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The sun. (New York [N.Y.]) 1833-1916, January 25, 1913, Image 1

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THE WEATHER FORECAST.
Cloudy to-day, with probably local rains;
fair to-morrow.
Detailed weather reports will he found on page 15.
Sim
OL. LXXX NO. 147.
NEW TURK CHIEF
MAY AVOID WAR
CoiNlanlinople Thinks Mnli
jnmid's Cabinet Will
Prevent Hostilities.
m:u kkpIjY to powkks
An-wer Now Hoins Formu
lated, lull Its Tenor as
t Is Unknown.
N Ws 1 1 :. Til liKliliKTTKh
I 'iititi'iiliiniiil. Say Revolt I.inil-
n-, Imt I tt!tviiilnlili Cutler '
i itviimstiiiicco. I
" ' v.,,, in Tar i v
mtii, J.in 21 Although
. " v .'f the Cabinet of Klamll
i I ''tis In en tocognl,:ed the
n
whMi brought Al.ihmotid
ni. i p.nvot has taken every
.i-pl'lse. Tile embassies re-
H' with great dNappolnt
I had been believed that a
' iiuient was ret tain. There
'nt slump on the bourse, as
d i Iivip will lie a renew ,i:
now uer iety what thp atti-
new Cabinet will be toward
i-iit per-ont" In touch with
nnieui s.iy that Alahmoud
! s not despair of his nbllliy
i ienolv.ll of ihe war lie
r ,ible to satisfy the Powers
iii m v t" the dignity of The
- I i in- popular sense ,,f honor
'.'v ii iemony of the Selumlik
-e.l without incident. The
i t afterward met at the
..rated on the r ply t the
w,nu lerount is now given of
1 when the resignation of
"' i ll' net Has forced. When
ns'i.ii.its. loaded by Hnvcr
, .1 I lieu- wa into t tm gi.md
li ttied to enter the coun
i. ''ill wen stopped by Nallj
aid of Kiatull I'.is'ia. who
i ,i revolver and tired one hot.
(nlM replied, fatally wound
tiry Capt Tew Ilk Hey. a
. ml aid of Nazlm Pasha, the
i mrindcr In chief, then tired
ml W-uitmtMftMMnied NedJIf, one
- nonstratois, and was Iminc-
dead. Capt. Tewllk was a
.iit.j In I'cra society.
' sin, on henrlne the ?liootinc
H 'be council chaniber nnd
upbraid th" revolutionaries,
a t.i mannered curs, but nn-
.i .in tin' latter (-truck Nazlm
fe.l ihlni;. An ai;ent of the
and an attendant of the
Islim were al"o killed.
1 in: Turk leaders profe
ver i hi. killlni: of Nazlm
T
a it w.i ipilte unlntcn-
' -ois Ii 111 the escltcmellt it
. .1 ,1.1. . Ills abilities and frank
w ,- respected even by his
to ml.-"
members of Klamll Patm's
ii. - t at lilierty to-day and
. .i t their homes without
n
nirked that Null:'. Hey was
in .n of .Major T.iinr, whose
.M .nnsilr durlns the summer
i-pslKiiiitlon of the Cabinet
'.ishn
It"., wlii with Knver Hp.v IpiI
o is n-sured the embassle.-i
i. nt- will bo done to prevent
in the it v. lie lias sent ir
" proi 1-lonal Oovernru-s ro
ie eionts of the last forty
is anil directing them to pn-
ide to support nnd aid the
w hich Is determined to de
'. r. sts of the country, and Is
. i prospect of the resumption
. j t! e killing of Nazlm Pasha
i.e moved swiftly. The new
i" been appointed and the war
now In full power. Thp Otto-
envoys. It Is said, have lieen
'I home from the London confer-
llnier Iley, who bended Hip
t.-iinst the peace moveniPnt, has
Mile chief of the (ienernl Staff of
n v .Tlio spirit of the Young
" - p'trtv U fhown In thp assertion
it'ier titan surrendpr Adrlanoplc
Kgean Islands they will lluht
n are no m"n left to nmn thp
. n Pasha's funeral, which took
' -ilav. did not rreate the demon
' ti "nit had bepn feared, but ear
' day there was fighting In
I'ir's of the rltv between tl"
I'ti i s friends nnd their oppon
s iral persons were wounded and
ri.sm werp made, as the nuthorl-
d noting with a firm hand.
' I tr v has Informed the embassies
' ir'i.tnces will be put down nt
'i . that life and property will ho
the citv.
'a', of the, old Cabinet was dra
A great crowd had assembled
(Jr.ind Vizier's odlcp nnd
wis wild cheering when Knver
i Tain nt Iley rode up with an rs
' t mi. mnteii otHcers They entered
a. I proceeding without ceremony
'"iinil Chamber where thp Atln
iie assembled, demanded the In
' in ment of the Cabinet. Klamll
. ' "iici wrote out Ills reslgnutlnn.
' Itiv, the paper In Ills hand, left
' 'i '"-i- without delay, mounted his
niil the cheers of the crowd nnd
1 might to tho Sultan's palace
'"in was nt first inclined to doubt
l' 'an nes.s of the document borne
' ' r Iley, but upon obtaining con
ri of tho resignation tent for
'' i linurrl nn Thlnl 1'riur.
