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Evening public ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, October 26, 1914, Night Extra, Image 7

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045211/1914-10-26/ed-1/seq-7/

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EVENING- LTiiDftliiB-PHILADELPHIA, MONDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1914.
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CONGRESS FORECASTS
. FAVOR DEMOCRATS
1 IN BOTH BRANCHES
Republican Gains in House
Probable, But Present Sen
ate Majority to Be Main
tained or Increase!.
The next Congress wilt bo Democratic,
according to forecasts based upon can
vMt made by the Sun, tho World and
the Herald, of New York city. Though
,u .mimales aro not Identical, each
hows the Democratic party will havo a
majority of approximately 43 votes In
the House nnci at least 10 In the Senate.
If correct, these figures mean that the
Democrats would loso 66 seats In the
HoiifO and gain two In tho Senate.
Progressives will lose heavily, all threo
nempapefs nro convinced. Tho present
rrogreKlvo vote In tho House Is 18. This
Till be cut to seven, according to the
forecasts A substantial gain for tho Re
publican party Is agreed upon. This will
come out of tho Bull Moose strength and
defection In tho Democratic States. It
ill raise tho Republican House voto from
121 to 192.
Chang1" In the Senate to be worked
on Tuesday of next week will Increase
the Democrats' majority, the estimates
ihow Republicans thero now number 45
and Democrats 61. This will shift to 54
Democrats against 41 or 42 Republicans,
tccordlng to tho Herald and the Sun fore
casts, Tho estimate la made without
counting as certain the Senate contest In
this State.
PALMER CHANCES BRIGHTER.
Penrose Republicans had been predict
ing the election of Penrose until two
weeks ago, but slnco then their confidence
has ben shaken nnd Washington observ-
I ers have been looking toward tho candi
dacy of A. Jlltchell Palmer as the most
piomlslng. Growing disaffection In South
Philadelphia and the likelihood of an open
revolt against Penrose on the part of the
Vare followers has become an Important
factor In the observation of the Pcnnsvl.
anla outlook.
Washington is beginning to look upon
the i'enroso canaiaacy as hopeless. Mr.
ralmer, the Democratic nominee, has
risen to tho favorite's placo In all tho
estimates. GIITord rinchot. forecasts say,
will poll a heavy vote from the Republi
can ranks, to tho further weakening of
Penrose Palmer Is the candidate picked
to win, however.
The election of Penrose, who has long
been a calamity howler, particularly out
tide of Congress, could not bo of nny
possible benefit to tho protectionists In
the Senate so far as a revision of the
tariff Is concerned. I
Even If a Republican landslide at next
week's election should give that party
control of the House, for tho reason, as
stated, the Democratic prepondennnce
at the other end of tho capltol 1b morally
certain to bo Increased, regardless of the
result In Pennsylvania. This fact, with
a Democratic executive In the Whlto
House, shows how futile must be any
hops of tariff legislation.
TENROSE A PARTV MILLSTONE.
The very reverse of possible benefit
which Penrose partisans havo made a
Isadlng part of their propaganda to brine
about his re-election is Indicated In a
published statement by United States
Senator George W. Norrls, of Nebraska.
Mr. Norrls Is a Republican and intended
to visit Pennsylvania this fall to speak
ssalnst Penrose, but has been prevented
by 111 health from carrying out his pro
gram, In writing, however, he has made
plain the view taken by national Repub
licans regarding the Pennsylvania con
flict He Bnirt:
"The candidacy of Mr. Penrose In Penn
sylvania Is doing untold Injury to tho
Republican party In all parts of tho
nation, and nothing would help that party
mora than his defeat on November 3."
As a Republican party millstone, tho
effect of Penrose's candidacy could not
be more lucidly expressed than In this
quotation from a letter written by a Re
publican United States Senator of national
reputation.
FORECASTS OF THE HOUSE.
The New Tork Herald's forecaat, a
conservative prophecy, gives Democrats
111 sure otes In tho next House, and
Republicans 163 votes. Ono vote is the
best outlook the Progressives have, ac
cording to the Herald, nnd GO votes are
let down as uncertain. Theee 60, de
noted "uncertain" by the Herald, help
the World to predict a Democratic vote
of 227 In the next House. Nineteen dis
tricts are doubtful, as tho World sees It,
and Republicans may look for 178 votes.
