway their guns, formerly attached to the Sixteenth In
Turkish soldiers fought with women and ' fantry. He was at one time chief editor
children fleeing from the flaming vll- of the Sarajevo Taublalt ond became
Isges to get aboard the trains going
down to Constantinople. How regi
ment after regiment of Bulgarians
plunged Into the smoke of he Turkish
cannon, setting nsldo the rifle for the
knife and fought like cavemen with
hands and teeth nnd the naked steel.
In the long tliys of fighting there
was no chance for rest and many of
the Turkish regiments were flung at tho
tough little Uulgars In a starving con
dition. One regiment of mutineers fell
on a correspondent's car and corre
spondents and foreign observers had tu
hoot them down with revolvers.
At Lule-Burgus when Nazlm Pasha
saw his untrained Asiatic levies run
before the liulgars he sent frantically
time and again for reenforcement.
Several tralnloads of troops came up.
Most of the men were unarmed: the
others were wounded who had been
atarted back, but were forced to turn
around and fight again.
This Is but one of n hundred shame
ful examples of Turkey's unprepared
ness. Witnesses say that the regular
Turkish regiments, whose bearts had
not been gripped by the panic of their
fellows, stood up nnd fought like men
until they were annihilated. The spec
tators agree that the Turkish officers
did all they could ti stop the panic that
came at the sight of the first liulgar.
Many of the officers shot themselves,
' unable to bear the .sight of the famed
warriors of the Hultan running like
sheep before men In civilian clothes,
armed only with a knife, n cartridge
belt and rifle.
FEARS IN CONSTANTINOPLE.
gnere f !hrltlmi
l.lkrly t
llrrnk Out.
ftciat Cable Detpatch to Tm Siv
Constantinople. Nov. 2. Fed by false
news of successes from
their own
Generals, with their dead und wounded
,v passing hourly before them and with u
tale of disgraceful defeat upon the pallid
lips of each arriving fugitive from the
front, the Turks In this city are stricken
with fear. The Kurds roam the streets
ready the moment the opportunity of
fers to fall with thirsty knives upon the
Christians.
The arrival of tho beaten army
probably will bring things to a crisis
and that crisis no one In this city likes
to think about. In the event of a gen
eral massacre the Christians have the
shelter of the foreign warships here to
flee to, but Just how effectively the
guns of thoso ships can quell a general
uprising Is a matter of grave doubt.
GREEKS DEFEAT TURKS.
Drlre Enemy Oat of Trrnrhra
In
Front nf Mouastlr.
Special Cable Detpatch to The Sin.
Athens, Nov. 2. News has been re
ceived here of a great battle between
the Greeks and Turks on the way to
Monastlr.
The fifth Greek division arrived be
fore the Turkish position nt Catrovra
hla and at dawn attacked tho enemy's
fortified position. After a two hours
fight the Greeks drove the Turks out
of the trenches. Tho Turks lost 200
cavalrymen and 100 Infantrymen In
killed.
BRITISH NAVY PREPARES.
Great Actlrltx at Portsmouth Bat
tleships on the War East,
Special Cable Detpatch to Ta Sox.
London, Nov. 2. The British Ad
Bilralty Is evidently preparing for emer
genclcs. Great activity prevails at
Portsmouth and other ports. The sixth
destroyer flotilla at Portsmouth Is hur
rlcdly getting ready for sea, and It Is
rumorod that It will sail Immediately
under sealed orders.
All the men who are on leave be
longing to the torpedo flotillas at Deven-
port, Portsmouth and other ports have
been -recalled by telegraph. It Is re
ported that tho warships at Devenport
will coal and take on ammunition on
Sunday and sail on Monday for the
Mediterranean and th-s East. The offl
1 cera and men belonging to the Itus
scll and Duncan at Chatham have been
recalled.
Gibraltar, Nov. 2. The third battle
ship squadron, which Is due here from
England to-morrow, will sail for tho
East'after an hour's stay In port. Tho
British cruiser Dartmouth passed hero
to-day bound for the Levant.