'"I' M III , MUMI, THA l'.VAM
vni.tlr Chhsi Line yie New Vork VJ-.3H
" Ml M rllri'iile l.lithlnl Pullmans. 3
Act 05 Uall)' SuWr HusUw . KH It'll ay
NEW
100 STUDENTS FLEE FIRE.
Ilnrnillory of ( ,,, In emln.rj,
er Sjm.o.r. Hum.
SYRcr.t;, .Inn. 24, The llv(w (,f 100
student were Imperilled by rite early
thlf morning In Callahan Mull, the
men's dcirtnltory of Cuzenovi.i Seminary,
jit Car.enov In, eighteen miles c.iMt of
here. All escaped In .cnntv attire, twn
being overcome by smoke.
The tiro started at midnight. It
spread with alarming rapidity, nnd at
one time It was fenied the entire In
stitution would he destroyed. Kddy
Mull. ,i dormitory housing about I Oil
young women, wa In grave danger
for an hour.
With flumes bursting through thp
fourth story windows of Cnllnnan llnll
the tin- gongs In the building were
sounded :ind the students routed from
sleep nnd marshalled In the hull. They
piir.ided In tire drill fashion to the
street.
oillclnls of Cnzenovla Seminary cnlbd
roll of the student body on the
campus nt 1 A. At. ii ml sever.il who
did not answer to tlulr names were
s.tld to have roup to the homes of
friend".
INAUGURAL RECEPTION OFF.
etuite lleinoerills liitr italnl t
"f lliilliltnu for I'.nlertnlnmciit.
WiMiisiiToN, .Ian. 2t- There will be
no inaugural reception marking the In
duction Into office of Woodrow Wilson.
Thp Democrats of the Senate ate
charged with thp res,onslb.llty of block
I nu the suggested , public reception,
which was to bp n Mihstituto for the
Inaugural ball. 'lit. go rcnuln now only
the lnaunur.il parade nnd some of the
Washington pc-oplu nre fearful that this
may be eliminated.
While the Senate Democrats. Individ
Ufilly and collectli ely, aume the re
sponsibility of blocking the public re
ception, the fact Is that (lo. Wilson
l Indirectly charged with this also.
Ills statement nt Trenton that he would
be 'perfectly content" to have the re
ception cut out of Hie programme Is
belleied to hap caused the Democrats
In caucus to-day to otp unanimously
ac.ilnst the use of the Capitol building
for a reception,
FIRE TIES UP BRIDGE
IN NIGHT RUSH HOUR
All n !;. the I'romenaile anil
P.ntli ltoaila. Hut
nf re.
At i SH esterday fnln when the
elei ated nnd surface car entrnnies at
Ihe Manhattan end of the Ilrooklyn
Hrldge were thronged, a fire started In
n tool house under the bridge elevated
tracks about L'o'i yarrts up the Incline
from Park tnw. The flames burst from
Uie pine shanty nnd nttacked the feed
wirct- that supply the trollei and ele
vated cars. Theie was a Hash, followed
by n loud report that sounded like nn
explosion.
The crowds nr the loops wheie the
surface cats make their turns saw the
flash, and the throngs who were hurty
Ing up the stairs to the delated plat
form ii in I those who were coming toward
the bridge in Park row nnd Nassau
street heard the big noise. Those al
ready In the bridge entrance turned and
tried to force their way back. They
met the crowd burning in the other dl
lection to gel out of thu ram, and for a
few minutes there was a 111 eh scramble.
Cnpt. Toole of Hrldge A siliad sent po
licemen Into the crowd to testore order
nnd reserves were hurried fiom the )jk
street station. Three policemen were
stationed at each of the subway nnd ele
vated entrances ami a string of blue
coats was stretched across the street.
Ily the time the tire engines nrrlved the
crowd extended to City llnll pirk. Moth
roadwavs and the promenade were
closed
It is thought that the fire was eaused
by a gasolene torch upsettlnsr In a tool
shed of the Northeastern Construction
Company, which is digging the tunnel
for the new loop connecting tho Will
iamsburg nnd Itrooklyn bridges.
The wires tarrying the current for
tho M. II, T. surface cars were burned
and n short circuit remitted. The fire,
which splead along the elevated sup
potts, for twenty ynrds on either side
of the tool house, was very dllllcult to
handle. It was nccesw.iry to haul th"
hose on to the hrldge from Frankfort
strtet. Several cables were melted nnd
live wires dangled down nnd sputtered
along the tracks. There were midden
Hashes when the streams of water came
In contact with the live wires.
The elevated trains began running n
few minutes nfter 0 o'clock. An hour
later the trolley wires were repaired nnd
trnlllo on the mirfnce lines whs re
mimed. The damage to the bridge
structure nmotinted to about 11,000.
Met ween ."i nnd 0 o'clock In the evening
300 trolby cars and sixty-two elevated
trains currying, It is estimated, 50,000
passengers, piss over the bridge. Atnst
of the crowd yesterdny made n rush for
the silbwny when they learned of the
Occident, but thousands hung around the
loop waiting for the trolley cars nnd
elevated trains to start Thue was n
big Jam In the tunnels lending to tho
suhwav platform nnd subway passen
gers from uptown and from downtown
nnd Ilrooklyn had hard work making
their way up to the street.
