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Evening public ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, March 25, 1916, Night Extra, Amusement Section, Image 10

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045211/1916-03-25/ed-1/seq-10/

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EYENIffG LEDGER-PHILADELPHIA, SATURDAY, MAttflH 25. 1916
"." ' I' '' 1 .. i .. n , ( i , , f , , , , , , , .T ' 'I
Cutbacks
THEN AND NOW I
AMUSEMENT SECTION
r Address alt communications to Dramatic Editor Evening Ledger,
Independence Square, Philadelphia.
THE AVERAGE NET TAID DAILY CIRCULATION OP THE EVENIN3
LEDGER FOR FEBRUARY WAS 104,115
PHILADELPHIA, SATURDAY, MARCH 25, 191G
The Magic Length
WHAT is the right length for a photoplay? Obviously there Is no right
length, Some excellent stories need only n thousand feet of film ior
their best development. Some need two reels, three leels, any thing up to
fourteen. Griffith made little one-reel masterpieces for the Biograph. He
put two plots Into seven reels each and glued them together with the commit
of real artistry to make "The Birth of a Nation."
Just as obviously the producers think they have found the right length.
It is just exactly five reels. The five-part "feature" reigns supreme to
day. Hardly a theatre but depends almost solely Upon a single ntlvertised
film and a single advertised star to bring in the crowd. The only "filler
that receives a lino of advertisement or thought from the exhibitor is an
occasional strong serial.
Sometimes the Fox people find that some scenario is too crammed with
action for five reels and give it six. Mary Pickford was lately screened in
seven. De Wolf Hopper's "Don Quixote" was cut to five reels only after
exhibition. But these nre startling exceptions. In general, every film that
receives serious treatment from producers or exhibitors is of the magic length
of 5000 feet.
5000 Feet or 100,000 Words
Thero nre" a irond mnnv disnrlvnntaircs in this. In the first nlnce, it
hampers the producers. They can't give the serious attention to some short
but exquisite scenario that its story deserves. They must put their "big"
directors on "big" pictures. The best work of the best directors, srennrio
writers and actors is devoted wholly to mastering the difficult problem of
putting out n fixed length of film. It is much ns if some one had decided that
all novels should be at icast 100,000 words long. More than that, it is as if
the literary world were so managed that only stories of 100,000 words received
serious attention from publishers, middlemen or public. Where would the
short-story be? All the infinite and invaluable freedom of the written art
would be gone. Thnt is what appears to be happening in lilmdom.
iw, mMgM fnn IB j ,
The High Cost of Boredom
As a matter of fact, the five-part length holds difficulties which arc be
ginning to bo felt. Producers and exhibitors have discovered the danger of
relying on a single feature to divert an audience. It may bore. That is the
weak point The five-part form not only limits the aitistic powers of the
producers. It also insures the audiences taking the product very seriously.
If a short film is poor, well, the next will be better. But if an hpur and a
quarter of failure fills the screen, where is the evening's entertainment gone?
A Variegated Prophecy
Boston has adopted the curious solution of putting two features into
every program two chances of boredom balanced against a very large
"money's worth." But the ultimate solution seems to lie elsewhere, perhaps
nearer homo. The Stanlev Theatre is settinir an admirable example to the
trade in the care with whi-h it selects, not alone the "feature," but also the
surrounding bill. Ultimately, it is a pretty safe guess that the theatre which
endures in popularity will be the theatre with a man behind it who can pick
the best of varied programs. Sometimes he will use a long film, sometimes a
number of two, three and four rcelers; and all the time he will have novel and
striking little dramas, comedies and "trick" films in one reel. That means
co-operation from the producers, of course more novelties in the line of the
Paramount Pictographs and silhouette movies, more good directors, good
scennrio writers and good players devoted to one, two and three rcelers.
Prophecy is a risky matter. But the future seems likely to find the big men of
the art making 12-reel photoplays, after the stylo of Griffith's masterpiece,
and anything else that the stories happen to fit, from a thousand feet to eight
thousand. But not five thousand alone. K. M.
