OCR Interpretation


Lancaster daily intelligencer. (Lancaster, Pa.) 1864-1928, December 16, 1880, Image 1

Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83032300/1880-12-16/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

x-
t .Xartfc!
VI IWV
Volume XYH-Ne. 1)1
LANCASTER, PA., THURSDAY. DECEMBER 16, 1880
Price Twe OmU
tcriiintcllui.
M
j eiis n'A.43f.tKJ-;ii'.s srenv.
THE HOLIDAYS AT
JOHN WANAMAKER'S,
CHESTNUT, THIRTEENTH AXI) MAHKET STREETS,
AND CITY HALL SCJUAltE, PHILADELPHIA.
rpilK HOLIDAYS.
X Thercisnewhc:rciiiPhilndelplii.TM. vuiicdit
collection et rich-goods as here such as lath
ers, mothers, brothers, sinters levers, leek ler
a little liitcr. "
There is un ciulovcnefGilf.'-i. Our colledion
Is large enough ami rich enough, one would
supne-e, even for a Ics-s frugal cily tlmii
Philadelphia. TIicm- goods are are new at tin:
height of their glory. The choicest of them are
lien:: ethers will come of course ; lml the
choicest are going.
Vhatiseiual'y te the purpose, buyer a:e
new about as ninny as cm 1; comleriably
f-erved, ami the throng will he den-rr every
fnii-lay till Christinas.
JOHN iVAXiMAKKK.
ri'Oll.KT FURNISHING.
J Sachets, tillfs,Iuiup-ftliadc.-. pin-cushions,
boxes, in -alin and plush, cinhreidered :md
pitinlcd.
JOHN WAXAMAKKI!
Fiii circle. t-enliivcst from the ceulr..
rACES.
J luehef-e veil with I'einl medallion-, f.V! :
the same liiiiy lie .-ecu elsewhere at 7.
JOHN rVA.NA.MAKEI..
Nine counters southwest Ireni the centre.
(
1 LOCKS.
J ?1.35 te?l MM', all guaranteed.
C'ily-hall. -quale en tianee.
rpev.s.
J. N-w loom, new levs.
JOHN WA.NAMAKER.
Outer circle, c.-t efthu Cl'Cslnut (-tret en
trance.
BOOKS.
A catalogue 1. 1 honk's limy he had rd the
tioek counter. We want every reader te iliVe
it. The li-l el children's holiday Ineks :- -s-pceiall
v complete,
JOHN WAXAMAKER.
Second counter, northeast from I he ccniie
IAIUES' I'LbTKKS.
j There :u e two genenil ,tjle., me cle-cd
at I he hack, the ether epen: the la tier i- knew n
as ceaehinau'ssty le. In detail ettriiniuing there
isgreat vat iety though theie is also marked
simplicity. Great vaiietv in doth-, tee. .W..VI
te ii.
Cloaks, lereign and home-made. Ourcollee Ourcellee Ourcollee
lieu is uiiirecedented,whet!icr jnu regard va
riety, quantity or value. A lady who huy.- a
cloak of any sort in Philadelphia, without
looking these ever misses the he.-t n-ceiliucn!,
perhaps, in the w hole ceuntrv. i'l.M te -i"1'.
JOHN WAXA1IAKER.
Southeast corner of the. huilding.
MISSES' COATS.
Misses' coats in mere than 7u cloth-,
shapes and decoration beyond counting.
Sizes 2 te 10 yeai s.
Ulstcrettes in .' cloths, ulsters in S clethsnnd
havelecics in cIeth:i. Sizes te l(i.
JOHN WANAM. Mi !::.
Southwest corneret the huilding.
UNIIKItWliAK AN1 HOSIIIU.
Wc have the licit goods the world allerd.-.
ami the next best, and the next, and seen.
There is no place anywhere, where jeu can
see se large a collect ion el thelilfe!ent grade
el goods, all passing for what they are, and
nothing for hat it is net. cotton for cnlte'i.
mixcrt ler mixed, wool for wool, pilir ter-.-ilk.
JOHN WANMAICKK.
Outer circle, Chcduut pt red, entrance ie
Thirteenth .street entrance.
E
.'MintOIHF.KlKS.
New ICuihreidcrie- are alu-ady in. Our
stock is new in the condition you c.pccl te
find it in at New Year's, i, c. the apiing novel
ties an- here.
JOHN WANAMAKLK.
Third circle, southwest Ireni the centre.
CAIM'KTS.
J The choicest luxurious carpel.-: the iuel
substantial carpels; the limist prices: punc
tual service. JOHN WAXAMAKKI..
Market street Irent, upstairs.
SILKS,
levelling silks in the Arcade, east side.
The. same and intiiiv ether patterns are u ithin.
JOHN WANAMAKKU.
Nct outer circle, southeast from the centre
EMI'.UOIUKUIKS.
Our next spring's neviltics in embroi
deries are just new received: they usually
conic a! New Year's.
JOHN WANAMAKKU.
Next euler circle, -euthwe-t from theceiilie.
At'KS.
Jlj Laces change daily, our sales are large.
our variety always large, and but little of any
one sort. Compare price-. A quarter below
Hie. market is no! uncommon.
JOHN WAXAMAKKI..
Nine counter-, southwest from the centre.
I. nxruArs, &v. I
kl Tf Such a stock of foreign cloaks as I'hiia-'
.1 lelphia has net before seen, $10 te SiV): shawl-
wear ey : eresses up siairs.
