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THE SUN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1912.
J.
J.
r
i tnsB
frsmiii istln JJMIonal Committee, !a also
elng spoken of tor an appointment
and Dr. Wiley, hsvln been a Wilson
upporter, la being hemmed a tne
future head of tho department where
t formerly held forth as a pure food
(xpert of nome distinction.
Many names nro mentioned without
any attempt to place the men In the
Governor's lint. There Is Just ft reel
ing that these men are of the kind and
mifllclently representative of different
J, sections of tho country to come under
I the Governor's notice when he decides
'to pick his heads of dopnrtments.
' Among these men nro Henry Morgsn
thau, who might go to tho Treasury!
A. Mltchel Palmer, who has heen re
elected to Congress from Pennsylvania
1 and who fought all over the Ktnte for
Wilson: Itollo Wells, who came out of
Missouri to take care of tho campaign
finances; E. M. Mouse of Texns, Homer
H. Cutnmlngs of Connecticut, Robert S.
Hudspeth of Jersey City, Judge Martin
J, Wado of lowo, Representative Albert
8. Burleson, of Texas and Mayor Newton
XX Baker of Cleveland. Joseph P.
Tumulty la regarded aa likely to be
scretary to the President after March 4.
Nevertheless, It may be stated that
unless he changes much In the nttltudn
BS haa assumed In New Jersey with
' napect to appointments Gov. Wilson
Ml name his own official family and
Mil surprise .Iot ofihla advisers when
V Among the first of the telegrams
MUch were handed to the Governor thin
Owning was that from William Jen-
Bryan, who had sent him a mee-
of good cheer late, the night be-
Thls time he en Id "I am glad to
that you have carried my State
of Lincoln And my precinct Your
ss here adds to my enjoyment of
t'gsrar nstlonar-vlctoryt"
,' Crying far from Lincoln to -the Man
I'Akttaa Hotel came this from George W.
p.Mrklns, chairman of the executive com
rptitteeof tho National Progressive party:
L"Ttra have, won a great victory. Per
WU& me to congratulate you vary
' .Speaker Chatnp Clark wrote out from
JwMrllns Green. Mo.: "Twas a great
Stotory. Congratulations to -you and the
Jpwnrtry."
(J Cms "W. TJIsIbi wuod. leader of the
ftjorlty In, tho House of Representa-
UMa. uent this telegram: "You have
a wonderful victory for -the Demo
j antic -party. I congratulate you on the
yttanlt and you have my sincere best
J sjtshes for a successful administration
"f the Affairs of oar Government,"
Jtohn Franklin Fort, who was Qor-
amor of New Jersey before Gov. Wll-
m and who led the Progressive forces
In, this State, said that no more sincere
mod hearty congratulations would bo
,, aant on the Governor's election than
V those which he conveyed and he knew
'the country was' to have a great Presi
dent . , Other who wired . their feUcJt&ttons
were Senator -el act Otlle Jameof Ken
tucky, Thomas Nelson Page, Bishop
ItcFatil of Trenton. Senator Atlee
, Pomerene of Ohio, John Hays Ham
mond, Gov. Frederick W. Plalsted of'
Maine. George B. McClellan, Henry
, George, Jr Jerry Belmont Judge Alton
B. Parker, Gov. Foss ot Massachusetts,
Gov. Harmon of Ohio, William Ran
dolph Hearst, Who cabled from Madrid,
' Spain; Mayor Carter H. Harrison of
Chicago, Senor Osmena of the Phlllp
' pine Assembly, who sent twoji May
Irwin, who Is an actress; Molly Mc-
Intyre, also an actress; George Foster
Peabody. Senator Gore of Oklahoma.
Martin II. Glynn, Senator Luke Loo of
Tennessee and hundreds ot others from
Maine to California.
Gov. Dtx also sent a .message, but It
couldn't be located when It was asked
for. Up to the time the newspapers
men left the Governor lost night no
word had come from Mayor Gaynor.
It was surmised that it' would be In the
mall to-morrow.
, To President Taft'a message of Tues
day night the Governor replied early
this morning. He Bald: "I warmly ap
preciate your kind message and wish
to express my sincere personal regards."
To Col. Roosevelt the Oovernor re
plied; "My slncerest thanks for your
kind message. Pray accept my cordial
good wishes."