A severe slump in tha Progressive party
all over the United States Is forecast
Hull Moose defections are rnimM nnnn
tf bring up the Republican vote In tho
House to 152 Pronrrpaslvos. mav tha T.
publican leaders, ara tired of supporting
a !rt cause: the? will desert In a body
to the Republican camp. Estimates place
the defection nt 65 per cent In ten
elections since 1812 tho Bull Moose havo
lost an avernen of FO nor rnt nt thai-
votes, It h acknowledged. Figuring an
per cent desertion In the election Tiles
aay the Republican gain would amount
w 6, seat in the House Even this.
.Ui,K uW -,eaVB lhe Democrats 63
in the lead
rifrnocratlc Kalns resulting from the
war hae heen noted by nil three news-
tinnert..u V1sauU'' upon thfl Admlnlstra
tion i,n , tnr)ff as H baBls havo jMt
trengih m the face of the Democratic
arguments that the Administration has
html rnmP"ctlons with the European
.. V! ""'" ana ,nal 't was responsible
lor the Miape from war in .Mexico. Dem
ocrats are also capitalizing the cessation
, 1 """ ,mPr's resulting from the
eiciM.T. . .Zle r conditions behind an
t i' '"'." wal1 T" "untry will
mV.n ianca to see nnat exclusion would
n.JumoenX are sa'n
to w . IT"18 are PnnIne helr arguments
be ui"".e"- Tncee' ,h'y " wl not
wthlm "'. away by ,he war- and "en
n "urif? W,U VOt f0r a ohailw and
PENNSYLVANIA PROSPECTS
lose'Tr!8"1' ,n the Sun' analyses will
he wlJ?f,,?craUo Representatives, und
House Vm "if l0n i1' "'fn "' tho
ranks. ' 8 fut ,0 one- l-Bses ln hoth
tan. hi 5 t0 '""cngthen the Republl
lll h. 'orecast runs Pennsylvania
UouTll'X oilcans
Onlt .1 ' ?? t,le Sun ees It.
Pon wtn,"ilnc,aUo South can count
II SrH "B Democra' to the House.
1KS ... N"'ern States
root
tha i..t ." . ""mocrauo majorities In
R.n,,kr, " elections
Republican line again,
will fall Into the
and the outcome
WsjoriTv 7. ". nearep to the. Democrtlo
Sen., . "-oniress.
IwZS "!," ,n conceding an
The best th.JrUy ,for tn DrnocraU.
tlomi vi."".y ca" l0 or Is an addl
The comt; f,"0.!"?..!? . Predictions.
1 test n . w,u " ln8 nrst sen
es is,, popular voting for Unltec
.. enV?r No extraordinary re
for United
,u" are ionSS . "'"""-dlnary
h.J ."ll at the primaries s
re-
cases
""n In ihlt I'elsalures. Thirty-two
' S th. r,?,W,nt Senata "Plr Warch
th oath of calnlns con'est results from
' My.,81nator.DacM' of Georgia.
!1n Iry!.,.!ftLon, of th South the eleo-
"""y thir. i,T. i over' ror ,nc8 the Prt
mocraHu .!? !en no opposition to th.
mocrati; ;.:i
to the
-a n mana... " . democratic cam
,. .4ngers ara nvi.. - xr ,.
' ir?Yld th .uu " i,"w Iorlt 'na r leisnman uaiting vomi
orrcerly eMii: -SI1? n,w ,eat' tnat damigo estimated at t300.000.
' ee upiw by ELhuRoot. J Or e fireman was Injared.
the
FflANK FIGHTS FOR LIFE
Atlanta Man, Convicted of Murder,
Wants Penalty Set Aside.
AUGUSTA, Ga Oct. .-Th fight for
llfo of Leo M. Frank, young Atlanta fac
tory superintendent, under sentence of
death for alleged murder of H-year-old
Mnry Phagen, an employe, on April 28,
1918, waa again before tho Georgia. Su
preme Court today.
