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Evening public ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, January 10, 1917, Night Extra, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045211/1917-01-10/ed-1/seq-1/

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'FINANCIAL EDITION
JSTRA
NIGHT
EXTRA
NIGHT
6
VOL. HI. NO. 101
PHILADELPHIA. WEDNESDAY JANUARY 10, 15)17
rortnii-iir, 1017, nt rue Pent to LtMtit CoilMltt
PRICE ONE CENT
fH -" IHIVIID X' fcfifflu .
c
VAST FRONTAGE
GUARANTEE FOR
IpORT'S GROWTH
I
1 6674 Vessels Docked in
Two Kivers were
During 1915
1916 FIGURES, SHOW
' INCREASE STILL ON
New Piers, in Construction,
Reveal Far-Sighted Plan
for Traffic
LUMBER TRADE MOUNTS
Receipts for Mammoth Ship
ments and Business Still
Rooming
UtTICLE III
During Hir- r.ir 1115, r. (5 7 1 vessels arrived
t tho port of t'lillnilclpliln, an nvcrngo of
ibout sixteen each ilav, Including Saturdays,
Sundays ami liolld.iv
These vessels unloaded their cargoes, re
loaded others nntl ilep.uteil. They liail an
ernEO tonnage of more than 2000 each.
Thy came from Argentina, HelRlum, Great
Britain, I'hill, Cuba, Denmark, Holland,
France, Greece. Italy. Mexico, Japan, Xor-
Uww, Hussia Spain, Sweden. .Ciuguay nntl
fiym various pints In tho United States.
.Naturally none came from Germany or
Austria
DIG worn. THAI-VIC
k From fori irii ports tliey htotiRlit miscel
laneous cirgoi s, from bananas to wool, tal
lied at $63 173 0H.I. and cairled away to for
eign ports equ.illv miscellaneous cargoes,
lalued at $11" 117,552 In addition, the car
goes handled b the costwlso vessels were
ulued at the stupendous IlRiircs of ?l,500,
000.000. Tho principal imports weio sugnr, wool
and goatskins and the principal exports
were wheat oil and gunpowder.
For the first six months of 1010 tho value
of the combined foreign exports and Imports
'tit Ihft nrtrl t.nu IICI .10. 170 MM-.,. l..nlnn
train shipments alone from Jnnunryto July,
1916, were .'6.CJ8 39G bushels of wheat,
-MS0.7U bushels of corn, 2,755,000 bushels
Moats, 28J.O0O bushels of rye and 1,041,053
'bushels of barley.
W X'lTV HAS 207 WHAitvns
1 To handle properly and expeditiously this
rowing minne commerce Philadelphia has
loma 267 wharves of alt sizes for ilm tin.
jcommodatlon of easels. This Includes
elehty-four individual sections of Improved
bulkhead on the Schuylkill Wver and tho
ivater-front terminals of tho threo Rreat
trunk line railroads on tho Delaware.
the clti s total water front on Ihn Ilel.i-
are and Kchuvlklll llivers is about ihlr'tj-
leven miles and It is from this Impos'ne
front that tho .'67 wharves extend Into the
rivers, giving a total berthing frontage, of
g.jv-.avu jeet
Of this, .'.in no foet can nccoiniuodntn
'ships of heavy draft, drawinc about thlrtv
.feet of water One hundred such ships, 350
feet long, could be berthed at one time. Of
line thirty-seven miles of river frontni-i.
jfabout seventeen miles aio In actual nun and
jtho remainder can be economically devel
lapped illl-inv.M'l) l''llONTAGl
The city and the United States Govern.