J JtlHX WAXAMAKKI:. ,
Southeast corner el the building. !
J' Furs et all sorts are going la-t. Theywen.
la-t last year and advanced in price as the sea
eon advanced. They are going up again. We
hull net rai-'e prices till we have te buy. i-.x-pect
te llnd here whatever you wan!, Hern :t
litel trimming up. JOIlx WAXAMAKE1!.
Tiiirlceutli street unlraucc
CROATS AX1 ULSTl'.KS FOK ClllLUKKX.
j Xet se great variety as for ladies: but
much larger than anywhere else here.
Coats, 'J toil years: in thirty ditl'erenl mate
rials, drab, blue and brown cords withtl.eey
black : cellar and cull et plush : also m ten
camel's hair cloth, trimmed with seal-clelh.
Coats, 1 te 10 vears : in thirty cloths, trim
med with plain stitching, plush, seai cloth,
chinchilla fur and velvet, 2 te $10. .
Ulsterettes, (i te 10 year : in live cloths, with
seal cloth cellar and culls.
Ullers, Ote 10 vears; in eight cloths, trim
med with plu-h stitching, heed ami plush.
llavelecks. i te 10 vears : two style.
JOHN WAXAMAKKK.
1OYS' CLOTII1XG.
Our trade is j uat what it ought te be ter
the laciliticsand advantages we enjoy.
JOHN WAN AM A li KK.
Kasl et central aisle, near Market street.
c
11IIXA AX1) GLASSWARE.
Tackloeng nrceiain, piiues eiuy. ier mu mu
er dessert, live patterns, $i" teJOper
ner
.li.v..
Ilavilandliiiiieifets: Camille pattern, -140;
eWewhetv, $-). Ti-c.s-ed, JlJt: elsewhere, '".
Tressed with Moresque border and decoration
of grasses and bulterllles. iriS : c!-ewhere.
$275. The latter is in the Arcade, chestnut
street entrance, te-day.
Table glar.swaix', English, StRiwberiy-dia-niend
cut : every article required for the table.
useful or ernameuial.
JOIIX WrAXAMAKLIt.
Northwest corner et the building
PLUSH HAXH-IJAGS. .
And a great variety of ether kinds. Alse
pocket books, embroidered leather card e.ises,
cigar cases, and everything in leather goeiN.
- JOHN WAXAMAKKK.
Third circle northwest from centre.
Chestnut, Thirteenth and Market streets,
and City Hall square.
JOHN WANAMAKER,
Chestnut, Thirteenth and Market Streets,
And City Hall Square, Philadelphia.
MIRS. C. L.ILL.EE,
LAIHHS' HAIi:m:KSSEll
Manufacturer and Dealer in Uajr Werk, Ladies
and Gents' Wigs. Combings straightened and
wade te order. Hair Jewelry of all kinds made
nn. Alse. Kid Gievesund l'eatherscleaiicilaiul
dyed, at Nes. 225 and 227 North Queen street,
fear doers above P. U. K. Depot el-ttnid
PAINTING.
AH kinds el Heuse Painting and draining
done at the shortest notice and in the best pos
sible style. We liaYC reduced our prices te
1.75 per day. Shep en Charlette street.
OCtlSsJiutl ALLEN GUT1IUIE - SONS.
t 1 IT-.
vX Te huy Holiday Oilts eailyls geed ad
vice: Tin! hr.st trade is early; and the best
tiade cariica oil' the Iiest Ihiuga.
JOHN WANAMAKER.
t LFKEI) WRIGHT'S PERFUMES.
J III. Mary .sluart is probably the most
la-ling el all the agreeable perfumes: none of
the lereign one-, approach it. It i.-very rich,
Mreiigaud lullet lite; it isagu-cablc te mere
lieiveiis. prehahlv. than any ether pertume,
Willi Olive i- nc .vl in pepulrily ; this also
N i.iugiilarly powerful and lasting. White
Ke-c is delicate and la-ting.
We l:ecp the preferred odors of all the Hrst
'.? jiertumers, :ieh as I.uhln. liailey, Atkin
son and Cetidrav ; hui of At.Ki'.r.e M:ic:ht's we
keep all.
Ilring an tun ci fumed Immlkcrchicl ; and
ve:i -hull litvcii -ample of anv odor veu wish.
JOHN VANAMAKER.
I irst circle. ;i'rt!iwe,t Irem the center.
iolereii dress geed-.
' T'ie lollewing, jusl leeeived. are away
deuii in puce.: French Canicl'.s hair, 47 ineli,
:!.7.'i:iimI..'i: 1'iencli rheviet suiting, .-illc ami
wool, l."i Inch, ;"l.7.; 1'rcuch ionic, all wool, 2S
inch. .fi'.iS.
il limiting en! ier.such opportunities a lauy
inav efleii mivu hall.
JOHN U'ASAJIAKKI!.
Nine cju liters, Tiiiileenth stieet entrance.
BLACK tiOOOS.
A laily waiitin;'. any el the lollewing will
lie obliged ter the mention el them ; Silk ami
wool salin de Lyen, .Vi cents ; silk laced
vcieui.s. srl ; meiiiie cloth, V cents: damasse
l:ap d' etc, f I.."0 ; dania e ea-hmcre, JlJ-'i.