Two motions of Frank, whose convic
tion was baaed almost entirely on cir
cumstantial evidence nnd the confession
of alleged accomplices, and has attracted
nation-wide Interest, have been before
the court. Arguments were begun today
upon the motion to set aside the convic
tion and death penalty because Frank
was absent from tha courtroom nt At
lanta when tho Jury brought In the ver
dict. Frank's attorneys claim this was.
a violation of hl constitutional rights,
Prank's other motion, which was de
nied October 14, was a request for a,
new trial, based Upon alleged discovery
of new evldenco since his conviction.
This motion was based chlofly upon the
sensational move early this month of Wil
liam M. Smith, former attorney for "Jim"
Conley, an alleged Negro accomplleo of
Frnnk n Smith declared ho was con
vinced that his former client, Conley, was
the murderer of Mary Phagan and that
Frank Is Innocent.
The Negro, Conley, was tho ohlef wit
ness against Frank, Conley said Frank
forced him to aid In disposing of the
girl's body by hiding It In tho basement
after taking It from the second story.
MAMMOTH SHOW OPENS
Oregon and Whole Northwest Exhibit
Products,
PORTLAND, Ore., Oct. 26. Oregon and
the whole northwest aro finding out what
they really possess through the agency of
the STanufacturers' and Land Products
Show, which opened here today at the
Armory. Ranged In booths on long table
In lnclosures and on walls were speci
mens of ovory manufactured thing pro
duced In the northwest. In adjacent
temporary structures are samples of ovory
plant that grows.
Flvo Governors wero scheduled to help
open tho show today. Governor West, of
Oiegon; Governor Llstor, Washington;
Governor Haines, Idaho; Governor Spry,
Utah, and Governor Johnson, California.
They also plan to hold a conference of
Governors on matters of mutual interest
In State development. Tho show will
last three weeks, with every succeeding
day set aside as a. special day for some
element In Industry.
SEES BLESSING IN DISGUISE
Savannah's Mayor Says Cotton.
Slump Will Help South.
NEW TORK, Oct. 26. The low price of
cotton ultimately will provo a blessing to
tho South, Mayor Richard J. Davant, of
Savannah, declnrcd at tho Hotel Mar
tinique today. Ho said that a huge cotton
losa waa about tho only thing that would
bring about a complete reorganization of
the agricultural methods of the Southern
States.
"Most farmers In tho South aro small
farmers," ho said. "They have found It
easy to raise cotton, nnd thoy raise tittle
olse. Now that tho marnet for cotton has
been seriously impaired, they will be
forced to diversify their crops. Thus they
will not only Improve their lands, but
they will have somet' Ing to fall back on
when there Is no demand for cotton."
THEATRES HARD HIT
Worst Season Country Has Ever
Known, Managers Report.
NEW TORK. Oct M. Whether or not
the war In Europe Is to blame for the
conditions, theatrical managers through
out the country report this season as
being tha worst tho country has ever
known.
"In New Tork and a few of the larger
cities," said Leo Shubert today, "the
shows that are unquestionably worth
while nro doing a big business, but even
here many a play which In nn ordinary
year would 'get by" is doing no business
nt all. In the smaller towns the condi
tions aro far worse, and I betlevo every
producing manager In tho country Is cur
tailing his activities."
GUIDE BELIEVED MURDERED
Seeking Slayer of Man Whose Body
Was Found In Adlrondncks.
UTICA. N. T.. Oct. 26. Detectives of
Herkimer County are scouring this sec
tion today for a man suspected of hav
ing shot and 'killed Donald Curran, an
Adirondack guide and hunter, whose body
was found last Friday near Limekiln
Lake, In the Adtrondacka.
In tho opinion of Coroner Huyck, the
killing was deliberate and was done at
close range.
Hunters and lumber jacks living in the
vicinity of Limekiln Lake discredit the
murder theory, and say he was killed ln
mistake for a deer.
PROBE SHOOTING OF BOY
Four Arrested, Although Lad Says
He Inflicted Wound.
TRENTON, Oct M. Four men are un
der arrest following the mysterious
shooting of David Lincoln, 11 years old,
who waa found In the woods near
White's Crossing. When taken to the
MoKlnley Hospital, where his condition
is regarded as critical, the boy said he
had accidentally shot himself.
Investigation disclosed he was in com
pany witti four men, all of whom had
revolvers. They were taken Into cus
tody pending an examination.
