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The Cleveland leader. (Cleveland [Ohio]) 1865-1865, May 03, 1865, MORNING EDITION., Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83035144/1865-05-03/ed-1/seq-1/

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DilLT, TSMTIULI UT) WEKE1T,
AT VO. la B0TSRIOS ST.,
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E. COWLES CO. v
S1ILT. TWO CaiTKMS MORKINt ITO EVEIINB.
(aeea an eompieee u nm.)
-
Aaan edvertfcrlBa.eaediam tbe Lumoflniftww
tsduoaaatKita tbee any other journal aubliahed Id Um
brkiA. outside of ( iinnmLl. it eablfAhiai eeversl
column mora reediae: matter, end lt Totefrreatiio
er-wl (Ix.th bf oar own Beaclel OorrpnndeoU, the
iw fork sad to Werprn Aseuctatod Press; la are.
anted In a mora iHtoUitrtbte mu teas ear other
T sTS il
kalev Montr or venlng, 07 gun, er raw .SIS n
" i nao s 00
" " " inn, s aa
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fa WasexT ear feu. 00
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To AB'i end Kewe-deelera, er Utt t 00
iM lr. deUvfiwi br oarribr. iMomiuj or jtve&lu)
Vtoenu or ween.
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
" ' OiBTlLjia, Onio, May Sd, 1806.
"rVTO TIC K. THK PURCHASE OF
lj Cavalry sad ArtfHory Bonos at tbs Poet.will
BASIL fc. SPANOLIR,
mytallMsIp elaptala ad A. Q. af,
CAUTIuN TO PROPRIETORS OF
BULLING! HILLS. Whereae, It hu been aa-
cereal oed tbat aUMtrg Bulla O'BBtrujted In eo.
cordanoe witb Letter Patent frrantr-d to J. .ita,
Oc.ober tta, 1S58, and Li tiers rmu gtanbd to J,
O. Frit. September 7la, 1869 are Dead It seve
ral oauoliibmeBta wltbout peimiail'a Ircra tba
owner of .aid pt'eate; aacb iorrineers ara eeretij
no lift -d that promut legal proc -rings will ba
taken against than, unless taev eommoulcete with
tba undorsltaad at an early data, w th a Ttaw of
mating aa tqatteDie aeuiunBat in paat iniriege-
tnanta
Llaana'0 to aaa tha inventions patented aa afore'
aid, wi 1 ba granted oa liberal Sanaa by tna u
sera-gat d, owaar of aeiri patnta.
JOBH a. KENNEDY,
(le Aa igare of J. a . friu.)
112 Knrta D'law.r. aroaaa, f hliadaltbia, fa.
Tl:2l7:at7l,g,u,27.nnl,S
UNION
TELEGRAPHIC INSTITUTE,
OBERLIN, OHIO,
OFFKK3 the most thorough, ay&iematic
Bd practical eonrM of Instrnctioii that cab be
obtained in in weit. Ji under tna upenuteod
enoe of t mcio ope-ator of yrrxprieD . En
J oy tbe patronage of lea. in; Te'icrapti eompaBiee.
GHBAP'-er In-tl ntJouof th kind in the ounntry.
Circular aDt frm tc aty aodreea.
pl4:RMA,fowlt ProprlPtorn end Pri Beige's,
HATS AND CAPS.
BARGAINS FOR EVERYBODY
IMFOSTANT SALE OP
HATS, CAPS,
AHD
STEAAV GOODS.
JN ANTICIPATION of CONFINING
Aoarselrta in tha Intn'e to tna FUn TBAUK ex-
cinalralf, wa eff r at WH0SL9ALI OB KRTalL,
oar antlra atock of
HATS, CAPS & STRAW GOODS,
AT
Greatly Reduced Prices!
Many article w!l bi told at osehalf tbeii Toe.
Oar Stock coneieu of
ALL NEW AND DESIRABLE STYLES
Iuned thie epiiotr. beeidei the aioal etaple article
ertintng to tiie butineea.
MERCHANTS AND DEALERS
la city or country, wilt do we'l to oel! end examine
at once, s we enaii oner loem
SPECIAL INDUCEMENTS!
aer'Ledial aad Oantl mea honld' anbracethla
opportnnltf to aapply tbetoeelTee aLd thatr faml
Uaa with thatr bpriug aad fcumiaer Bata, Oapa, c
8. A. f ULUB & CO.,
mylti'a al SnperTorat., Marbla Block.
Spring Styles of Q
HAW, CAPS, BTEAWCOODs, 4c.
L. Benedict & Sons
Hare a larca assortment of all tha lateat atylea,
which tbay offer at tba loweat market ratea, whole
aala and retail, at
SOI Nnpttrior tlraal.
March 80.
s
PRING STYLES OP
HATS AND CAPS.
Wa are now Introdoolng oar BPBIN8 BTIUtS
of HATS, inclndina;
TSB GRANT BA T,
THE SHERMAN BA T,
TEE SHERIDAN EAT,
THE DERBY BAT,
And a aplend!d ateortment of Men's and Beys'
Ho ft Hats aod Oapa. AIho a aloe line of GL0V29
for Bprlnit and Summer wear,
B. BUTTS it 00.,
kW9T "7 SnraHor atraat.
INSURANCE.
STATE FIRE INSURANCE CO
Of Cleveland, Ohio.
capital.. aaoo.ooo CO.
Invested la or folly aeenred by tirst -class
Mortgagra, Bonda and Etocka.
DIRECTORS:
E. V. Morgan,
at. P. yt.
J. S. TJnderword,
J. B. Heriam,
ixirea Prentiss,
H. at. Baynolda,
T 8. Bectarith,
W. W. Wrlsht,
Dr. T. T. Seelya,
Dr. W. 8. btreator,
Darina Adama,
A. M. Batche d.r,
J. P. Stanard,
O. O. eriswold.
OFFICERS:
C. P. MOHOaK, PieeMrnt
. B. P. MTERS. Vke President
J. W. i(iLKBWOOD, feoretarj.
J. B. MtUIAM, 'ressnrar.
A. H. BATUHKbDEB, Oaneral Agent.
KVOffiee in Kotae's Block, corner of Snperior
at and Pobllc Bqnare, Claye'and, Ohio. myl:B4
J EXSWOETH,
Fire & Lire Insurance Agent,
OfBe 211 Marble Block, Superior St.
CLEVELAND, OHIO.
Bepreeanta tba following Oompanlaa: Capital.
Insurance Ompany of North Amereee...f 1,716 1T1
Kew Ingland aire Ina Co , Hartford . 23S 0U0
tana, Hew York. 40J 4U7
Weatera MaaaaebnaetU, Fire Pittateld . 6 T41
Alba. City. Fire Ina. Uo. Albany, M. T Vb
kjope " Provldtnce.m
Patatm " Hertford..-..
