OCR Interpretation


Anti-slavery bugle. (New-Lisbon, Ohio) 1845-1861, May 04, 1861, Image 4

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83035487/1861-05-04/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THE ANTI-SLAVERY BUGLE.
Woman's Rights.
REPORT OF THE GENERAL AGENT FOR
OHIO.
To the Eleventh National Woman's Rights Convention.
tion.'.
' What abundant reason h we to congratulate
ourselves, tod each oilier, oo ever; returning
Anniversary upon Ibe success of our Woman's
Rights movement! When woman came forward
few jeare ago Kith timid step, and laid la bumble
.tone, "I'ltaie, giod eiri give Da a cbince to livel
We have hands to work, and heads la plan, and
will share with our brother in useful and noble
pursuits," how the world sneered! and said jou
bave onscxtd yourselves, and Young America
stood at the earners of the streets to add its' petty
lotult to tbe general confusion! But what cared
they who had taken the gauge of tbeir own powers,
wbo bad discerned tbe appropriate orbit of tbeir
own soul? Tiiey said, ''We know our business
best" tbey trampled the old time deapotitm into
lb dust; and furcod tho tyrant custom down nt
tbeir bidding. They entered upon new fields of
induitrj and enterprise; they engaged in some ol
tbe professions, and more extensive!; in Ibe Arts;
and many evocations to which the; had never ap
plied themselves began to claim tbeir serious at
tention. Their life was enlarged, their whole be
ing elevated by earnest thought and labor, and
holy purposo. They soon oonquered a position fur
woman such at she bad never occupied before.
All olasses of society are now pervaded by the
iuflutnee of ibis agitation, and this success. Tbe
young man begins to ask why be should lax him
self to support a sister io idleness. Fathers begin
to see that while the egs demands accomplish
ments for thoir daughters, it demands also practi
cal common sense, and noble aims to give charac
ter to tbeir life. SoLool-girle are already chcosing
for themselves occupations and professions for the
future. Even the votary of fashion, who revels
- in wealth and luxury, has been led to inquire, why
tbe stupid dolt that drives ber coach should make
iaws for ber. Legislators have inclined a gentle
ear to oar complaints, and wisely enacted ealutary
tatutes to aid us in our pursuits, and lessen tbe
disadvantages to which we wero exposed. Unrea
sonable indeed would it be to expect more rapid
progress.
Not uf the general aspeats of tbe Cause, how
ever, is it now my purpose to write, but to furnish
report of the work done in Ohio tbe pasf season.
It was announced at the last Anniversary that
such work was contemplated, and in accordance
with the provisions then made, it has been prose
cuted, though under considerable embarrassment.
Tbe Presidential canvass engrossed the publio at
tention she forepart of the bo&soo, and the seces
sion movement was of a still more absorbing' na
ture at a later period. Still, it was deemed best!
not to delay tbe work, nor subsequently to abandon
it.
It is difficult to tell when or how this idea
human equality first took to itself form and pur
pose ia this Slate with reference to tho inferior po
sition of woman. As in all movements of a simi
lar character, doubtless a multitude bad been
made to feel from Iheir own experience, end their
own fettered aspirations i tbe injustice that was
mefed out lo bur sex, beforo there bad been
publio expression of its enormity. This Is
the secret of the earnest response wuictt a
idea elicits. In 1849 Mrs. Elizabeth Wilson
Cadix, published "A Scriptural view of Woman's
Bights and Duties," which very happily,
quite fully icaugurated the present enterprise.
Single banded and alone, Ibe entered Ibe strong,
cjt fortress in hich tbe enemy of our claims
ever Intrenched himself; and to the utter discom
fiture of every foe,' she triumphantly demonstrated
tbe Bible equality of man and woman in all
relations of rife social, politioal, and religious.
Ouf first Convention was held ia 1850, at Salem.
It was called eod conducted by Mrs. Emily Rob
inson, with euch aid as sbe could enlist. It
largely attended, and entirely successful. A high
ly favorable and lengthy report, found Its
into the New York Tribune, several speeches
published in full in Journals, both East
West, and the proceedings of the Convention
widely in pamphlet form. All this made
a very strong impression upon the publio mind,
and even from tbe Old World, wo received
and sympathy for tbe valiant words
had spoken. Subsequently, conventions were
annually for several years; and through tbe
efforts of Mrs. Robinson, Mrs. Cage,
Wilson, Mrs. Tilden, and mauy others, the Legis
lature was petitioned from year to year, for a
of legal and political wrongs. At a later
ried. the iodofutigable exertions of Mrs. Adeline
T. Swift, sustained the interest and tbe agitation,
in such portions of the Stale as she could
At the fruit ol her labor, many thousands' or
pleading for equality, have been prcsonted to
General Assembly, whioh labor has been continU'
ed to tbe present lime.
Our last effjrt, of which I am now more partiou
Inrly to speak, was commenced early in tbe
by extensive correspondence to enlist sympathy
and aid ia behalf of petitions. As toon at
could get tbe public ear, several lecturing
were called luto tbe field; and tbey did most
cient service, both with tongue and with pen.
