OCR Interpretation


Memphis daily appeal. (Memphis, Tenn.) 1847-1886, December 20, 1876, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of Tennessee

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045160/1876-12-20/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THE MEMPHIS DAILY A-PPEA.LWED3STESI3A.Y, DECEMBER SO, 1876'.
1IEIPIHS APPEA
-BT-
GAIiIuVWAY & IU2ATRTG.
crmn of HoliseripUon, Dally A. W'ecUly
D.ULT4
-ne oo pi, one meats, bi maU. 1 J0
l leeopy.one xear.hf raaH... J"
,m copy, sit months, by taall s u
ime copy, one week, in cay-
One copy, one month. In city iu
WEEKLT:
0ns copy, one rear. . 2
One jpi. six month. x x
i pednien copies seat Iree ot chare.
Our mall-bocks are kept by postoSSces, and not by
Individual names. .
I i ordering papers chanpe4 from one postoffieeto
aaoUier, me names olboUi postofflces should be
Clvcn.
llateii of AdrcrtlMlns.
iTrrf insertion, per square OO
iuUiMuent Insertion, per square
idgbt lines wild nonpareil makes one square, and
twelTe lines make one Inch.
local Notices are twenty cents per line first lnser
aon. nft4n conU per line per weelc.
Wants, ttL, arc lea cents per line Orst Insertion, and
Etc cents per line each subsequent Insertion.
Death and Marriage notices. Funeral notices and
Obituaries, are charged at regular rates.
We will not accept anj advertisement to follow read
ing matter,
first or Fourth page advertisements, statlonaiTi
double rates.
All Advertising Bills tor amounts less than Five Dol
lars must be paid lor before Insertion. This rule
will be strictly adhered to.
To Contributor and CorrewpondcntM:
We solicit letters and communications upon subjects
of general Interest, but Mich must always be ac
companied by a responblMe name.
We will not return rejecd communications.
All letters, communications, or anything else for the
AITHI, should be addressed
GALLAWAY 4 KEATING,
iL C. OAiXAWiT, I 282 Second street,
J. M. Kkatwu. f Memphis. Term.
MEMPHIS APPEAL
WEDNESDAY JIOKXIXti, DEC. 10,1876,
TUB M'AXT OF l'ATIEXCK.
There is much demoralization among tho
Democrats of the south. They have been
oppressed so lonp, disappointed po often in
thnr expectations of deliverance, that they
lave but litUe faith of She election of Tilden.
They complain that th northern Democracy
arc not making a vigorous fight, and in the
next breath advise caution and deprecate the
expression of extreme views. We advise the
Democracy of the south to be patient, and to
trust their northern friends. It will be sev
eral weeks before the political problem can be
solved. There is no cause for despondency.
The outlook is most favorable. The situa
tion at present is thus correctly defined by a
correspondent of the Cincinnati Enquirer:
"The Democratic leaders have been actively
canvassing the situation for the past forty
eight hours, with the result that their line of
policy is assuming definite shape. Their cour
age is growing, and the outlook is bright
ening. Mr. Hewitt is authority for the state
ment that if the senate should arrogate
for its presiding officer the power to pass judi
cially on the electoral count, thl house will
resist, and will never yield. Nearly all the
Democratic members have been seen individ
uallv, and all that have been seen are fully
agreed upon this point. Mr. Hewitt further
thinks that a largo number of the house Re
publicans would not support such an assump
tion on the part of Uie senate. He does not
think himself that the senate will assume this
much, and says that if the right men
are put upon the joint committee which the
two houses have authorized to try and devise
home plan acceptable to both for the counting
of the vote, they ought to be able to agree
upon some scheme. He says the house is
ready to agree upon any scheme which is fair
and constitutional. Several of the Republi
can senators are known to be anxious for a
compromise. Morton has determined to push
his bill, and Hewitt says that he personally
woal I vote for it if he could get no better.
Even under that bill the , Democrats feel
that they have the advantage, for
wh.Ie it provides that the consent of both
houses shall be requisite to cast aside the vote
of any State, it also provides where two sets
of returns shall come up from any State, that
only shall be counted which both houses shall
agree is tie lejul vote of the State. Double
returns are certain to come up from Louisi
ana, Florida and South Carolina, and under
Morton's bill the house would have the right
to refuse to agree that any return from these
States was legal which should be proven to be
illegal by the testimony taken by its southern
committee, and such returns could not then
be counted. This bill, however, is not accept
able to all the house Democrats, and will not
be Hie first compromise offered by them.
They have the best of the situation, and
know it. The plan, as explained
by Mr. Hewitt will be to first
proffer to the Republicans their own
medicine, the old twenty-second joint rule.
If the Republicans refuse it, they will stand
before the country in the unenviable position
of holding that what is sauce for the goose is
not sauce for the gander. Under the twenty
second joint rule Mr. Hewitt thinks a peace
able solution of the difficulty would be had.
It would act in two ways; it might first throw
the election into the house through the throw
ing out by that body of the votes of Louis
iana, Florida and South Carolina. If the
two houses should get to playing the game
of object and counter-object, it might result
in the throwing out of all the electoral votes.
In that event the legal result would be that
no electors have been appointed, consequent
ly no election has been held, and, under the
constitution, a new election would have to be
ordered under the statutory provision of 1792.
Chairman Knott, of the judiciary committee,
has devised another plan, which he has em-J
bodied m a bill to be oirered to the
house. He 'proposes that all questions
which may arise in the counting of the elec
toral vote shall be decided by a majority vote
of the two houses, acting as a joint assem
bly, and balloting exactly as the State legis
latures do Sor United States senators. He lias
not much faith that the senate will agree to
his plan, but he holds that it is the only plan
thus far suggested which would settle amica
bly all questions that might arise, either now
or in the future, which woukl be satisfactory
to the people, and which is clearly constitu
tional. The people have .waited long, and with a
patience that has commanded the respect ot
the whole civilized world. They waited to be
convinced of the fraud in Louisiana, waited
patiently wliile the votes were being thrown
out that had been honestly caet for Tflden.