180 0 0
607 982
S3.670 301
Leasee promptly adjnrted and paid.
pl8:ffl6Va J. BWMWORT1T, Arena.
T D. HUDSON,
taeateral Fire, Marine and Ufa Inaar-
aKw".
Oatoe. Onatt'a Crchange. foot gnperlor Street,
CLEYKLAND, OHIO.
aaraairaaTa tes rouowixa ooaiMjnaa :
Baokeya Mutual Ina. Co., Olerelaad, Am":m
Ohio, (Hre aad Marine) .9 845,14
Market Fire " 414,7tt
Fa toa Hre ' - M,IMI
horwich Fire Ina. Oo., Borwloh, Ot..
KorthWaatera " Oswetfo, N. T.
Sew Tork LI'S Hew York S,tt5h,7.V5
rhoenlx Marina Ina. Oo. of BrooJlya
N. ., eaah capital I.OOO,wJ
LOtlSBtf PKOMFLTr AVJU8TMD AHD PAID.
Particular attention flrea to the adjustment el
Marina liii L. D. Bl'DBOS,
Agent and Adjnatar.
Oapt. O. A. H-tamnra. "arine Inspector. rel8:B8
SUN
jpire Insurance Co.,
OF CLEYELAND.
Office W Snperlor Street.
nAPTTAL" - " $250,000.
FB11J TK taandBtoeka.
awar n . e I
huvrtd may
Receive rrr v
Nt Prni.
BIBICTOBI? t
PTILLM iW WITT, ' J AM IS MAfON,
K. I SlLOWW. V. M.OHAF1N.
fio. r'wARHKR, 6 BO. WOBTHIHOIOH,
BKHXT HAkVl!.?, O. A. BROOKS,
W. B. OOf LKB,
'" " STTMlfAI WITT, Presldeiit,
. a. M. BiPlS, Ylee Pre'.
s fr RilTTPK. Seoretary. mb9n.R5
EAVJE-TROUCHS.
TtruOD EAYE-TKOUGHS,
170 VCT0S3 AND LADDERS.
All orders for th, above articles mavnfactnrad bj
me7aaet hereafter be addrasaed to P. B. 10UHS,
x..xkr Dealer, Oclnmbiia at., Oiereland.
".H WAKiriKLD. PBBXJOTT00.
CUTLEBYiSDPLATE-WAEE
he
in
rrn
-
WEDNESDAY, MAY 3, 18G5.
..v.. ,
3vo.irinxrc3r edition.
VOL. XIX-NO. 106.
DAILY LEADER
WEDBi'KttDAY, HAT S, 1865.
Secretary Stanton.
It has long been known to big intimate
friends and to ft certain extent to the pub
lic, tbat Secretary Stanton i tended resign.
ing big plaee in the Cabinet as goon aa tha
rebellion was so nearly crushed that he
could safely be spared from the adminis
tration of the War Department His
health, bis inclinations and his pecuniary
interests alike call upon him to lay aside a
position which he has accepted from mo
tives of duty rather than preference, and
which has worn heavily upon his physical
and mental effereies. The rumor Is now
repeated with more posltiveness than ever,
and it is affirmed lJll the Secretary intends
to neign upon the first of July next, the
termination of the fiscal year. By that
time the rebellion will not only be crushed,
but the armies will be reduoed to one
fourth or one-eighth the present size. The
energy, the experience, the genius of Mr.
Stanton will no longer be essential, as for
the last year it has been, in the administra
tion of the Department.
But though the nation will not need
Mr. Stanton's services so greatly in the
future as in the put, there is no public
officer with whom it will part with more
regret. Among the most decided and
wonderful changes of opinion which have
occurred in this time of change and devel-
opements, one of the most striking has
been in regard to the Secretary of War.-
A year ago, Mr. Stanton was a generally
unpopular man. The McClellan and Buell
order; of generals, and their adherents
the Northern Copperhead!, were of course
in open and bitter hostility to him, while
his impulsiveness, his brmque, decided
manner, and hu harsh treatment of indi
viduals had made him many enemies
among loyal citizens. All this has been
forgotten in the splendor of his successes and
the integrity of his administration, and
today Secretary Stanton is regarded by
the people as the pillar of strength on
which the government is supported. He
is perhaps, if not the most popular, the
most admired and respected officer con
nected with the administration. Ho one
doubts bis commanding genius, his Napo
leonic energy, his unsurpassed executive
ability or his strict integrity.
Kecent events have developed Mr. Stan
ton's character very finely. His "impulsive
temperament" has always been on the side
of liberty, his "revolutionary energy" has
frequently been necessary to save the
country from harm. When President Lin
coln was assassinated and the whole Cab
inet threatened when all Washington
was in an uproar of excitement when
other leaders and officers of the Govern
ment were stunned and paralyzed by tbe
shock Secretary Stanton, though weep
ing at the President's bedside, retained bis
entire self-possession. Even here he was
master of the situation. Not neglecting
the usual details of bis department work,
devoted himself to keeping the govern
ment running correctly. Prom the hour
when Lincoln was shot till that at which
Johnson was inaugurated, the real Presi
dent the man who counselled, suggested,
planned, who met the unprecedented and
horrible emergency as coolly as be would
bis ordinary office-routine was Secretary
Stanton. The nation owes it to bis ready
intelligence and undaunted courage that
tbe government sustained no greater shock
the murder of the President.
His recent prompt and trenchant state
ment of the grounds of disapproval of
Shenran's negotiations was another illus
tration of his energy, fearlessness and ca
pacity. It was just what the country
wanted.
But the highest glory of the Secretary of
War will be tbe meed of his remark
able executive powers, in organizing
and administering his department. Con
trast Mr. Stanton's management of an ar
my of 800,000 men with the arrangemts
made for the transportation, feeding, clo
thing and arming of other armies, large or
small, and the excellence of the model Sec
retary becomes most manifest. In all
the vast details of this work for
these years there has occurred oo single in
stance of short supplies, irregular trans
portation or defective clothing and arming.
All this is due to the organizing head and
all-permeating energy of Secretary Stan
ton. More than this the administration,of
his office has been honest and eco
nomical. N o extravagant expenditure has
been permitted, and tbe bitterest enemy of
Mr. Stanton will not charge him with the
slightest taint of corruption or venality in
the administration of his office.
More Surrenders.