Oscar S. Straus sent this telegram:
T congratulate you upon your election
and wish you the fullest measure of
' success throughout your administration."
Nona of the secret service men who
r to guard the President-elect from
on has arrived In Princeton. As
aoon aa one does Capt Bill McDonald
will set forth for his ranch In Texas,
He apologized to the Oovernor to-day
' because his own State, hadn't given
'mors than 185,000 plurality for Wilson
and said he didn't know there were so
many "Radicals" down his way. A
' "Radical" In Texas Is anybody that
Isn't a Democrat
The reporters expected to see the ran
' gar do some stunts with his guns this
afternoon when he came upon a snake
aa he was walking with the Governor.
Instead of that he broke the Guberna
torial cane In striking down the reptile.
Several elements entered into tho do
feat of. President-elect Wilson In Essex
ooontjr In the election last Tuesday.
Although the Democratlo nominees for
Congress and Assembly were earned
' Into offloe by substantial majorities the
Now Jersey Governor was beaten In the
county by Col. Roosevelt by nearly 7,600
plurality. Complete returns show that
Roosevelt reoelved 83,714 votes to 26,2:9
for Wilson and 18,681 for President Taft
Roosevelt's plurality was 7,485.
The regulars say that the Smith ma
chine In Essex voted for Roosevelt rather
than for Wilson In retaliation for Wilson's
defeat of the ex-Senator's Senatorial
plans in 1010 and a Rain at the preferential
primaries of September. The two other
counties that gave Roosevelt majorities
were Cumberland and Ocean, For the
A
Quality Never Varies
first time In nearly a quarter of a century
Atlantlo county, whefe Oov. Wilson, with
the aid of Sunremn Court Justice Ralinoh.
uncovered and prosecuted the Kuehnle
taction, and Camden, whose ring naa
also been raided in Wilson's time, give
Democratic majorities.
SECRET SERVICE MEN READY.
Wilson to Choose Three Mentha far
Ilia Bodrsroard,
Wasjhtncjtow, Nov. . John E. WTUrle,
chief of the secret service division of ths
Government, will submit to Gov. Wilson
within a day or two the names of four
or five men of his service from which the
Governor will be oxnected to choose
three as his bodyguards during the re
mainder of tho time until his inaugura
tion.
It Is customary for the Government
secret service to put a guard over the
President-elect, the some as the Presi
dent. Instead of sending three men at
once to Gov. Wilson. Chief Wllkle will
give the future President onnortunltv
to select nis cnoice from a list or an men
who are now available for that work.
G.O.P.
THUS COL WATTERSON
Marse Henry Calls Defeat Great
er Than That of the Whigs
in 1852.
l
hormmuM, Ky Nov. 8. Under the
caption. "A Popular Revolution Mr,
Watte raon will say In the Courier- Journa I
to-morrow:
Tuesday was a proud day for Democ
racy . Nothing was wanting to give
It substance, color and effeot. The old
saying that 'It never rains but it pours'
was verified. Mr. Tilde n onoe deolared
that It requires a revolution to loosen
the Iron grip of the Republicans and to
secure a national victory for the Demo
crats. Tuesday was a revolution.
'Ground swell?' exclaimed. Bop Price on a
memorable occasion; it was an earth
quake.' "After the overwhelming trlumnh
the Democratlo ticket the most decisive
feature of this revolution Is the anni
hilation of the Republican DartT.
"Its defeat is even creator than fhait
sustained by the old line Whigs in the
Presidential election of 1862, when Scott,
the Whig nominee, carried but four
states.
"The old Whla- nartv. be It said, had
never any snoh hold as the modern Re
publican party, i nat makes tne couapse
of ine lauer Dy contrast uie more preg
nant and mirnrislnir. Thn Whiffs had
hores to the last. The Republicans can
have none. But yesterday they made
bold to Htand against the world. To-day
there is none so poor to do them rever
enoe. With Its : armor on. Instinct with
life, its lines of lattle, its flags and tropliles
yet visiuie, tne u. u. f. sinus as some
great wou oi stone ana iron Deiore s
tornado into a heap of shapeless ruin
It will never rise again.
"The little that Is left of It the Bull
Mooso will swallow even as knownothlne-
ism swallowed the little that was left of
tho Whles.