One of these, was Mrs. C. J. II. Nichols of
tas, formerly of Vermont; and perhaps co
was ever better qualified for field labor than
Ever ready, and vo faithful, in publio and
private, and ever capable too, whether disaussing
the condition of woman with the best informed
members of the legal profession, or striving at
fireside nf some indolent and ignorant sinter,
whose best energies "death' is creeping like
nnlimoly frost," to awaken In ber heart a
for that which is truly noble and good,
; Of another of our agentsMrs. Collar of
equally as much can be said of her
(and bee efficiency, Ilaving . been
widely acquainted with tbe sorrowful experienees
of women, both abroad and in our own country,
wbisb have been eaused by their inferior position,
and by legal disabilities! and lamenting too,
only great and elevated natures can, tbe
week of tree,' noble womanhood in the
circles of society, a necessity Is thus laid upon
to d. ell ia . be power to lift both elasset
freer, better life. ' '' - 1 "'
Mrs.; f rentes f. Gage ef Ohio, deeply interested
herself io this question io the1 beginning, and
never failed in faithful testimony, and timely
to promote jits eooess.f Although tnoi identified
with us n ad agent, yet mi had ber active co-op-ereiiow
during -the camrtigi. - Her editorial
nection with tbe Tress, and Tier Lectures on
(Wetloaiac Islands, gave her abundant opportu
nity, wbioh sbe did not fail to .embrace, of
latiog petitions and advocating tbe Cause to
bt hat to largely given be energies.;!,; 7
Beside the General Agent, feee tiia wee
between correspondence. Meoturios. and
'
of
any
ever
new
ol
and
bad
tbe
was
way
were
and
cir
culated con
gratulations we
held
ear
nest Mrs.
re
dress pe-
reach.
names
the
we
agents
effi
Kan
person
the
in
the
over
an
desire
Illi
nois qualifi
cations very
as
general details of the movement, there were other
aod most efficient worker), especially in canvass
ing for sinature's. We are indebted to Mrs. Anno
1C Rjder, of Cinoinnati, for much labor in this
direotiun; and also to Mre. Howard of Columbus
for similar service. Miss Oly mpia Browa, a gradu
ate of Antioch College, canvassed several towns
most successfully adding thousands of names to
the lists heretofore obtained. Equally tealous
were women! and men also, io various sections of
the State. By means ol this hearty ooperation,
both branches of the Legislature were flooded with
Woman's Rights potitious during tbe forepart of
tho cession a thousand and even two thousand
names were presented at a time.
Our main object this year, as heretofore, has
been to secure personal, property, and parental
rights, novcr ignoring, however, Ibe right to legis
late for ourselves. We were fortunate in tho com
mencement, in enlisting some of tbe leading influ
ences of the State ia favor of the movement. Per
sons occupying the highest social, and political po
sition, very fully eudorscd our claims to legal
equality, and rendered valuable aid by publio ap
proval of the same. We took measures at au ear
ly period to obtain the assistance of the Press; and
by means of this auxiliary our work has been
mure fully reoognized, and more generally appro
ciated than it could otherwise have been. With
out exoeption tbe leading Journals of the State
hate treated our Cause with consideration, and
generously commended tbe efforts of its agontt
So numerous were tbe petitions, and to largely did
tbey represent tbe best constituency of tbe State,
that the Commiiteet in whose hands tbey were
placed, felt that by all just Parliamentary usage,
tbey were entitled to a candid consideration. Ac
cordingly they invited several of us who had been
prominent, to defend our own Cause ia tbe Sen
ate Chamber, before tbeir joint Committee and
such of the General Assembly and of the public,
as might oboose to come and listen. From the re'
ports of the numerous letter-writers that were
preeent, I will plaoe one extruct only opon record.
"The Senate Chamber was filled to overflowing
to bear Mrs. Junes, Cutlor and Gage, and bun
d-eds went away for want of a place to eland
Columbus has seldom seen so refined and intelli
gent an audience, as that which gathered round
those earnest women, who had none of tbe charm
of youth or beauty to challenge admiration, but
whose head', were already sprinkled with the frosts
of Ufa's winter. Earnest, truthful, womanly,
riobly cultivated, by tbe experieuoos of practical
iii'e, those women, mothers, and two of them
grandmothers, pleaded for tbe right of womaa to
tbe fruit of ber own genius, labor or skill, and for
tbe married mother her right to be the joint guar
dian of ber own uflspring.
"I wish I could rjve you even the faintest idea
of tbe brilliancy uf the sccno, or tbe splendor of
tbe triumph achieved over tbe legions of prejudice,
tbe cohorts of injustice, aod the old national
guard of boary conservatism. If tbe triumph of
a Prima Donna is something to boast.what was the
triumph of these toil-worn women, when not only
the members of the sommittee, but. Senators and
Members of the House, crowded around them with
congratulations and assurances tbat tbeir ablo and
earnest arguments bad fully prevailed, and the
prayers of tbeir petitioners must be granted.", :--
lhe addrest of the Bret speaker wae a written
argument on rights, it vd solicited
members of tbe General Assembly for publication,
and distributed over the State at tbeir expense.