1 KILLED; 3 BURNED IN HOME
Explosion Follows Attempt to Start
Fire With Kerosene.
UUNKIHU, n. x., Oct 26. Mrs. Cl
mento Salvatora Is dead. Mrs. Relno Sera-
nno in a critical condition and tho latter'a
husband and young son severely burned
as the result of the explosion of a ran of
nersene me women were using to start a
fire in a kitchen stove late last night.
Members of the house extinguished the
Are with palls of water and by beating
si ino mazing doming wim tnelr hands.
j. no women were burned from head to
AHSON LAID TO EX-FIREWTAN
Dismissed, He Is Said to Have Caused
Series of Blazes.
WHEELING. Vf. Va., Oct M -Pre-vented
by his dismissal from the city's
Are department of the right to fight
rtres, George Kraft went to starting them,
according to charges made against him
today
Seven fires during one week In August
resulted In his arrest and release for trial
under HW0 ball. Seven more flres within
two hours yesterday resulted In a second
arrest
300,000 FIRE IN CHICAGO
Building of Fleishman Malting Com
pany Burned.
CHICAGO, Oct M. Fire ewept the
fire-story brick and frame bulldlnr of
Fleishman Malting Company, doing
WILMINGTON WILL
WELCOME VISITORS
THOUSAND STRONG
Italian - American Alliance
i and Synod of Baltimore,
With Kindred Societies,
Convene This Week.
WILMINGTON, Del Oct SUBegln
nlng tomorrow and continuing until Fri
day, Wilmington will entertain close to
1000 visiting delegates to tho convention
of the Italian-American Alliance, the
Synod of Baltimore and its kindred
societies.
Six hundred; delegates aro expected to
attend the convention of the Italian
American Alliance, the sessions of which
will continue .four days. The visitors will
bo welcomed by a committer from the
United Italian Bocletles of this city with
a band. They will be welcomed formally
by Mayor Harrison W. Howell.
The rest of the first day will be given
to sightseeing trips and a big luncheon
at Brandywlno Springs Park. Wodnosday
and Thursday will be given to business
sessions. A banquet will be hold at the
Hotel du Pont Thursday evening, at which
probably 1000 peoplo will attend. Speeches
will bo made by prominent officials, In
cluding the Governor, the Mayor and
likely tho United Statos Senators from
Delaware. The King of Italy is expected
to send either a message, to tho delegates
or a personal representative to tho ses
sions. Tho Synod of Baltimore, which Includes
Presbyteries of New Castle, Baltimore
snd Washington, will open Us sessions on
Tuesdny evonlng, when the Rev. DoWItt
Benham, of Baltimore, the retiring mod
erator, will speak, and a now moderator
will bo olectcd. A number of Important
subjects will come before tho Synod, In
cluding a proposition to divide the Pres
byteries of Now Cnstlo and Baltimore so
as to make tho Synod consist of flvo
Presbyteries Instead of three. This mat
ter was postponed from tho meeting In
Washington last year, so that tho sen
timent In the Presbyteries involved
might bo obtained. It Is understood there
Is considerable opposition to tho plan.
Wednesday afternoon will bo given to
a conference on missionary and benevo
lent work. While tho Presbytery is in
session, the synodlca! missionary socle
ties, comprising women from each church
In the Synod, will hold sessions in Cen
tral Presbyterian Church and will trans
net business. Ono hundred and thirty
ministers and elders will bo delegates to
the Synod meeting and probably twice
that number delegates to the synodlcal
missionary societies.
STIcrXJE FOLLOWB QTJARREL
Young "Woman Inhales Gas Alter
Meeting' Lover.
CARBONDALE. Oct. 28. After meeting
her lover with whom she is said to havo
quarreled Lillian Hennemuth, a domestic,
went to tho homo of Dr. J. S. Harper,
where she Is employed, and ended her
life by Inhaling gas.
Pinned to a bureau was a note ad
dressed to tho young woman's mother,
tt gave the motive for suicide.
mfjh'srayTO.en. ln Wilmington Suburb
WILMINGTON, Del.. Oct I5.-On ac
count of tho numerous hold-ups which
havo been reported ln the vicinity of
Hare's Corner, only about five miles from
this city, many nro afraid to pass along
that road at night, nnd tho authorltlos
will make a special effort to captura the
highwaymen.