The report that Dick Taylor wants to
surrender on the terms granted to Lee is
renewed, and we have from two different
sources another to the effect that Kirby
Smith has offered to surrender to Pope on
the same conditions. We see no reason
for doubting these report, and indeed
think it highly probable that these sur
renders have both been already consum
mated. If this be so, there is not a single
armed rebel left in the rebellious States,
except the cavalry escort which is riding
as body-guard with Jeff. Davis on bis
wild Sight across tbe country. Every man
now found in arms against the Govern
ment has no sanction not even that of
the rebel leaders for it, and is liable to be
treated as a guerrilla.
Important and startling as are these
facts, there is another of greater signifi
cance contained in these surrenders.
Coming as they do to quickly and with
such apparent eagerness on the heels of
each other, tbey demonstrate the folly of
the last-ditch braggadocio of the South.
They show that the rebels are convinced of
the hopelessness ol their struggle, and in
stead of desiring to struggle on hopelessly
are eager for peace and the old Union.
They indicate that we shall now
have peace in fact as well as in name, and
that the mass of tbe Southern people will
come quietly back to their old allegiance.
Proclamation by the Governor.
Governor 15 rough yesterday issued a
proclamation, which will be found in our
dispatches this morning, concurring in the
recommendation of tbe President that
Thursday, June 1st, be set apart as a day
national humiliation and mourning foe
the lei"" of our cillaf mftg's-r&ta na palling
upon all gTHXl citizens to close (heir Places
of business ana join in tie solemn ceremo
nial of the day. We cannot doubt but
that the day, thus set af .art by our state as
well as national authorities', will be uni
versally observed. ''
If Kirby Smith surrender's, Jeff. Davis
chances of escape from the country would
seem most desperate. When he arrives at
his goal the Trans-Mississippi he will
find it held by Union troops. How can he
escape Vheml w.
The Latest News
BY TELEGRAPH.
LAST NIGHT'S REPORT.
SURRENDER!!
Kirby Snlth and Dick Taylor
boin want to
Surrender.
NEGOTIATIONS IN PE0GEE88.
- NO MORE FIGHTING !
Sbeiman'g Bojs Coming Home.
FOREIGN NEWS.
BUMMED CABINET CHANGE.
Stanton, Seward and Welles
Seward
la Daol
n.
THE BEBEL BiM WEBB.
Details of her Destruction.
Proclamation by the Goiernor
THE FUNERAL COETEGE j
Departure from
Chicago.
GOLD DOWN TO 110.
Jeff. Davis' Late Movements,
FROM COLUMBUS.
[Special to the Cleveland Leader.]
COLUMBUS, May 2.
proclamation :
Excuttv Depabtmint,
Columbus, May 2, 1865.
In view of the affliction of Divine Pro
vidence on the nation, the President of the
United States has designated Thursday,
the first day of June, as a day of humilia
tion and mourning, and recommended that
our people, on that day, in their respective
places of worship, unite in solemn services
to Almighty God in memory of the good
man who has boon removed, so that all
shall be occupied, at the same time, in the
contemplation of his virtues, and sorrow for
his sudden and violent end. Fully con
curring with his Excellency the President,
in this measure, I do recommdnd to the
people of the State of Ohio a united and
solemn observance of the same ; that all
places of business be closed and that tbe
day be observed as a Sabbath of the Na
tion; that all our people unite, not only in
humiliation before the Lord and contem
plation of the services and virtues of the
great and good man who has been taken
away from us, but in earnest prayer that
Almighty God will sanctify this great
affliction to us as a nation, that in His wise
providence he will rule all these things for
our good, and that he will strengthen and
guide our present rulers and endow thorn
with wisdom to couduct the nation to
peace and unity again.
In witnecs whereof I have hereunto set
my band, tbe dsy and year above written.
JOHN BROUGH.
By the Governor:
F. A. MARBLE.
Associated Press Report.
THE OBSEQUIES AT CHICAGO.
CHICAGO, May 2.
Until a late hour last night crowds con
tinued to pass through the Court House in
an increasing stream. Many who came to
seethe remains of the late President, were
unable to on account of the pressure. Du
ing the afternoon and evening a large body
of singers were retained in the rotunda,
and performed appropriate pieces ot sacred
muaic
Up to a late hour to-day, lone lines of
people have been moving towards the
Court House, entering a door bearing the
inscription, "Illinois ciasps to her bosom
her slain but glorified son ; " and retiring
by one on the other side, surmounted by
the words: "The beauty of Israel is slain
upon high places."
Grouped around the coffin were ever
greens and the choicest flowers, vases filled
with roses, crosses of white flowers, aGreek
cross of white camclias, with a green back
ground, resting on white satin, on the lid
cf tbe coffin, a Greek urn, filled with
flowers, and a wreath of camelias and
white lillies, bedded in evergreens, resting
on the foot of the coffin, and interspersed
among all these were rare bouquets of
white flowers, wreaths of flowers and
wreaths of evergreens and mosses.
Business was entirely suspended here
yesterday, and is only partially resumed.
It is everywhere admitted that never be
fore has Chicago seen a day to compare
with that of yesterday, in the overwhel
ming solemnity of the occasion which
thronged tbe thcToughfares. In surpassing
splendor, the day could not be compared
with any other that ever dawned upon the
city. So public bereavement was
ever so deeply felt by the public
Not only citizens from distant parts of
Illinois, but nr any from adjicent
States have come here to take their last
farewell of the truly lamented dead. The
wigwam in which Abraham Lincoln was
first nominated to tbe Presidency, the first
story of which is occupied as stores, posses
ses much interest to all visitors, and the
erection of an immense wooden structure,
for holding the Sanitary Fair in, reminds
us of the fact that President Lincoln had
nartlv promised to be present at the open
ing. All party division and party spirit
has been entirely obliterated by the sad
event which caused tbe heart of tbe nation
to throb heavily at the portals of the tomb.
FROM PLYMOUTH
WASHINGTON, May 2.
The Navy Department has received a
communication from Commodore W. H.
McCord, dated April 12, at Plymouth, N.
C, in which he says : I got word yester
day, to the effjet that the rebels had sent
a floating battery down the Boanoke river,
and that it was then just above this place.
I immediately started from Winton, in the
wilderness and arrived here last night, I
then found that Commodore Febiger had
sent a party under Lieutenant Franklin, of
the Isaacs, which party bad found the bat
tery sunk near Jonesville, by one of their
own torpedoes. Lieutenant Franklin set
fire to all of ter that was above water, and
it is supposed that she is pretty thoroughly
destroyed.
FROM CHICAGO.
CHICAGO, May 2.
. A dispatch has been received from Cap
tain Robert Lincoln, stating it is his moth-
i ex's request that Oak Ridge Cemotery be
the permanent .Dnnai piece oi nis miner.