It will be seen tborefore, that in some respeots
the seed time was propitious we were able
turn to our account many agencies that had heretofore
been arrayed against ue. The harvest con
sequently was full of promise. The change
public centimeot, the marked favor with whioh
our Cause began to be regarded in tbe Judicial
and Legislative departments, encouraged us
hope that if equal and exact justice were not es
tablished, wbioh we could hardly expect,
bould, at least, obtain legal equality in many
particulars. The Senate Committee soon reported
a Bill, drafted by one of tbeir number Judge
Key and fully endorsed by all tbe Judgce of
Supreme Court, securing to tbe married woman
be use of her real estate, and the availa of
own separate labor, together with such power
protect hor property, and do businese in her
name ae men possess. Tbe last provision
stricken out, and the Bill thus amended passed
both' Houses, the Senate by a very large majority.
Although this secures to us property rights
measure only, yet it ia a great gain. He, who,
abject bondage, has striven with his fetters,
joices to have the smallest amount of tbeir weight
removed. We bave therefore, reason to be grate
ful not only for the benefits we shall de.-ive
this Act, but lor the evidence of a growing
of justice on the part of those who claim
tbemseives the exclusive right to legislate Sena
tor Parish bad already prepared a Bill for Guar
dianship, and to change tbe Laws of Descent,
that something more than a paltry dowor should
be secured to the widow in the common estate;
the press of business, and the sudden commence'
meot of open hostilities between the North
the 5utb, precluded all possibility of further
islation in our behalf. While Judge Key has
servediy leceivea universal toanks Iroru tbe
men of Ohio fur proposing and carrying tbrcugb
tbe Legislature the Properly Bill, tbey are no
indebted to tbe lion. Mr. Parish for, his faithful
defence of tbeir Cause, not only during the
session, but io years past. If all the honora
ble Senators and Representatives, who have
iheir influence in lav or of it, were to be mention
ed, and all tbe faithful men and earnest women
who bave labored to promote it, the list would
long ana aistinguienea. 1
In view then of tbe past, aod tbe glorfous
peat lor woman in tbe future, let ue lenew
xeal, and pledge Io each otter untiring fidelity
the great principles ef human freedom aod equal
ity. While the civil war, now inaugurated,
continue, other interests must neoessarily be
but should this strife at leogth result
reeonairuolion of tbe government, let us not
in that day, what it due to woman.
J. ELIZABETH JONES.
THE CHOICE.
has
word,
con
the
airou.
which
')
di
wiisl the
to every man and nation
Comes tbe moment to decide
Io the strife of truth with falsehood
For the good or evil side!
New occasions teach new duties,
' Time makes ancient good uncouth,
' Tbey most upward still, and onward,
Wbo would keep abreast ol Tama. -Lu!
before us gleam ber watoh-firesl
' We ourselves must pilgrims be;
l Launch eui Mayflower and stser boldly'
Tbrocgh tbe desperate winter's ! ,.,
Nor attempt tbe Future's portal ' . :,
' With Ibt Patl'i blood-iutted key! -
Miscellaneous.
For the Anti-Slavery Bugle.
THE CRY FOR FREEDOM.
BY MARCIA M. BASSETT.
There's a cry for help borne on Ibe breeze,
And wafted through the lind,
'Tie borue o'er the rivers, the mountains, the teas,
Aod the desert's glistening sand. .
It comes from the South where slavery reigns,
And men are eager for gold,
Where tbe "image of God" ie bound in chains,
And to bis "brother," man is told.
It comes from Afrio's far off there
Wbon the proud ship sails away, .
For it is filled with those wbo'nevsr more.
Through their native groves shall stray.
That cry comes up from tbe ship's dark holds,
As it sails o'er the waters blue;
But appeals in vain, to the iron hearts,
Of that demon-sailor crow.
How long, Oh Lord! shall tbat cry for belp, .
Be wafted to our ears,
Or tbe graves of martyred freemen,
Be drenched with blinding teart.
YANKEE INQUISITIVENESS DEFINED.
by
Lever never penned anything better than his
Yankee Quakinboss'e advice to the English tourist
" 'Here's bow it is,' said he at last. 'Our folk
isn't your folk because they speak the same lan
guage. In your country your station or conditions
or whatever you like to call it, answers for you,
and the individual man merges into tbe class be
belongs to. Not so here. We don't caro a red
cent about your rank, but we want to know about
yourself! Now you strangers mistake, all that
feeling, and call it impertinence, and. curiosity
and such like, but it ain't anything of the kind!
No, sir. It simply means what sort of knowledge,
what art, or science, or labor, can yuu contribute
to tbe common stock? Are you a-coming amongst
us to make ue wiser, or richer, or thriftier, or god-
lierf or are your a loafer n mere loafn? My
asking you on a rail car whence you come and
whore you're goin', ie no more impertinence than
my inqnirin' at a store whether they bave got an
article, or tbut 1 want to know whether you and I,
ae we journey' together, can prufit each other?
whether either of us mayn't have something the
other has never heard afore? lie can't have trav
elled very far in life who hasn't picked up many
an improvin' thing from men be didn't know tbe
names of; aye, and learned many a sound lesson
besides of patience, or'contcntment, forgiveness,
and the like; and all that aiu't so easy if people
won't be sociable tog.Hherl"
" 'After all,' said he, drawing a long breath
like one' summing up tho pith of a discourse,
you're goin' to pick holes in Yankee coats Io see
all manner of things to criticise, condemn, !ind
sneer at; if you're satisfied Io describe a people
by a fow peculiarities -which are not pleasin.
you, go ahead and abuse us; but if you'll aocopt
honest hospitality, though offered in a way that's
new to you if you'll believe in true worth and
genuine loyalty of ehaiacter, even though its pos
sessor talk somewhat through his nose then,
I say there ain't no fear that America will disap
point you, or that you'll be ill-treated by Ameri
cans.