TOLEDO MAN BUYS A FRANS HALS
John V. VIII Mill il to Dure I'flhl
About $inil,IMMI for Port ml I.
It Is reported from the office of
Henry Kelnlinrdt, an art dealer of utl.'i
Fifth nvenup, that John N. Willys, an
automobile manufacturer of Toledo,
Ohio, hus bought a I-'rans Hnl. Tho
painting Is a portrait of Joseph Coy
mans. It Is understood that Mr. Wlllv paid
nhout $t. "0,000. He recently bouvht a
Itcmbraridt. tl Pilgrim at Prayer,"
wheh hanss In the Toledo .Museum of
Art. The IVans Hals hangs ne.-;t to It.
The picture Is a half length, turned
three-quarters to the spectator. Coy-
mans wears n large broad brimmed hat
and a broad white collar. He Is drensed
In a blatk Hurcd velvet cloak and his
left hand Is half gloved.
YORK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 25, 1913. - rownoM.
NO MONEY MONOPOLY,
SAYS H. P. DAVISON
Partner of ,1. p. Morgan Makes
Statement to flic Pujo
Committee.
KNI OK 1XVKSTKSATI0X
James .1. Hill Says Conscience
of Directors Is the Itesf
Safejrtiartl.
I WisiitNOTOv. ,lnn. 14. The Pujo In
vestigating committee closed Its public
Hearings tor tuts session ot ongress
.and iiiisslblv forever with to-dav"s sen-!
slon. The committee will now under-
take the drawing of n preliminary le-j
' pott, which It will present to the Mouse
befole the expiration of tile present ses
sion of Congress. The life of the com
mittee dies on Alnrch t, and tbnl is the
reason for haste In presenting n report
1 and recommendations based on the
ground already covered. An effort will
be ninile nt the next session to bring
Into being a new committee to carry
the Iiuiuiry still further under the guid
ance of Samuel rntertn.icr as loiinsel.
The general Impression In Washington,
however. Is that the country has seen
the last of the money trust hunt nnd
, that the Democrats will deiote thein
. selies after the nppcaratuo of Wood
row Wilson In Washington to securing
tho legislation recommended in the Pujo
! i ommlttee's repot t.
, The tlnal bearing of the committee
brought forth a notable group of witnesses-
James .1. Hill, the railroad man.
KraneN 1. Mine, president of the I'lrst
National Pank of New York; Henry
P Davison of .1. P. Morgan .I- Co.,
fJardnor AI Lane of Lee. Iligglnson Jt
Co. and Hubert Wlrnbor of Kidder.
Pcaboily ,V Co.
The most Interesting deielopment of
tile day wns the ptcsontntlou bv .Mr.
Dailson on behalf of . I. P .Morgan A Co.
of a formal unswtr to the chnicc that
that house Is the dominating factor in
a "money trust."
Tile statement of .1. P Aloigan A Co
coming at the close of the Imiuliy and
challenging the entire foundation upon
Willi h the Inipilrv has been based caused
a lug stir In Congress.
Mr. Davison submitted to the com-mltt-e
a Pt.tement lefutlng the charge
that there W any such control of money
and credit and analyzing the rabies Hint
have been prepared b the committee's
experts. It wus the hardest blow the
committee has received since It began
groping for thu ."llimncl.il octopus."
The Itn estigators declined a tlrst to
'admit the statement to the record, hut
! Air. Davl-on promptly gave it to the
newspaper correspondents. Later the
committee voted to receive It as nn nr-
gumenl. but not as part of Air. Davi
son's testimony.
Thp Morgan statement holds 'hat the
concentration of banking resources in
New Votk in recent yint has been due
to the lessons learned In the l'.nj; panic
and to the defects In our prr'ent bank
ing laws, it has been n movem. nt In
seif-defcnce on 'he part of the batik,
nnd .1. P. .Morgan Co. pledge their own
support and the support of other bank
ers to any efforts which Congress may
mak" to Improve the present obsolete
'and Inadequate currency system In this
coiintr.i .
Air. Davison's statement was as fo:
lows .
I "There hnve been presented to your
committee elaboiiito tnbles from which
It has been inferred and In man news
papers slated as 'pioved' Hint a 'group'
of 1 so directors 'controls' the assets of
corporations whose aggiegate resources
are $U."i,(joil,()u0,mm.
'No such control exists nnd no such
I deduction can be properly made from
these tables I
'Those who have made surli deduc- ,
, Hons hnve fallen into several obvious
1 errors. They fall to observe first, that
of Hie total number of directorates In
these particular corporations tills group'
I represents only about oni'-iiunricr, sec-
i ond, that upon this assumption these
i men, In order to exercise control,' must
act and vote in every instance ns a
unit, although they come from differ
ent parts of the country and repiesent
' diverse nnd freipiently conflicting In
terests; third, that upon this assump-
! Hon the directors outside of this 'group'
must be mere dummies with no voice or
I onlnlon of their own. who in nlmos
every Instaucii are overruled by n
1 .rll.. 0,.,ll., lie., tl.lu .......