"The voters appear to have sited up
the situation with a certain wide spread
ing unification of ideas. Everywhere
tnoso wno nan called themselves KeDun
Means seem to have agreed that a vote for
Taft was cither a vote thrown away or
recorded In favor of continuing affairs
at Washington precisely as they are.
"Conceding Mr. Taft an able, honest,
patriotic man who in many things has
mado us a good President, vet he Is a
standpat protectionist, in his pnbllo
relations no better and no worse than
his party, which should have been sub
jected long ago to popular discipline
ine nign protective tar in is aeaa.
Taft
his
could not defend it and live.
"Tho vote for Roosevelt attests
extraordinary popularity. Though a
vote for life tenure in the Chief Magis
tracy and a personal government abso
lutist in all ltn parts, those issues were
lost in the campaign because his election
was not imminent. Admitting Mr. Roose
velt to bo a moral phllospher and an
American of shining personality, sincere
In hit soheme of uplift, like liousseau, the
friend of humanity, ho is vet as vislonarr
as Itoeseau, who was half afmadman, and
If tho ex-President oould become President
again we should have at best a benevo
lent desDotlsm renting uton a single life.
to whose ambition had been sacriflond
all our free Institutions and noble prec
edents, gaining nothing in 'return but
a costly experiment in socialism. If he
rfver runs asraln this isaua will hn nn.
dominant. He might aa well make up
his mind that be will never again occupy
we nmtn noose.
KENTUCKY- A wTUWN SWEEP.
Vote Is Greater Than Other Csndl
dates Combined,
Tjouisvnjjs, ICy Nov, 6 With less
than nine full counties to be heard from
Wilson's vote In Kentucky Is 205,340,
Taft 91,285, Roosevelt 92.565.
The final count will make no material
changes.
ALFRED BENJAMIN TM(Mm 1
Box Overcoats,
skirts of moderate fullness,
split sleeves, giving the
Raglnn effect without the
exaggerated slope of shoulder;
320 to $55.
The Shawl-collar Ulster,
with graceful rolling
collar that can bo
readily adjusted to moct
any changes of weather,
$22 to $55.
Gov. Wilson and Chairman McCombs at Princeton
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J.F.
TO
Undson Conrrty Man Slated for
Senat Presidency, Then
Qovernor'8 Chair.
J. P. TUMULTY SECRET ART T
President-Elect Decides to Name
Him, It Is Said Talk of
Appointments.
Tho Benjamin Box a conservative
mode) of moderate length; volvet
collar; $18 to $65.
Tho Bond Street a belted overcoat
moderately short nnd lined to tbs
waist only; $18 to $48.
Thentow, 'Sot. fl. When Oar, Wilson
resigns his present office to become
President of the United States it Is prac
tically assured that his mantle as Oov
ernor of New Jersey will fall upon Senator
James F. Fielder of Hudson county. This
presupposes that In the meantime Senator
Fielder will have been elected President
of the Senate, a position which, carries
with It the acting Governorship In the
event of the death, resignation, disability
or absence of the Oovernor.
Should Oov. Wilson for any unforeseen
reason relinquish his position before the
organization of the Legislature on
January 14 next he would be succeeded
by President John D. Prince of the
Senate, a Republican, who haa been
sworn in aa acting Oovernor fifteen times
during the temporary absence of the
Oovernor from the State. Eliminating
all other considerations, therefore, there
are ample political reasons for the Oov
emor continuing to serve until the State
shall have passed into full oontrol of the
Democrats as a result of yesterday's
election. It Is the .Governor's intention
to servefnot merely until the Legislature
convenes but until a few days before his
Inauguration, whlob will cover about
two-thirds of the probable legislative
session. In that time the Oovernor la
expected to make all 'the Important ap
pointments for the ensuing year so that
his successor will have a comparatively
easy time for the remainder of the unex
pired term, whloh ends in January 1914.
Senator Fielder's claims to the presi
dency of the Senate are reoognlced without
question by at least a majority of his
Demooratlo colleagues. Be haa been ths
minority leader on the floor for the last
two years and besides being ths senior
member among the Democrats he repre
sents the county whloh gave Oov. Wilson
more than half of his plurality at Tue
day's election aa well as at ths election of
1610, when he was chosen Oovernor,
The only possible obstacle which might
stand in the way of Senator Fielder's
ambition would be a desiro of the Oovernor
himself to have some other Senator selected
as president. There was a sharp clash
during the last session between Senator
Fielder and tho Governor regarding the
disposition of the casn of Senator Fitz
Herbert, who was tried for official mis
conduct and found guilty by a vote of the
Itepublican majority. Since then the
Oovernor and tho Hudson Senator have
patched up all their differences and the
latter had beon an enthufllaatto champion
of the Wilson movement. This fact seems
to preolude any likelihood of interference
by Oov. Wilson and to make it plain sail
ing for Senator Fielder.