From the Liberator.
THE PRO-SLAVERY PULPIT.
in
to
we
the
ber
to
own
was
Yt claim to be, and proudly call yourselves
The servants of the meek and bumble Lord,
His ministers, expounders of his word;
Yet, is not the pnor slave, who humbly delves
Beneath tbe diiver's whip, whom none afford
Kindness, or pity, in the truth-clear eyes
Of him who bade bis followers leave land,
House, wealth, nay, even far dearer household
' lies, band
Brother, wife, child, breaking life's strongest
Rather than brsah bis true, life-giving laws
Js not tbat helpless slave nearer to him,
Although bis lamp nf knowledge buro but
Than such as will not, for a righteous cause,
Yield at Christ's call riches, and man's applause?
Tentcrden, Eng. . Jane Asiiur,
SMUGGLING.
io
re
from
sense
for
but
and
leg
oe
wo
less
pres
ent given
be
'
pros
our
to
shall
for
gotten; in a
for
get, A Paris letter writer thus describes some of
prizee in a museum of contraband articles,
Io a large, dirty room are eoattercd over
floor, oo the walls, aod all over tbe ceiling, all
inventione of roguery whioh had been confiscated
from time to time, by those guardians of tbe
the revenue officers.
It ie a complete arsenal of the weapons of smug
gling, all, unfortunately in complete confueion.
Look before you; there is a hogshead dressed
up as a nurse, with a child that holds two quarts
and a half. Oo the other side, are two logs, -
low ae tbe Trojan horse, and filled with armies
cigars. Oo the floor liee a huge boa constriotor,
gorged with China silk ; and just beyond
pile of coal, perforated witb apools of cotton,
A colored gentleman met his fate under
following circumstances: He was built of
pa;nted black, and stood like a kej-duck of Ethio
pian chasseur oo the foot board of a carriage,
tened by bis feet and bands. Ue bad frequently
passed through tbe gatea. and was well known
sight to tbe soldiers wbo notioed that he was
showing teeth which they supposed to
the custom of the country.
One day, the carriago he belonged to was
ped by a crowd at Ibe gate. There was as
a grand chorus of yells and oaths, the vooal
being performed by Ibe drivers and cartman,
tbe instrumental by Iheir whips. The
however, never spoke a woid. His good
delighted, tbe soldiers, who held him up
an example to the orowd.
l- - t .L't, , tf ..... . -
- noon at uio uiaca leiiow, tony tried, '
bow well he behaves! Bravo nigger'' ,
He showed a perfect indifference to tbeir
plause. ..
"My friend," said the clerk at a barrier, jump
ing upon the foot-board, aod slapping our
friend oo the shoulder, "we ate really aiuob
lo you," . ., . . i f , i
Ob, the eurprisel the shoulder rattled.
officer waa bewildered; be sounded the footman
all over, aod he wae made of metal, and a full
skin could bold of Ihe very best kiod of contraband
liquor, drawn out at bis feet, ' ., , .
Tbe juioy mortal wat teized at once and carried
off in triumph. ' ,
, The first night one of the revenue people
op one of the tbouldert and be was soon lied
death, , li is bow six yeare sines he lost Ibe
of bis system, and was rtduced la a
skeleton, '
EXPLOSION OF AN OIL WELL.
The following narration of the terriBo explo
sion or an oil well, at Titotville, Pa. it abridged
from Ibe Buffalo Courier.
"A well which bad been drilled over -two hun
dred feet by Unwley k Merrick, bad struck oil,
but tbe yield being lest than expeoted, tbe pump
ing wae abandoned, and drilling reoommenced.
Over one hundred feel further were drilled, when
at half past 5 on Wedoetday evening, a tuddoo
rush of oil through Ibe five inch and a belt tu
bing, threw out the drills and gushed up in the
air 40 feet above tbe eurface of the ground. At
the least computation it wae throwing from 0
'if
to
to 100 barrels au hour. Above this mass of oil,
the bus or benaice rosa in a cloud, for flftt or
.i.l. Cut. Am annn an tlm nil (.filnmenacd Bush-
in forth, all the fires of entices In tbe oeliibbor-
c w
hood were immediately extinguished. At aboutl
i past 7, as a large number 01 men ana loyt were
arouna tne wen engaged in eaving ine on, tuo
gas from the well whieh had spread in every di-
rection, took fire from tbe engine of a well over
400 rods distaot. whon in a eeoocd the whole air
was In a fiamo. with a crash and roar like dia-l
, c us?. .u
a . . . s. .1.1 J .F iL. :.s
assooobs tne gss 100a nre. ineueau oi .u.jo.
ot oil was in a lunous blase, ana lauing me a wa-
tcr luuntain over a epace one nunurea loot ia ui-iubusetts.
ameter, each drop of oil same down a blazing
elobule of boilinaoii. Iostantlv the ground was
a lame, constantly increased and augmented by
the falling oil. At once a scene of iodescribAblo
horror took place. Scores were thrown flat, aua
for a distance of twenlv feet, and numbers horri-
btv burned, rushed biasing from the belief
misfortune, shiieking and screaming in tbeir an-
guish.