All I he plies cv-pl the iirsl are piebably
Ih'Iew lhiMe-t :1 uiaiiufactuie, and een the
lii-1 nil', he.
JOHN WAN'AMAKLl.".
Nct outer eiicle, -eutliw si Irem I he center.
'pillMMlMJ Feil DIM.SSKS ANI CLOAKS.
I our trade r juirc- thelargestaud Ireshest
.-te-!.- of i in se goods, lringcs.pa-semi'ntcrie or
naments, ginliiv, Jas-el-, sjiikes, lings, balls,
button-. We h.ue novelties net te b; found
itnvH liiiecl-e.
JOHN VA.A.1AKEK.
Nc i ouscreeole northwest Irem the center.
i'HAWL- Xr.
k A lew s.h.iul- ate &!mwii in the Arcade
ycntleiiien's dre-sii-g gowns and smoking
jackets in i)ice.tme case. Mere are within.
JOHN WAXAMAKKK.
Kast e! iii- Clw.-tuui stivet entrance.
rn;u-.
.1 our eik-:siii i- fell el preparation, se
ttilltli.it v,e cannot crowd it faster. We have
leady, also, a large teek el liui-hed garments,
furaud tiirliueil.
We have sacijues and dolmans in sealskin
djtdiu Louden we have none hut London Lendon Londen
dyed .seal. Wchuvcthcui in great numbers,
ainl, of eeur-e. iiiallsi::es including cxtrcmex.
Prices, from fli" lef-JV.
Londen eoulreK the seal market et the
world Tiieiu have been two advances in
pi ice since our tur.- were bought. Wc shall
net advmce till we have te buy again; we
have ii;i ailvaue-il ai all, as yet.
V.eiiave, at iltl'i. :.eal saeiiues such n- you
will leek in vain ter el-ewhereat the price.
i ur lined eirciilats and dolmans in very
grt.-t arie V- We use mostly Satin de Lyen.
gre--i:rain, ariiitiree.ud brocade silk and ."-icil-leune:
ler meuriiiii:;. Henrietta and Dnip
d'i:;e. I h" Jailer ale maiie te order only.
We haw everything worth having in sets
I rimming-, robe-, glove.-. -aps und tile thou--au
i -and-eue little things thai are kept in the
ceinplctc-t iists.
JOHN WANA.MAKLI.'.
'fhii'teeiiLh sired e.itiance.
tKIIIT.-.
t ' Kelt, all ceiiirsaiiil variety id styles, .Vjete
t!-J"i: Jl.iiiiicl. black, bin-. "gray, brown and
scaije'.. vJ."i li .;'." .7." : -at in. black, $l.7. te
irl''..ti : salin, !!ae. scarlet, brown and black,
I?..V. In .): Italian cloth, black, f l.i" te X
The fatietv i-verv great.
JOHN WAXAMAKKI:.
" Southwest corner of the building.
I toy-.' OVKKCOATS.
j Netice these twesa-. pics:
ithie chinchilla sack, velvet cellar and de
tachable cape, lined with Farmer's satin, horn
butt"!!.-. ;..VI. Is there another such coat ler
?.'i..vt? V e have sold hundreds d tiiem.
llrown-red-aiid-eld-gohl diagonal ulsterette
-oil woe: lining. sleeves lined with n durable,
silk-st raped labile, horn buttons, $).S'I.
These re bu: but, siieeimen-el many. 11
Ihevsccm inviting, ethers niav be mere se.
Sec'them. JOHN WANAMAKKU.
Central ai-le, net te 1 lit: oilier circle, Mar
ke street -iilc.
I I iir.iliiXs .1X1) MILL1XKUY.
It (!lbbens and Millinery, ye:t knew, we
Inn u much mere of than anv ether house
j JOIIX "WAXAMAKKK.
i North of Tliirleuutii street entrance.
J lXKNs.
ij A very great variety et the iinest linens,
a very great variety et staple linclis, and the
limc'i price:, in I'liiladclphiii.
JOHN WAXAMAKKK.
Muter circle. City Hall square entrance
5 im;." haxiskkuciiikf".
j New goods just received irem abroad. We
hae, without doubt, the richest and fullest
Steele en thi- side of I he Atlantic. We. buy
Irons maker.-, direct, knew the quality of our
tiiieu beyond qi'.c-lh.u, anil keep bdew the
le.i.l'et b'e-ides.
JOHN WAXAMAKKI..
.-cceiid cilUe, .-euthwest from theceulre.
. 'ILK ll.YXDKKl.TIIIKFS.
O The ver iinest ilngli-h ami French hand
kerehiels and Mulll'T.-: iuindkcrehiefs $l.i" te
$2..v:: mul'lcrs, $I..V te $l.."i. Klsewhere they
are. sebl for a iirai ler mere, at leasl.
JOHN WAXAMAKKK.
Si eei.d ein !r, southwest from the centre.
2 'VOKKWKAi:.
,1
I i Kverv individual article el Merine or
Sill Underwear that we buy we examine te
see w lielhcr the buttons are sewed en secuicly
and whether the sunns are right and properly
tavtcned. If anylliing is wrong, hack the gar
ment gees te the iraker, or we right it at his
expense.
Sue'.: Ins been our practice for a ear and a
half. I- there another merchant in Philadel
phia who dee-the same, or who watches the
interests et his customers in any simil.ir way
Defects may escape u-. neverthles-. Yeu de
ns a laver, if you bring back the. least imper
fection te be ir.ade geed.