This will be complied with.. . '
The Court House was closed at 8 o'clock
this morning, when the remains were es
corted to the railroad station; members of
the Common Council acting as pall-bearers.
The cortege was flanked by torch bearers
in large numbeu. Very many persons
were assembled at the depot to witness the
departure of the train, which will arrive at
Springfield to-morrow morning at 8 o'clock.
The funeral will take place on Thursday
alteroooa.
THE RAM WEDS.
NEW YORK May 2.
The steamer Guiding Star has
from New Orleans on the 35th and Ha
vana on the 28th ult .. ; ' ' -
The dtrjtion of the rebel ram Webb
is fully conijfeied. She passed New Or
leans under a heavy fire of our war vessels,
the Lsckawana sending a 260-pound shot
through hor bows.
Only cne vessel (the Hollyhock, Lieu
tenant Commander Gherardi,) was ready
to follow, which kept close on tbe track of
the Webb until twenty-eight miles below
the city. The rebel saw the sloop-of-war
Richmond ready for action, and turned for
shore. The Hollyhock gging straight at
her, the Webb's officers and crew fired her
in several places and fled into tbe swamps.
The boats from the Hollyhock boarded her
and saved one man abandoned asleep, but
were unable to put out the flames from the
innammable nature ot the careo.
The Webb was armed with thirty-three
guns, one a thirty-pounder.
'J core were two hundred and seventeen
bales of cotton and some turpentine aboard
the ram.
It seems the pilot of the Richmond
knew the Webb. Three of herorew have
given themselves up.
The Times of the 25th says: The rebel
gunboat Hodges came out of Pea river on
the 23 ), under a nag or truce, lor the pur
pose of negotiating with Colonel Sprague,
(Jhiei of Stan of General f ope, tor the
surrender of General Kirby Smith and his
force. Colonel Sprazue left Cairo on tbe
gunboat Lexington for the purpose of meet
ing the Hodges at tbe mouth ol aaa river,
and there can be little doubt tbat Kirby
Smith has surrendered his entire force.
Tbe terms of surrender are the same that
Grant proffered to Lee.
The Lexington and Hodges were at last
accounts at Hog Point, a few miles below
the mouth of Red river.
Tbe surrender of the rebel Secretary
Mallory at Pensscola is confirmed.
Eight niillionsof greenbacks had arrived
at New Orleans to pay our troops, and as
much more was on the way.
Claiborne, Ala., has been occupied by our
cavalry, under General Lucas, after a vic
toiy ever a regiment of rebels, north ot
Mount Pleasant, the rebels losing 10 killed,
15 wounded, and 422 prisoners. Our loss
was 3 killed and 9 wounded. Five hun
dred bales of cotton were secured.
Havana advices to the 28th of March,
and Vera Cruz to the 13th, have beeL re
ceived. Tbe Mexican news is unimpor
Unt. The Imperialists are said to have
been repulsed at Huatilla, and to have been
again defeated after a pursuit of four
leagues. Tbe Revolutionists had defeated
a squadron of Imperialists at Obispo. The
town of Pemaodero, in the State of Ne
cbaarcan, had surrendered to tbe Juarists.
FROM CAIRO AND BELOW
ST. LOUIS May 2.
Tbe Democrat's Cairo special says: The
Memphis Bulletin learns that on Sunday
last, probably tbe 23d, that negotiations
were progressing, a few milei below Red
river, between Colonel Sprague, Major
General Pope's Chief of Staff, aad the au
thorities of the Tranj-Misiiassppi depart
ment for the surrender of Kirby fcmith's
forces.
Tbe Republican's Cairo special says:
General Chalmers was murdered by per
sons unknown, but more reliable informa
tion says that it was done by rebel sol
diers. A Refugee from TomkinBville brings a
report tbat the rebel General Maury, late
commander at Mobile, has been superseded
by Gibson who commanded a brigade at
Spanish Fort. He says the demoralization
among the rebels is very great. The rebel
gunboats Morgan and Nashville were al
most deserted by officers and men.
FROM DICK TAYLOR'S FORCES.
MEMPHIS, Mar. 30, VIA CAIRO, May 1.
The Bulletin of this morning says it is
reported tbat the rebel General Dick Tay
lor sent General Hodge to notify General
Dana of the surrender of Johnston to
Sherman, and to inform bim of tbe terms
of the surrender. General Dana immedi
ately gave full credence to Dick Taylor's
statements, and arranged an armistice with
Hodge.
'1 us terms are said to be an entire cessa
tion of hostilities, each retaining the right
to punish guerrillas, and trade regulations
and intercourse continuing under the most
liberal constructions.
This armistice contemplates arrange-
rrents on tbe same plans as those proposed
by Sherman, unless repudiated by Genoral
Dana's superior officers.
The armistice commenced on tne 2am ot
April, only to be terminated on forty-eight
hours' notice.
Ciiao, May 28 p. u.
The river in the vicinity of Baton Rouge
is Btill rising. Many plantations are inun
dated. The stoamer Von Phul, from New Or
leans on the 27th, has arrived.
Captain Reed and twenty-six of the crew
of the rtm Webb, captured by the 10th
Illinois cavalry, were brought into new
Oxlnans on the 2Cib.
Tbe steamer St Mary, sunk in Mobile
bay, is being raised.
The stoamer Hamilton rrom new Or
leans, with the Third Michigan cavalry,
struck a torpedo under her boilers, in the
Lowtr Uap unannel entrance to MoDiie.
on the 2S.h, making a complete wreck of
that part of tha boat, killing and wounding
thirteen persons. Tbe Quartermaster im
mediately issued an order directing all
steamers to take the Eastern Channel by
wav of TenBaw River, maunz the distance
to and from Mobile twenty or thirty miles
NEWS ITEMS.
NEW YORK May 3.
Tbe Commercial's Washington special
says Mayor Wallack has been appointed
President ot tbe association for the erec
tion of a monument to the late President
Lincoln in that city. George W. Biggs,
banker, is Treasurer.
Captain Robert Lincoln hu gone to Il
linois to be present at the interment of his
father's remains at Springfield.
Tbe PoBt's Washington special says the
ti ial of persons implicated in the assassin
ation will commence in that city early
next week. Newspaper reporters will be
admitted.
A steamer has just been captured run
ning out of the Rappannock river with
several kegs of specie stolen from the
Richmond banks by flying rebels on board.
The Prst says : General Barry and Major
George Ward Nichols, of Sherman's staff,
Mi jor Ludlow, of tne Engineer Corps,
Captain Marshall and Lieutenant Yr
pUnck, of Ganeral Barry's staff, arrived
in this city last evening. They left Ra
leigh on Friday morning, at ten o'clock, by
wav of tbe Dismal Swamp Canal, and
have made, it will be seen, a quick passage.