An Appeal to Decency
The first page of this section is devoted to the coming activities of the
Ballet Russo because, apart from the institutions which extend their work
over lonir neriods of time, the onera, the theatres and the orchestras, no
single organization has presented such an opportunity for entertainment,
of the very highest order, this year. The pictures and the articles indicate
the nature of the work to bo done and, fortunately, there has been no great
question of the artistic merits of the work as it is done. The significance
of M. de Diaghileff's enterprise may be summed up in his combination of
Fokine, Bakst and Stravinsky. The three arts of choreography, decoration
and music have been infused with vital and great dramatic file. Only the
last of the three is sufficiently cultivated in America, and for us the Ballet
Itusso. is a revelation.
Some things about all revelations wo resent, but it is rather pitiful that
of all things we should have chosen the so-called "moral" factors for dis
pute and scandal. Already attempts have been made, even in this city, where
the Ballet has not yet appeared, to stir up dissension. The police have been
invitod to givo or refuse their august sanction to the proceedings of an
.artistic group. The "Scheherazade" has been put in the category of "Dam
aged Goods" by a contortion of the intellect which defies analysis. The ballets
have been called corrupting and disgusting. It may be interesting to the
propagandists of these ideas to learn that when "Carmen" wns first sung in
America it was subjected to the same dirty-minded criticism.
There is a stronger sense of social decency in Philadelphia than most
persons seem to believe, and on that sense the Russian ballet confidently relies
for a fair judgment. Decency is never prurient; it is hardly curious; it is
always generous. For ourselves we know that hundreds of thousands of
clean-minded persons have found the Russian ballets dtccnt. For ourselves
we do not know anything more indecent than the sweeping indictment of
these same hundreds of thousands as corrupt and degenerate because they
have seen and enjoyed. To some the Ballet Russo has been something rev
olutionary; to others it has been the evolution of their most passionate yearn
ings for something in art which shall be all art and all life in one. To still
others it has been simply u beautiful spectacle. Some have gone to hear
the music, others to see. Few, very few, hae gone to bo indulged in a de
sire for base sensations.
Are we never to escape the domination of these few? Will there never
cease to be intelligence which can be bought or bullied into their defense?
G. V. S.
100G
1916
Letters to the Editor
With the Lecturers
At the Academy of Music on Friday
evening and Saturday afternoon. Dwlght
ElmenUorf, the artist-lecturer, ulll close
his local Benson of Illustrated travel talks.
"Around India." a "summlnc up" of
JIr. Elmendorf's jecent Indian experi
ences and Impressions, will he tho topic
of hla discourse on Friday evening. In
this travel talk three of the supremo
sights of the world will bo pictured and
described; The most beautiful of all
architectural creations, tho Taj Mahal,
at Agra; the most amazing of rclIglouH
spectacles, Benares, and the highest of tho
earth's mountains, tho ninuilajas.
On Saturday afternoon Mr. KInienilorf
will present the latest revision of Ills
most popular lecture. "Famous Paintings
from tho Galleries of Kurope "
Cosmo Hamilton will lecture before the
University Intension Society on Tuesday
oienlng. March 28, on tho "Itomanco and
Tenor of Aerial Warfare." Ho has scried
In the Kngllsh Territorials as well ns tho
Air Service and his actual experiences In
tho air nttacks ulll throw new light on
the news methods employed in modern
warfare, as. tho British Censor lias care
fully guarded details of the retains of utr
raids.
This l.s Mr. Hamilton's first appearand
as a war lecturer, hut he Is better known
as a writer of 10 trinelH anil numr.ius
plays, the "Dllndness of Virtue" being his
latest success.
Score One to H. L. W.
To Hie t'hnlaplaii Pililo)
Sir To nttempt a llt of the ten best
photoplavH, as suggested In ynur col
umns of March 18, scemi like the photo
ll.iy Itself, well tilgh hopcIcs. Any ten
titles Hclected from ynur photoplay nil-
ertlsemmt will do ruiltc ns well as any'
Dttmr ten. A list, too, of the ten worst
pliotoplavs could be complied In tho samo
way Inl.e tho next ten titles In tho nd
column.
Ts there rrallv ft "best photoplay?" nnd
Isn't the worst no nrm than the best.
nnd tho best no better than tho worm?