MODERN DANCINO
CHAS. J. COLL'S
Corner 38Hi and Market Streets
Beginners5 and Dancers' Class
in Modern Dances
Tuesday & Friday, St Per Month
Polite Assemblies, Mon. and Sat.
PRIZE MASQUERADE BALL
Saturday Evening, Oct. 31st
BRANCH ACADEMY
22 South 40th
MISS MARGUERITE C. WALZ
Studio of Modern Dances
1804 WALNUT BTrtEET.
Mrs Elizabeth W. rtetd, Cbaperona.
Bpruca 8231
IF OU WANT TO BE ABLE TO DANCQ
better than tho average parson consult
Arm-Brust, Chestnut St., 1118
HALL BOOM SPECIALIST
etrlctly private lessons In up-to-the-minute
(lances. Classes taught anywhers.
THE C. ELWOOD CAWHNTEn SCHOOL,
1123 Chestnut st , eni branches, private and
class Instruction dallj , Fox Trot Lulu Fado
Onutep. Ta TaoJlesltatlonjnoull Roull.
TIIR MODERN riAVrKB
Private Losaons & Classes Tauiht Anywhere,
oiuuiu ,., itiaiiiicim m rn (itn
M1S8 6LOANB and MR. BRU8T
Open
1 1 YOUR HOME lfi
Mm .. vi v Jt BJft S Mt
mm MgmmmYJr-? Ariimnrp. Ms
fffl rC- Dia 8km
iWWj SfflS!?D..vT?H ?.I?,r,i ""r1 for you at Ardmoro fSJto&J
IHiV bHSS lp.: ,'v-Tt., "-i.1",10 PV 'or , Que to so t ling the BM .
JftJR r AY00tt ?.8.tt8- You're only a minutes from tba 69th fiCRI WV
$K&5 P-..ntr.e' ?' Terminal. 'Phone our office! and SA Ugl
Y$ffirS ..'l 5" "I"'1 to ,ake you and yeur wU out T to seeVH &t
WW '2" fu,ure hom- THco and terms to your llkinr 8 'H
m Wood, Harmon & Co.. "SLfflssss' YB$8
SMI "" s-uone, opruce 4i7 Keystone, Ilace 205S Vfi
I j!Le I I
We announce the reopening of our restaurant
for ladles as well as gentlemen
II
OYSTERS CRABS SALADS SNAPPERS
TERRAPIN A SPECIALTY. SHORE DINNERS
VAN HOOK'S
416 Sansom St.
6 IN AUTO HURLED IN RIVER
Machine Crashes Through Bridge
Railing: it Rockefeller Estate.
TATtRYTOWN, N. T Oct 28.-A motor
car containing flvo persons employed on
tho John T. Rockefeller SBtnte at Po
cantlco Hills in Westchester County,
struck tho rail of tho Pocantlco bridge
leading off the Sleepy Hollow road last
night, carried" away the railing of tho
brldgo and fell about seven feet into the
shallow water of Pocantlco Illver.
The passengoru were Mr. and 'Mrs N.
P, Llndqulst Miss LlndqUlst, their daugh
ter! Charles Oloson and Charles Johnson,
Standing more than half way out of the
shallow water of tho stream tho car took
fire nnd was mined, ,
Oloson was carried under tho car and
held there unconscious and would havo
drowned had not Miss Llndqulst, desplto
her shock and bruises, rescued him". The
victims of tho accident all sustained Inju
ries. TEACHERS GATHER
FOR DISCUSSION
OF RURAL SCHOOLS
Montgomery Institute Opens
60th Annual Session With
Prominent Educators Pres
ent' to Aid Deliberations.
NORRISTOWN, Pa., Oct 2J. Beginning
today and continuing until Friday, the
Montgomery County Teachers' Institute
will hold its 60th annual session hero. All
hotels, boarding houses and many private
homes are crowded with the 800 teachers
attending tho Institute.