General Sherman has gone to Charles
ton and Savannah to look, after his com
mand.
The 10th and 23.1 Corps, with Kilpat
rick's cavalry, are to remain in garrison in
the Carolinas, while others are en their
wav home, by way of Richmond and Alex
andria. They will be at the latter place by
the first of June.
AN EXPLANATION.
ERIE, Pa, May 2.
Whilst acknowledging with profound
humiliation the absence of a proper dem
onstration of respect on the part of this
city, to the great remains ol r resident
Lincoln on their arrival here last Friday
moraine, justice to our citizens, who have
ever delighted to honor the lamented
patriot whilst living, and who are second
to none in heartfelt devotion to . the
memory of the illustrious deacLreq aires pub
licity of tbe fact, that, in the midst of prep
arations lor tne mournmi occasion, auey
were informed by a superintendent of the
Cleveland & Erie R. R. that the funeral
escort had made special request that no
public demonstration be made at this plac,
u order that the committee might have
rest and repose. Acquiescence in this un
authorized request is the true cause of the
apparent national discredit attributed to
F. F. FARRAR.
LATE FOREIGN NEWS.
NEW YORK, May 2.
The following is additional to the Scotia's
news:
Tha King of Belgiams, on his return
to Brussels waa taken with illness.
London, April 22 Faturdav Evening
Illinois Cent-al 58a68 ; Erie 45i45j
6-20's 66.
The Index and some other pro-Southern
journals mil propose to look hopefully upon
the second act of the war, which they argue
is aoout to open
Mr. Harvey, United States Minister to
Portugal, publishes a letter in the Times
giving his version of the firing into the
.Niagara and Sacramento, at Lisbon, show-
ing that they were eatirely blameless and
according high praise to Commodore Cra
ven lor bis forbearance, and at tbe time
they were ordered permuting their depar
ture-
The extradition case of Windsor, the de
faulting cashier of the Mercantile Btnk of
New York, had been before the Court of
the Queen's Bench, and was postponed for
a week.
The Bank of France lost i,7o0,000 francs
in specie during the week.
The Times thinks that unless the South
consents to re-enter the Union, the end is
as far off as ever; but as the North shows
evidence of liberality, and as slavery is al
ready half extinct and verging on its final
doom, tbe Times thinks a reconciliation
wi'l be effected; but come what will, Eng
land will wait the issue with the forbear
ance of neutrals, but with a wish fur a
speedy and lasting peace.
JEFF DAVIS.
KNOXVILLE, May 2.
A man who was on one of the railroad
trains captured by Stoneman's cavalry be
tween Greenburg and Salisbury, says Jeff.
Davis was on the same train, and on his
way to Charlotte, but tbat learning tbe
railroad was cut above and below
there, he, with the other passengers
escaped and returned to Greenburg. .Stone
men's cavalry is now in the valley of
Saluda river, with headquarters at Ander
son, S. C-, and are scouting from there to
ward Augusta, Ga., with instructions, if ne
can hear of Jeff, and bis treasure, to fol
low bim as long as there is a horse left
The infantry portion of Stoneman's com
mand are engaged in clearing the moun
tains of bushwhackers, guerrillas and horse
thieves, and are making clean work.
GOLD
NEW YORK May 2.
Gold has further receded. Sales were
made during the morning as low as 1-1" J
with a good business doing.
Special Report.
STOCKS.
NEW YORK, May 2.
At tbe Sleek Exchange this morning
there was a strong pressure to sell railroad
lists.
The market was from one to three per
cent lower. There was some heavy buy
ing at the decline.
The market was firmer at the second
Board si d strong at the last Board and all
better.
Government securities were all firm and
in demand.
State bonds were steady and slightly
better.
Coal and miscellaneous scares were
slightly dull and lower, especially on Cum
berland, Quicksilver and Mariposa.
The price of geld fell oil' to-day 12 per
cent, but towards noon the market im
proved, and it wa? steady and uniform
throughout the p. m. wi'h only slight fluc
tuations. There is very little interest man
ifested in gold speculations. The supply
of gold at this point is constantly on the
incresse, and the amount in bink and the
Sub-Treasury is over forty millions.
The Money market is extremely oasy.
SALES OF PETROLEUM STOCKS.
Excelsior, 490; Oceanic, 251; Buchan
an, 251; Heyrick, 2590.
PETROLEUM.
Market heavy. Prices a shade lower.
Crude, 38; refined in bond, 55; froe, 75.
SUPERCEDED.
Rear Admiral Hiram Paulding was yes
terday relieved from the command of the
Brooklyn Navy Yard, and turned it over
to Acting Rear Admiral Charles H. Bell,
late commander of the Pacific Squadron,
Admiral Paulding has been commandant
of the Brooklyn Navy Yard nealy four
yean.
The Tribune's Washington special says:
The official papers ef President Lincoln
have been carefully collected, sealed up,
and forwarded to Judge Davis, of Blcom-
ingdale, Illinois.
Hon. E. Sells, of Iowa, resigned the
Sixth Auditorship in the Postoffice De
partment, and accepted the appointment of
of the tenth.
SENT TO JOHNSON'S ISLAND.
from the Old Capitol to-day and sent,
under a strong guard, to Johnson's Island.
Eighty-six enlisted men were sent to
Elmira.
WAR DEPARTMENT NOTICE.
The War Department has directed that
all civilians desiring to visit Fortress Mon
roe, City Point and Richmond must go by
Baltimore boats.
TO BE TREATED AS PIRATES.
The President is preparing a proclama
tion declaring all vessels sailing under the
Confederate flig pirates. They are to be
pursued and, if captured, treated as
pirates.
WISH TO RESIGN.
Messrs. Seward," Stanton and Welles
have indicated their desire to be relieved
of their respective portfolios. The two
former will be succeeded by Mr. Charles
Francis Adams and Preston King, and the
latter by John W. Forney.
GENERALS TO BE MUSTERED OUT.
A number of Generals will be mustered
out of the service in a week or two. It is
thought only about fifteen Major Gener
als, sixty Brigadier Generals and 150 Col
onels will be letained.
There is a report here that the President
has ordered a general jail delivery of all
political and State prisoners in Old Capitol,
Fort Warren and Fort McHenry.
General Grant announces that the head
quarters of our armies will be in Washing,
ton.
FROM NEW ORLEANS.
says:
Letters from New Orleans allege there are
indications of a junction of tbe pro-slavery
Union men there with the secession
sympathizers against the unconditional
anti-Union party. This is represented to
be the probable status of political parties
throughout the South.