Just within the circle of the flame, could be
seen four bodies boiling ia the seotbiog oil, and
ono man who bud been digging at a ditch to con
vey away tho oil to a lower part of Ibe ground
was killed as he dug, and could be seen, as be
fell over the baodlo of the spade, roasting in the
fierce element. Mr. II. R. Rouse of the firm of
Rouse, Mitcbel & Brown, uf the village of Enter
prise, Warron Co. a gentleman largely interested
io wells in this locality, and whose iucome from
n..m mnn,n . Sinnn . was standing near
tuviu uuw-uvh w v.vvv J I " - D
.... 1 I I... ..... r-.. K. th. .nl,.-
sion. lie got up and ran about ten or fifteen feet
further, and was drnggod out by two men, and
conveyed to a shanty some distance from the well.
When be arrived not a vestige of clothing was
left upon him except bis stockings and boots.
His hair was burned off as well as bis finger nails,
bis ears and bis evelids,' while tbe balls of bis
eves were crisped up to nothingness.
The bodies of some seven or oight persons were
taken from tbe flames. In addition to these are
the skeletons of five others visible within the cir
cle of flames, and as many are missing stran
gers, who canie to witness the operations of tbe
wells. It is supposed that a number of others
have been burned to a powder, close by the mouth
of the well.
At the time of the explosion, everything in
neighborhood sixty or seventy rods took fire,
dim,
and shanties, dorrioks, engine houses, dwellings,
were at once mvoivea in names, xne Doner
Dobb's well, 80 rods from the orignal fire, blew
'nS & tremendous exiilosioD. killine instantlv
... .... .
enir neer. weslev skinner, aaains anotuer mien-
n -
sitj to tbe evening's horror?. . At Ibis
whole air was on fire. Tbe jot of cil rushing
fortv feet wae almost a pillar of livid flame, while
tbe Has above it to tbe distanoe of a hundred feet,
flashing, exploding, dashing towards
beavens, and apparenty licking the clouds with
furious tongues of beat. All Ibis time, during
this tremendous combustion, tbe sounds of the
plosions and burnings were to tremendous
continuous, tbat they could be compared to noth
ing but tbe rushing of a hurricane or a
tornado
tlivmiirh n formik.
r
. . r ,i c . at.. a
inoneaiui lu, uco a, su .u.ou.. iuuv u
could approaoh within loO feet without ecorohing
their skin or garments. It was the most frightful,
and yet, the grandest pvrotechnical display
vouchsafed to a human being.
cm r naay morning me on was stilt rustling
on fire, with the same regularity and speed, throw
ing it was calculated et least 100 barrels an
covering an immense space with Aiming oil
Ices to tho proprietors of the well of from $20,000
to S25.C00 daily. No human power can cxtin-
the
the
the
law,
hol
nf
is a
the
tin,
fas
by
al
ways be
stop
usual,
part
and
negro,
beha
vior as
see
ap
sable
obli
ged The
as
drank
te
mois
ture dry
pui.h the flames, and the oil must burn on
" '
the well is exhausted. No pen can desoribe
. r .. .. ...
Aaab. M.mm asi tnnina nnn ivaanri l.a lha mannttiiriii
urtc.., uu v.-
of its horrors.
An Accdmmodatinq Railroad. Everybody
heard of the railroad down in Georgia, wbore
conductor was so accommodating that, when
lady passenger asked for water, he got off
train, blocked tbe wheels of the car, and went
" T""r. - H J
.-lAnired beverage. Wa have a case to match
Oo Ihe Peoria, Oquawka and Builington railroad,
they run a combioed express and etock train,
which they carry boge and humanity,
quite ae much attention to tbe former as to
latter. One day last week a poroine quadruped
escaped from tbe train at Greensbusb when
. . . . . , .
T J .- l . . n Ih.l i,rw mil Klmnnnn
UHUKaj u,lvu sun J ui.wwu,
forthwith Ibe 1 "express and stock train"
brought to a dead bait, for tbe purpose of captur
ing his swineship.-. An exciting chase of half
hour followed, in which the passengers were
out to join, when porky was run down,
turned to bis fellows, and tbe "express and
train" moved on its way. Great institution
'expre-a and etock train 1"
A Palpable Hit A few yean aince
a meeting in tbe New York City Hall Park,
political ;Wbat is it T" of the Tammany .
wat dilating very lucidly upon "the nigger,"
declared tbe sable eons of Etbiopa not to be
man, but a cross between the baboon aod
else. ' Surrounded by a crowd of roughs,
stood a stalwart mulatto. He wat i evidently
privileged character.