JOIIX WAXAMAKKK.
outer circle. Thirteenth street entrance.
MUSMN UXnKKWKAi:.
Oura-surtmcnt of all muslin undergar
ments i-a- lull a-at any time el" the year: and
when the demand for such is net generally
strong w e are etteu aide te buy at unusual ad
vantage. We have very nearly the same goods
the year round : but. prices vary mere or less.
Xew, for example, probably, there is net te be
leundin this city or in Xew Yerk muslin nn nn
derga i meats equal te our regular stock except
at higher prices. We knew, el no exception
whatever.
JOIIX WAXAMAKKK.
Southwest corner of the building.
1 1 1Tl'.ISKIt OVKKCAKMKXTS.
. De you knew, many are net of llubber.at
all, and are net waterproof.' We sell as many
as all Philadelphia besides; real articles enly:
anil guur.mb'e tiiem.
JOHN WAXAMAKKK.
Central aisc, near Market street entrance.
IJiZSIOVAL.
LV MIIS. M.A. KDWAKDShss removed her
Millinery Stere te Ne. sju West King street,
where she will be pleased te see all her old
customers. Keiiucts. Hats, Kibbeus, Satins,
Velvets, Feather-, Flowers. &c. will be sold
cheaper than ever boferu. Call and see.
nevJy-lmd
.EASY
BOOTS
lebH-tfd
ISOU'iS. SllOliS AND LAST
made en a new principle, insur
iiigcomfeit ler the feel.
i.a-:s iiia.de te order.
MILLEB,
133 East King street
BUY GOOVS.
BARGAINS! BARGAINS!
In every department el Dry Goods, at
FAHNESTOCK'S,
Next Doer te the Court Heuse.
SHAWLS, LADIES' CLOAKS,
DRESS GOODS,
Iilauket-, Coinlort Ceinlort Coinlert
for the HOLIDAY.
. (guilts
at
ail .Suitable Gitts
LOW PRICES.
FAHNESTOCK'S,
Next Deur te the Court Heuse.
Holiday Goods.
Holiday Goods.
Holiday Goods.
mu k sin
Aieellerinjr a Lur-rc and
ineiilol't'eods suitable ler
Attractive. Assert
HOLIDAY GIFTS
LiteUnriMOuireD.
HOLIDAY GOODS.
HOLIDAY GOODS.
HOLIDAY GOODS.
Grand Christmas Display
GMT, Bewers k art,
Ne. 25 EAST KING STREET.
Istilics m ilciitlcinrii :
We announced in las'. AiturdayV iia
ner, that en that day, December litis,
and December i::tlian.l litli. we would
be opening nn immense stock of HOLI
DAY NOVKIl'II'S. Wc new say that
tlie goods liave all been received, ex
atuiucdund marked, and are new ready
for sale. There is no use in us begin
ning te try Ie mention any et Hie im
mense quantity et articles that we new
display, se- we have net the advertising
space te de it, but would invite all te
come and seethe article themselves,
as that will be mere satisfactory, and
lic-ddcs will give you pleasure in doing
se. In order te sll these goods rapidly
we have marked (hem very low, which
you will llnd upon examination te be
the case. We also opened yesterday a
very handsome line of DKKSS SILKS
and IJliACK CASHMKKKS, which we
have niarhed very low for the Holi
days. In Lace tSoedi and Handker
chiefs ac have also just received an
ether large let. We also call attention
te our Window display. We invite all
te give us a call, as it will give us pleas
ure te show our goods.
Givler, Bewers & Hurst,
Ne. 25 Bast King Street,
TOl'KLTIJiS IN SUAKF 1'IXH.
THE "BERNHARDT" GREYHOUND PIN
USDERSHIRTS A.D JMAWERS,
-AT
E. J. ERISMAN'S,
THE SHIHTMAKER,
06 HOKTH QUEEN STJREET
Earn aster I-ntclliflencer.
THURSDAY EVENING, DEC. 13, 1880.
SENIOR ORATIONS.
rwe
RfcCKNT DELIVERANCES AT
31. CULIEUE.
F. &
" The Factors tu Civilization " and Amer
ican Industries" Eloquently
Expounded.
VOLUNTARY STARVATION.
The Singular Case or Fasting te Death Re
ported from New Jersey.
TUK FA'CTOKS IN CIVILIZATION.
A Senior Oration Delivered December 13th,
1880, by w. It. SiieitJley, of New
Itloeiulield, la., Class of
81, F. and M.
College.
Man, the crowning piece et the world's
ei catien, is ever destined te move forward,
reaching higher and higher planes of de
velopment and aiming at his eventual per
fection. When once as an individual he
resolves and determines that he will ad
vance, the first step has already been made
and iu his efforts te advance himself he is
in the most clfcclual way advancing
ethers.
Discontent may exhibit itself in man ;
but discontent is only a necessary condi
tion of improvement. Fer man will net
ee stimulated te rise into a higher condi
tion unless he be dissatisticd with the con
dition out of which he has te rise.
Wc ask, what are the factors at work iu
the civihzatten of man'.' Ihey may be
classified under four heads : Industrial
Arts, Government,
Deutai intercourse ana
Literature.