FROM WASHINGTON.
Secretary Usher has concluded not to
leave Washington until the termination of
his official career, when he will be suc
ceeded by Senator Harlan. ; '
The Times' special says that President
Johnson will not take up his residence in
the White House nntil it Is thoroughly
painted and re-furnished.-" It is not ex
pected that this work will be completed
till the first of July.
COMING NORTH.
The Herald's Richmond correspondent
. ..
says more citizens of Virginia contem
plate moving North from the impression
that they can enjoy more freedom here
than there. They believe that being here,
mixed in the general population, they
would enjoy privileges accorded to all, and
not be made special objects of attention by
the authorities : while they apprehend per
secution there to some extent in the tights
and
EXCHANGE COMMISSIONER ARRESTED.
Captain Hatch, the rebel assistant agent
under Judge Ould for the exchange of
prisoners, has been arrested and committed
to Libby prison upon charges of the
gravest character 'concerning the affairs ot
both Union and rebel prisoners ot war re
cently under bis jurisdiction.
WADE WOULDN'T SURRENDER.
The World's R tleigh special says that
Wade Hampton was the only rebel officer
who declined to be included in the surren
der. Ha notified Johnston to that effect,
and the latter promptly relieved him and
appointed Gen. Baker, who immediately
accepted and surrendered all Hampton's
cavalry. Hampton, it is thought, joined
Jeff DaviA and Breckinridge, and with
them is believed to be making his way to
Mexico.
MONUMENT TO LINCOLN.
WASHINGTON, May 2.
An association has been formed here for
the purpose of erecting in this city a suita
ble monument to the memory of the late
President Lincoln. They propose to raise
$100,000, limited from $1 to $10 per indi
vidual contributions. Such is the general
solicitude to contribute for such a purpose,
that it is not doubted but that the amount
required can be promptly raised and the
monument erected. Persons throughout
he country desiring to contribute, are in
vited to send their contributions to the
treasurer of tbe association, G. W. Biggs.
COURT MARTIAL.
The court martial, of which Major Gen.
Friber is President, now in session here
for the trill of B. G. Harris, member of
Congress from Southern Maryland, who is
charged with persuading rebel soldiers not
to take the oath of allegiance, and urging
them to return South and fight again as
soon as exchanged, will not, it is under
stood, be dissolved upon the conclusion of
bis trial, but will be continued for the
trial of Booth's accomplices.
THE PLOT TO BURN PHILADELPHIA.
The Star of this evening says cir
cumstances under which the plot to burn
Philadelphia was discovered are as follows:
On Friday evening last Sergeant A. P.
M'.-Kinny at the 6th wharf discovered two
suspicious looking individuals lurking
about. On Saturday evening these two
men again made their appearance at
tho wharf, when the Sergeant seeing them
conversation got close enough t j hear
one of them enquire of tiie other, "Do
you think tbey will meet to-night?" Tbe
reply was not heard, and the men again
started off. Sergeant McKinney overtook
them. One of the men seeing they were
followed drew a pistol and fired at the Ser
geant the ball Viking effect in his right
breast, and the men made their escape.
Fergeant McKiar.ey discovered a letter
upon the ground, wh ch the man who
fired tho Bhot had pnHed from his pocket
with the weapon. Tnis lutter ,sent to
Coidinghain, revealed a deliberate plot to
burn PLiladelphia, in wtich a large num
ber of coaspirators were to take a part.
Colonel Ingham immediately dispatched
ffieers to the railroad station, where it was
ascertaind that men answering the
description of those who had assailed the
sergeant had taken passage on the train a
few minutes before. Information of the
discovery of the plot was then telegraphed
toGoneral Cadwalador at Philadelphia.
Facts are within the knowledge of the au
thorities which show there are some 800
conspirators banded together for the pur
pose of burning Philadelphia and other
Northern cities. Tbe affair is undergoing
thorough investigation.
War Department, "1
Washington, April 29, 18G5.
ORDER RESCINDED.
The Executive order of January 20th,
1865, prohibiting the exportation of hay is
rescinded from and after the first day of
May 1865.
By trdr of tbe President,
EDWIN M. STANTON
Secretary of War.
Treasury Department, 1
' Washington, May 1, 1865
In pursuance of the terms of the above
order, all restrictions heretofore placed, by
this Department, on the exportation of
hay are hereby removed.
H McCULLOCH
Secretary of tbe Treasury.
MR. SEWARD'S CONDITION.
WASHINGTON, May 2—9 A. M.
To K. M. Stanton, Secretary of
fc'iR: I have the honor to report that the
Secretary of State is feeling very well this
morning. Mr. Frederick Seward's condi
tion is more encouraging.
Very respectful ly,
Your ob't servant,
J. K. BARNES.
Surgeon General.
WASHINGTON, May 2—9 P. M.
Hon. E. M. Stanton :
I have the honor to report that Secre
tary Seward has had an apparatus put to his
lower jaw to-day, which promises to an
swer the required purpose.
Mr. F. Seward is quite as well as at last
report Very respectfully, &c
J. K. BARNES.
Surgeon General.
GENERAL GRANT.
PHILADELPHIA, May 2.
General Grant arrived in this city this
afternoon and went to Burlington. He
will return to-morrow with his wife, to
take possession of the splendid mansion
presented him by Philadelphians.
7:30 LOAN.
PHILADELPHIA, May 2.
Subscriptions to the 7:30 loan to-day
amounted to $5,231,100. The largest
Western subscription wag $100,000, from
Cincinnati. There were 3,652 individual
subscriptions. ''
GALLAGHER'S EXCHANGE.
Gold 141; 5-20 a, 106; New ditto, 103.
New Yo Central, 6 J; Erie, 74;
Hudson) ; Beading' ; . Michigan
Southern' ; Illinois Central 116J; Pitta
burg, 72 ; Bock Island 86; Northwester j
30; do preferred ' -Fort Wayne, ;
Ohio and Mississippi certificates 80 ; Cum
berland 46 J; Quicksilver 62, Canton 40;
Mariposa, 13.
Stocks active and irregular, but im
proved a little after call. Goldnot active;
closed as above.
??a
Yesterday Evening's Edition.
VARIOUS ITEMS.
NEW YORK, May 2.
The Herald's correspondent says Davis
remained in Danville six days under the
greatest suspense, failing to hear from Lee
who was expeoted to reach that place, and
maae tne disunion nver nis line of defence.
The news of his surrender finally came,
brought in by scouts, but was disbelieved.
It was kept secret however as lone as pos
sible, and when it became known there
was a panic. The next morning there
was a general exodus. Stonemen s men
were between Danville and Greensboro,
and they hred on the train tbat carried
Davis and his cabinet away.