. iinio'iiij , j , ,.. vi, in cool yii iwen-
' ty-tlve billions of dollars Is not actual
I cash or liquid nssets, susceptible of
I manipulation or misuse by the direct
1 ors, the fact of course being that the
great hulk of this enormous sum Is nnd
lor many years has been tied up in
the form of tights of way, tails, ties,
equipment, factories, plants, tools, man
ufactured goods nnd other forms of
corporate property necessary for carry
! lug on railroad and industrial business
, In the country.
"It I most regrettable and harmful
'that either Congress or the country nt
j large should gain Ihe wholly erroneous
impression that these great resources
art- at the disposition of n small group
of men, or thut the corporations them
, selves ore controlled by u minority of
I their various boards,
' "As to the point of so-called concen
tration, It Is an unquestioned fact that
New York city Is the chief centre of
i money nnd credit In this country, Just
'as London Is in Ivngland nnd Paris In
Prance. Hut it has frequently been
charged that this financial growth ot
New York has been duo to the care
fully laid plans of ccrlaln men who
have brought about a condition which
I they may utilize for their own selfish
. ends.
"This Is not n fact, The great ac
cumulation of money nnd credits In
New York is duo In part to purely
economic conditions and in part to tho
Cniitinitcil an Fourth I'nuc
.M-.ft iiitl.t.A. HAKIM 4.KA.
fennl IvAlllH ItalllnAil Tour I.PAie 'en- Vnrl,
IJnnunrv SO. Jlillim Inrlwlri tirmsary expenses
fnr right day. .HiccUl Pullman train, booking
oHrK JJ rifth Avenue, .ch York City, or any
4KVl.lVGa tUF.
DEBS ARRESTED. GIVES BOND.
Soelfill.t l.emlel- lilillclcil oil I till rue
of Corrnptlnu Willie,
Tei:i:k Hiitk, 1 nil.. .Ian. CI -L'URoti" t
V Debs, tlilee times Socialist catldldite
for President of the I'nlted States, was 1
released under $1,000 bond to-day. Im
mediately following his nriest on a I
charge 'f obstructing Justice by cor- i
iiiptlug a witness In the (SovprnniPiit's
case iignlnst the Ipprnl fo Uiiwun of
Clrnnl, Kan
The bond, given b.v the Soclnlis:
leader's brother Theodore and a brother-in-law.
Arthur I'.auer. druggist, stipu
lated that Deb would appear nt the
May term of the Pulled Stales Court
of the Third Kansas Distr ict.
The Indictment on which the So
liallst candidate was arrested was re
turned two months ago The delay In I
I serving the writ was s.iVl to have been j
'due to the fact that tile I'edefal Mar-j
sh.il's office In Indiana.. ills was busy
Willi the dynamite cases 1
RAIDS WOMAN'S FLAT
AS GAMBLING DEN
Inspector hwyer Carries Off
Table. Chii anil Two of
Twelve Plajcr.-.
Inspector Dw.vcr nnd Ins squad raided
another tilbged tinker room for women
lat night In the I v y Court ninil tmeiits at
210 West 'ii7th street. The police got
the same line of Information which
brought nboilt Hie raid on .Mr. Itetle
Citihnor's apattmcnt In Wet Nlnet
second stieet a week ago last night.
Detectives Sutler and Armsttotig got
the information through two women
whom they met at Hector's. The women
gave tin lr names ns Airs. Dot Hoyer
nnd Alts. John c Yeager
After last week's raid the two detec
tives met Airs. Ho.ver bv appointment
and she took Ibein to nn right room
iip.iriment on the sth II oof of the ivy
'"".irt. thev a There she Introduced
Suiter arid Atmstrons to .Mrs Alice D
Merrill as the hostess. The detectlvej
say tln-v found two poker games run
ning, one for men In the dining room
and one for women in the parlor. The
detectives plajed for a time and lost
$20. '
They reported to the Inspector an'd
got vv.ii rants from Chief .Magistrate
AlcAdoo List night the inspector and
eight men weni up to serve the war
tauis. Sutter and Armstrong went
ahead and vveie admitted by a negro
butler. Itefore the door was closed
tile rest of the policemen left Hie ele
vator and were Inside the apartment.
There were six men and six women
seated nhout a big mahogany t.ible In
the parlor Some ixcil tnenl nttpiidid
the entrance of Hit poiuemen. War
rants for g.imbbng as a felony charae
were set veil on APs. Merrill nnd Hubert
S Hobetis The natiKs of the others
p i re taken nnd t In v vv et e allow ed to no
(Up of t'.e wouiiii. wlio said she vva
Airs, Man Martin, objected to the
breaking up of the giitue at that partic
ular time In cause she said she wh
Just having a run of link. Another.
Mis Dotnthy Jane, was anxious for the
safetv of her I'lench poodle, which was
with her, in case she should be arrested
which she was not uie of the men.
of unuital height, was recognised b
the policemen ns a downtown lavvver
widely I'li'.wn about town
A pat tol wagon was backed up to the
apaitment hous. and the police carried
out what they i onsiilered gambling
paraphernalia. The big tnahogaiiv
table, which, the detectives s.iy, ptob
ably cost nt least Jl.tttm. had to be
broken up to g- t Into the elevator.
There were eiglry pucks of cards, the
police say. nnd tho characterized hair
n dozen ns "cold" decks, nnd a quantity
of real ivory chips
ROBERT GAUSS'S 62 OUNCE BRAIN
-.lereil 'J'luit of (irn ml fn I her, Nnleil
lie rm ii ii M.-itlicmnt lelnn.