When the returning board for the second
tune buried itself deep in infamy, and de
clared the vote of the State for a man whom
the vote of the people had rejected, still the
people waited. They were waiting to know
whether congress would sustain this wicked
act Before long it became apparent that
he President and the senate would sustain it,
would carry it out to completion by evtay de
vice in their power. Whn the utter
nes of the President. aad of
irjtmnent Republican; in congress
an I out. and the tone of the Re
i ' -. Lain press made ihk fact rieir, the peo
I '. ! gan to wafce up. They woke up to the
situation in Indiana, wfaeie a convention of
the whole State has been called. They are
waking up all over the Union, and soon
every city, every town, every village and
ever, hamlet will be abiase with indignation
at the attempt of a party to steal the Presi
dency. The honest men who voted for Hayes
will join hands in this movement with the
men w io voted for Tilden. It is no longer a
qu3stic.i f politics, but of principle. Let
the Rep il'ican managers who would steal
car votes L wrel Already th; handwriting
13 glnng on the wrll, and tier destruction
ia cure to follow.
T2IE -'TJENHnSSSEE.
The XcirClnb Opened to Members and
their Friends on Monday Sight An
Elegant Interview.
Wltat Clubs were In the Olden Time, and
what they are In the Xcw Their
Purposes and their Advantages.
The Tennessee club was opened on Mon
day night to members aod tlieir city
frieodi. and unless otherwise ordered
by the governing committee, will here
after remain closed to other than inem
Ws and out-of-town visitors. There was no
ceremony. The doors were thrown open to
all comers. the rooms were brilliantly lighted,
and all who entered wandered at will from
room to room, ejaculation and exclamation
telling of the fresh gurprise that at every
turn waited on the vkitor. There was al
ready an aroma of club life pen-ad in g the at
mosphere, and notwithstanding the new
ness and freshness of furniture
and appointments, guests and club
alike fitted to the sur
roundings, every one rejoicing that at last
we hod a club on the best plan, the home of
which is all that such a home can be made
So pleasantly located the Tennessees cannot
fail to quickly recruit beyond any limit they
liave at present set, and make themselves
felt as a potent and powerful influence in the
social life of the city.
Clubs mid. Club tire The TcnnessecB.
In New York, Philadelphia, Boston, Balti
more, Cincinnati, Chicago, St. Louis, New
Orleans, Mobile, Savannah, Charleston, Nash
ville, Louisville, and other cities in America,
clubs have become a respectable and repre
sentative feature in the social system. In
manv instances the influence of these club3
Lave" been felt both socially and politically, as
organizations embody in their respective
raembershiD much of the learning, culture.
and even moneyed power of the rmminent
and rremorted circles 01 society, uia umo
permit, we could give along and interesting
account of the origin of clubs in American
cities, then: progress, development, mnuence
and advantages, together with much that re
calls pleasant reminiscences of their past, and
which would naturally and rightly stimulate
in any intelligent and thrifty community a
desire to liave Uiese organizations junncu .uiu
rwrf.r.id to a deOTCe of unexceptional socia
bility and utility. Clubs originated in Eng
land lwincr at first societies or coteries as
far back as the days of Sir Walter
Raleigh, Shakespeare, Ben Johnson, Capham,
Beaumont and Fletcher (the twin stars of the
drama), and other wits and literati of the age.
On Friday street, London, was located "The
Mermaid,' where Raleigh astonished every
one by smoking tobacco, while lieu Johnson
founded a club which held ib first meetings
in the old Devil tavern, where Crew, Martin,
Donne. Cotton. Selden and others of that age
were wont to assemble and have a merry
time, both theology and politics being ex
cluded. Under the reign of Charles II the
corrupt excesses of the age had a most pow
erful influence upon the clubs, which degen
erated into vicious and immoral habits and
customs. About 1735 the "Beefsteak club"
wa3 formed, thanks to the social habits and
appreciative habits of the earl of Peterbor
ough, who chanced to visit Rich, the panto
mimist, and included among its members
Brougham, Fox, Sheridan, and the remark
able duke of Norfolk. These clubs, however,
were organized on a modest scale, and be
tween them and the magnificence of the pres
ent London clubs, which occupy among the
finest buddings in the British metropo
lis, there 'was as much difference as
now exists between a country " 'possum sup
per", and a metropolitan banquet. While
the facilities of modern life-club have won
derfully increased the expense has greatly
diminished, each member for a small yearly
sum being enabled to secure comforts and
advantages which only an ample fortune
could procure. Previous to the establish
ment of clubs in England, tavern and coffee
houses supplied the place of these institu
tions. According to the account which Cal
ley gives of his first visit to "Will's in Co
vent Garden, it required an "introduction to
that society not to be considered an imperti
nent intruder. The politicians assembled at
the St. James coffee-house, whence all the
articles in the first "Tatters" are dated.