In early ages, the industries of nations
were apparently non-existent, for man had
net the material at haud out of which te
fashion the implements which he needed,
and these which he first made were of rude
and edtl shapes. He barely sustained his
fire, but his persistence led him en te still
greater ellbrls until his parseverauce is
crowned with success in the great manu
factures of the present day.
Ever since man began te break the soil
in order that he might preserve his life by
the produce of the laud, the industries of
nations have been making vast strides
towards their perfection ; aud
who have helped the world on
ward se much as the workers
men who have had te exert themselves
from necessity or from choice? All that
we call progress, civilization and prosper
ity depends te a great extent upon indus
try. It enables the poorest man te gain
honor, if net distinction aud is the founda
tion en which rests the perpetuity of all na
tional institutions. Te see the strides which
the industrial arts have made, wc need
only leek around us and sec proofs of it in
our great manufacturing interests aud our
great railroads! which extend their arms
te almost all the enlightened parts of the
world. Te whom then is the advancement
of industries due? A working instrument
maker gave us the steam engine, a barber
the spinning machine, a pitman perfected
the locomotive, aud workingmen of all
grades have one after another added te the
triumphs of mechanical skill.
Hut the tsrm workingman is net meant
the man who merely works with his
muscles and sinews, but he is in every re
spect the workingman who works also
with his brain. It is the savings of the
world that have made the civilization of
the world. Savings arc the result of labor
and it is only when the laboring class be
gin te save that the results of civilization
accumulate.
The government or system of political
organization is another great factor iu a
naatien's civilization. It is closely allied
te her industries, and ene of the greatest
duties of a geed government is the protec
tion of her people in their vocational and re
ligious duties. A uation,er its ruler, should
first leek te the business of providing for
all the wauts of the people, and produce an
abundance of all the necessities of life to
gether with its conveniences and enjoy
ments. But experience teaches that peo
ple may be unhappy iu the midst of their
riches and their accompanying pleasures.
This should receive the serious attention of
the people or their representative. The
ruler of a nation should make it his first
duty te labor for the happiness of his
people ; for the desire of happiness is the
powerful spring which puts man in mo
tion. Hence the education of young men
is an important matter. The most certain
way of forming geed citizens and a sound
government has been and is the establish
ment of the public school system and pro
viding able masters te preside ever them.
Dr. Brewster remarks that "it would
be of no avail te the peace and happiness
of society, if the great truths of the mater
ial world were confined te the educated
and the wise." If the education of a
people or nation were net looked after,
ignorance with its effects vice and vio
lence would rule supreme, would destroy
our institutions of learning and all which
arc the grand monuments of our advance
ment, and would convert our social and
domestic life into a wilderness.
The government has a great duty te
perform. As it punishes crime it is bound
te prevent it ; as it subjects us te laws, it
should teach us te read them. Te-day we
see hundreds of public libraries open te
both licit aud peer; orphan schools for
these whose parents arc dead aud who
arc unable of themselves te pay for their
education, and night schools for these who
are compelled te work by day for their
living.
Stephen Girard during his life-time es
tablished a school for the peer ef Phila
delphia, which has accomplished and is
still accomplishing great geed for our
ceuutry. But still there is room for great
improvement in the education and govern
ment of the nations of this world. The
Remans and their manner of educa
tion are an example for us. Their
young men put themselves under
the instruction of learned men, were
imbued with their teachings and man
ners, and thus prepared for the struggles
of the rising victorious or decaying city
of the Seven Hills. Fer in such schools
were trained men, who, like Tacitus,
Cxsar, Cicere aud Seneca, have been the
admiration of all subsequent ages.
Greece, tee, figugrs largely in the
world's civilization because of the free,
self-governing of her states. All ether
governments of nations were despotisms ;
there was an absolute lord, a mass of
slaves, but no free people. It was left te
Greece te illustrate a democracy the gov
ernment of the people, for the people, by
the people.
Anether great factor is social intercourse
of- one nation with another. This em
braces net only the material machinery of
conveyance and communication, but also
what is called the moral machinery.
"The nature of man, who, Jieing with
out the assistance of his fellow-beings, is
unable te supply his wants, te preserve-
himself, te strive after bis higher per
fection, and te live happily, shows
that he is destined . te live in society
iu the interchange of mutual aid;
and that all men, by their very nature
are obliged te unite their common cn'erts
for the perfection of their own beings.'
We are taught that if man were te be
shut out from the society of his fellow
men he would become an idiot. Se a na
tion which does net encourage free inter
course with ethers becomes biased. It
holds te the ideas which were born in it.
ouch a nation has no history, no progress,
and as long as it withholds itself from the
social intercourse of ether nations it sinks
deeper into ignorance and barbarism.
A people te advance its own civilization
and that of ethers must cultivate a dispo
sition te mingle with ethers te study
their customs and manners. It must net
confine itself only te the preservation of
ether nations, but must centtibute te
their perfection. This obligation society
imposes upon it.
If a nation which has advanced in civ
ilizatien should be applied te for teachers
by another nation that wishes te shake off
barbarism it ought net te refuse them.
When the Remans sent embassaders te
te Greece te collect geed laws,
the Greeks received them in a
friendly manner, and it was due
te Greece that Reme became ene of the
greatest powers en the glebe. Kemnns
then learned Grecian laws and customs,
came in ceutact with the ablest rhetor
icians, scholars and philosophers and re
ceived a stimulus from Greek literature
that led them te native productions which
the world has placed side by side with
these of their teachers and still studies as
the crowning works te masterful genius.