GREAT BRITAIN ANXIOUS.
Foreign .Minister Has .several
piirtnnt Conferences.
Special Cable Detpatch to Tils Sin
i m
London, Nov. 2. Sir IMwnrd Grey,
tho Foreign Minister, hnd u very busy
day nt the Foreign utlice, tie nud a
long Interview with the Bulgarian Mln
lster and also had conferences with tho
Italian, Austrian, Itusslan, Turkish nnd
Japanese Ambassadors.
U. S. NOT TO INTERFERE.
Will .Not Sen if n Warship to (on-
tnatlnoplr Water.
Tto,,fi,'wl,,,"'IIN0TON. NOV
. 2. The United
Lcad..nU,enlgl)tvlU not send a warship to Con-
stantlnople, despite reports that the
capture of the Turkish capital by the
Dulgars Is Imminent and that a massa
cre of foreigners may precede It.
Tho gtlnbont ReoriJlon Is the only
American war vessel In Mediterranean
waters.
Tho Scorpion Is commanded by Lieutenant-Commander
H. H. Upham. Iter
officers are Knslgn John P. Latham, As
slstant .Surgeon Duncan C. Walton and
Assistant Paymaster I). W. Hose. She
has a crew of eighty men.
The Scorpion has a displacement of
77 tons, a speed of 17.8, knots and
carries four guns, all of which are
under four Inches.
The United Slates will rely on the six
Towers, who by treaty have guaran
teed the status quo In the Ilalksns, to
handle the situation.
WHO LIEUTENANT WAGNER IS.
Foreign IMItor of Vienna "llrlelis-
linil" n Striking Personality.
Special Cable Detpatch to Tn Sc.v.
Virn'na, Nov. 2. -Lieut. Wagner, not
Wegener, as at tlrst printed. Is a mem
her of the staff of the Hfichnpoitt and
Is well known In Viennese Journalistic
circles. Ho Is not a member of tho
Austrian General Stuff nor an active
officer of the army. He Is merely a
lieutenant In the Landwehr (reserve),
While there Is every reason to suppose
that he had exceptlon.il letters of In-
troductlon It must be stated In Jus
tice to Lieut. Wagner that he ha
nvnlled himself of his facilities In u
brilliant manner. ,
Hermenlgllde Wagner Is 32 years of
age. He Is n tall, 'well set blond. He
I speaks several languages. Including
various Slavonic dialects. Ho was
foreign editor of th? AVfenpoi In
1909. I
He Is the author of the book entitled i
"Bosnia's Future." which prepared the
way for Austria's annexation of Bos
nia, but heretofore he has been bet
known as one of the first to penetrate
the King's palace at Belgrade after
the assassination of King Alexander
and Queen Draga, disguised as a ma
son, before any attempt had been made
to hide the traces of the crime.
GEN. MILES ON BALKAN WAR.
Says HalKurlnn Preparedness Should
Hp I.rn in Others.
Fin iitufhu, Ma."., Nov. !. "Thre- es
sential things are due to the recent mar
vellous stlecestt of the Bulgarian army
in their Iwttles with the Turks," was
tho statement of Tien. Nelson Miles when
seen hero to-nighl He points out that
thorough training, entire, secrecy and
rapidity of moblliatlon havo aided the
present victors of the K.uropean war
and this Is nn excellent lesson for any
nation.
The fact that the Turks art- in great
disorder nnd tint there will be a stampede
to Constantinople, is doubted by the
former heud of the L'nited States Army,
who In inclined to think that Adrimiopln
was carried by (light tusheH only afer
an nil day bombardment, and asserts that
if aocounts from the scat of war niv trti"
th" battle nroipid Adriauopl will go down
on ivconl as the IdixxHi t I tittle ever
fought . ,
'lti less of Oo.lKKi out of uneven 2(X),MX)
in thin butllu (Jen. Miles is Inclined to
third; In includible und a big mistake,
unties an lltni-frutloii he said that in the
three tUiyii lighting at the buttle of Gettys
burg ( lily ulxiut 40,110 t.u IhiIIi sides were
killed or cm:iied
hucceKhful frontal attacks on anything
like un equal number me nlmobt un im-
tii.Lull.lItt . ... .In Lltl. l.liularll n'u.irmMa
ii,.',i1M ,i..vtIn n Mll,'iiksirinr mul
hn states that if the facts are true, that
some wr.ou) men urn being landed on the
Hlack hen coast above Constantinople it
will mean that the Bulgarian urmy can
be tuken in flunk anywhere between Kirk
hilixseli unit tho (Upitnl In rough and
uinicun countrv.