"White's" was the favorite morning lounge
for young dandies and men of fashion about
town, m those days three o'clock was the
fashionable London dining hour. Soon after
six the men began to assemble at the coffee
houses they frequented. The lighter graces
of wit, refinement and conviviality were but
too often the prelude to hard drinking in
those days. The staid and sober gentlemen
who now-a-days frequent the gorgeous
modern clubs hi Pall-Mall and St. James street
are not in search of "lawless revelry,"
high play, or those keen passes of wit which
characterized Brooke's in the days of George,
Selwyn and Fox." They rather seek the com
forts of a home, freedom from restraint, a
trood cifeine, and fino wines at the lowest
possible cost, a well-chosen library, a quiet
game of whist, and, above all, the inesti
mable privilege of not bemg bored by family,
friends, foes, duns or acquaintances. From
England clups have parsed to other countries,
where they liave olno become popular,
wealthy, and largely representative of the
higher and more commanding worth of so
ciety. On the continent they take the form of
the French "circle" or theGennan "casino,"
having assumed real social perfection in Paris,
being situated in the most elegant quarters,
and fitted up with great luxuriance. At all
French clubs there is a daily table d'hote, for
which members inscribe their names and
those of their friends whom they wish to in
vite. In English and American clubs, how
ever, the table d'hote system is rather the ex
ception than the rule. While the English
idea of club life has found favor,
and made great progress in the
various American cities, in no place
has the system become so general or attained
such magnificence as in iNew York. In that
city, as at present here and elsewhere, young
men who frequent clubs were hi the habit of
meeting at hotels, taverns, chop-houses,
dnnking-saloons and billiard-halls. In New
York, and other large cities of America,
most of the young men in certain conditions
of life belong to some one of the many clubs
which liave sprung up in such abundance
during the last fifteen or twenty years. "For
those who arc unmarried," says an intelli
gent writer, "an organization of this kind is
a great boon, almost ahoine. Ata moderate
rate they secure furnished rooms in the
neighborhood of their club. Here they
breakfast and dine. Lunch is taken down
town. The habit, or rather the necessity of
taking 'lunch down town' has already made
its influence manifest in New York.1' We
find in the World, of that city, the following
article upon the subject of "luncheon clubs:
While strife and rumors ol strife disturb the at
mosphere of club life In the upper regions of the
ctty. there Is a movement gathering strength, we are
told, to revive a particular varletyof club down-town
which sprang up, nourished and died out there some
riUeen rears ago. This mar be called a Luncheon
club, the object being to provide the members with
a convenient and accessible place where, like Gen
eral Scott, thej mar "snatch a hastr plate of soup"
lti the middle of the daj. A number of merchants
are said to have already subscribed to the project,
which In Its main features resembles rather the
mercantile casinos or lonjas t-stabllsbed for the con
venience of foreigners at such ports as Vera Cruz,
OUaoor Valparaiso, than the regular English or
American club with which we are all familiar.
It Is ot the essence ot the true English and Amer
ican club that It belongs to the nlgtit-llfe of great
cities as It has been picturesquely said b; a clever
woman of the olive tree, that It grows br moonlight,
so It mar be said of the true modern club that it
grows bj gaslight. It Is a place where the members
nw meet In their hours of relative relaxation, after
Sinner, to sum up the events of the daj, exchange
si-cilat!as on the morrow, and general lr "shake
up" their minds. When the luncheon-club experi
ment was tried in New York before, it very fcoon
came to grief. The 'TueU" of the members, to use
ai: expressive If not an el;ant phrase, soon found
that the managers were better served than them
selves, .txl began to suspect that ther were no better
off than that most degraded class ot beings known,
despoiled and despised of all practical men as
"stockholders." .is the same causes are apt to pro
duce the same effects all the world over, the lunch
eon clubs of South America and Asia and other
regions. In which It might be supposed the sharper
necescttr for such an Institution would counteract Its
radical vices, have fared little better. In manv
Instance ther have degenerated Into mere bar
rooms, chete, during the business hours of the dar,
a few foreign stragglers rcaj be found Imbibing fan
tastic Imitations of English or American drinks, or
maundering over old numbers of I'unch and the IL,
Uairaiei Xtm and La lie itorMwnne. With such
excellent provision as now exists down town for the
Inward accommodation of the business eommunltr
daring the busj part ol the dar, the fate of any re
vival of the old Luncheon club mar be easllr pre
dicted from the outset.
But to return to the advantages of club
me to young men who are unmarried and j
Lave no family, as set forth by tho practical
workings of the system in .ew Y'crk. The
writer whoa we quoted saya "When the
uay s wr: k is over, cur cang c: --..to goes to
his roora. dretsca fcr dinner, and repairs to
his dub, where all ha wants are supplied.
For from forty to seventy-five dollars per an
num he is furnished the year round with lux
urious rooms, gas, fire, daily papers, maga
zines, books of reference, the use of a library,
materials for writing, and admirable attend
ance. He has the command of regular ser
vants, without having to pay or to manage
them. He can have whatever meal or re
freshment he wants, served up with comfort
and cleanliness, of the best-mounted private
establishment. He orders just what he
chooses, having no interest to think of bnt
his own. He can always command agreeable
society. In short, it is impossible to suppose
a greater degree -of liberty in living. In
view of the organization of the Tennessee
club in this city, it may not be amiss to give
a few points relative to the grand clubs in
New York city. By far the oldest and most
complete of these is the Union club, organ
ized in 183C, its membership being Umited to
one thousand, initiation fee ?100, and annual
duea $75. Some idea of the wealth and
magnitude of the Union club may be had
when it is stated that there- are seventy em
ployes attached to its service, the an
nual pay-roll being $53,000. Among
the items of expense for the past
vear were ?8000 for rent, $7000 for fuel,
$3000 for stationery and printing, $3000 for
cards, and $1500 for newspapers and periodi
cals. Large as these items may appear, the
receipts of the club for 1876 amounted to
$109,000. The lot, building, furniture, wines,
liquors, cigars, provisions and stores on hand,
cash and dues trom members, are valued at
$375,182. This club is largely composed of
heads of families, and like other such organi
zations in New York, receives among its
members and officers the gravest, worthiest,
and most conservative men in the cominu
nitv men who liave distinguished them
selves in law, commerce, and politics, and are
identified with the great social, industrial,
and commercial movement of the day. An
other noticeable and prominent organization
nf the above citv is the New York club,
organized about 1848, being considered the
exponent of the ideas 5f the jeunessee doree.
The New Y'ork club opened with about
one hundred members, and soon became the
foremost organization for the young men of
that citv. Its membership is limited to lour
hundred, the mitiation Ice being two hun
dred dollars and the yearly dues seventy
five dollars. The New York club is an
incorporated organization, having the right
or holding real estate to the amount oi tnree
hundred Siousand dollars. At present it is
located in the large house on the southeast
corner ot Astor i'lace and uroadway, its an
imal rent bemcr fifteen thousand dollars.