Aren't they nil ocpinlly dull and deadly'
A flrilllth Is as labored llnpdoodlo as
nn Inee. n ri'isky-Falrinniint Is not lean
puerile than a t.Hliln Triangle Mniorcos,
silly Sellgs, lnramotm I'lnyers, your "enrlv
limine" and latest Vat nil grind, grind
along In the bitmo stupid way
What evdulslte tnrturo Danto might
liavo devised for the pmr lost soul If ho
had only known. condemned him to wan
der oM-rlastlngly out Market street, vis
iting first-showing feature lllnis!
Anyway If 1 may trespass with Just
another nucstlon why tako tho photo
play so seriously? any moio EPrlnusly
than, say, meny-go-rounds? II. I. W.
Match 22. 1916
Concerning Many Things
To the Photoplay llitltnr.
Sir Thero are three questions I would
like to ask, and would appreclato It cry
much If ou will answer them
First. Who was tho producer (what
company) of n film entitled. "I.ovo, Snow
and Ice," dealing with Ico skntltig. to
bogganing and nil winter itpoits at Lnlco
Saranac. N". V ?
Second. Did tho late Arthur Johnson
appear In a play entitled "Four Nar
ratives'"
Third. Is the photoplay of "Mr Barnes
of New York," with Naomi Clilldrrs, Don
ald Hall and Darwin Karr an tho prin
cipal characters, still In existence? Was
It the Vltagrjph Company that produced
it?
T lead your column Irr tho Uvkniwi
Lnnonn eery night and think It ory Interesting.
Hoping thlB will cause you no trouble
Philadelphia. March. 17 J, F. K.
(1) Tho Vltagrnph Company filmed
Wnlly Van In "Love, Snow and Ice"
(2) No (3). Yes (4). Yes
The Movie Companies
To the Photoplay Villlar.
Sir Would you kindly give mo the ad
dress of tho following companies If you
are ablo to do so: Trlanglo Film Cor
poration. I'.ithe flold P.ooMor Film Com
pany, Stanley Booking Company?
w. a. k.
Tho addresses asked for aio. Tho Trl
anglo Film Corporation. Hfi7 Broadway.
New York : Pntho Hold Booster, 2G West
45th btrcet. Now York; Stanley Booking
Company, till Mailtct street, Philadelphia
PROGRAM OF THE
RUSSIAN BALLET
(niillnnrit frnrn Pane One
nrotifrctl sensations and ho settles down
with It Into dt cams.
"PJUNrrj KiOIl" Pnlovstlenncs dances
frr-n the opera by Alexander Borodin;
choreography by Michel I'oklno; tcencry
and costumes by N. Iloorlch. Principal
dancers Adolf Holm, J.ttbov Tclicmlkovn
nnd others
Wild native dnnces to the music of tho
second act of Borodin's opera, which
has already been dono In Us entirety at
tho Metropolitan Whllo the dances have
no special significance, they nre said to
be barlvirle and mndly frenzler. They
nre performed for the delight of tho Slavic
Prince Igor, who, although a prisoner of
the Khan Kontchak, chief of a nomadic
tribe. Is treated with all respect In tho
hope thnt ho w 111 consent not only to a
lasting peaco with tho I'olovstl, who nro
ruled by the great Khan, but also to the
union of Igor's son Vladimir with
Kontchal.ovlnn, tho chief's beautiful
daughter.
Saturday Matinee, April 1
"CIjnoi'ATItn" repeated ; see Wednes
day's program.
"I.KS SYIiPHIDnS" repeated; rco
Thursday's program
"SOLKltj Di: NUIT" repeated; see
Wednesday's program
"LA PKINCnSSi: nNCHANTHi:"
Pas de deux In ono scene; music by Peter
Tschnlkntfdcy, arranged by M. Petlpa :
scenery and costumes by I.eon Bakit
Principal dancers Adolf Holm and Ljdia
I.opokoa
Wko "I.es Sylphldos," o.n the Thursday
evening program, this ballet Is a typo
of what some ono In Chicago has called
"ahsoluto dancing,' n, display of poses
and pirouettes and steps for the sako of
their pictorial cfTect alone, nnd not con-
crying nny connected story.