It Is nn Interesting fact that this instl
tuto had Ita beginning almost with the be
ginning of the public school system In
Pennsylvania nnd has elnco been one of
the State's Important educational conven
tions. The program for the Instltuto Is ar
ranged by nn Executive Committee, of
which tho county superintendent Is a
member. It has been the aim of this
committee to make the Instltuto a source
of Instruction as well as of Inspiration.
Teachers from many fnshlonablo sub
urbs In Montgomery County, such as Ard
moro, Bryn Mawr, Elklns Park nnd Olen
slde, aro attending the Instltuto. To
Jonklntown. however, goes the honor.
This county has had Institutes for 60
yoars and la rated as one of the fore
most counties educationally.
WORK OF CONSOLIDATION SLOW.
Consolidation of rural schools has mods
very llttlo progress In the county outside
or tno southern townships, It was reported-
This consolidation, it Is hoped,
will ultimately give equal opportunity to
all. At the present rato several genera
tions will come and go before this attains
throughout tho county and Stato.
Prominent among the Instructors here
this week Is J. G, Carter Troop, pro
fessor of English literature. Trinity Col
lego, University of Toronto, public lec
turer for the New Tork Board of Edu
cation; Edward F. Worst, supervisor of
construction work, Chicago publio
schools, and Clarence G. Cooper, super
visor of rural schools, Baltimore County,
Maryland. Miss Mary Adair, of tho
Girls' Normal School, Philadelphia; Dr.
Harlan Updegraft, of tho University of
Pennsylvania; Dr. Ambroso L. Suhrlo, of
West Chester State Normal School, and
Superintendent James M, Coughlln, of
Wllkes-Barro, will speak at several ses
sions. B&NAHA JVCIFIC
EXPOSITION
INFORMATION FREE
AT LEDGER CENTRAL
The Travel Bureau will ttve
you cpeclal data on tho exposi
tion, routes with tho finest
scenic attractions, train sched
ules and connections. Pullman
and boat accommodations even
tell you tho necessary ex
penses for the trip, Including
hotel rates en route and nlonc
coast.
Call at the
Travel nurcmi
LEiDGER CENTRAL
IfPTEL DENNHS
Al LAN TIC CITT W.J.
IN AUTUMN
Provide a charm of comfort and
ease amidst characteristic envlron
msnt that ha established It ns an
Ideal seashore horns
Dlrectlv on the ocean front
Capacity COO.
Walter a, nrznr
Today
low1, I WALTER J, HPZrtT I
"5tft3t Jnfi
BALTIMORE FRIENDS HOLD
THEIR YEARLY MEETING
James F. Ilushmore, of This City, to
Mfike Address.
BAlVTIMOnia, Oct M-rhe BalUmlre
Yearly Meeting opened Its U2A annual
business session today ln the Friends'
Meeting House. Several Philadelphia
Friends are In attendance, and James P.
Rushmore. general secretary of the
Philadelphia Tearly Meeting, will ad
dress the conventlondurlng the week.
Although the convention was not f6r
mnlly opened until thin morning, advance
catherlnga wero held Saturday nnd yes
terday for worship and discussion of
FIrst-dny school work. The customary
80 minutes' devotional oxerolses preceded
the business session this morning', and
similar meetings will bo held morning
nnd nfternoon until Thursday.
The temperance meeting, with Jonathan
K. Taylor presiding and Thomas M.
Hare, superintendent of tho Maryland
Anti-Saloon Ieaguo, and Arthur E. War
ner as speakers, promises to exalte more
than the usual Interest Arthur B. Far
quhar, of York, will be the last speaker
at the closing meeting on Thursday, his
subject being "The Fundamental Causes
of the European War."
Among the week's speakers) are in'
eluded Julia 0. Thorn, Harlan S. Gat
choll, Furman I Muford, James W.
'Harry, Henry D. Sharplesa, Anna B.
Qrlscom, Dr. O. Edward Janncy. William
Eves, 3d, W. Russell Tylor, Mary B. Hull,
George A. Walton and Gladys Brooke.
Store Opens 8:30 A. M,
The Grand
m m is s i s ijl - ' " ' """ '" ' ii sssi ssss 1. 1 i i
-S M& -. rat "s'-
Starting
Hall, the First Great Fall
Sale of Pianos
We have jmist Ibrooglhit nira from tlhe 5clho
macker factory, where they were overhauled
amid pint into good pflaynnug coodntfloira, over 100
used fitfiistriui meets', whnch go omisafle tomorrow
at flower prices thae any of them have ever
tame fle thenr history amd mpoini easy Chnstmas
terms.