Gen. MileB does not believe that there
will be uny active intervention by any
one Power owing to mutual jealousies,
but takini; into consideration whut the
Turks did at Kara and Plevna, he says
wo may look for plenty of hard ding (long
fighting within the next fow days.
No words are too high, according to
Gen. Miles, for the vigor and activity the
ituiganan army nas Known ami lie says
that tho physique from personal obser
vation is Huperh and that they compare
with our own American backwoodsmen
during tho civil war and, filled with en
thusiasm as they are at the present time,
he believes they are the equal of any
soldiers in the world.
Tho present war. Gen. Mites save, has
shown that a now tlrst class fighting
Power has arisen at the Ftorm centre of
Europe.
GEN. MENA SEEKS HIS LIBERTY.
Court Asked to Free NlrnrnRrnan
Itevolu tlnnary From Aneon Hospital.
Special Cable Detpatch to Tn Srv.
Panama, Nov. 2. Gen. Luis Mena,
the leader of tho recent revolt In Nicar
agua, who surrendered to Hear Admiral
SoutherLand, the commander of fan
American marines, nnd who Is confined
to the Ancon hospital with an attack of
rheumatism, has Instituted habeas cor
pus proceedings through his attorneys,
Hinckley & Qansen, before the Su
premo Court at Ancon.
The petition for the writ of habeas
corpus recites that Gen. Mens Is un
lawfully Imprisoned, detained and re
strained of his liberty by the chief nf
police of the Canal Zone by being con
fined in the hospital.
Similar proceedings have been Issued
In behalf of Gen. Siena's son, Daniel,
who In his petition recites that he Is
unlawfully Imprisoned and confined In
the hospital by the same authority.
The Supreme Court of the Canal Zone
will hear arguments on the applica
tions next Wednesday.
FLANS AROUND THE WORLD LINE.
Ilniiibara-Anirrlran Co, In Rstrnil
lla Japan Srrvlcr Across Farla.
Special Cable Dttpatcli o'Tiik Scs.
Ueklin, ffov. 2. The Hamburg-American
Steamship Company will soon
carry out Its long cherished plan of
encircling the globe by extending Its
China and Japan service across tho
Pacific to Vancouver, Heatlle, Portland
and Sun Francisco. With tho comple
tion of the Panama Canal another link
will be completed between Han Fran
cisco and he present terminus of tlu
line to tho east coast of Mexico.
Tho proposed competition with the
Kngllsli and Japanese lines for the
transpacific traffic Is said to bo tho
outcome of the recent visit of Herr
ISfillln, tho managing director of tho
company, to New York,
MRS. W. B. LEEDS GIVES DINNER.
firaml ItuUe Alrxmidrr Is fluent nt
Honor In I'arU.
Special Cable Detpatch lo Tmk Sr
Paris, Nov. 2. Mrs. W. 0. Leeds gave
a dinner to-night In honor of the Grand
Duke Alexander. Thn guesta Included
Mr. and Mrs, Harry I.chr, Lady Paget,
Herman Harjes and A, J, Drextl,
MAP SHOWS FORTS WHICH PROTECT ADRIANOPLE
1 s
g! 'y i,r .,52' uiJl&a&iK Js'S .t'-iii (isiKakiJ5r . 'isSSE
WESTCHESTER MAY HAVE
TROLLEY STRIKE TO-DAY
Motor-men and Conductors
Third Avenue Line
Hold Meeting.