Near the New Y'ork club is located the
Knickerbocker club, which was organized
in December, 1871, its membership, being
limited to three nunurea; tne lmnauon iee is
three hundred dollars, and the yearly dues
one hundred dollars. This club is admirably
managed, and has a prominent status, Alex
ander Hamdton, jr., being its president. The
oldest artistic and literary club ot New York
city is the Century club, which was founded
in 18-17. The obiect of this club was to form
an association of gentlemen of the city of
New York engaged or interested in literature
and the fine arts, with a view to their ad
vancement as well as the promotion of social
intercourse. The .Century has in its art
gallery about one hundred pictures, engrav
ings, casts and busts, valued at over $26,000,
and a library of fifteen hundred volumes.
The membership is limited to five hundred,
the initiation fee being one hundred dollars
and the annual dues thirty-six dollars. It is
in a flourishing condition, owning property
in ihn nmniint nf S119.fi?!!) 53. The Centnrv.
Union and German clubs are the only organ
izations of their kind that occupy buildings
esneciallv erected for club-house purposes.
Similar in object and aim to the Century is the
Arcadian club, organized m JUay, i&iz,
and paying an annuid rent of $6000; the in
itiation being $50 for professional and $100
for non-nrofessional members. The member
ship is limited to 600, the annual dues being
$40. the mam aim ot the Arcadian is to
promote fellowship amoncr journalists, artists,
musicians, literary men and members of the
dramatic profession. Art, music, the drama
and literature constitute a subject of atten
tion from respective committees, each of
which select an evening lor their special be
hoof, and can invite for such evening only
an artist, literary man, journalist or dignitary
who may desire to be present. Ladies are
invited to the monthly receptions, which are
usually brilliant. During the gay season
there is a Saturday table d'hote, to which
members can invite a friend. Pall Mall,
originated some sixty years ago by Lord Cat
tereagh, has its antitype in the Travelers'
club, which is comfortable, homelike and
well managed. The object of this club, like
its great prototype in Pall Mall, was to afford
a resort for gentlemen who had resided or
traveled abroad, as well as with a view to the
accommodation of foreigners, who, when
properly recommended, received an in
vitation for the period of their stay.
Another New York club of great weiorht and
importance is the Manhattan, which is
partly social and partly political, being in
close sympathetic communion with the Demo
cratic party. The principal leaders of the
Democratic party, both in the city and State
ofVN'ew York, are members of this associa
te, its president being August Belmont.
The lata John Van Buren had a great deal to
do with the establishment of" this club, whose
membership is limited to six hundred. The
initiation fee is $250, and the yearly due,
$50, The Union Leaguo club formed in
May, 1863, is partly social and political in its
aims and objects. It is in direct affiliation
with the Republican party. Similar in Pur
pose to the Arcadian is the Lotos club,
which was founded in March, 1870. Dis
tinguished strangers, sojourning in the city,
are always welcome at the Lotos club.
The resident membership is limited to four
hundred. In addition to the above oaganiza
tions m New York, we may mention the
New Y'ork Yacht Club, organized July 30,
1844; the American Jockey club, and the
Army and Navy club, organized in April,
1871, These three clubs have also their social
features, and in point of wealth and
prominence are lof no little repre
sentation in the New Y'ork club system.
We have thus presented as it were a glimpse
into the character of the leading clubs of New
York city, for from the character of the gen
tlemen who are members of the Tennessee
club we feel assured that our city will be
proud of the organization and the good re
sults of its operations.
THE TENNESSEE CLUB
received its charter about two years ago, the
incorporators being Colton Greene, D. P.
Hadden, H: C. Warriner. C. W. Metcalf, U.
B. Miller, and I. M. Hill. Pursuant to the
powers vested by the charter the incorpora
tors effected a temporary organization by se
lecting as the executive committee, General
Colton Greene, chairman, J. M. Fowlkes, R.
B. Clark and R. D. Snowden. The regular
organization will be effected at the meeting
Thursday night, when the regular officers
will be elected and the governing committee
appointed. The Tennessee club is oganized
on tie stock plan, each share being placed at
$10. The amount of initiation and tho regu
lar dues have not been announced, though
the membership is already, about two hun
dred. The governing committee will have
the arrangement of the dues and the man
agement of the club, which is inaug
urated under the most favorablo aus
pices. Since the temporary organiza
tion of which wo speak was made,
the executive committee, above named,
has rented the three upperstories of the large
and commodious budding, No. 37 South
Court street, and so altered and fitted it up
as to make it suitable in every respect for the
purposes of a club-house. The building is
four stories liigh, and occupies a most desir
able locality, having all the rebracy, and at
the same time being adjacent to the center of
the city. It is midway between Main and
Second streets, its front overlooking Court
square, with its green sward, glistening foun
tain, and wealth of nian-nolia, oak and other
trees, where the partially-tamed squirrels
sport and frisk about to the great delight and
amusement of visitors and others who fre
quent the beautiful park. A description of
TENNESSEE CLCIl-IIOUdE
cannot be made within a short space. Upon
entering iue uuor,wmcn is openeu m response
to an electric annunciator, the visitor ascends
a handsomely-mounted staiwayto the first
floor, where elegance, taste and convenience
are at once manifested by the arrangement of
the hall, handsome walnut dwre.with French
plate-glass, and handsome chandeliers, and
modestly beautiful carpet. To the left, and
immediately at the head of the stair
way which reaches the hall, is the
office, which will be occupied
by the secretary, who will be
a member of the club. This office is of rich
walnut, neatly paneled and intrrained. the
upper part being surmounted by a framework
ol ground glass. lhe east wall holds a ruby
window, of octagonal shape, the clas3 beinc
of the same material as that which encom
passes the olhce. Immediately in rear of the
office is the boudoir, fitted up m the most ap
proved style. To the left of the center hall is
the library, a room whose furniture, papering
ami carpet at once attract tne eye and encit
the admiration. The furniture in this room
is of walnut, with table to match. The pa
pering and paneling are in accord with the
color of the carpet and furniture. A notifia
ble feature is an elegant chandelier, with pat
ent drop-light. On the opposite side of this I
hall is the parlor, a large and commodious
room, fitted up in handsome style. The walls
are decorated with the very finest paper and
paneling, while the furniture is elegant and
novel. The furniture is of walnut, the cush
ioning being of Egyptian fabric, made of
feathers and silk. Every glance gives a
clear and harmonious combination of
right and obtuse angles, the colors of
the carpet blendinir in harmony with
those of the cushions. At either end of
the room is a handsome mirror, set in rich
walnut to correspond with the windows and
doors, the glass of which is heavy French
plate. This will be the general lounge-room
for social intercourse and such diversions as
the members desire. In the library there
will always be found the daily papers of the
Union, four London dailies, besides one daily
of Manchester and Liverpool, England, and
Dublin. Ireland, all the American matrazines.