But a nation will tee often fall into an
error in forcibly obtruding its geed offices
upon another. It then violates its natural
liberty. We have this exemplified in our
own country when England tiicd te sub
ject us te her dominion in order, as she
pretended, te civilize us. Wc tee fall into
error when we study political economy and
let social economy pass unnoticed.
Secial improvement is always very slew.
Hew gradually has its humanizing influ
ence operated in elevating the mass of the
people ! It took four centuries of persecu
tion and martyrdom te establish Christi
anity ; two centuries of civil wars te es
tablish the Reformation ; and the emanci
pation of.eur slaves was only accomplished
after almost a century of dispute, culmi
nating in four years of bloody war.
Commerce between nations has its
humanizing effects. It seldom happens
that nature produces everything necessary
for the use of man in one country. Thus
nature herself shows that one people
should trade with another. Every nation
ought net only te cultivate foreign trade
but protect and favor it. But there is
also a limit beyond which foreign trade
becomes disadvantageous and dangerous ;
then is the time when that country must
protect herself. Thus a country should
cultivate social intercourse with another
se far as it is advantageous te its wel
fare. The last-but net least great factor in
civilization is literature.
Dr. Channing, in his remarks en "Na
tienal Literature," says that the quicken
iuginlluencc of literature need net be
urged en these who arc familiar with the
history of modern Europe, 'and who, of
course, knew the revival of ancient learn
ing.'' AVe see that the influence of litera
ture is continually increasing. Beading
which was once the privilege of a few, has
become almost as wide-spread as humanity
itself. Beeks penetrate everywhere, and
where at one time they were almost un
known, they new are seen in abundance.
We, it is true, have few names te place
by the side of the great names in litera
ture en the ether side of the ocean. It
was net many years age that Europeans
scorned any American book as unworthy
of their notice, but in au age like this,
when the literary world forms a great fam
ily and the products of mind arc circulated
mere rapidly than these of machinery, it
is a nation's own fault if it be net pro
nounced with honor beyond itself.
Te literature wc must then leek as one
of the chief means of forming a better race
of men, and te superior minds, for the
impulses by which a country is te be car
ried forward. Te a nation or people then
which has attaiucd the highest perfection
in the industrial arts ; which has laid a
firm foundation en which te form a geed
government ; which has extended her so
cial intercourse aud commerce further, and
which has attained the highest perfection
in the literary, world belongs the greatest
advancement in civilization.
" American Industries."
A Senior Oration at FrnnKlin and Marshall
College.
By J. E. Sprcnkle, ofllauerer, Fa.
It is quite within modern times that an
extensive and philosophical conception of
the importance of industry has reached
humanity, and has become an essential
part of its development. The social destiny
of man could net be understood until by ex
perience things necessary for a philosophic
generalization concerning it were obtained.
Through the relativity of all knowledge,
mankind has become acquainted with the
industry of the world. Fer instance Soci
ology, the philosophy of all human society,
opens a wide field for a scientific method
of inquiry. In fact had net mankind out
grown the tendency which has everywhere
characterized the infancy of nations te
personify their gods, and ascribe te divin
ities the benilicent establishment of their
industries, as well as the advent of their
misfortunes. In the social advance of man
industrial pursuits show the power gained
by organization, and the advantage of ap
plying scientific knowledge te the processes
in use. In industry as in science itself
we must seek te discover new methods,
and new appliances in harmony with
the new conditions of the so
cial organization. The only way
that it should be made use of is, that, it
should advance together with our moral
and social progress. Loek at the indus
trial improvements of the present century ;
the application of steam, of the telegraph,
of science te the arts, arc proofs that the
human race are becoming acquainted with
their powers, and are begiuing te use
them. The application of machinery te
performing the processes which formerly
were carried en ey the slew and teutens
methods of hand labor is a most striking
proof of this generai principle, that by les
sening the time and labor required for the
production of the necessities of life, they
have performed a work that is equal te
the moralist's in aiding the social and
moral progress of society. Voltaire in his
historical works made the first expression
in literature of the importance of studying
the opinions and the condition of the peo
ple, rather than the whims and ambitions
of kings, for obtaining an accurate concep
tion of the progress of society, he laid the
foundation of the modern spirit of
scientific historical research, but mere
ly expressed, in literature, the sen
timents which had been for a long
time fermenting in the hearts aud minds
of the people. The actions of the states
men, legislators, and their knowledge
were the results of the times in which they
lived, and of the conditions of which they
were surrounded ; by comparing their rela
tive'value te the human race would he as
unfair as comparing the opinions and ac
tiens et a child with these el the same
individual after his maturity. The mis
takes and errors of a child are but neces
sary material for his maturer judgment ;
skill and energy will prompt te larger
plans, aud will be but a stepping stone te
his future efforts. Thus it is with a nation,
the errors and mistake of earlier times are
the necessary materials for its future wel
fare. Man appears in the economy of
nature, he is forced te depend upon his
own resources ; and the earliest records of
antiquity show hew he has displayed his
ingenuity in devising suitable protection
for his country. With the increasing ex
perience of man, new demands are created,
and our ideas of perfection are continually
advancing ; it is only by continual
improvement that perfection is
reached. The theories of one
age are found unequal te supply the
necessities arising iu the next from au in
crease of knowledge gained by experience.