VOTING ON A
WA TjKOI'T
President WllitridgC Of Ilnilroild
IfpfllSPd lo -Vltpp to 11
JllIHSMI IO .,1LI. I( II
Pence Proposal.
A meeting of tho motormen and con
ductors of tho Westchester trolley lines
called for 3 o'clock this morning was ox
pected to result in a vote to strike because
of tho refusal of President Whitrldgo of
tho Third Avenue Ilailroad and, its sub
sidiaries to agree to a peace proposal.
It Is said on good authority that when
the men quit work this morning they
will not go to work again under pres
ent conditions. The strike may he
called at 5 o'clock this morning.
If the strike occurs the officials of
tho roads will make no effort to run
cars to-day, but to-morrow they will
man the pars with strike breakers and
cnll upon tho police to protect them.
This meeting was called by National
Organizer William D. Fitzgerald of tho
trolley men's union ofter a conference
during the day by Mayors I.ennon of
Vonkers, Fisko of Mount Vernon and
Waldorf of New Hochello with President
Whltridge.
A report which received some credence
In Vonkors was that tho midnight meeting
' ,J . iniVrj,, l o)X ' , ,'
"u!'
und that tho men would wnlk out thU
morning and tlo up tho trolley service in
Yonkeru, Mount Vernon, Now Hoc-hollo
and F.ast Chester.
The Westchester Mayors hud asked
Mr. Whitrldgo to ngreo to a proposal
that tho street car company would not
oppose tho union; that tho company would
treat with n romtnltteo of tho employees
011 all grievances and that tho working
conditions and wages would continue u&
at present.
President Whitrldgo dictated llm follow
ing reply to this proposal:
"All theso propositions havo lieon
answered in my correspondencu with
tho representatives of the Department
of Labor, in letters copies of which I hand
you herewith, nnd my views stated in
theso letters are still truo and will remain
true. 1 am not prepared to say uny
more or to havo any further conferences
about tho matter,"
Ono of tho letters to which President
Whitrldgo referred was written to William
C. Kogcrs of tho Stuto Hoard of Mediation
und Arbitration, in which ho said in part:
"1 havo no objection whatevor to the
mployees of 'the Yonkers and West-
Chester electrio railways belonging to
as many unions as they liko unlehs, I am
satisfied that theso union promote in
' efficiency and disloyalty to the company
1 or that they squander tho men's money
I or really entertain such notions as were
I contained in un nrticlw iu tho Westchester
Soeiafi'sf that tho men circulated lust
,wcek. If 1 should find these things to
' bo (run I should object to the men bo
j longing to thu unions us I would object
to their living in a scarlet fever hospital,
j "No chango whatover in tho wages,
I hours or working conditions is contem-
' l''at,1' ',y tnp company, other, rhaw.
1 uuiii a nine i iKineiiiui; 01 wit' (imuiiMiue
I for the good of tho service. This miy bo
I werwary, ns the men havo devoted
'more time to thinking ebont their fancied
'rights' tlum lo the discharge or their
, actual duties, I wish to havo it' under-
stood that tho legal relations of tho mn
to tho comnny are thoo of master and
servant."
Tho president of M10 Mount Vernon
union said after visiting Mayor Finko
nnd learning of tho luisiicecssful outcome
of the conference:
"The men will lio asked to determine
Immediately whether they shall strike
or not."
To this statement Mayor Fiske replied:
"Don't do anything rash. Do it right,
nnd I will bo with you."
LITTLE HOPE FOR LOST BALLOON.
liny
Hair I, mint In Mountains nf
Sweden nr III Itassln,
Special Cable Detpatch to Tn Srv.
Stuttoaut, Nov. 2. The managers of
the international balloon race said this
afternoon that they hnd little hope of
tho safety of the Dusseldorf II., with
Pilot John Watts of St. Louis, which
has not been heard from since the con
testants started last Stonday. Inquiries
nt nil Baltic and North Sea stations nnd
of ships, Including Germnn warships,
,' whlcI' bnvn been Instructed to keep a
""""' r-r tho missing bal.oon,
I brought replies that nothing had been
seen or It.