There havo been reports that In the
event of Senator Fielder's becoming
aoting Oovernor ho would seek tho regular
Democratlo nomination nozt fall. This
wns dono In 1S08 by Foster M. Voorhees,
who become noting Oovernor when Oov,
Griggs resigned to enter President MoKln
ley'H Cabinet. The New Jersey Constihi
tlon prohibits a Oovei-nor from suooeedlng
htinsnir and to avoid this inhibition Oov.
Voorhees resigned tho acting Governor
ship two weeks lieforo elention. Be was
succeeded as acting Governor by Speaker
David (). WatkliiH of the House.
Assurances were given to-day by
frionds of Senator Fielder that In no
circumstances will he attempt to repeat
the performance of Oov. Voorhees hy
becoming a candidate for tho nomination.
So far as he is conoorned the field will
be left olear for Mayor H. Otto Wittpenn
of Jersey City, who seams assured of
the solid organization support of Hudson
county.
There was an unconfirmed rumor
about tho State House to-dnv that Gov.
Wilson nractieallv had decided to irive
Joseph P. Tumulty, his private secretary
in New Jersey, the corresponding !osition
in Washington. Mr. Tumulty qualified
last week as clerk of the Supreme Court,
but tho Oovernor announced at the time
that he would continue to act as private
secretary, which gives some color to the
report that he is to accompany tho Gov
ernor to Washington.
Having retained control or the Legis
lature on iolnt ballot the Democrats will
havo the selection of a State Treasurer
to succeed Daniel S. Voorhees next March.
Friends of State Comptroller Edward I.
Edwards of Jersey City believe that he will
trv to make a shirt from the ComDtroller-
shlp to the Treasurership. His term att
Comptroller expires in 1914 and If he
can bring about the change it will assure
him three more years In office regardleMs
oi ine political complexion ot tne next
liegisiature.
Chairman Edward K. Orosscun of thm
Democratic State committer, who was
appointed to the State Board of Taxation
or uov. tison. is also said to h on as
pirant for another berth. He would like
either the Treasurership or Comptroller
ship and falling to land one or the other
will prbbably be a candidate for mem
bership on .the Board of Public Utility
Commissioners to succeed Prehklent Rob
ert Williams of Passaic, whose term
expires next May There are few other
important appointments to be mado
during the unexpired term of Oov. Wilson.
The Department of tabor, which has
assumed considerable proportions during
recent years, will undoubtedly bo turned
over to a Democrat with the expiration
of the term of Commissioner Iewis T.
Bryant or Atlantlo City next September.
A similar result is exnected In the cn
of the Bureau of Statistics of Labor and
industries, or which winton U. Garrison,
treasurer of the Republican State Com
mittee, is the present chief. Tlie term of
Judge O. D. W. Vroom of the Court of
Errors and Appeals also will expire next
year and Gov. Wilson will luive the naming
ot his successor during the next session.
Judge Vroom is a Democrat.
LAte returns rrom luesdav s eleotlon
merely have served to emnhasize the
extent ot the Democratlo victory and the
aimosi roiAi rout, oi uio uepuDiioan
forces in every seotlon of the Stute. Eleven
of the twelve Congress districts were
carried by the Democrats. Five of the
six State Senators chosen are Democrats,
and of the sixty members in the House
the Republicans will not have more than
nine, and some of the Assembly contests
are so oloee that oven this small minority
may be out down to six or seven.
In the Congressional contents William
J. Browning of Cumdeu wax the only
suooessiui itepuniioun. Among mose de
feated was Representative John J. Gard
ner of Atlantlo City, who Is rounding out
twenty years or nemos in congress.
'Old Brains, ss Gardner Is sometimes
called, has been In publlo life almost
without Interruption since he was eleoted
Mayor or Atlantic City In IMS.