The Herald's correspondent says the ar
mies of Georgia and the Tennessee, com
manded respectfully by Generals Slocum
aad Howard, weie under orders on the
2dth ult. to move north via Richmond to
Alexandria, where they will be disbanded
or sent to more important and active fields
of tbe rebellion, it any can be said to exist
The Time's Washington special says in
the further progress of the prelimiuary
examinations as to the assassination con
spiracy, arrests are constantly being made,
aud thus far the whole number tiken in
custody will reach nearly three hundred.
Tbe trial of these conspirators will be
commenced, however, before a military
Commission, and if on this hearing the
same facts are brought out that have ben
disclosed in the preliminary examination
the magnitude of the plot will astoniah
the whole country.
It is not true, as reported that Harrold
has been tried. His trial is sat for to-morrow.
Lieutenant Doberty, who commanded
the detaehment of the 16ih New York
Cavalry that assisted in the capture of
Booth, has been promoted to a Captain
by commusion ot the Governor ot New
iork.
The Herald's Buenos Avres correspond
ence, of March llth, reports very fully the
concJudingsuenes of tbe war between braz 1
and UniKuay, and also furnishes a codv of
the Peace Convention concluded at Mont
eviedo by virtue of which ireneral Floras
was inaugurated Provincial President of
Uruguay. Buenos Ayree still maintained
hxr course in the path of social progress
and solid improvement
The Herald's Washington special says
Chief Justice Chaae has gone South to re
organize the United Slates Court
i.he Times Charleston correspondent
says: Gov. Aiken was arrested by order
ot Jrresident J obnston, and that arrest Was
based upon his refusal to take the oath of
allegiance.
The World's Washington special says:
It is understood that Seward, blanton and
Wellua have indicated a desire to be, re
lieved of their positions by the 1st of July.
The two former will probably bj succeeded
by Charles Francis Adams and Pieston
King and the latter by J. W. Forney.
The World's Washington special says
Wade Hampton was the only General wno
refused to be included in Johnston's sur
render. Johnston promptly relived him
by putting General Baker in command of
all his cavalry. Hampton went off with
Davis and breckenndee, who are trvinz to
reach Mexico it is thought
FROM SAN FRANCISCO.
SAN FRACISCO, May 1.
papers hanging
fifteen horse thieves and robbers in Walla
Walla county by lynch law within a short
time. The Vigilance Committee had a liit
of 150 rcgues, who be driven out of the
country or punished.
Arizona advices, of tbe 12th of April,
mention another recent fight with the
Apache Indians, in which twelve Indians
were killed, and one soldier killed and one
wounded. The Indians flod.
Gilbert W. Hopkins, a member of the
Arizona Legislaiure; Carlos Smith, one
of the officers of that body, and several
oiher whites bad lately been murdered by
the Indians.
Tbe mining business is prosperous.
The crops in California all look well.
Depouits at the mint during last mmth
were about $225,000.
FROM SHERMAN.
NEW YORK, May 1.
The Trbune's Raleigh correspondent
gives the following description of the scene
of the last interview between Sherman
and Johnston :
Bennett's House is live mi.es beyond
Durham's Station, and about thiriy miles
from Kaleigb. The train bearing tbe union
Generals arrived at tbe house about two
o'clock P. M. Johrs'o", with Captain
Wade Hampton Jr., and Major Preston,
of his staff, with several other officers, ar
rived about half past two. After a very
civil, but not over warm greeting between
tbe officers, Johnston and Sherman held
a short private interview in a room set
apart for the conference. Meanwhile tbe
rebel officers withdrew to some distance and
remained in conversation among them
selves, and the union officers doing the
same. General Schofieid and Howard
then gained a conference which lasted
about one hour. Wada Hampton be ng
relieved from command was not present,
neither was Breckinridge. Tneir arms
and munitions of war are to be delivered
to our officers at Greensboro.
FOREIGN NEWS.
NEW YORK May 2.
The Scotia from Liverpool on the
via Queer s town on the 23 j, has arrived.
Consols t0Ja!l for money.
Tbe Czarwitch continues dangerously ill
at Nice.
Tne Czar passed through Par's and had
an interview with Napoleon.
The Mexican loan is highly imc:essfjl.
Bourse heavy.
Liverpool, April 22. Cotton buoyant
at an advance of 1 and in some cases more
for American.
Breadstuff) quiet and steady.
Provisions quiet
The Advertiser asserts tbat on tbe re
ceipt of the news of the fall of Richmond,
Napoleon proposed to Lord Cowley, Britith
Ambassador, that England and France
should by treaty, offensive and defensive,
make a common cause, and assist each oth
er with all land and sea forces in the
event of an attack on either Canada or
Mexico. The Advertiser denonnces the
scheme, and trusts enquiry will be made
into it on the reassembling of Parliament
This statement must be taken for what it
is worth, as it is not referred to by any
other journal. The blief in the struggle
being over in the South continues to gain
mound.
American securities and even cotton are
very buoyant and active in anticipation of
peace.
The Army and Navy Gazette thinks it
impossible that organized resistance oan
be prolonged.
Tbe rumors of a reconstruction of the
Cabinet are decidedly premature. Very
prabably Mr. Stanton may withdraw from
the Cabinet. Possibly Messrs. Seward and
Welles may do so, though our diplomatic
relations are still, and for some time to
come will be, so intricate that we cannot
well afford to spare Mr. Seward. But the
statement that Mr. King, or Mr. Adams,
or Mr. Forney or any body else will take
seats in the Cabinet, is the merest specu
lation.
A New Clock.
At a meeting of the Society
Sciences of Versailles, M. Jeannon pre
sented a clock, which requires to pe wound
but once a year; and It appears that, with
out making the clock to dinar irom one oi
the ordlnarv kind, he could construct it to
go for a much longer period, ite does nos
chancre the mechanism; the pendulum is
merelv reulaced bY' a horizontal lever,
which is- made to oscillate by the torsion of
an elatic metallic wire suspended verti
cally. In the clock presented to the Socle'.
the lever makes one osculation in six
seconds: bv varvinfr the dimensions of the
lever and of the elastic wire, tbe length
the oscillation is changed. Tare simplicity
of the contrivance is said to exceed any
thing hitherto kaoynu&Mnnjw Jmvkw,
The Vastest Lady in Paris.