It Is feared that thn bnlloon has been
lost In tho Riltlc. nlthough there Is
somo hotio that It may have landed In
tho mountains of Sweden or the In
terior of Russia.
The Aero Club of America cabled the
German club yesterday requesting that
all possible steps bo taken to And Wntts.
Tho club replied by cable ns follows:
"All possible step's taken. lYobaUly
Watts landed llussla uninhabited coun
try." MARTHE STEINHEIL'S DIVORCE.
llniiRhter of Heroine In Freneli Mur
der i'rlnl Seeks It.
Special Cable Drepatch to Tits Sun
Paiiih, Nov, 2, A duughter of Mme.
Stelnhell, theierolno of tho great mur
der t rial of some years ugo, Is about
to sue for divorce. Tho daughter was
married a year n?o to an Italian ar
tist, Hnphacl Perugia, Ills name does
not tully with talent or temper and
henco Murine Stclnhell proposes to di
vorce him. 1
COURT FINDS CITY OWNS
BAY SIDE OF CONEY ISLAND
1 I... 11 n , ... ,.
Appeal Will Prolong Litigation
US to Many Dispiltrd
Llllld Titles. "
Supremo Court Justtco Crane in iirook-
lvn yesterday handed down a decision
regarding titles to lands on the Grnvesend
Hnv sido of Conev Island, including Sea
Gate. In which ho finds that Graverend ! searchers have not yet found the body
Hay is not n landlocked liarbor, but is of Mrs- c- K- MacKaddcn. wife of the
part of New York harlor. and that the general manager of the Coody Oil Com
titles to the property in dispute wero'an' n 8"est of t,1K llolcl reported
got from the State by grant. He holds 1 mls!,n'''-
that tho State could give no title by grant. I, ' score of others were Injured, many
I,,,, .i,. .i, .- ,i..0o..n,i..,i r-o.., ti... 1 by leaping from upper stories when
Dutch and English Governors by patent
to tho town of Gravesend and that the
city became the successor in titlo when
tho town of GravoFcnd became a port
of tho city through consolidation.
Tho present action camo up more than
six months ago through an order by Dock
CqnimiBsioner Totnkins stopping Edward
h. Sommervillo and IjouIs Gottlieb from
bulkhcading land claimed by them along
Gravesend Day, so as to fill in all the
land back of tho bulkhead and develop
it. Injunction proceedings were started
by Sommervillo nnd Gottlieb to restrain
Commissioner Tomkins from interference
it developed on tho trial that the real
question at issuo was whether the land
under water in Gravosend Hay belonged
to tho State of Now York and its suc
cessors in title or to tho city of New York
as tho successor in titlo to the old town
of Gravesend.
Justice Crano says that, although the
city has Ireretpfore treated this prop
erty ns neionging to persons deriving
titlo from the State and has taxed it,
this fact does not uct as an estoppel and
prevent the city making claim to owner
ship in this proceeding.
An appeal is to bo taken, nnd it Is not
expected that the litigation will bo ended
within a year.
ROW OVER OLD GILSEY HOUSE.
Illseii. Who Put Slr Thrnuuli, Sue
Fouel. Willi Provided .11 one;-,
A suit over the purrhnt-o of tho Gilsey
Houw property for ll.COO.ooo was filed
In tho Supremo Court yesterday by John
!. Olson, who engineered tho sale, against
Hubo H. Fogel, who furnished thn money.
U is nllego that Fogel is dourylng tho
construction of a now building on the
Gilsey House site.
. Tho complaint, explains hat Olson
had on agreement to buy tho pro)erty
from James M. Anderson, trustee 'for
James W Anderson, und mado an arrange
ment with Fogel to furnish tho money
und take half the stock of a corporation
to bo organized to put up a new building.
Olscii suld ho deeded the property to
Fogel under nn agreement with the latter
that ho would reconvey it, which he' has
refused to do. The now crorutio!i
hasn't been organized, It is alleged.