The Congressmen ohoson in New Jersey
are as follows:
First District William J. Browning,
Republican.
Second District J. Thompson Baker,
Democrat.
Third District Thomas J. Scully, Demo
crat. Fourth District Allan B. Walnh. Demo
crat. Fifth District William E. Tuttle. Jr.,
Democrat.
Sixth District Lewis J. Martin, Demo
crat. Seventh District Robert O. Brcmner,
Democrst.
KlKhth District Eugene P. Klnkesd,
Democrat.
Ninth Dlstrlot Wslter I. McCoy. Demo
crat. Tenth District Edward W. Townsend,
Democrat.
Eleventh Dlstrlot John J. Eagan, Demo
crat. Twelfth Dlstrlot James A. Hamlll, Dem
ocrat. A. C. Hart. Democrat, was elected from
the old Sixth district to till the unexpired
term of Judge William Uugliee. Under
the prerereutlal primary plan now in
vogue In New Jersey the Democratio
control of the Icgislaturo on Joint ballot
insures the election of Judge William
Hughes to succeed Frank O. Briggs in
the United States henato. All the Demo
cratic members aro pledged to vote for
Hughes as the candidate receiving tile
highest vote in the party primaries.
(if the six State Senatont chosen lllanch
ard 11. White of Burlington was the only
ltepubllcan to pull through. The 11 vo
Democrats are: Harry O. Wheaton of
Capo May, George F. Martens, Jr., of
Hunterdon, Dr. William E. Ramsay of
Middlesex, Petsr J. MoQlnnls of Possalo
and Samuel Munson of Sussex. The next
Senate will have twelve Democrats and
nine Republicans. The nlno Republican
Assemblymen who appear to have been
elected are: E. L. Richards and Joseph
W. Salus, Atlantlo county: Robert Pea
cock. Burlington: Isaao W. Coles and
John B. Kates, Camden; Edward C.
Leeds, Gloucester; George W. Adams and
Harvey S. Moore, Meroer, and David G.
Conrad, Ocean, The election of Poqoock
in Burlington and Conrad in Ocean are
still hi some doubt.
The Democrats elected J R. Carrow In
Camden and Erwin E. Marshall in Mercer,
thus dividing the vote in those counties.
Tho House apparently will stand nine
Republicans and fifty-one Democrats,
giving the Democrats a majority of
forty-five on Joint ballot.
Returns still Incomplete Indicate that
Wilson carried New Jersey by a plurality
of about 35,01)0 over Roosevelt. Ho car
ried seventeen counties and Roosevelt
three and one doubtful. Gov. Wilson's
vote was muoh smaller than that bv
whloh ho was elected two years ago, but
the split between the Republicans and
Progressives maintained for him a large
plurality.
ltulpmnt
Making Hopes Come True.
Joy In building depends upon
the ratio of results to hopes.
A full measure of satisfaction
Is frequently denied tho owner
because of the excess of costs
over the original appropriation.
Under our method of building
the owner Is guaranteed that the
final reckoning will come within
his appropriation.
- Oarlfk'TlulhnMmSlniUCanlMtl
MtlktdtJ iBulUlnt,' on maul.
HOGGSON BROTHERS
7 EAST 44th BT., NEW YORK CITY
BOSTON NEW HAVEN CHICAQO
TOTAL VOTE FOR GOVERNOR.
Tflbls Rho-TTlnir br Connttes Kewr
York Slate's Vote for Governor.
Rulzrr. lIedRe.