the leading English magazines, and French
magazines. Tnis will be the nouclus for a
grand and permanent library. On the next
floor is located the billiard hall and a number
of card rooms. The buhard hall contains
four handsome tablei and outfit, with the
usual compliment of chairs for spectators.
This hall, like the card rooms, parlor and
library, is also fitted up in the very best style.
Tlverytning indicates the good taste of the
commiiiee in me selection oi uie iurmiure,
and the artistic talent of Mr. E. C. Jones, the
architect, under whose direction and design
the building was altered and the improve
ments made. Un the lourtn noor is
a lafrre hall and two committee rooms.
These apartments have not yet been finished,
but their outfit and furniture will be equally
as appropriate and handsome as those already
mentioned, in iact; we can no wnere in uie
south find club rooms more, elegantly fitted
and moie beautifully furnished than those
of the Tennessee club. The monogram of
this club is seen in the furniture, window cur
tains and service. Every arrangement, from
the wine cellar to the root, is m accord with
convenience, elegance and comfort. The gen1
eral design of the whole house was conceived
by the executive committee, with Mr. E. G.
Jones, who made the plans the change nec
essary to render the building what it now is.
The elegant walnut furniture in different
mountings was made on special contract by
Mitchell, Hoffman & Co., of this city, who
also fitted up the entire building in the luxu
rious style of which we speak. The hand
some walnut cornices, window casintrs, doors.
etc., were made by W. II. Eader A: Co., of
this city, under the directions ol zir. h. U
Jones, the architect. The handsome wall
papering, window shades and decorations
were done in the most skillful manner by
Marcus Jones, wliile the painting is the most
artistic ellort yet made by Hook x LaUriil. in
every room and hall there is an electric enun
ciatoror indicator for summoning servants
and waiters and announcing the arrival of
members, 'ihis leature is the work
of A. 0. Schultz. The chandeliers and fur
niture, which harmonize so well, and are the
wonder as well as the admiration of every be
holder, were made by Mitchell, Vance fc Co.,
of New Y'ork, especially for the Tennessee
club. In addition to the rooms which we
havementioned, there are the necessary wash
rooms and private apartments. To avoid all
odors from the kitchen, no such feature is
within the building. However, a connecting
hallway leads to Uaston s neighboring res
taurant where auy and everything can be
ordered by the electric bell, and will be served
in the most elegant style known to the
cuisine. Nothing buttliepurest and mostre
hable brands of wines, liquors and cigars will
be kept in the club.
other social diversions are allowable, no
species of gambling will be tolerated. In
fact gambling is not only excluded, but any
aina oi gaming win resuu in uie expulsion
of the member who attempts it. The pri
mary object of the Tennessee club is social
intercourse in a genial and gentlemanly man
ner. That it will accomplish much (rood we
need hardly say. The informal opening of
me ciuD-nouseiast mgut, tne generous spirit
that pervaded, and the wann courtesy that
marked the occasion, somewhat indicate the
social excellence and elegant hospitality that
will characterize the career of the Tennes
tee club. y
No wonder that consumptives are feeling
glad over this new principle, new way, Dr.
J. H. M'Lean's cough and lung-healing
globules, they give almost instant relief and
will cure coughs, colds and consumption.
Trial boxes, by mail, 25c. Dr. J. H. M'Lean,
314 Chestnut, St. Louis.
ORGANIZED IN 1846.
Connecticut Mutual
I
Insurance Company,
OF HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT.
Assets, : : $43,494,650 92
Surplus yiplSrd.H5004,851 92
Dividend i iib 2,543,556 08
Ratio of expense of management
to receipts in lS7f 7-55 per cent
Policies In force, December 81, a
1875, 6H,209, Insuring Sl070,842 00
Amount of Losses paid at Mem
phis Agency 312.5S0 00
JAMES GOOmVIxT rrcMldent
JACOB Ii. GBEEXE Secretary
JOHN 31. TAYLOR Asp't Secretary
Jas. S. Carpenter & Co.
Gen'l Agents for Tennessee,
No. 43K MADISON STKEET
Memphis Tennessee.
New Type. . New Machinery.
New and Improved. Papers.
t
'I VI
FRANKLIN
PRINTING-HOUSE
AXD
BOOKBINDER!
No. 15 Court Street.
BY THE RECENT ADDITIONS OF NEW DE
SIGNS OF TYPE and NEW MACHINERY,
and new and Improved stocxs of papere, I am ena
bled to do superior work on very short notice, and at
extremely LOW 1'ltICKS. I can successfully
duplicate work and prices of Eastern and Northern
cities. I employ skilled workmen In all the depart
ments of my printing and bookblrJery business,
and will guarantee entire satisfaction with all the
work turned out of my establishment. I do ALL
Ji.l.M)S or ranting and Bookbinding, and re
quest those desiring either or both to examine
my styles and prices.
MUSIC BOUND
In the most elesant stjle, at exceedingly low prices
CAI.I1IXG CAKDS
Gotten un In tho latest and most beautiful stiles.
tor the execution of which I haTe added new styles
of type and cards. S. C. TOOF,
ir uiun street,
between Main and Front sts.. Memphis, Term.