Penvkh. Col, Jan :m- In compliance
with the expressed wish of tile lati
Hubert (lauss. Ids brain was removed
for the purpose of weighing and exam
ining Hie same and comparing t wit Ji
Hint of Ids distinguished grandfather.
Karl l-'rederlck (lauss, the great (ier
imi ii mathemntlclan
The operation was performed b.v Dr.
It- W. Arndt and the brain weighed and
photographed. As exH'cted it was found
to lie unusually large. Its weight with
wrappings, which were very light, was
sixty-two ounces
Air. (lauss wns a well known cdltorln'l
writer The brain of his distinguished
grandfather weighed Ii2.7 ounces
The average malp brain weighs about
IS ounces and the average female brain
i 4:iif. ounces. In mnn- men of grent In
tellectual eminence the brain weight
, has bren large. Cuvler's weighed 6IK
I ounces, Abercromble's 63 ounces nnd
1 Cioodslr's a 74 ounccii.
"Ilralns over '10 ounces," sns the
Kncyclopiedla Hrltannlcn, "are fre
1 quently found In quite undistinguished
, people." The same authority says that,
while Idiots sometimes have brains that
'weigh as little ns SVi oune-s, it is
doubtful If normal Intelligence Is posl
1 bio with a brain weighing less than 32
ounces."
HURT BY R. W. CHAMBERS'S AUTO
' You UK Woinnii Knoekeil llnirn When
! Crninlns I'lftli Aveune
An automobile owned by Hnbert W.
1 Chambers tan down Klflna Cayo. a mnld,
i Hying nt 131 West Seventieth street, at
I'lftli avenue nnd Slxtv-elghth street
1 last night. The young woman was
(carrylng an umbiella against the r.iln
,nnd dlil not see the automobile, which
was coming south on I'lftli avenue. She
was knocked down and thrown to una
side.
(iinrleB II. Klein, Air. Chambers's
chauffeur, stopped the machine, nnit
Alts, Townsend Ashmore of 141 Knst
I'ifty-slxth street, who wns returning
to her home in the machine, got out
nnd went to the maid's help, An
lillibiiliilicii look (be fining woman (o
the Plower Hospital. , HI10 hail 11 scalp
wound, but Itor. condition -was not con
sidered serious.
ms, iv .r $ p,w.,., . r-bu,ht,,a
WAITERS IN FURIOUS
Windows anil Hoofs in Del
inoiiico's anil Ititz-Carltnn
Smithed by Strikers.
Font DKTKCTI V KS II TUT
1. W. W. Iieleate l.eatls Willi
Itiot With Cry of
"Kill thcCn''-"
A day's rioting and violence on the
par: of striking hotel workers culmi
nated last night nt about the supper
hour In attacks on Delmonlco's and the
Illtz-Cniiton. A mob of singing, yell
ing waiters anil hangers on, led by
agents of the ll.i.vwood-llttor organiza
tion, the I. W. W.. smashed windows
and doors In both restaurants and wete
driven away only after hard llahtlng by
Hie police.
A column of strikers started eastward
from Hroadway and l-'orty-second street
at a few- minutes past 10 o'clock after
shouting Insults at lioprlctor Hegan of
.he Knickerbocker. The marcher,
roared past the Hotel Alanh.1tt.1n. hurl
ing bricks through the windows of the
hotel cnbstnnd as they went. They
swung up .Madison avenue to Porty
fourth street and then marched to Del
monlco's, where nfter vainly trying to
draw out the waiter there they began
to throw bricks. A missile cra'hed
through a window on Hie liflh avenue
side of the restaurant and brb ks and
stone were hurled through the doors
on the Potty-fourth ftreet side.
The striker made for the P.ltz-Cnrl-ton
next and delivered their ultuck 011
the .Madison uvetiue entrance. Half a
dozen rioters broke the revolving door
and used Jagged stones lo break the
glass and damage the woodwoik
Policeman Haase was the onl bluecont
on tl nt at Hie Hits and for a
time he was In danger of being badly
hurl Haase flnallv tired seveial slims
from his revolver to attract help
Police Commissioner Waldo, who has
apartments In the Carlton Chambers,
mljolnlni. the hotel In Porty-seventh
street, heard the shots and looked out
of bis window lie got one gllmp" of
tlie brick throwers and then phoned t'n
Ihe l-Iast l-'ifty-tirst street station.
Seigeant Peter Held came over In a
hurry with a patrol wagon load'd wiih
fifteen stout men After ten minutes
bard lighting, in which the police used
their clubs fieely. Held dispersed th
moll and arrested the man who is
charged with breaking window cI.ims
nt Dehiionieo'f eTitt"lbe- Hltr-Carlton.
The man cave, hi name ns (Jeorge
Ciiagiiinto a waller, of UK Oreenw lei,
avenue He wns inken to Ihe night
com t.
At umluislit last night Lieut Haviler
and a detail of men were pitrolluig
I'lftli avenue. .Madison avenue and toe
side streets foi the protection of hotels,
ti-stnuiants and citizens. At that time
iiiket" patrols vveie In caking windows
In the Hotel Panel son at 40 West Forty -sixth
street and nt other hotels.