Albany 14900 17922
Allegany 3100 f.300
Hroomn fWOO 7268
Cnttaraugm CSOil 7200
Cayuga 4950 R2G4
Chautauqua 470 S'JOO
Chemung 02.i ai4
Chenango 3214 4140
Clinton 3oi3 nnm
Columbia 4'J.IG 3722
Cortland 2023 313H
Delaware 41S3 4 127
Dutchess SSS0 0110
Erie 37041 22172
Essex 2023 3032
Franklin 2T.9!t 3S24
Fulton-Hamilton .... 2872 3783
Genesee 24R2 3221
Greene 3512 2617
Herkimer 5100 6000
Jefferson 5660 6540
King 106717 50247
Iwls 2200 2006
Livingston 2926 3026
Madison 3083 376G
Monroe 19594 197R8
Montgomery 4840 6217
Nassau 7944 470.1
New York 160053 49689
Niagara 8208 6603
Oneida 11789 10701
Onondaga 14600 18000
Ontario ...' 4636 4996
Orange 10390 11400
Orlean 2448 2S86
Oswrgo 6214 6611
Otsego 6200 4900
Putnam 1196 12S3
Queen 29191 8877
Kenaselacr 13301 10944
Richmond 8186 2691
Rockland 4080 2117
St. I,awrence 6600 8500
Saratoga ." 6293 6147
Fchenectady 5987 Bill
.Schoharie 3600 2700
Schuyler 1365 1722
6eneca 2592 2371
Steuben 6992 6421
Suffolk 7416 6583
Sullivan 3683 2985
Tioga 231S 2686
Tompkins 3222 2570
Ulster 7815 7292
Warren 2770 3162
Washington 3427 4381
Wayne 3862 4563
Westchester 20093 14461
Wyoming 2600 2000
Tates 1518 2028
Straus.
3850
1400
3000
2200
2748
6.166
2303
1361
1001
1303
1455
16X2
2IS9
26503
1593
1331
2225
2041
786
2900
3199
67229
12S6
1539
24 SO
15800
1835
6832
106461
3216
8515
9500
2294
2386
1360
3319
3500
453
1067UI
4041 !
3436
21S7
6200
2015 I
2S6S
1100 I
409
997
3480
4875
S29
967
2361
2394 I
1553 I
2516
2723
14678 ,
1900
798
Ulysses S. Grant
to
Woodrow Wilson
Total vote for Bulzer 646,787
Total vote for Hedges 460,983
Total rate for Straus 380,021
Plurality for Kulrer 195,804
TOTAL VOTE FOR PRESIDENT.
Are there certain
points about card and filing:
equipment that you deem es
pecially important?
Are there certain points
about your own files that are
not entirely satisfactory?
We ask you to compare our equipment
on-these very points.
We believe you will quickly discover
what we mean by :
Highest type of card and
filing equipment WITHOUT
THE FANCY PRICES.
Ttlephone, Franklin asflx
Shaw-Walker
371 Broadway
Table Showlnit br Counties New
York Slate's Vote for President.
Roose
velt. 3900
2800
2593
3000
2407
6480
27JM
1573
1211
1329
1626
1868
2293
26188
1747
1856
2105
2066
787
3142
3589
71242,
1612
1786
2569
14852
1S69
6121
99094
4127
8254
8262
2261
3000
1436
3924
1696
694
14698
3724
S762
2319
4220
2218
2638
1186
EES
10S1
3976
E6S1
965
1046
2196
3029
1636
2537
2C34
14705
2465
, 901
665,828
462,990
386,731
202,838
Wilson.
Albany 16136
Alleftnny 2600
Uroome 6581
Cattaraugus 3600
Cayuga 4690
Chautauqua 6021
Chemung 6072
Chenango 3351
Clinton 3316
Columbia 4603
Cortland 2279
Delaware 4618
Dutchess 8923
Erie 33537
Kssex 2068
Frarkltn 2632
Fulton-Hamilton 2649
Oenesea 2660
Greene 3675
Herkimer 6090
Jefferson 6051
Kings -.. 109836
Iw!a 2337
Livingston 8201
Madison 3129
Monroe 17865
Montgomery 4505
Nassau 6444
New York 166154
Niagara 7591
Oneida 12171
Onondaga 18531
Ontario 4749
Orange 10600
Orleans 2449
Oswego 6242
Otsego 6282
Putnam 1218
Queen 27866
Rensselaer 11677
Richmond 8443
Rockland 4224
St. Lawrence 6284
Saratoga ES36
Schenectady ........ E343
Hchoharle 4163
Schuyler 1416
Seneca ............. 2573
6tuhan 7389
Suffolk 7874
Sullivan S860
Tioga 2393
Tompkins 8316
Ulster 8499
Warren 3814
Washington 3604
Wayne 3866
Westchester 22714
Wyoming 2409
Tates 1451
Total vote for Wilson
Total vote for Taft,,..,,.,
Total vote for Roosevelt. , ,
Wilson's plurality ,,
Taft.