M. D. JOHNSONVPrealdent.
J. u. UHitMNU, cashier.
J. L. COE, Ass't Cashier.
Mechanics and Traders Bank,
Jib. O Madison Street,
Memphlx, : - : : : : : Tennessee.
Transacts a Banking and Brokerage business.
Bonds. Stocks. SctIds and Securities cenerallr
dealt In.
Makes a specialty of paring taxes, furnishing
scrip for same, at lowest market rates.
Loans negotiated, and money advanced upon local
securities and other approved collateral.
rrompi attention given to collections.
Plantation for Sale or lease.
THE well-known Walnut Grove Plantation, In
Coahoma cooty, MlssIsslppL, :i miles from
RoblnsonvllU Landing, consisting of absut 1200
acres clear land and about l!!0O acres woodland.
Offers will bo retelved bs JUSTII CO.. 10 Rmad
6treet, New York.
mriA'ri
AX.L.COUK'S
Porous Plasters!
t3TAHlc for ALLCO CK'8, nnd olitnln
them, and so avoid inlHcrnblr: lmltntloiiH.
U. HKAXmtKTJI. Iret,
Offlre.2!4 Caunl Htreet. N'ew Y'ork.
The Greatest Bargains
EVER OFFERED IX
Are to be found at
A XEW ARRIVAL OF
Hamlmrs Embroideries,
Ladies' and Gents' Iiincn Hand
kerchiefs, ladies' and Gents' Silk Hand'
kerchiefs,
Hackings and Ties,
Iiincn Collars and Sets.
Toivcls and Napkins,
AT IMPORTERS' PRICES.
And tire entire stock at greatly reduced
prices. Call early for bargain.
Taylor, Joy & Co
312 Main Street,
opi. Peabody Hotel.
AfiEXTS
FOR T II S
Rest SEL
LING KIX-
MECE JEWELRY COJIUIXATIO.V
OUT Gents- elegant Watch-Chain. Gold-Plated
Sleeve-Buttons, Qollar-Buttons, Set of Spiral Studs,
Plain Ring, and Imitation Coral Scan-Pin. Com
plete sample lots, 25 cents; 12 lots, S2. Special
terms to agents. BRIDE & CO.. 7('."i Broadway. N. Y.
TH03. FiaiEEii, President. I Wsi. Y. Hamlin, Cash le
EMMET BANK,
OE MEMPHIS,
Transacts a General Ranking Busi
ness. Collections on Memphis a Specialty.
Drafts for Hale on the principal Cities
of Europe. Also,
Passage Tickets by tho Inninii, "White
Star, Cunard, Allan, and Anchor Lines
oi uccan mcanicrs.
Particular Attention given to Pay
ment of Taxes.
City and County Scrip for Sale at the
Lowest Market Rates.
SOUTHERN
Hoopskirt & Corset Manufactory,
JTo. 383 Main Street.
VTOW READY THE MOST
JLN complete stock of Improved
Corsets, both French and Mem
phis made. Ladles will remem
ber that my genuine Corsets bear
my stamp; otner nandinade cor
sets are nmuierent imitations.
Double Corsets for stout ladles,
Extra-long Abdomen Corsets, In
valld's Corsets. Red and Blue Sat-
teen uorsets ami aiisse3- unoreaK-
aoie uorsets. rew iraas, Braces
and very besS Corset ClasDS. The
Uncrushable Potte Robe (Tllter) for Trains and
Street Dress, manufactured for all figures. Goods
sent u u. u. yuanty anu styie guaranteed.
L.OUIS I,AXGE
Dissolution of Copartnership.
THE copartnership of GREENE & LUCAS,
INSURANCE AGENTS and MANAGERS, Is
this day dissolved by mutual consent, W. R. Lucas
having sold all his rights, title, Interest and good
will in and to said arm to Colton Greene, who Is
alone authorized to sign the firm name In liquida
tion. COLTON GREENE,
W. R. LUCAS.
Memphis, Tennessee, December 9, 1870.
Copartnership Notice.
T HAVE this day associated Mr. JAMES E. BEAS-
x Lr.x wltn me m the business or FIRE, MA
RINE and LIFE INSURANCE, under the firm name
of GREENE & BEASLEY.
COLTON GREENE.
Memphis, Tennessee, December it, 1870.
COLTON GREENE. JAMES E. BEASLEY.
GREENE & BEASLEY,
Gen'l Insurance Ag'ts
18 aindison Street, Memphis, Tenn.,
Representing the following large and well-known
companies:
Liverpool and London and Globe
Insurance Company (England),
assets (gold) S28,425,160 02
Continental Insurance Company of
New York, assets 2,845, 1 05 00
Fhenlx Insurance Company "of
Brooklyn, assets 2,549,058 00
National Fire Insurance Company
of Hartford, assets 1,003,201 00
Knickerbocker Life Insurance Com-
pany ot New York, assets 7,080.000 00
Acme RyeWhiskies.
THE old and extensive Hannls Distillery Company,
of Philadelphia, Pa., have appointed
A. Vaccaro & Co., 324 Front Street,
their sole agents for the sale of their celebrated
Acme Rye whiskies, where a large stock will be
found constantly on hand.
JAS. FLAHERTY. J. J. SULLIVAN.
Flaherty & Sullivan,
3
-5:
EL
UNDERTAKERS,
317 Second Street, near Monroe
METALLIC AND WOODEN BURIAL CASES
and Caskets. Elegant Robes. Gents' Suits and
Coflin Trimmings. Orders by telegraph sent promptly
C. O. D. Special attention paid to embalming.
TAKE YOUR CHOICE!
We propose to sell our stock of
Pianos & Organs
To the Highest Itidder, on
Wednesday, Dec. 20,
At II o'clock n.m.
o
UR BUSINESS MUST BE WOUND UP THIS
month. t e want moner. and must submit to
a sacrifice of our goods. Come nnd buy ut your
own price. We mean business. You will get a
splendid bargain at our expense. We cannot help
it; money we must nave.