Also These New Redtacedl
Thirteen new Grand pianos, Schomacker, Knabe
and Ghickedng, with reductions of from $75 to $600.
Six new playerpianos, including: three Knabe
Angelas, with reductions of from $65 to $100.
There are a haflfdo2emi old Galbtaet players
that somebody may find very good use for In
spite of their rldlcmfloiuisfly small prices. '
The used Instruments Include ten player
pianos, fifteen grand pianos and a long list of
squares and uprights. You can get a square
pano for as low as $15 and an upright for as
low as $75,
Plenty of extra expert salesmen will be on
hand for quick and satisfactory service, and
the business of selling these pianos will sro like
a wnnrlwlnd from the start.
(Egyptian Hall, Second Floor)
JOHN
WAGERS HEART ON GAME
Dartmouth Loses and Elaine French
Promptly Weds Nobleman's Nephew
NBW YORK. Oct J8. When rrtnoeton
booted ltn way to a rlotorr over Dart
mouth on Saturday afternoon, the players
of the two teams little realized that Dan
Cupid was playing at fullback for "the
Tigers nnd playing a star game at that
It came about ln this fashion: Elate
French, one of the best-known show girls .
qn the American stage, former wife of Hr
M. Fernbld, son of an jGovernor of
Mnlne, nnd organiser of the now famous
Chorus Glrla' Union, whose -strike nearly
tied Up the trafficking of one of the local
theatres some time ago, had a leaning
toward the husky Dartmouth team. Bhe
had a hunch they would take Princeton's
number, and she told all her friends so.
Including Vannte Cooke, nephew of the
Earl of Ltnoolm
The latter had an Idea the Tigers would
emerge from their Jungle victorious, how
ever, and ho took exception to Miss
Elaine's Judgment This all happened at
a Broadway restaurant on Friday after
noon. The pair took to wagering cham
pagne until some one suggested they, bet
something really worth while, Mr. Copke,
being English and rather far from home,
was inclined to wax sentimental. He
agreed to bet his large, throbbing heart
against Elaine's dainty little hand.
The latter gained considerable publicity
through her marriage to II. M. Fernotd,
the son of an ex-Governor of Maine, and
the subsequent divorce, .which Fernold
obtained last summer on the grounds of-
WANAMAKER'S
Organ Plays Tomorrow at 9,
Tomorrow Monmimigj
Sixteen! off our own fine new upright pianos,
hi pries reductions off from $30 to SB00.
W,
ANAMAlrCra
PHILADELPHIA
desertion, so she wan Inclined to males
light of' a mere heart. Tlie folio-wins' day,
howerer, when the returns of the football
game were In, she manifested considerable
Interest in the final soore, and when she
learned Dartmouth bad lost she forth
with became very despondent.
About 1 o'clock that night Cooke ap
peared on the scene and chartered a Jersey-going
hack. It conveyed Miss French
and himself to Hoboken in duo time,
where they were married at ji early hour
by Justice of the Pence Rosolter.
Their plans for the future Include a trip
to England, where hubby will make ready
to go to war, and Mrs. Cooke will prepare
herself for the duties of a Red Cross
nurse.
FOUR KILLED IN AUTO PLUNGE
Machine Dashed Down Embankment
When Tiro Bursts.
NIOW PIIUjADBLPHIA. o Oct J
Four persons, two women and two men,
were killed and three seriously Injured
early today, when tho automobile In
whloh they were riding" plunged down a
20-foot embankment at Maestllon, O., naar
here.
Hugo Horn, Cannldorer, O., clothing
merohant, and Carl Rupenthal and wife,
of New Philadelphia, were Instantly
killed. Mrs. Horn died at the Maestllon
City Hospital today.
Harry Robinson, owner and driver of
the machine! Mrs. Clara Horn Bpahr and
Miss llsia Camden were badly Injured.
The bursting of a front tiro threw the
machine.
Store Closes 5:80 P. M.
II'
Oril
B
th:
A,
11 and 5:15
ed.
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ggllns
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part ,d to
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