Hector's, almost depleted of waiter.-'.
11. iiaued 10 wentlnr Ihe stor-n ani'
keep half of the ni.ilu dining room open
fo? dlntn r and supper last night inly
1 , g 1 t captains of waiters remained and
the chambermaids and women help
were at work .11 Hie kin hen nnd nt
dishwashing.
line of i'..e dinner patrons wis John
C. Hoib. piopiici.i of the (!rea: North
ern Hotel m Chicago. Air. Heth, who
knew whit a ll.x Ins friend Hector was
In. Insisted on serving Ills own party,
and travelled back and forth bctwicn
his guests and the kitchen.
The big tight of the day came
earlier In the evening at Sixth
nvenne and Forty-second street, where
n dozen detectives fought with their
backs to the wnll against ".uO
frenzied men led by Carlo Trescn,
nil associate in the Independent Workers
of the World of Hig Hill Haywood and
Httor.
With a volume of Kllzabetb Harrett
drowning' love sonnets In his pocket,
a book presented to him by Hllzabeth
(iurley Plynn, the young woman who
lielie,l him to organize the strike, and
In which was this inscription, "I love
you, Carlo Thine, lllizabeth," Trescn
fought like n tiger nnd urged on the
mob with his shrieks of "Kill the cups!"
When the fight of half an hour was
over four detectives had been Injured,
fifteen of the strikers had been bruised
or knocked senseless nnd Tresca nnd
eight others were under arrest. It was
the most desperate encounter with riot
ing strikers that the police have had
for several years In the Tenderloin.
The slambang fight wns witnessed by
thousands of people, who climbed down
from the elevated trains In Sixth ave
nue and off tho trolley cars when they
heard the roar of battle and tho yelling
of Tresca ami his half frenzied fol-
IllWOIS.
Warned In ndvnnce that he was to
have 11 day of trouble Inspector Labey,
who commands the old Tenderloin, went
to Police Commissioner Waldo yester
day morning and obtained from the
Commissioner forty extra uniformed
men and 11 number of plain clothes men.
Lnhey scattered these through his dis
trict so that they could gllilld Ihe big
hotels nt which the strikers were driv
ing most furiously, nnd beforo the night
was over tho Inspector had use for all
of tbcsu extia men as well as for his
regular policemen, reserves and all.
Half a dozen skirmishes nt tho Asinr,
Louis Alartlrfs, Hector's, the Waldorf
and the Knickerbocker were effectually
squelched before Lahey's brisk boys
were thrown Into the big fight of the
night, the riot In front of the strikers'
talk headquarters, Hryaiit Hall, Just
south of Forty-second street In Sixth
avenue, Tresca and Kllzabeth fiurley
l'iynii, tlio strike organizers, had de
termined to so cripple the service of
five of the biggest hotels In the, city
that they would have to shut up shop
for the night These hotels were the
Aslor. the Knickerbocker, the AlcAlpIn,
CttHliitttrtl 00 "( I'oiot Pujv,
AMi:illl.l'VIA WIIISKI'.V
Indexible, la evennrai nf pure vvhiilcsume nuall
Uu Is Antcillluiluo. Lu lien Drui.. ti. V, Ait.
,D,S0(r,,i,0.
j GOV. WILSON SH0FS HERE.
I .loin Mr. Wit. on 11 nil I. tiler ee
"II lit lierfonl nml on."
( (iiiv Wilson arrived In New York nt
2 o'clock jesteiil.iy ufteinoon le- th
Penns.vlvanla Hallro.-ul lie left Prln
'ton at S:22 o'clock nnd went to Phila
delphia, where he visited hi dentist
and then caught the noon train for
New York.
In New York Clof. Wilson went
dlleetly to the home of Col. K. At. House
at 14,"i Hast Thlrty-tlflh sheet.' There
he Joined Alts. Wilson, who bud come
from Princeton eat Her In tho day and
they went shopping logether
In one of the department stotes they
visited the Ii esldetit -elect was recog
nized by a number of men and wonun
and thete was n few minutes of hand
shaking. Last night iov. Wilson nnd
Col. House attended the porfnrninui e
of "Huthetf'ord nnd Son" at Hie Lllll
i'lientie iiie (loir 1 nor nnd Airs Wllon will
go over to Hoboken this afternoon and
will lemaln over Sunday with .Mis.
Caroline Alexander, mother of the late
AtchlbiiM Wilson who was itov. Wil
son's nld.
$5,050,000 IN GOLD ON SHIP.
bluer Verill Tnlie Illum-sl Ship-'
ineiil In South Vnierlcil.
The Uimport nnd Holt liner Verdi,
which sails- to-day for South America,
will cany the biggest shipment of gold.
In half eagles, eagles and double pagles,
ever designed for I'.uenos A.vies nnd Hlo ,
Janeiro in u single ship.
The gold Is In Idl keg, ,.,-iih about
eighteen Inches long and twelv e Inches t)
diameter and weighing 200 pounds. They
wte taken to the ship io-toiily in
coveted wagon, 011 each of which were
live armed guards. Ten armed men
were on the pier.