Our terms for purchasers of over one hundred dol
lars will be: One-third cash, one-third In ninety
days, and one-third in six months; for purchasers
from S50 to $100. one-half cash and balance In
ninety days; for purchisers under S50, all cash.
Deierreo payments to De satisiacioniy secured, ite
meraber the time and place December 20th. at 1 1
o'clock a.m., on comer of Madison and Second sts.
MERRIMAX & WILXCOX.
1. ESTABLISHED 1840.
J. &.J. sfEELE&CO.
Grocers
AND
COTTON FACTORS
No. 1 Exchange Building,
1C8 Front street, Memphis, Tennessee.
Are prepared to handle WHEAT on commis
sion. Sacks furnished on orders.
TaylorJoy&Co $
312 MAIN.
WANTED
mm
IV. A. WILLIAMS.
Lnmber Dealers
AND MANUFACTURERS,
MILLS, SALESROOM AND YARD,
SOUTH FROST STREET. CORSER GAY0S0 ASD SECOSD STREETS,
MEMPHIS TEjSTjST.
PAGKOCtBOXES of AJLIa IOT5S on IIAftT
Wholesale Grocers and Cotton Factors,
II J and 13 Union street, Memphis.
D. T. T0RTER.
W. F.
Wholesale Grocers,
Aim
Cotton
SO FRONT ST., Bet.
Agents for the Celebrated Cheek Cotton Press.
SAfOLEOS HILL.
S.
360 and 362 Front
COTTGlf FACTORS
Silverware, Watches, Diamonds,
Opera-Glasses, Lockets, Bracelets, Etc.
DESIRABLE iiiimS. : : : CAUL AXD EXAMIXE.
C. L. BYRD & CO., No. 275 Main Street,
A. 31. BOYD.
3GO FROST STREET i s : t
TV. B. txALBREATH.
J. 31.
COTTON FACTORS
11 Union Sti'eet, Menjplais.
AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED CHA3IPION COTTOS GIS ASD HULLER,
S EDGE MTKAY&CO
COTTON FAOTOES
ASD
371 & 373 MAHS" STKJ3IKT, MEMPIEI8, TEKM"
CHAS. J. fSEELIilTS, Cotton Salesman.
qas:
H ADVANCES MADE ON CONSIGNMENTS
CO., Liverpool, England.
AT WHOLESALE!
Wheeler, Pickens & Co.
328-330 Main St., Memphis.
A. VACCARO.
B. VACCARO.
A. VACCAEO & CO.,
IMPORTERS ASD DEALERS IS
WINES, LIQUORS & CIGARS,
Mo. 324 Front street, Memphis.
SOLE AGENTS FOR. COOK'S CSIA3II'AXE IMPERIAL.
31. C. PEARCE.
PP. A a nr. sirasM l nn
WHOIJGSAIjE grocers,
Cotton Factors and
No. 258 Front street, Memphis, Tenn.
PARTICULAR ATTENTION PAIR TO THE SALE OF COTTON
Executor's Notice.
ALL persons Indebted to the estate of Mrs. F. M.
E. Hoblnson, deceased, are desired to ccme
forward Immediately and make payment; and those
havlnc claims aealnst It are hereby notified to Dre-
sent them, duly probated, to me, within the time re
quired by law, orthey will be forever barred.
ue4iue juu.n . uakbin. Executor.
DICKINSON BROS. & CO.,
COTTON" FAOTOES
AND
Commission Merchant s
35S FROST STREET,
(Over Stewart, Owynne & Co.'s)
MIUIFHIH : : : : : XEXXEHHEE.
15. K. PLA12
TAYLOR.
G. IV. McRAt.
Madison and Monroe.
FOSTAISE.
JEROME HILL
street, Memphis, Tenn.
ALSTOS BOYD.
t i 3IEMPIHS. TE'WESJSEE.
FOWLKES.
TV. J. CRAWFORD.
Factors,
WHOLESALE GROCERS,
OF COTTON TO MESSRS. BBOWN, SHIPLEY 4
A. B. YACCARO
L. B. SUGGS.
Commission Merchants
NORHTOIiK. OYSTERS
AfESSRS. It. BUCHIGNANI 4 CO.'S OYSTER
-lVJL Restaurant and Refreshment Saloon, at the
corner of ?i-coinl anil JefTernon Htreetn,
hare reduced the prices of Norfolk oysters to :5
cents per dozen for raw and stewed, and 40 cents for
fried. They have also fitted up elegant apartments
In tbelrup-stalrs for the accommodation of ladles,
to whom refreshments wUI be served at a slight ad
vanaeon tho above rates.
M. 5. Ij. STEWART,
SOLICITOR
AND
A T T 0 It N E 1' A T-L A
OHIceSo. Si Poplar Strees, Memphis.
"TTriLL vtzC'-v In tho Courts ef Law and Chan-
V eery In Wet Tennessee and North Mlsslsls
sippl, and give special attention to collections, con
veyanclng, etc.
NOTICE!
, St. Louis. November 10, 1876.
YyE have this day appointed
Messrs. Orgill Rrothcrs & Co.
Sole Agents for the sale of our Cekb rated
"Diamond" Anti-Friction Metal
AXO JOUItXAI, IIEAIUXUM.
who will supply the trade and consumers at manu
facturers' prices.
Diamond Antl-Frlrllon 3IH.il Co.
Avery Plow Agency.
HAVING been appointed by Means. B. F. Avery
,!t Sons their sole Agenu for the sale of their
Flows and other Implements in Memphb, weaie
now prepared to fill orders from thfci point or Louis
ville. 40tm iioiv lu store, rrompt aod care
ful attention to all orders.
OIIGILL BROTHERS & CO.
Hardware, Cutlery nnd Asi-ionltnra
Implement.
310 and S12 Front Street, 3Ioinpli5.
Fairbanks's Scales.
ORGILL BROTHERS & CO., Agents.,
3 10 and 3i2 Front Street.