(ment own 43 117 feet of this frontage, of
hlch2585 feet are leased to lnilustW.il con
cerns, 1320 feet to steamship lines, 715 to
.railroad companies and J 83 feet to dock and
wharf companies
The remainder Is held principally for
keity piers and Darks und for the navv vard
Bt League Island
The principal marine terminals at nresent
iMS those owned bv tho eitv. ronslsllnir
at modern piers with otheis in tho course
j)f Construction, the flrtoen uflmriaa nt tho
Pennsylvania Itailroad, the twenty-thre'e
quants of the Heading Hallway nnd three
lounging to the Baltimore and Ohio Ball
goad, and the 4S00 feet of Improved bulk
Lad frontage of the Atlantic and Gulf
Continued oil Pair rite, t'uluuiii Three
pIITE HOUSE REPORTS
iua TAUUISLL'S REFUSAL
iaoounces Woman Named by Presi
ueni Will Not Serve on Tariff
Commission
if-WASHINGTON. Jan 10 Official an.
Muncement was made at the White House
I J Wsht that Miss Ida Tarbell had de-
Ped to become a member of the Tariff
Wmmlsslon,
e refusal of Sllss' Tarbell to serve on
Tar"r Commission was announced on
JJ.WWKJT Uy the HVENINQ LEDQBIl two
lu ago,
! THE WEATHER
FnjtKflAKT
?r Philadelphia and vicinity Prol
yl! tain. (. .-..,..,. .,-.
m
' -- uIWIIWH ui tuntititt o-
(J ew clcaritm ni,t f.1,v al..,.-.,j,.,.
Qnd ln.UCh fnlrlt'r mimlivnia .,,-. W I.F..
W. tecomlni northwett and trona.
LENGTH OF WAV
7-a.m. I Moon rives . 7 20p.m
i 53 D.m. 1 Moon souths. 1.33 a.m.
futtlut
"U-AWAKE ItlVEK TIOB CHANGES
CUKSTNlT STItKBT
Jft'.'f .H-'?m lltab water 3X)3p.m
water 10 ut a in I lw water JO 32 p bj.
,rKTi:8B AT K.1CH HOfK
IJ 101 Hi 121 II i 6li 6
Wii 461 471 481 4SI I
FAMOUS, SCOUT AND SHOWMAN DEAD
Colonel W. V. Cody, lictter
ELIMINATE WASTE,
REDFIELD URGES
Prepare for After-War Busi
ness, He Tells Com
merce Chamber
ASSAILS CARTAGE BILLS
"Prepare for the New Day," '
RcdReld Tells Merchants
'QTOP the waste in the United
J States -and eliminate the handi
cap in our industrial lines."
"Educate our boys and Kirls for
their work."
"It is time to set our house in
order and prepare for the new day."
"Tho average business concorn
does not know what the Government
has done in its behalf."
"Get a new system of weights and
measures and eliminate our present
antiquated method."
"Learn costs and the causes of
costs anil study and control tho ex
penses involved in distiibution."
The need of ellmlnntliiR wasto and nlly
ing science with Industry In the 1'nited
States was pointed out by William C. Iletl
fleld, Secretary of the Department of Com
merce, in the course of nn address this
afternoon beforo tho Chamber of Com
merce at tho Ilellevue-Stratford.
He deflated that no rov eminent in the
world did more, it as much, for tho aid of
business as the United States IIo osserleiV
with much emphasis that it was 'time to
set our house in order and preparo intelli
gently for tho new- day "
In many industries In this country, he
said, there exist certain handicaps, which,
if not corrected; vyill prevent tho United
States from taking the Place In tho world
to which Its wealth and resources cnlltlo it
Mr. Jtedlleld depleted tho jearnlig to be
lavish "We would rather hand jut n roll
than save u few cents." Jtb said. "This
wastefulness is one of our grunt industriu'
weaknesses "
Touching uiwu the many kinds of waste,
he said that It cost more to take a barrel
from the warehouse to the railway In
Philadelphia than It did to transport It from
Philadelphia to Chicago.
Humming up it few ills, he urged that
six definite things be done If tho nation
hoped to compete with the others stop
Continued on I'uee Heir", Column One
CONGRESS MAY RETAIN
MAIL TUBES HERE
Dourse President Says Fiuht for Pneu
matic Service Has Prospect
of Victory
Favorable action toward the umtlnuanee
of the pneumatic mail tube service in this
city hy Congress la more than probable,
according- to George K. Uartol, president of
the tlourse and chairman of the joint com'
mlttee of trade bodies who are fighting for
the retention of the service.