Man in his own domain of intellectual de
velopment must fellow the same course of
evolution which nature herself has fol
lowed, in producing different varieties of
hererganized beings. Thus it is that our
domestic animals have been produced, and
that man has obtained in civilization that
knowledge and control of the forces of na
ture which divide a portion of the earth's
inhabitants te-day from the periods of
barbarism, out of which they have
emerged. Thus it is that the study of
any branch of the advanee of society in
respect te its progress or development
becomes valuable as affording an indica
tion of the laws of growth, and as giving
a .suggestion of the method which must
be observed for the scientific study of all
social advauce. The Greeks, the Remans
and the Egyptians had organized govern
ments, put in operation systems of taxa
tion aud carried en large commercial
transactions, yet they never entered upon
the course of social and financial progress
which characterized the whole development
of modern society. It is everywhere te be
noted in the history of a great manufactur
ing enterprise of any nature, that its great
success depends upon the compliance with
the laws of rigid industry. Men who arc
engaged altogether in industrial or com
mercial pursuits are tee apt te think
lightly of the value of these who devote
themselves te what is .supposed te be mere
theory. On the ether hand, these who by
the constitution of their mind are naturally
attracted te theory, are, in their turn tee
apt te despise these who care only for
what are termed practical pursuits, lhe
United States new offers te the industry
of the world, for the first time iu the his
tory of human progress, the opportunity
for it te enjev the most perfect freedom
of development. With the use of
the ballet industry litis secured the
ability te peacefully obtain its
rights ; by means of a free education
the power te comprehend these rights is
offered te everyone, te carry forward still
further the process of iudustrial develop
ment, and alferd in our turn the evidence
that the moral progress of mankind is
best secured by liberty, and that the prac
tical knowledge iu this ceuutry gained by
experience will offer au opportunity for
taking advautage of the admirable combi
nation of favorable conditions which this
country offers for the increase of culture,
and the prosperity of the whole American
people.
Voluntary Starvation.
A I-l
idy in Jersey WIie Refused Feed anil
tiled Alter a Seven weens' cast.
The death of Miss Martha Terhune,
which occurred recently at Ledi, Bergen
county, N. J., is attracting considerable
attention, especially en account of the as
sertions of the relatives of the deceased
that she had starved herself. .Miss Ter
hune was 39 years of age at the time of
her death, had never been married and had
always been regarded as eccentric te a de
gree bordering en insanity. When 19 years
of aire she aud a companion broke through
a bed in their sleep, which se frightened
Martha that she ever since declined te
sleep en a bedstead, Miss Terhune
weighed nearly two hundred pounds at the
time she began her singular fast and lest
very little in consequence. On the 18th
of September last her mother, who was
ever 90 years of age, was stricken with
paralysis, which se shocked Martha that
she formed the resolution net te cat any
mere. During four weeks she partook
only of the minutes nourishment, and then
ceased te take feed altogether. At the
end of seven weeks of total abstinence,
eleven weeks after beginning her fast, she
died. The neighbors seem te place the
greatest reliance in the statements made
by the relatives of the deceased. Mrs. Ger
trude Terhune, the mother of deceased
who lived in the same house with her, de
clares that her daughter died of veluutaiy
starvation. Mrs. Jehn Terhune, hcrsistei-in-law,
who attended her previous te he r
death, says: "It was just eleven weeks
before Martha's death that she gave up
feed. She just had sense enough te call
us te come te her mother, and then she
went and lay down. Frem that day she
never wanted te cat anything ; she wouldn't
take anything I offered, though I
made up all sorts of dainties. She
would take no medicine from the doc
tor and could net bear te have him come
near her. She did for the first three or
four weeks take a few spoonfuls of nourish
ment sometimes days apart, also a little
water. One day she ate a little mince,
that is, the inside of a mince pie, but net
au ounce in all. She was very llc-hy and
lest but little of her flesh in all that time.
She bail bright red spots en each cheek
and seemed te have fever after she had
gene without eating several weeks. It
was impossible for her te get any feed
without my knowledge, and I am
sure that during four weeks she
did net cat mere than a couple
of ounces and that during seven
weeks she ate nothing at all. It was the
forty-ninth day when she died since she
had tasted anything in the shape of feed or
medicine. She took a very little water
new and then. She seemed te be very
strong up te the last week and there seem
ed te be nothing the matter with her ex
cept the notion that she could net cat."
Mrs. Stephen Massey, who assisted in tak
ing care of Miss Terhune, said : " 1 gave
her the last mouthful te cat some corn
meal mush just seven weeks before she
died. Counted the time by the almanac."
The sign ever Hie store read as follews:
"Beeks, Stationery, Drugs and Medicines."
He went in and asked for h copy of " Croup in
Children" anil the cleric handed him a bottle
of Dr. Hull's Cough Syrup.
- JimMc;
CJTOVES.
ST '?!.
Brick-Set and Portable
HEATERS and RANGES
Sliertzer, Humphreville & Kieffcr's
40 EAST KIKG STItEET.
G1 KKAT WESTERN GUN WORKS, rittu
r burgh, l'a. Send stamp for catalogue
Kiflcs shot guns, revolvers, sent C- O. P. te-examination.
xjanicAz.
KIDNEY WORT.
This Great Remedy
in cither Liquid or Dry Ferm act at the same
time en the dlsases et the
Lifer, Bowels anil Kidneys,
J7u's combined action gives it wonderful pei'e
te cure all diseases.