Saturday Evening, April 1
"THAMAIl" repeated; see Friday's
program.
"PirmoUCHKA" repeated; see Thurs
day's program.
"IAi SPItnCTim III: LA nOSC" re
peated ; sco Wednesday's program,
"PRINCK 1QOK" repeated ; sco Friday's
program.
Looking Forward
A bill has been Introduced in Congress
to establish a Federal censorship of
movies. Hence tho following- contribu
tion! I mod to bo Addicted to the raotlon.fllm!
Uy Its mftlc I was able- to behold the things
I had feared existed nowhere- but In fancy's
For Inntance, eowbors. cuttUflah nnd Icln.
It entertained fn much to watch tba redKln
Cremating pale-faca settlers at the stake
allio. ,
And equally as thrilling was the wan whits
When the villains: dragged her, BlruRgllng-, to
tho dive.
Tut now I Insipid drama occupies tha acreen;
Tlio photoplay Is suddenly and sadly tamo.
Tho good, old-fashioned, grisly, blood-and-tlninrfcr
scenes
Are gone, to sooths the censors' sens of
thnmo.
Blnce sov'rnl solemn genttemen sincerely feel
Thnt thr'lls nro detrimental to kids In their
teens.
No longer, the movies move ma every reel's
iinrenl
I turn mo to the muck-rake magailncs.
AIXY8IUS.
The Maid and the Movie School
Shn read tho ad.
Then paid her cash,
Now sho Is sad,
Has to sllnjc hash.
Ian and Header.
A Good Wine Needs No Caption
SAHAII IlEnNHAnDT
. . "JEANND Done
filmed Shortly After tho Loss of
. Her night Limb.
Organ Selection March of Triumph.
Theatre Program.
Musical Glasses
The repertoire for the cntlro week of tho
Itusslan Uallct will to found on I'ago 1 of
tho AmuRcmcnt Section.
SL'XD.IY, MAKCir St.
"Penitence, Pardon and Pence" at the Sec
ond I'resbjtcrlnn Church, Uermantovvn, nt
I :io.
.UO.VD.tV, MARCH t7.
Mahler Symphonv by the Philadelphia Or
rhentra at the Acndcmy of Music.
TUKSD.W. MARCH ZS.
Yvetto Clullhert In recital at tho Adclphl
Theatre.
HBj.v;;sD.ir. march :n
Ma 111 or 8mplinn l tho Philadelphia Or
chestra at tho A' idcm of Music.
What Are the Six
Best Photoplays?
"rnHE Birth of a Nation?"" Cer-
- talnly.
"Cabiria?" Perhaps.
Hut what about the rest? There
nre any number of fine films that
never had the number of reels or
press agents that made those fa
mous. Send in your list The Evening
Ledgeii will print it.
BARRIE AND BABBIE IN SILHOUETTE
m MaR2jff BlfflSv jHi
BROAD Last Matinee & Evg.
The TaitoHt Vlmm-ia Operetta
PRINCESS TRA-LA-LA
ln" u'rlts' MONDAY eg at s is
CirARLliS FIIOIIMAV I'rc'ents
MAUDE ADAMS
Jn J M Hand Comedy
The Little Minister
Spa-lul Tues Slats, nripnn r A T.T
Starch i'S un.l April I it 1 ILK. r AlN
Sats fur tho Jut W.Ut on .-lale Thursday
FORREST MATIN KU I TONIGHT
"".. Final Wp1c llKa ut 8-15
The Greatest Musical Show
Evrr Produced
ADELPHI THEATRE
Tuesday Aft., March 28. at 3
(INT. U'FI.KM'i: (IM.
YYETTE GILBERT
IN MINUS OP H CIATI'KIIN IN COS-
Tl Ml (IL VAKHIl'S l'I.KIIII)-
Agisted liy
r.Vlll.Y flltrAM'K. Violin
V.KII-Vrr.I'lll.Nl ut the I'linn
Tloki-tn ut llnv Olllio Knulie rhino
lilrritlou Catharine A. Uiimmun N. V.