The total amount of Hie shipment I
J.VO."0,onii, contributed thu- National
Hank of Commerce. ll.r.r.O.nnn; National
City H.ink. ? I. HOo.OOii. C.oldman. Sachs
- Co. 1 1, 2011.0(10. imlo. South Ameri
can Hank. K'0.owi. Ifunover National
Hank-. JuOO.l'Oo. pier jSuperlntendent
Oedde said that this hlprnenl com
pleted a total of $300,000,000 In gold to
South America
VANDERBILT HOTEL FOR GIRLS.
Will TnUr lnl Thine M ho Work
ml Will He Culled ntl,nn Home.
Plans for a seven story hotel exclu
sively for working girl and to lie known
as the Anthoiiv Home were Hied vester
day b.v Valentine & Khsam. architects.
The building will be erected on the
north side of Twenty-ninth street. 100
fee- west of Lexington nvenue. it will
hnve n frontage of ,"(l feet and a depth
of sp.9 feet, with a facade rf brick and
lime-tone. It will be absolutely lire
proof and will have accommodations
for nhout Kid girls.
This building 1 being elected for
Atrs. Frederick V.inderbllt. who Is the
IiimiI of a movement to provide home
like quarters for working girls at a cost
of about $3.."i0 per week for board and
room. In the bnsement will he n 'laun
dry equipped with every modern con
venience, with n large dining room and
a kitchen on the tlrst flout uud a roof
garden on tlt roof The cost of the
building has been estimated a: $100,000.
CHURCH TO GIVE AWAY $450,000.
I Colleslntp Offer Sum Tovtnril idToll,
' 000 Itn pi 1st lleniliiiiHrtera.
j The Colleglnte Hapllst Church of the
Covenant In Thirty-third stieet near
Klglith avenue has offered to the .Metro
politan Pupil"! Pnlon the church site on
' Thirty -third street, worth $l."i0.oon. nnd
n building which it own on llleecker
I street, valued at $800,000, provided Hap-
tlsts will raise another $300,000. the en
tire amount to be ucd for a headquar
ters for New York Haptlsts.
The union has taken up the offer nnd
prominent Haptlsts said yesterday that
there would be no dllllculty In complet
lug the $7.i0,000 fund.
At a luncheon vvhlih Frank Dickinson
i will give next Monday at the t'nion
League (,"liih the question whether to
I recommend seilng the present site of
the Coileg'ate Church, which overlooks
the Penns-ylvaiila Knllrond ynrds, or to
.build on a new site will be discussed.
NO POWERS' GRIP FOR CHINA.
OrtenlHl I 'en red I. unit i'rrin W until
I pact (oMi-riimeiil.
CtiUtt iei to Thk Siv
Pkki.v, Jan. 24. The bankers of the
six Powers authorized their agents here
on .1 in uar v 22 to make an initial loan
contract if the tespiclive Ministers of
the P. we' were Ml'smi. The i.uter,
however, were In no wisp unanimous.
The representative of France particular
ly Insisted on severe conditions. Others
demanded payment of China's debt. for
war material from the loan, and other
Ministers made still further objections.
The Chinese ottlclnls say they ac
cepted all the original terms and had
agreed to all the bankers' conditions,
and that llovv It would be better for
them to hand China over to the Powers
than to accept terms which would re
sult in Ihe overthrow of President
Yuan Shlb-k'al and the lest of the (lov
erunient, pel haps causing their deaths
by their Infuriated countrymen
I $350,000 MEMORIAL TO HUSBAND,
Will of Mr.
I p I
Huston, Jan.
, . Ilrotvn, Who linvr
Isliitr. lileit.
2 I. -The election of the
'"Samuel Newell llrown .Memorial Hos
pital," for which $2."i0,u0ii bus been set
.aside, is among the numerous bequests
iln the will of Mrs. Chaiiotie Thompson
'Ames llrown. widow of Samuel Newell
Hrown, who for maiiv .vears was v,co
piesldent of the Fairbanks Scale Com
pany. The will was tiled to-day. The
estntn Is estimated nt $700,uurt.
llrown, who died last July bv his
will left $1,0110 to Harold II. Hrown, hla
only child by his tlrst wife Harold
1ias Just maiiied Idylln Vynnr, a re.
tired actress, Tho rest of Ids property
went to ids third wife, Chatiotto
llrown. The son contested the will,
. nnd by agreement of counsel It was
sei aside, the widow releasing her
light. She previously had received
trom her husband, property amounting
lo 1111.01)11
llrrrfiiol In r 111 .smi-.nf
i liprr Isnnililiu: ninie iiimiciIIiik mill ilrllchtbd
for n w Intel 'b bu-aUfast. Ir a I pouinl packajc.
,tlt.
PRICI3 TWO CENTS.
MURPHY'SVET(T
ON HEARST MEN
Says So Holicvci' in Muni
cipal Ownership Shall
Succeed Willcox.
CONFKRKXCK IS IIKLD
.Nomination of rnfavorablc
Candidate to He IMockcd
in Senate.
1JAKS MITCIIKI, KOI? MAYOR
1 Conferees to Ask Stilzer to
! Name d. M. Palmer for
Stevens's Place.
Charles F .Mm pity, head of tho
Democratic Slate organization, after
conferences at Delnionlco's yesterday
afternoon took the stnnd that If he can
prevent It the Democratic Senate at
Albany will no- 1 onlirni the nomination
of any Democrat for Public, Service
Commissioner lo succeed William H.