17846
3600
8027
4500
6782
8052
2980
40311
3896
3760
2958
4786
8940
19033
3072
3837
2837
3227
2623
4860
6671
61465
2059
3722
3536
16867
4306
4192
63076
5831
11233
18363
48S6
11900
2987
6033
5142
267
9200
10862
3036
2200
8374
6532
62(5
2231
1649
2336
6974
6691
3037
2647
2281
7834
3141
4650
4669
16027
2740
1793
ri The political status
of all parties is now es
tablished for four years
at least.
I And the New Yorker
who has during the past
few weeks survived the
baseball series and the
red rhetoric of political
pulpiteers, may now
turn his attention to
his personal affairs.
"I The question now be
fore you is, Clothes and
Where to Get Them.
And we who have been
answering that ques
tion during all of ten
Presidential terms, are
now ready to answer it
again.
From Ulysses S. Grant
to Woodrow Wilson, wo
have been -making
clothes.
And in seeking the
support of all parties
upon this our nomina
tion for an eleventh
term, we once more re
iterate our resolve to
maintain the integrity
of Saks clothes and up
hold the traditions of
Saks styles.
7 This year's collection
of Saks overcoats, great
coats and snappy Eng
lish topcoats is a never
ending variety of fabric
a;nd color, and the list
of models is as long as
a state ticket.
In suits the fabrics
are a kaleidoscope of
design and color, and
the models, though they
conform to masculine
modes, have a mode all
their own in doing it.
; And Saks prices;
though elastic enough
to embrace , all sorts
and conditions of pock
ets, are standpatters on
the question of Style.
Suits 17.50 to 50.00
Overcoats. 17.50 to 75.00
Broadway at 34th Street
WILSON PLEASES GERMANY.
nellef That His Election Wni Eal
TarlS Troubles.
iptetal Cabtt DttpatcK to Twm Uxm.
Bkblin, Nov. . Notwithstanding tbt
war and International and European
politics the newspapers here devote ool
umns to tho Presidential eleotlon In the
United States and details of Oov. Wil
son's personality and record. They haU
his election with satisfaction, belierlnj
that it will result in oloaer and better
trade relations between Germany and
the United States.
The Tagcblatt says that but for thatrsf
in the Balkans the decision of the Amer
ican people would be regarded aa the most
Important event of the closing year.
"Germany," Bays this paper, "tercet with
pleasure the return to a liberal trad
policy and a reduoed tariff. Thla will
open an agreeable prospect for permanent
and Just trade relations, an agreeiosnt
for which Germany has long been etch
ing." Ths paper also expresses ths belief
that the American eleotlon will have s
reactionary effect In Europe and that.
the countries on this side of ths water (
win can a nait on high tariffs.
The Tatgliaehe liundtchau says that
Germany has every reason to be satisfied
with the reeult. It expresses the belief
that Gov. Wilson will alter what It de
scribes as the Inconsiderate American
forelRn policy
TAFT GETS HIS HOME CITY.
I,oses ITU ConntT and State), bnt
Ilrats Itooaovrlt,
Cincinnati, Npv, 6. Returns from
2.057 precincts out of 5,266 in Ohio pavo
Wllnon 150,165, Taft 105,183 and Hoose
velt 73,007. If Wilson maintains tho
same lead In the remaining precincts his
plurality over Tuft will be about 115,000
anrl Taft's plurality over Roosevelt will
be about 80,000;
Congressman Cox, Governor-elect, will
win with an equal plurality over Gen.
II B. Brown, the Republican candidate,
and Garford, the Progressive cnndldate,
will poll about 60,000. So completely dl.l
Wilson and Congressman Jameg M. Cox
snow their opponents under In this, tho
home Btate of President Tft, that the
President even lost his homo county, no.
cording to almost completo official re
turns to-night Taft, however, wins In
his home city.
The Democrats have won all the Stato
offices, both branches of the General
Assembly and havo elected a majority
of the CongToBsmon. Congressman
Nicholas Iinirworth. son-in-law of Col.
Roosevelt, haa beon returned to Con
grass by majority ot shout 1,000,
IE
Every
Day
you delay your plans for
transferring correspond
ence means m.. - rush at
the first of the year. Get
ready now. Investi
gate L. B. Transfer
Files. Wonderfully
strong, essentially
practical, most eco
nomical. A6k us
"How to Transfer
Correspondence."
Library Bureau
ClTf a. FlH&sT Iffisai saj fM
316 Broadway, New York?;
'rasas, 1M War
h
(I

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