Jnst Received.
m
A NICE assortment of English DouWe-Barrel
Guns and Wostenholm's Pocket Cutlery, Scis
sors, Razors, etc
OrcIIl Brother & Co
Direct Importers. :UO and HVJt Front Street.
"WM. CJLOIR.jE'S
Hoffman Patent Steel Plows,
IV. Clore's Genuine Calhoun Plows
THE Hoffman Patent Steel Plow Is a late Inven
veatlon ot Wm. Clore, and will commend Itself
on sight. It has a cutter attached for plowing In
hard ground, and also for bearing oil cotton. For
loose ground plowing the Cutter can be reaUlly re
moved. Call and see It at
ORGILL. JiROTJIERS & CO.,
Sole Agents for Wm. Clare's Plows,
31Q and aia Front Street.
HOMES FOR ALL!
Subscribe to the Third Series of the stock of the
Workingiaen's RniMins: ami Loan As
sociation. The subscription books for tho Third Series (lim
ited to f00 shares) are now open at the office of the
Secretary, 2!tl 3Ialn street, uu stairs.
This Association has achieved a substantial suc
cess: has been the means through which many nave
already secured HOMES, and Is now In the full tide
of successful operation.
Persons desiring to subscribe would do well to
hand In their names early, as the books nil! close
with f00 subscribed shares.
First monthly payment due on the first Tuesday
In January next
CHARLES T. PATERSON, Secretary.
TT!
S 2
DISPENSARY !SSSi
3UK
TTiirtT yum r Twrienca in the titmeiit of Rtnai .-arv
Chroma Diseases oflx'!
Jj&iB Ji , A Physiological View of MarriaffO
-ffifir for the marr.ed ad thoe cwro-inptng
WjklrV'iJfc rnarrinrf, oa the mytrrB uf rt-p.-odue'.--fttaaAr
icn &nd t!ie secret Inflnnitiwot youtij,
manhood and womanhood AnlKutCratnibuolcotSflOaaxrs.
for private readinif, which should be ktfC under Wcknoa
key. Srat ondrr forfiOets.
A PRIVATE MEDICAL THEATI32 on all dheiiez
of a Private Nature In both mcs, the abuse and dis
orders ot the sexual system, and the means ot cure, 150
Witjienmriiip. sent txndcr seal tor2J cL.
HEDICAXi ADVICfi on bexualacd Chronic Dtsa-es,
Seminal Weakness, Catarrh, Cancer, Rupture, the Opton
Iliit,&c, n JO pipe work wnt under seal for 16 ets. Alt
three books containing 4 GO pages rxlercrTihiozwoTt!t
knowing on the subject, sent securely sealed oa re
ceipt of 60 cts Address, Dr.Butfe' Dispensary
BJo.12 N. 8th t. St Louis. Mo. Ctabluhed i'.jT
W. H. Gregg, PresL F. W. Hock wax, Setfj.
Southern White Lead Company.
Every package of this Company's brand ot Strictly
Pure White Lead bearst he follow lng guarantee:
"Tho White Iail contained- in this
f neUnue is Kiinmistood livtlie Maiit:m
urern, tlie SOI TlIKItX VIHTi: TKAI
C St. I)uIm.: to contain no adulte
ration whatever. It I composed en
tirely of perfectly Pure Carbonate of
Lead ami LinNet-tt Oil. and is sold sub
ject to Chemical Analysis and the SJiow-
pipn lest."
i3T" The name of this Company Is placed o.vlt
upon Strictly Pure Lead. It Is not placed upon a
second or ether Inferior quality. So parties purchas
ing White Lead branded " SOUTHERN' COJtPANY,"
are absolutely sure of obtaining a Peefectit Pujuc
Article. C&For sale by dealers In Paints and
Oils throughout the West and South.
JOHN POOL.
Late IT. S. Senator.
BEES B. EDMONDSOX,
Memphis, Tenn.
pooii&saMosnDSox
law lEce,
507 Twelfth street, Washington, D. C.
W LL practice in all the Courts of the District of
Columbia, Supreme Court of the United States,
Court of Claims, and before the Executive Depart
ments of the Government Prompt attention given
to the Collection of Claim'. oe3
G. H. HOLST. T, W. HOLST.
O. H. HOLST & BEO.
UNDERTAKERS,
330 Slain, opp. Pealiody Hotel.
ALWAYS on hand, a large assortment of 3MallIc
Cases and Caskets, and Wooden CoQhis, of
every description.
tlff Orders by telegraph psomptly filled, and
Cases shipped C. O. D.
Browne, the Plumber.
Gas Pipes,
Water Pipes,
Steam Pipes,
Stone Pipe,
Kuller Pipe,
Batli Tuls,
Pumps,
Hydrants,
Gas Fixtnrcx ! fins Fittings !
jtrass Fittings:
EVERYTHING CHEAT.
J. W. X. BKGW3TE,
258 Second St., opp. Court Square
:d:tviieho.
OFFICE HOME INSURANCE COMPANY. i
Memphis, December , 1879.
fas'" At a regular meeting ot the Eeard of Di
rectors of this Company, a
Dividend of Six per Cent.
was declared on tt.e capital stock, and ordered to be
credited on the stock notes.
K. p. BOLLLMi. secitury.
CrISAINi G3SA1X!
,'!0O acks Rust Proof Outs.
HX) sacks Shorts and ShlpstafT.
irX) sacks Wheat Bran.
JOOO sacks Com.
700 sacks Oats.
MOO sacks Cracked Corn.
10OO bales Hay.
:(0O bales Straw.
10,000 new Corn Sacks.
10,000 new Oat and Bran Sfteks.
15,000 Second-hand Sacks.
JAS. S. SUTTO.V k CO., '.iC'l 3Ialn street.
THOMAS J. BEASLEY,.
COTTON FACTOR
ASD C EX Kit All
Commission Merchant,
230 FRONT STItEET,
Up-Stalrs : : : : : 31 e nip hi. Tcun.
gy STRICTLY J
W Reached ??
V, iij

xml | txt