LYRIC
last mati.vke today
I.AhT TISII! TONIGHT
"Trip Onlv flirl" By Henry '"""'"
ine KJIliy Vain ,ml M,tnr JlerNrl
A Mustcul Triumrli IlxtHinrdlnnry'
i . i MArtKirr Anovu iath
VrmnliQir n 15a In 'i- p-m.
UlamVy HAZEL DAWN
In ' TUB SAI.KSI.ADV"
ACADIMV Sents at IIepn'B. 1110 Chutnut
Philadelphia Tonight at 8:15
Oi-pViMtrn I Soloists IhmMcun
vjrcnesira rUcn nnJ an3 Ktndier
in
hrt. ty
FRI.
I EVE.
SAT.
MAT.
9 Tickets
rmmrrmMOMaaai
ACADHMV or MUSIC
TWO IWnRF. TRAVHI.
' TALKS
UV rni'tT.AIt DKMtMl
LAST TIMliS THIS MKASONT
at
8:15
at
2:30
nt HfPiirV,
III!) rhmtnut
AROUND
INDIA
FAMOUS
PAINTINGS
50c to $1
HOTEL WALTON
Tuesday Evening, March 28
'Nobody Home' Night
Crnno nnd tnlncle ntul
Special novelty fcnturei
Booil tlm
Souvenirs. Dancing After 10 o'clock
Pictures from the ITascltinc Gal
leries will he given away.
becuro tahlo rierv.itlnnn from hend waiter
IUiroho O Jllllcr, JIanagcr.
Wilherspoon Halt, Mon. Eve, Apr. 10,8.15
AURELIO GIQRNI
Ilp.rrTrd Srntu Tr A VTTCTPrlrTtlon Smlt
B()r to 83.00 1 lAINlOl.Mus llurrau
IM II? i AsifrsrtlR
wmi
aHI
MARKETflJUNIPER STS.
I'ltirri in. in, g-r
CIIXTlNUIIfH 11 A. M. TO 11 1'. .11.
Nr.vr n'HRK
Tim kvknt or Tim sn,soN
James. J. Corbett
Tlio I'ormrr C'linmnlnn of Ihc World.
A tll'NICAI, COMRI TKATI'lin
THR FE-MA1L CLERKS
MI DTIIKU ST,Nlltl) CTS
mW tA oM?
THHATBt: IS
VI TINKK IJAII.Y. 2:30 ALL Sli,T8 10r
HVI'.NINtis. 7 s. 0'. inc. 15r, 20c
WIIKK I OVIVIIINl'INO MONDAY NKT
The Garden of Mirth
M sli'Vt, t'OVlKDV ri'Lt, OP
SURPRISING NOVELTIES
V ilntanc Molnfllcw niul Smpnv Snucw
vno oTiirit mvTi'iti: acts
11 "t lioiti-A MAUKHT and
-JM1Z VAVnr.Vll.LK Continuous 11
A M. to 11 r. M. Kio. 15c. 25o
THK TIMELY WAIl COMEDY
"A NIGHT in the TRENCHES"
"ED FORD'S Dancing REVUE"
Comlnc Next Veok James J. Corbett.
MELVILLE ELLIS
Tho pianist, raconteur ond'to.
tumo designer, who will entrEfa
at Keith's next week.
B. F. Keith's Theatre
CHESTNUT AND TWELFTH STS,
.Mat. Z l-.M. 2 Hliow llallT. Wlthi.TiTg
NF.XT Wr.Elt
Comedy and Song Festivall
nnoADWAVs roruwn paib
MELVILLE ELLIS
& IRENE BORDONI
. Plnno Artistry nnd Charactirltlo Smn
First Appearance Hero
rittMIM HILI.UM
Nordstrom-Pinkham & Co.
In a Ono-nrt Comedy, "ALL ATBOXn"
A SIIHSI'LITTINO SKIT
Foster Ball & Ford West
I'r-aontlng "Wlnro tlm Days of '61"
Ruby Norton & Sammy Lw
Otrrrlne Novrlty Pongs and llatioi
Daniels & Conrad
Youthful Muloal Marvels
anuni:n'N wnMiERi'ui. amwus-
MAItntrilRITK rARKKLly SAniKAjT
bii(nni:k ALn-vA.NDrn nno3.