"I say, Jim," eaid one of tbe "Dead Rabbits,"
io a sneering tone, "I alwsys said you wasn't
hetter than a mookey. You aiot human,
. ,y
i i i in. i.
ine worus were uareiy out ui ui. , ups,
be was stretched on Ihe groond from a
movement uf tbe mulatto's arm, wbo standing
over the form of the prostrate rowdy ehouted
Wft.n'l that a huma blow, eh 1"
.
- : ..l..kl.l. 1...L J! I
ins was so paipuuie m uum uirsuuous,
that both the orowd aod Ibe fallen man laorhed
heartily.
1
Short. A lady made a complaint lo Frederick
tbe Great, King of Prussia. "Your Mujesry,"
said sbe, "my husband treats me badly." ,
"Tbat it uont of my businsss," . replied
King. ' '
"But he tptakt ill of yon," said tbe lady.
"Tba," replie J he, "it noot cf your lurinett."
ANTI-SLAVERY TRACTS.
The Traol Commlttoe of the Western Anti-Slavery
Society will furniab the following Traete on
application at M'Millan's Book-Store, Salem, Ohio.
Correspondence between Lydia Maria Child and
Governor Wise and Mrs. Mason, of Virginia, pp.
liB. o oaots
Tbe New Ricn of Terror in the Slavcholdioe
States, for 1859 nnd lbuu. pp. 144. 1U cents,
Daniel O'Connell on American Slavery) with
other Irish Testimonies, pp. 43. 8 cents,
The Riaht Wsv the Safe War. proved hy Eman
oipatlon in the. West Indies and elsewhere. By
li. Maria i;bU4. pp. vo. tu cents.
Testimonies of Cupt. John BrowO at Harper's
Ferry, with bis address to the Uourt. pp. to. acts
The Philosophy of the Abolition Movement.
&J Wendell Phlllipl. pp.47. 5 Cents,
. The Duty of DisoHdience to the Fugitive Slave
lot An Anninl In lh I .Amsl ntftrsa fit ftl Allfltintl 11'
B-L. Maria Child, pp. 30. 5 conte.
Tl)(f Infij8,ilv of Abolitionism. By Wo, Lloyd
Harrison, pp.12. 3 cents,
Speech of John Hoeeaok, convicted of a Viola
tion of the Fugitive Slave Act at Chicago, Illinois
pp. o cents.
Ahe 1'atriarchsl Institution, as described by
i I r i r ti ;i i-i w
iiueraoern ui 119 jwn rniiiy vuojuiicu vj j-j
rr-
,. . ... 0m R...Sf. l
Appeal to the People and Legislature of Masse-
pp.24, scents
Platform nf the American Anti-Slavery Society
and its auxiliaries, pp.30, d cents,
Packages containing all of the above will bo
furnished far 30 oents, or if eont by mail 45 cents.
The Postage on the Reign of Terror is o cte, on
the Right Way 3 cts.andon the othere 1 cent each
Redpath'e life of John Brown for sale a above,
price 75 cents
NEW HAT AND CAP STORE.
M, R. Robinson, offers for sale at the new
II A T STORE.
n Salem, (North side of MainStreet, four doors
hast of tho farmers Hank,)
HATS AND CAPS,
in great variety of style and material.
Call and examine his stock, end decide for your
st-ives concerning tne quality ot nis gooas, ana
""" " H1
I O 1 A If Wt lOtfV
oaniu, nprimn, iouy.
WALL AND WINDOW PAPER
Just received by
MARIUS R. ROBINSON,
At the New Hat Store, North aide Main Street
Also, a good assortment of
GAITERS, BOOTS AND SHOES.
For Ladies, Misses and Children.
Salem, Sept. 1, 1800. .
the
A large and well selected assortment, of Cheap
and lieautitul
WALL AND WISDOW PAPER,
Just received at ISAAC TRESCOIT'S.
ALL
THE YEAR ROUND.
CONDUCTED B T
CHARLES DICKENS
IN WUICU IS INCORPORATED
U JCkensH0USeh0ld WOldS
ui
upl This brilliant and beautiful periodical is issued
Ibe mootblv bv us from advance plates made in L.on
Ii4nn thtiaaAAiirini?itamihl!.AlinrwinfhA MimA ft ft
- -- t---- .- --
up anj America of over 130,000 copies of each num
ber. There was commenced in the Marob number
teries of papers entitled,
tbe
its
ex
and
Journey of the Uncommercial Traveller,
BY CHARLES DICKENS.
There was oommenced in the January number
new and brilliant story by WILIUE COLLIN
entitled:
THE WOMAN IN WHITE,
which was written fur and makes its first appear
ance in this publication. Readers who peruse
beautiful atones, sketches, etc., ol 'All The ie
I r i j . u - -...i.t! a:A va.
I UUUUU. UUUICU IUW UII1UT UUUIIUnllVUS BUVU
" lln,4Bralftn , ,hnt the- ... oni; - ,.. nf the ric
thins wllion tbe crit;re work oontaios each month
J be American edition of All the Year Koun
ever issued in monthly parts, put up in neat tinted
""""'" " ..Uw.uK
np, 0ne Conv. One Year. 3
hour,
a
Wo will furnish 'All the Yetr Round ' and
United States Journal for one vear. and a
of the 'Horse Fair,' printed in oil colore for,
We will furnish 'All Tbe Year Kound with
Horse lair,' in oil colors, lor id oU.