The correspondent of the Mon
treal Herald tells as that the Princess Met
ternich, one of -the ugliest and wittiest
woman of the day, with a passion for ec
centricities of every kind, and going every
where, even into tha least prop r places,
though invariably accompanied by her
husband. Is always inventing some new
piece of witty nonsense, or contriving
some new piece of extravagance. Her
great delight at the present time is to sin?;
all the son ge of tha famous Theresa. She
has taken tifUen lessons ef the prpular
diva Cafe Alcazar, and flatters herselt that .
she surpasses her teacher in her own pecu
liar Jrto. '
"I put ten times nore Billingsgate into
Theresa's songs than Theresa at.rse!f I" tna
Princess has more than once triumphantly'
declared to her intimates.
Both the eccentric Highness herself and
her husband are first-rate musicians, com
pose a good deal, and often play together.
The other day a highly accomplished and
popular professor of the Sorbonne wag.
dining with them, tbe lively sallies of tha
Princess making the two or three guests '
laugh so much that they could hardly do
justice to the veryrecArJi dinner. When
they left the dining-room the Princess .
called to her husband, who had sat down
to write a note at a side-table in tbe first
drawing-room, where they had assembled :
" Riccaid 1 let us play our last waltz for
the Professor I" and suiting thi action to . .
the word, she seated herselt at tbe piano.
. The Prince, who adores his wife, and al
ways does what she wants, laid down his
pen, and took his seat at a second piano, in .
the nextroom (they have eight drawing
rooms opening one out of the other, with si
piano in each and an organ in two of tbem)
and tbe ptir played their last coin position
in magnificent style, on the two piane s. The
Princess declaring that the wans was such
a delightful one to waltz that there was no
resisting it, jumping from the music-stool, '
and imitating the movement of waltzing
as well as she could with turning, playing
away all the time, with the utmost brii
lianee and peruision. After this, tha two
played various other pieces, mostly of their
own composing, and all of high merit, and
splendidly performed. They are said to be
the most worshipingcouplealive, and worJC
together at everything they take in hand ,
mu ic, painting, or the writing of littla
plays. Whenever their friends venture to
remonstrate with her on the extraordinary
toilettes she delights in sporting, the ex
travagant things she does, and the im
proper places sne is so fond of going to, she
invariably replies: "But what is life good
for, if one must not amuse onesoti c
There's nothing I eri y half so much aa
astonishing people, and making them open,
their serious eyes. And as for the things I
do, and the places I go to, pray where's the
barm, when Kichard is always wim me i -
Enoch Arden in Iowa.
An Iowa paper has the following story,
which recalls tbe irat': dents of Tennyson's
poem:
Thirty months ago a German, living oa
White street, in Dubuque, Io a, volunteer
ed with the Twenty-first Iowa infantry
and went to the war. We shall cll him
Schmidt for short He left a wife who wast
rather good looking, quite industrious, very
frugal, and childless. Time rolled on, and
Schmidt, says the the Dubuque Tim's, went
with his retimentto vicksbursr. 1 here ha
was shot one day and was left for dead on
the field. The sad intelligence was sent ta
his wife by his captain, and she immediate
ly obtained the assistance of a lawyer, se
cured his back pay and a widow's pension.
She drew tbe latter regularly, aud, with,
what she earned, managed to live comfort- .
ably. In a few months she attracted the
attention of one Schones, a miller by occu
pation. Ha wooed and won, and for him
she gave up the pension. They ware mar
ried last summer. The course of true love
ran smooth with them until last Saturday -morning,
when, just after they bad finish
ed breakfast Mr. Schmidt, the first hus
band, opened tbe door and walked in I
Mere was a nxl Mrs. what would.
her name be in such a case? shrinked: ,
Mr. Schones turned pale and trembled, for
Schmidt looked vengeance after he had
surveyed the scene a moment and takn all
meaning in. After several minutes of
silence, Schones revived, and boldly asked,
What is to be done - Schmidt sat down
and told his sterv. He was wounded, not
severely, near Vicksburg, and taken pris
oner, and the rebe.s carried him away with,
them. From time to lime he had been in .
Southern prisons until thre9 weeks since,
when be was exchanged. Ho came to
Dubuque as soon as he could, and haa toned
to his home. He received no intimation of
his wife's marriage until he entered the
house that morning. As he concluded his
story, his feelings overcame him, ho wept,
and she wept also. But it all ended in the
second husband's refusal to give tbe wife
up. She, we are informed, refused to ex- .
press a preference, and said the two men
might settle the matter between them
selves. For four days both men kept very
clo.-e to the house, and had many ardent
discussions over their difficulty. But the
matter ended on Wednesday last The
returned husband offered Schones twenty
five dollars to evacuate the premise and
leave him in possession of " Annie." He
accepted tha olfor, pocketed thai money and
left Schmidt is now with his wife.
Enoch Arden in Iowa. Secession of Revolution?---England's
Last Hope in Disunion.
[From the London Times April 17.]
. We must now wait for what
othing but time can teach us the solu
tion of the great problem of secession.
Has this terrible drama been simply a war.
or is it a revolution ? If it is a war, tha
end must be near if, indeed, it has not
been reached already for, beyond tbe
feeble force under Johnston at Raleigh and
the remnant of the Richmond garrison un
der Lee, the South has no organized ar
mies in tbe field, nor is it probable that any
can be raised. The stage cf the great
struggle has been accomplished. The:
North, by its determined will, and lately.
it should be added, by the excellence of it
generals, has overcame the South, has de- .
f eated its armies and occupied its principal
towns. It has had far greater difficulty in
doing so than was at first anticipated, and
it appeared, indeed, at times, as if even
this portion of the work could never be ac
complished at all. But if the exhaustion
consequent on this protracted struggle
should teiminate the resistance of the
South altogether, it may be fortunate for
the North that Richmond was not captur
ed till the fifth year ot the war. When.
President Davis declared that it Richmond
were taken the war could be prolonged for
twenty years in Virginia aloe e, he was
ipeculating, perhaps, on resources which:
five desperate campaigns may have fatally
reduced. The confederacy, which for fiver.
years has proved so unexpectedly strong
and resolute, may now prove unexpectedly
powerless and desponding. In that event
the work of the North will be easy ; but if
we have now arrived at the end, not of at
war, but of the first stage of a political rev
olution, the real troubles of the North are
but just beginning. A few more months!
will disclose tne scene, anuit wouio De use.
less to anticipate the spectacle by conjec
ture or prediction. We can only admire
the heroism ot the comoatants while we
deplore the carnage; but what so dreadful
a strife may ultimately bring forth it is
impossible to imagine.
of
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Is a First-Chus Borate, t Safety, Comfort
and Speed, to all Eastern (Jities.;
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sea. ' are to au bsums as isw as .Bv as sttegj
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Bejrrsa Cheeked Throajrh and Transferred Tree; "
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REVOLVING BUTTKftDISHEa
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