SKI.m-TKIIIUM: PICTURES
tltf II tl VI1 1lllVTlllllni
r. C Mton-Mrdlincer . (ja. Mrr.l
Doiir alula., inc. i:K.t 7 & 0. 10c & soe 1
MIDNIGHT FOLLIES
Vaudevlllo'B most pretentions Mailctl
Comedy. 10 people, mostly pretty, btutl
fully conned Klrls, Llltln: music, piqatut
romedy. wplenHId efTeets.
6 BIG ACTS AND PICTURES
&
Ampncnn Olrard telow 8th. ilarkit iU.il
iuu. xues., inurs,. us
LYRIC
Beginning MONDAY!
Evening!
THE ART
SENSATION
OF EUROPE
METROPOLITAN
OPERA HOUSE
Evenings, 8:15
Mat. Sat., 2:15
Trices. BOo to $4
5 NIGHTS AND 1 MATINEE ONLY
BEGINNING NEXT MONDAY NIGHT
BE THERE THEN !
And Yon Will See the Maximum Climax of New York Winter (iarnn Hemes
BETTER THAN THE BEST
.1IATINKKS
WIIIINKMIAY and
MTCUPAY
BIGGER THAN THE REST
THIS IS
THE WOULD
lly blxHial Ar'an'Hnir nt U lth Til
nn: MKTitfir n.ir
Ml. II r
HA I I I
a
1 O'.Ullll
ndrKinnlnc
MOVDA,
Ai'Itil.
3
Jlal n t ooo IC fi DO
Come to Bohemia!
Jaei.t of JlaaHal Cumolles
.real i'aai un.l llfauty Chorun
GARRICK WATINKB I TO.NIUHT
VJ'rx"1,-'r' Today at J IS at 8.13
f5't. 3d Bit WeMf NiOllTS. 6 13
wetK - - Mats id i, feat
COHAN A HARIUS Trescnt
The Funniest Play
in the World
IT PAYS TO
ADVERTISE
Original New York Cast and Production
Het freata fl ut Popular Wed. J!attnes
The movies have lately adopted the shadow picture as a mode of
expression; Magician Thurston does tricks with it; and now Maude
Adams uses it to obtain striking and novel photographs of moments
in Barrie'a "The Little Minister," which returns to the Broad
Monday.
METROPOLITAN OPEItA HOUSE
LAST PEHKOIUIANCE THIS SKAS.ON
MirraoponTAH opf.k. toypi
t&S' Die Meistersinger
Uma. Oaiiki, ilttaM MM Urlus, Weil.
UorlU, ni, WItliwrspoon, bchltssl. iLeon.
hardt. Cud.. Mr. BaUntky.
Sat. 110U Chtwtout St WaJ. 4131; Race 67.
npolirAN' JiPfllA COMPVNY, NBW YORK.
!-T rniil'Vr,JlSc PrvKenta the
GREATEST ARTISTIC SENSATION OF THE CENTURY
SERGE DE DIAGHILEFF'S
BALLET
USSE
i
l 1 I ..!
fib !
tf jm ?
-Wi i' r .MwL JW ff'yWk I 3
v ,'? f&F'-Mk m "-S if Tift i
nitit.i.iANT iiKPi:nTon.Y or hallkts and mimed schnks phoduckd and
pnnhirTEi kxaotly as in- pahis and lo.ndon. wiiKnn tub iiali.ut has
IH-I N l.-1UAIt hUNHATIO.N ' "rt1
MiiVDAY NIOIIT "I.'Olwau do Keu."