Olsen wants, a receiver for the property
and an accounting of the rents.
PX-MRS. ABELES BURNED.
I'ortiHT Aetra-n ami llnnkcr Die
III
St. I. outs lintel I'lrr.
Sr. Louts, Nov. 2. Mrs. Helen C.
1 Harrington, former actress and divorced
I wife of James A. Abeles, sen of Julius
,u Abel0fl a woalthy Sl' Loulsan was
burned to death In the fire which de-
stroyed the Berlin Hotel here early this
morning. Her charred body was re-
covered this afternoon and Identification
' ma(Se from Jewelry she wore,
I "The body of "W. C. Douglas, a retired
banker, was taken from the ruins. The
flames cut off escape through the build
ing. Mrs. Helen C. Harrington hnd been
married four times. She came Into the
public prints here within the last year
In a divorce suit against James A.
Abeles and a 150,000 suit for alienation
against Abelcs's wealthy father. She
was given a divorce nnd her maiden
name was restored. The other suit was
settled out of court.
CLEMENT SAILS FOR NEW YORK.
lie Will Slnar Before the Symphony
Society on November 11,
Special Cable Deepntch to Tnr. Scn.
Paris, Nov. 2. Kdmond Clement, the
tenor, sailed for New York to-day on
tho steamship Majestic. He will sing
before tho Symphony Society on No
vember II In New York, nnd the nct
night will appear In "Mlgnon" In Phila
delphia, after which ho will go to U0.1
ton for five weeks.
M. Clement Intends to lecture on nn
clent and modern music In Now York
nnd elsewhere. He will go to Chicago
in February.
NOBEL PRIZE FOR M. FRANCE?
Itrport Tbnt Author Will Itrrrlte II
This Year.
Special Cable Despatch to Tnr. Six.
I'Anis, Nov. 2. It Is common talk hero
that Anatole Franco (Jacques Anntule
ThlbaulOi the author and philosopher,
will bo awarded tho Nobel prlzo for lit
erature this year. This prlzo was
awarded to Maurice Maeterlinck In 1911
GERMAN CAPTAIN KILLED.
Kxulnslon ' Cartridge I'ndrr
Wnlrr a) Kiel lines Murli Itnraawe.
Kiel, Nov. 2. Cnpt. Jtieobson of tlv
Germun cruiser Ynrck nnd one of his
men were killed and two sailors wero
wounded to-day by tho premature ex
plosion of cartridges they were placing
under water to note the effect of tho
blast. ,
V
(JEALOUS WIFE HAS
HER SANIIY TESrtD
Mrs. Mnrshnll Consents to Spend
Sunday in Psychopath ic
Ward of Bellcvuc.
PLANNED BY HER HUSBAND
He Told Police She Had Forced
Him to Move by Her Fears
of Other Women.
Mrs. Bertlo Archer Marshall, whose
homo address is given as 204 West Ninety-
second street, is spending Sunday in the
psychopathlo ward of Bellevue, although
the physicians In charge declare she lias
ovcry appearance of sanity. She Is there
by consent, and If no symptom of mental
(listurlmnco dovelops by Monday they
will lie unable to entertain her any longer.
Mrs. Marshall's trip to Bellevue was
originally engineered by her husband,
A. A. Marshall, who Is an officer of the
International Service Corporation which
has offices at 141 West Thlrty-slrth street.
After it was begun tho wife expressed
her determination to go through with It.
Policeman Garvey of the East Thirtieth
street station was summoned to the
office of the corporation yesterday after
noon by an office boy, who said a man
wanted a woman taken out of the place.
Arriving there he found the man and
woman talking quietly together. The
mr.n announced that ho' wanted thb
woman's sanity tested at once.
".She is my wife." he said. 'Bhe a so
jculous that sho makes It imposaib'ta for
mo to remain long in one place. She
lir.H driven mo out of Washington and
Philadelphia and I have been compelled
to move five times in New "York city.
She thinks every woman is after me or
1 am ufter every woman."