The work was enmmenoed in June, 1850,
until we can send it, if desired, to new eubsoribers
1 .. .. .. .
its irom tno commencement, mus giving me wnons
Charlos Dickens' great etory, A Tale of tbe
. " :
Cities,' which was concluded in the January No
Tbe First and Second volumes of 'All the
Ritnnd ' Vtrmnfl in fliihalnntinl lihrarv kinHintv
has I ror salo at $1.75 each, and will be sent bv'
the publishers to any address, post paid, on receipt
a the amount,
the EMERSON, FITCH A Co.,
to 73 Park Row, New York
IT II I
this.
ATLANTIC MONTHLY.
oo
paying Commencement of the Seventh Volume.
Ihe
The publishers of The Atlanlio Monthly
about ole in announcing that the new volume,
. commence with the number for January,
anil ... . ....
wuu
was
an
call
ed re
stock
will contain features of remarkable interest
attraotiveness. Among these, may be named,
A NEW" NOVEL
By Mrs. Harriet Beecber Stowe.
Author of 'Uncle Tom's Cabin,' and 'The Minis
ter s Wooing.'
A NEW NOVEL,
By Charles Reade, -
that Author of 'Christie Johnstone,' 'Peg Woffingtan,'
during
a
stripe
and
hu
some
thing a
Ac. Ac.
. NEW STORIES,
By Miss Harriet Prescotl
Author of 'The Amber Gods,' aod 'Sir Rohan's
Ghost.'
A NE'W ROMANCE.
By the author of 'Charles Auchester,' and 'Coun
terparts.'
Also, Contributions in Prose and Poetry, bv
Henry W. Longfellow, Nathaniel Hawthorne.
Oliver Wendell Holmes, James Russell Lowell,
Ralph Waldo Emerson, John G. Whittier, Bayard
Tavlnr, Edwin 1 Whipple, Henry Giles, Richard
U. Kimball, ueorge b. Uillard, Koae Terry,
no Dr. Bellows, Mrs, Fanny Kemble, Charlee E.
any- i?n. w'nmrop oargeut, i. w. u.ggmsin, J.
I Trowbridge, and other distinguished writers,
I maiuoi
oeiore Three Dollars ner Annum, or Twantv-Fina
sudden U Number. Upon Ibe receipt of the subscription
price, the publishers will mail the work to
. Prt of. b United States, pre-paid. Subserip-
"0D" mT .B,U w ' u "ia" ,u" r
I n ii An I nnmhni. I ha nn.fi cr H at lha A r ? n t i
M---. .. --.. -..-. iv
Tbirtv-Six Cenle a year, if nre-na id
The pages of the Atlanlio are stereotyped,
the
back numbers oao be tupplied
uiuoDing arrangements, suusoriliert to
Iheir own postage. Two copies for Five dollars;
Five copies for Ten Dollars; Eleven copiet
Twenty dollars.
Booksellers and Newsmen will obtain the
by the buodred, upso application to the
usners,
' TICKNOR A FIELDS,
1"j3 Washington Street, Bettow.
NEW GOODS IP
Just received at JACOB HEATON'S, our
THIRD FALL A WINTER STOCK OF GOODS.
The people seem to have foood out without
excess ot puffing, that tbey always fel.lbt wcrU
of their money at
THE SALEM EXCHANGE,
Where you will find one of the best selected
Stork (I GOODS tbat wat ever brought Io this
market. .
LADIES' DRESS GOOD.
You will find everything in that line, from a Risk
Brocade Silk, to a levy Delane. Call and set.
MENS' AS J) Bars' WEAK,
Every thing that Is wanted In that line, from ft
$20 Overeont, to a sixpence Pocket Knife.
MISCELLANEOUS ARTICLES,-.-..
Ladies' Clnakt, Hooped Skirts, New Fall prlos)
Dusters, Duster Cloth, Trimmings, Hats, Bonnets;
ltibbooR, l lumes, ftc, fto.
CHOICE GROCERIES, '
Carpett, and Carpet Chain, Leather and Buffale
llobet.
A SPLENDID LOT OF QL'EENSWARK,
Glassware, Knives and Forks, Hats, and Caps,-
Boots aod ohoc, &f an.
All of which will bs told on the "Nimble tii
pence," basis.
J. IltAXUIV
Salem, Nov. 3, 1800.
Kottmber, 18C0 I Abrrmltr, 18601
WINTER STOCK!!.
L. SCIIILLIX Q, cf Salem, Obie,
Are now opening their Second Larie Stotkef
oods for tbe season, embracing every variety aad
tylo of
lu inter Jjrc00 oodiv
CLOAKS A SHAWLS, UOODs Jb BONNETS,
Ladies' Furs, io Great Variety, ' ' " v
Ladies' and Misses liead Druses, ",
EMBROIDERIES and TRIMMINGS.
And every variety of Notions and Fancy Gote'e,
together with a Full Stock of '
Staple and Domestic Dry Goodt, Carpet, Ladie'
ana unilaren shoe, vtma, via, ana '
Qiteenttoare, Groceriet, Cotton Yam,
Carpet Chain. Cotton liatit, d-e. ' . '.