titllinval ' ' Lhclloruarie "
U niJNKSDAY NIOUT. MARCH 29
'fltopatra " "Lo Hpctre ,le l,i Roe,"
'Solr-ll rlo Nult." "Curnaval
THPRSDVY NIOIIT. MARCH 30 "Lea
Myipniaen reiroucnhn am. r.-rrajiie
el'hS'EUY AND
I'US'U'MUS 11Y
LEON BAKST
SEATS ON SALE 1109 CHESTNUT ST. Telephones Ydhel
l HILN PIANO PBIID '
rniDAY NIOIIT MARCH 31 "IOIkwi
?? '(, ,mTu"n,lr' .. "L'Arres-MMI d'un
1 uuiu' "Prlnco luor "
HATtlltDAY MATINUR. APRIL 1 "Clo
patr" -Ij-s bylplride " "La Prlnceeso IJn
linnlpe." "Kolelt rle Nult "
HATUnOAY NKIIIT APRIL 1 "Tha-P"-
. ! I'otrouclika.." "Lo Spectre da la
llii. " Prima Igor "
I.nnH SYMPHONY ORCIIEISTRA
j;ilNU8T ANSUItJIKT. CONDUCTOR
1421
WALNUT l?op' Mal-Tues-Thurs" 2J5c- Hc f&a,!Si
VV-TVJl VJ X JUg. Mat. Snt.-Nights, Best Seats SI. NoHiUer
l&UrA(JN3Mz3y only
Itetclnuliis Muit.
hve.. 5 1 arc It 41,
Ausiutuii I'ltou.
Jr,,rrM;iiti the
l'uorl(u Actor-hlnvtr
IN A NEW
PLAY
''KILKENNY"
T,hu,u5JuJt,uu;7aiv:..I,"l, Tb- w"
"A WORLD OF PLEASURE"
A MAMMOTH MKLANOK or MIRTH. MUSIC AND MYRIADS OF MARVELS
With u Wortd-lltatlnc I'aat of l'.'S. Includlnc
CLIFTON CRAWFORD
CONROY and LE MAIRE
COLLINS HART. IIELKN OOI'K, VINITA FITZHUfill. McJIAHOV, DIAMOW1
vii,i'i.iiit. t is.Arsii 1,11 u.iiE.. jiantLinr,! .jfriT,iOi um ..wo... ..w
ft I
WHY IS THERE
tl&f''Mk
Xrjf.TiV
$m'?w ', ,t' ,' r ,' " ' " '
? ? ?
BECAUSE THEY ABE ALL AT THE
p ' ) v wm !mwifK fTwSt&m
nr.uK uu(iiis. jolly iu.mm anii pkktxy ohils abb caitiOax
lUItuMEUIIIA READ WHAT CRITICS BAXI , ,
Full of funj V MT
the cheerle and 1 J
face to ." TeITf)fj
'Attord ery on Wftj
,ood tlmr? " BultallK. 1
'Jolllost aort of mualcal
comedy; a uraart entertain
nwnt In eery particular,"
lierortl.
"Km originality and ma
netlsra: 14 brUiht. lively and
tuneful.' Inquirer,
-
"Comedy dlvertlnz: mulc
parkllng; a very attractive
chorui." I'resa.
'Ha un-to-datenen , and
wlnir: a aucceas,' North
American.
FORREST Monster Benefit, FRIDAY AFT., April 17
In aid of the Earlevllla Haiiltorluu for Coniumptlteu. under Autplcea of " "
Tneatrc Maoacera of nmauelviiia. lireat ytottum ot nut ye.uj -j-j-j-
jeauiuc iLeaires. cai owe 10 s.w. oea.a dih-i as "" --"
THE MOVIE NUT!
Francis
pUSHPlN
in
W0UH6X.S. KAVL
CANHOT PNP
THE G-JfU OF
HI 5 HE-ART
AfAONCrST
THE .PL6
StCH-
J$?
g)lSUJS.I AS
A WORK-MAN
H GOES Jtf
auesr of an
IDEAL DAMSEL
aiii rarawaaiaw 1. imiaia-aw Mr
-a- i
tAURA THE
LAONDR-CrlRL,
TOILS PAIL.Y
AT HEP.
SITUAT.OiN
OOTIDS
Jn n 1 nnL
cSjJrXH
n n
u
0 O
(Ehl'su
Wj
firz?
",n
"TOOTS'
- 'foot"
i. t to
..(nr1
1
Continued o 1 p
TOWORf
LA55 Bg
iwtsgs
AMCO THE
WBOfllNOcVOOR
1 1 o -
OR. SOB OF
AOJuAiNTe
WORK.
;rvrv
t'lniSfe
ji I

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