Garvey told tho man that he -could .not
arrest the woman. There was nothing
the matter with her so far as the police
man could see. He finally suggested
that if Marshall wanted to take his wife
to tho station he, the policeman, would
go along.
TliO'Woman consented after some hesi
tation nnd ho party appeared before
Lieut. Preston. Preston said he could not
see anything wrong .but agreed to call a
llellevue surgeon. Dr. Stillman came and
said he could see nothing wrong, and then
tho woman talked.
Sho was tho widow of a man named
Godnoy in Washington, she said, when
she married Marshall in 1800. At that
time she had between S20.000 and 125.000.
1 That money was all gone now and she
described now it went. Her nusoana,
she declared, was making a good salary,
but was giving her so little money that
she was compelled to work as a dress
maker. All she wanted, she. said, was
sufficient to support her. Sho then an
nounced that she would bring counter
charges. An effort was made to find
out what sue meant from Mr. Marshall,
but he had gono away.
Dr. Stillman said the only way Mrs.
Marshall could be taken to ftclloviio was
by consent, and the woman said s.ho had
no objection to having her sanity tested.
Sho was examined after her arrival nnd
no one could find anything more wrong
with her than nervousness) duo to ex
citement, , '
WITBECK GETS RENO DEGREE.
.IiiiIkp Withheld It Three Week for
AHIilavlls.
IIf.no. New, Nov. 2,- Judge Moran
to-day handed down judgment in the can
of Harold Witbeck, a soda manufacturer,
at whose trial three weeks ago ho with
hold granting a decree, in order to learn
the status of tho case in the courts else
where. It appeared that the mother of
Florence G. Witbeck, his wife, never
recognized her daughter's marriage to
him liecauso it was a civil ceremony,
while she is a Catholic and believes no
marriage legal unless It is performed
by tho Church.
"We will consider it legal," ramarkod
the court.
The decree was granted on furthor
testimony contained in two affidavits.
One, from Wit beck's Kastern attorney,
declared that Mrs. Grogan of Brooklyn,
the wife's mother, had demanded 120,001
for her daughter, refusing to agree to
an amicable settlement of the couple's
marital difficulties for less. The other
was a. certified copy of the record of -a
New ork case in which his wife asked
separate maintenance, which was dis
missed. ARREST SISTERS AS SHARPERS.
Tito Spanish Women lla a 170,000
In Trunks When Caught.
Special tiitf Detpatch to Tm Si. v.
LtstioN, Nov. 2. On the' application
of the Spanish Government two staters,
Curmen Arcz and Pepa Arcz of Seville,
have been arrested at Vlanna Caste!!')
nn the charge of being the leaders nf
a gang of card sharpers who have swln.
died rich youths and elderly married
men nt Madrid, Seville and Barcelona
out of $300,000.
When the women were arrested $175,
000 In cash and stocks was found '.n
their trunks.
77
tt
to
GRIP&COLDS
The epidemic of Influenza
Coryza Grip is rapidly spread
ing throughout the'entire country;
the importance oft escaping con
tagion, with a long winter ahead,
appeals to everyone.
Dr. Humphreys' "Seventy
seven" meets the exigency of the
epidemic.
Taken early, cuts it short.
Taken during its prevalence
preoccupies the system and pre
vents its invasion.
A small vial of pleasant pellets,
fits the vest pocket. At , your
Druggist 25c. or mailed.
Humphreys' Honiro. Medicine Co.. Cor. William
and Ann Streets. New York. Advertisement.
THE 1 ftON SOCIETY
MIth St. tt Park Ave., New York City,
offeri younc ladlrs and trnttemeo possrislac
dritmatla ability opportunities to develop. same.
Must possess a thorouih knowledce of Genuaa
and be socially acceptable. Address with refer
ences and previous state experience, CHAIRMAN,
Arlon Dramatto Club. I'.xthanc ol courtesies
desired with secretaries of Amateur Dramatis
Clubs. 1 1
I
J.
.1
wtH4tf in- ic? f

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