Willcox. Whp believes In the tenets of
municipal ownership.
The conference at Delmonlco's wan
really an adlotirned affair from the nlicht
before, when .Mr. Murphy gathered about
him his keenest advisers, among them
some of the hyst known lawyers In New
York city.
At the conference on Thursday nlaht,
which lasted until midnight, it liecamn
known that Cov. Sulzer was titepared to
send to the Seriate next week a nomliia
'tloti for Public Service Commissioner to
succeed Air. Willcox on February 1.
It was then that the discussion of
'candidates began, followed by a search
ing inquiry ns to the stnnd certain
Democrats had taken on the rubject of
miinlcipnl ownership. Practically no
decision was reached at that conference
and the matter came up yesterday after
noon for fin tber and final decision.
All In yesterday nftcrnoon'.s confer
ence, which did not break up until lato
last evening, were unanimous In sup
porting the position taken b.v Mr. .Mur
phy that no Democrat who believed In
' municipal ownership should tie con
, firmed.
, The deciee of Mr. Murphy and his
counsellors will be conveyed to-dny to
, Siiimtor Hubert F. Wagner, leader
the Democratic majority In llm Sennto,
;nriil through Senator Wagner to the
thirty -one Democratic Senators, who
are as follows:
Thomas 11 (liveefe. Oyster Hay, Her
ruird AI. Patten, l-ong Island City;
Thomas H Cullen. Henry P. Velte, Will
lam .1. Hetfernati, William It. Cnrswell,
1 Daniel .1. Carroll, Herman II. Turnery
nnd Felix J. Sanner of Hrooklyn; Chris
topher D. Sullivan. John (1. Fitzgerald,
James D. .McClelland, James A. Folev,
1 John .1 Hoyinn. Walter It. Herrlck,
Henry W. Pollock, .Inmes J. Frawley,
Stephen J. Stllwell nnd" Anthony .1. tlrlf
' fin of New- York; (leorge A. Hlauvelt of
i Alonsey; John F. Mealy. New-Hochelle,
. Fr.iukiin H. Kooeveli, Hyde Park; John
' W. McKnlght, Castleton: Ioron 1L
( Willie. Delanson; Wlillam D. Peckham,
t I'llca, .1. Henry Walters, Syracuse; Clay
ton L. Wheeler, Hancock; John F. Alur
' taugh, Htmira; John Seeley, Woodhull;
John F. Alalone, Samuel II. Kamsper
ger and Gottfried 1. Wende of Huffnlo.
Senator .lames F. Duhamel la a
Hearst Senator at heart and believe
In municipal ownership, although he
vi!s nominated nnd elected by tho
Kings county Democratic organization.
If it is necessary, a cauciiH of tlin
thirty-one Democratic Senators, whosn
fealty to the Democratic State or
ganization as at present controlled, in
unquestioned, will be called nt Albany,
and the flat of Atr. Murphy nnd his ad
1 vlsers will be made the official promul
gation of the continuing body.
, Tills decree thus promulgated by a
caucus of Democratic Senators would
1 prevent the confirmation of William H.
I Hearst, Clarence J. Shcarn, John
'Temple C.rnves or any of Atr. Hearst's
j friends who are popularly believed to
. In- committed to the doctrine of muni
cipal ownership.
I As u matter of fact It would also
1 prevent the continuation of nny Public
j Service Commissioner named by Oov.
Sulzer who wus be, .veil to bo n muni-
1 clpal ownership man.
As 11 matter of fact there Is a gen
eral understanding that Oov. Sulzer
, himself believes In too tenets of mu
nicipal ownership. And yet, those who
participated in the Dclmonlco confer- '
'etices desired It to be mnde plain that
the action of the conferees nnd tho
proposed action of tile Senate caucus
lis not In any way directed against Gov.
, Sulzer or Air. Hearst, hut because It
has been deemed advisable nt this tlmo
lo put the Democratic party of tho
. State on record as opposed tii municipal
ownership.
1 The conclusions of the conferees at
Delmonlco's were based, it was stated,
not only jm the diMlnetlvn economic
and political beliefs of thofu present,
but were nlso based on the til result?
attending the municipal ownership 01
the Stnten Island ferry. In a recent
report lo .Mayor (laynor by Commis
sioner of Accounts llaymond It. Fo.s
illck, which dealt with the city's opera
tion of the Stnten Island ferry since
! October '.'.'1, lt'Oe, w hen the city took It
over, it was t-liown Hint the net loss
1 to the city fiy operating the ferry for
seven years, or until December 31, 1911,
was $l.l."i0.i'i'.('.. or nearly fiS per cent,
of the entire tax levy of tho borough of
Itli'hmnnd for th" same period.
The city's loss on the Sluten Island
I ferry proper, coupled with tho loss on
what Is known as the Thlrty-nlnth
stieet division, a Ilrooklyn ferry, was
for the years mentioned $i!,ij2,"i,(ioo, or an
average of $2,!i.'M a day.
Commissioner l osdlck In his report
polntr.t out that lb" chv'h handling ft
tho Staten Island ferry waa Its first
comprehensive experiment In municipal
ownership. It took over the ferry from
1 Wl
M 1
rl
II

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