And in fact everything the wants of winter mar
demand. Such is our confidence in the eteve)
Stock, that we feel satisfied we can suit the waste
of customers, either in point of Styles, Quality,
Quantity or Price. -
Thankful for past favors and soliciting an early
call, wj remnin,
Yours, Truly,
. J. A L. SCHILLING).
Salem, Nov. 24, 1800. . ,
v
tbe
00
VALUABLE FARM
AT PRIVATE SALE!
Will be held at private sale, that desirable pre-
pertv situated in Knox Township, Columbiana eo..
Ohio; four and half miles south-east of Alliance,
and one-fourth mile South of the Salem and Ml.
Union road; formerly the proportv of Ilcnrv Coop
er, but more recently owned by Joshua Lee. It
contains 120 acres, 100 of which ie cleared and
in a high slate of cultivation, tbe remaining SJ9
acres being covered with timber. Tbe improve
ments consist of a large substantial brick house
two and a half stories high, ith lour rot mi c-n
floor with a large ball both up stairs and down. '
A large noarly new double decked barn witb ever
thing about it in perfect order, wagon bouse wilp
loft above and corn crib attached. Sheep house,
bog bouse, wood house, spring house, dry irk
. j . . i
oouae, oiavssmim ennp ana a tenant nouse acti
barn. These buildings are all in fine condition,
tbe most of them being nearly new, and for neat
ness and durability cani.ot be surpassed y eJ
in the neighborhood. There is alto upon tbe
property an apple orchard of 100 tiees bearing
fruit of a superior quality. Also a pooch orchard
of 300 trees just itj bearing order, a gord stone
and coal quarry, a never failing stream of water
Inch passes through the barn jard, affordmf
sufficient water for tbe stock. Besides this rna
ning stream, there is two never failing wells at
the born and two at the houso, one of which eon
tains soft and tbe oiher hard water; the differtat
enclosures are so arranged that stock can obtain
water at any time. This is a desirable property
and worthy of the attention of any one desiroaa
of purchasing; tbe land being of extra quality ana
considerably elevated, the buildings occupy a la
position nnd area short distance from tbe poMia
road. Tbe farm would be suitable either for
farming or grazing purposes, and would make
splendid country residence. It is contiguous te
schools, mills, and placet of publio worship of
various denominations. Any person wishing ta
view the premises will be shown the tame by
ur.r.141 isiiuditn, resaing toereon. .
Ihe
oopv
$4.
tbe
and
-
oi
Two
Year
tar
the
of
bave
to
1861,
.
and
Rev,
Nor-
x
Pni.
any
tubte-
and
pay
for
terms
Pub-
HARRINGTON!
Is for tale bv
M R S. H. F. M. BROWN,
288 Superior St., Cleveland, O.
Price, $1.25. Postage 25 cente.
BOOKS AT COST.
Mrs II. F. M. Brown, 288 Superior St.. la faw
doors east of the Publio Square, Cleveland,' O.,
bae Tor tale a general assortment of
ANT I-SL A VER Y BOOKSv
Among which are :
Shamab in Pursuit of Freedom. $1.25, Jamee
Redpalb'e Life of John Brown, $1 00. Helpers!
Impending Crisis, $100. Unconstitutionality e(
Slavery, by Lytander Spooner, 50 cents. Echoee
of Harper's Ferry, $1.25: and a .variety of otberC
Uooks, all of wbiob will be told 30 per cent leee.
than tbe retail price.
VARIETY k NOTIONS,;.
Having just returned from the East, I take plea-
sure in announcing' to my uumerous oustomers aasT '
tbe public, tbat I bave a large and carsfully aelee;
DRY GOODS AND NOTIONS
Please call and see my
White and Brown Muslins, Irish Linea, Fiat)
Muslin, Delane, Cashmere, Gingham, Caliee,
I White and Colored Flanel, Shawls, Mens
Under Shirte and Drawers, Wool and
i ... . .,
Zepher Hoods, Head Dresses,
FANCY HAIR PINS,"
and Shirt Fronts; '- 1
Comb and Bruthe; Embroidery, Suipenitrt,
' White,- Drab, and Blu Yarn, Silts, Oil ' '
Cloth, Uotiery, Glove, Toy, Sewing .
Bird, ' and Notion of alnxoil
. every variety.
I bava moved my Notion ani Variety te.reu
opposite the Town Hall,, and One door West ef j
Callahan's Shoe Store, where I ehell be pleased la
wait on all wbo will give me a call, ' ' ' 1
Thankful for past favorr, I still hope for a libers) '
share of publia patronage. - ' i
S. E. BARR., t
Salem, Nov. 3, 1SC0. ' ' ' .
' SALEM ' ' '
S0AP& CANDLE WORKS.
II. P. ADAM S 4 SON, -
CORNER OF MAIN AND LISBON STREET -
MANCl'ACTfRXRt Or ''
Every variety of Washing aod Toilet Potpe.eovjj
Refiued Tallow Candles. . r
tQ-Cesb paid for Tallow; Great taken In tx
change for Candles or Soap.
PsHm, Deo. 1, 1?60.

xml | txt