WHY ARE WE SICK?
Because ice allow these treat organs te be
come clogged or torpid, and poisonous humor
are thereere forced into the bleed thai should
be expelled naturally.
KIDNEY WORT WILL CURE.
Itlileusceiw, riles, Constipation, Kldiiey
Cemplulut.t, Urinary Wlseu-wn, Femule
Weukucss and Nervous IMMmlers,
by causing free action i these organs and r r
siering their power te threw off disease.
Wliv suffer bilious nun- and uclie-t?
Why tormented with l'ile-. Constipation .
Why frightened ever disordered Kidneys?
Why endure nervous or sick headaches?
Why have sleepless nights?
Cs: KWOSKT WOKT and rejoice in health.
US-Ills put up in Wry Vegetable form, in
3tin csins, one pacUai;e of which makes six
43"- quarts of medicine.
4W" AImi ill f.iqnW Ferm.vrry t'liiiccntraUil
S3- ler the convenience et t!ie-c who cannot
X3-readily jvepare it. it ects with cptat
&3ct)lciruc! in either form.
tJKT IT OF YOlTIt IUi:t5GIST. 1'KICK.Sl.
NKLLS, RICHARDSON .t 10.. Prep's,
Ciirliiiutiei, vt.
(Wiliseiid (lie dry peji-paii'.)
deei:: ' . lyd&wl
.i t:n elm:
IJIMSIX watbiiks.
I.I. STI..SOI.If,
JLj .Silver
rand Nickel, f. te ilM. Chains, etc..
sent C. O. !'. te bit-.uunni'il. rite ler Cata
logue teM.tndard American Watch Company,
rittsburh, l'a.
LOUIS WKHKK.
WATCHMAKER.
Ne.l.V.l3NOi:TH UUKKX tsTKKKT.nenr 1. It.
K. Depot, feiiuiistcr, la. leld, silver and
Nickel-cased Watches, Chains, Clocks, &c.
Agent for the celebrated r.iutuscepic spccin
clesand Kye-lj.Ia.ss"
Kupuiring a specialty.
aprl-li'd
A Full Line or
A Full Line et
A Full Line el
AH larailiM of
All iSmdrtf el
All tirades et
WATCHES, CI.UCKh,
WATCHES, CLOCKS.
CHAINS. LOCKETS.
CHAINS, LOCUETr,
UUAKl'S, SIM'CTACLK,
ti V A IC I ).S, S l ECTAC L ES,
TllhUMOMKTEKS, &v.
TlIEltMOMKTEItS, Ac.
at Lew l'rices. Wholesale and Kctail. iTij-Fiin-WiKcli
Kcnulrint;.
E. F. HOW MAN,
y:. F. COWMAN.
Ii:: t:a.-t Kinx St.
lf East Kim; St.
HOLIDAY
AMOMCEMEHT
AUGUSTUS RHOADS, Jeweler.
20 East King: street, has completed
his preparations for the Holidays,
and suggest3 that an early examin -atien
will enable purchasers te
secure
avoid
month
tne
the
choicest
crowds
selections autl
later in the
AUGUSTUS RHOADS,
JEWELER,
Ne. 110 East Kins Street, Laiieaster, l'a.
CHRISTMAS PRESENTS.
1HAMONDS. A larjn stock et splendid Seil
tuirc Ear-IMngs with Late Tins te iu.li:Ii
CHRISTMAS PRESENTS.
WATCHES. Tins Kroat Icatureef this si-a-en
is (he introduction of llie.stuudniil Wutcli
(jrfiitust vain- for its price.
CHRISTMAS PRESENTS.
I'OUCELAINS. Elegant seriincnt of varied
and novel .-tylcs. Va-e-". Cup-, Sauce's'
1'iatcs, Ca'dnct I'i'eniv.tieiis, Ac.
CHRISTMAS PRESENTS.
SILVElt ANI VLATEI) WAKE. Aniniiiien-e
variety of articles of original disijju and
faultlc-stasle.
CHRISTMAS PRESENTS.
JEWKLKY. A areat stock or all varieties et
Jewelry for Indies and ;:entleineii. Iice
Pins, sleeve IJuttens, Kr.icclcts, Scar!
Pins, Kings, Ear-Kings.
Every article is marked at
which will net be changed.
Its lowest price.
BAMY, BANKS ft BIDDLE
12T1I AXI) CHESTNUT STS.,
PHILADEIiPHTA.
scpaO-JniilT T&S
ST.EHUIS, JtV.
SLE1UHS! SLEIGHS!
AT
EDGERLEY & CO.'S.
Practical Carnage Builders,
Market Street, Rear of Central Market Houses
Lancaster, l'a.
We have en hand a Large Assortment el
PORTLAND, ALBANY, AND
DOUBLE SEAT SLE1UHS,
Which wc offer at the
VERY LOWEST PRICES.
Alie n full line of I5UUGIES and CAR
KIAUES all of our own well known nislft
Give us a tall.
iCa-Rcnairing promptly attended te.
ntM-tfd&w
J"1 ICAIA tsnSCULATlOM
XJT In large or small amounts. fi or $20.WW
Write W. T. SOULE & CO.T Commission Mer
chants, 130 1a Salic street, Chicago, 111., ler cii
ulara.
inSs-lY1!"

xml | txt