Sir. ljartol Informed the board of di
rectors of the Hourse of this today at the
January meeting. JJr. Hanoi said that
copies of the Joint committee's report re
futing Postmaster Burleson's mail tube
commission's statements had been sent to
every member of Congress and would be
used In the fight on the Iloor of the House
No New Quarters Until February 1
WASHINGTON, Jan. 10. The new
twenty-ftve-cent pieces, which were to. have
made their first' appearance In (in days,
will not be.put, In circulation until Feb
ruary 1, the Director pt the Mint announced
today. The mints have been so busy with
the new half dollars, which appeared Jan
uary 1. that they cannot undertake coinage
of the quarters now, It was said
Inspect Francis S. Key Memorial Site
WASHINGTON, Jan, 10. Secretary of
War Baker and Quartermaster Ueneral
Sharps today went to Baltimore to inspect
the site for the Francis Scott Key Memorial
oo the Fort lIcJeory reservation.
known as "KulTalo Hi 11"
1
n
NOTED SCOUT DIES
Colonel W. F. Cody, Scout,
Soldier, Showman, Yields
to Conqueror at Last
HAD WONDERFUL CAREER
DUNVIIR. Col. Jan 10 "Iluffalo lllll"
Is dead
Tin end came to the famous "Id scout,
whtiNo real name was Colonel William F.
Cody, at 12.115 this afternoon nt tho homo
of his daughter, Mrs .May Cody Decker,
vvhllo his old-time friend. Jimmy linker, was
indue across the continent to see him onco
again before he diet!.
At bis bedside when the ord camo wero
his wife, Almm ho married in ISfiO, Ills
two daitfi 'iters, Mrs. Pecker and Mrs. Irma
Cody Harlow, nf Cody, Wvo, his sister,
Mrs Julia Uoudmun; his nephew, . Will
Cody llnltlfoid, nntl several grandchildren
nnd other tolatives.
"lluffnlu lllll" had been fulling rapidly
for sfvei.il weeks I In was 's,"-''l to
Dcnvei a few dnys ngo In n ilslng condi
tion. F"r tho last thieo tlavs his tleuth
lins briii hotitly expected, but the remark
iilile vit.illt) of Hie famous plainsman allied
him in tlii- struggle for life
Hhortlj before daylight he begun sink
ing rnpidlv and doclqrs realised the end was
at hand ,
His I'HTFHUSQl'r: CAItKtill
William F Cody was born in Scott
County, la, Fobrusuy 20, 18IC. His father
was a frontiersman, whu was killed while
defending a wagon tialn from an attack
by Indians.
Cody, when still young, became a crack
shot, and while btlll In Ids teens took his
plueo among tho men of tho fioMUir in the
danguious vvnik of kieplng the wagon Halls
open between settlements.
In ISti'l lu beenino a Government 'pony
oiitlniied on Pilst. Tyhi, ('uluinn i
P. R. R. ASKS $75,000,000
ADDITIONAL IN BONDS
Move Will Be Made to Increase
Indebtedness at March
Meeting
At the uunn.il meeting of the Pennsyl
vania Itailroad to .bo held March 10 the
stockholders will lie asked to approve an
increase nf the authorized Indchleiincsii
u( the company to the extent of S75,0O,0UO.
This will cnnblo the bocuil nf directors
to Issue from time to tlmo such amount,
either of general murtg.ige bonds or of
capital Mod; that has heretofore been au
thorized by tho stockholders, ns may be
necessaiy to provldo for tho company's
juipltal requirements in the iiear future. In
uuillng maturing obligations.
ARGENTINE ARMY CHIEF
URGES CONSCRIPTION HERE
General Pablo Itiechiri Thinks Uni
versal Service Would Bo Found
Heneficial by U. S.
VHittd I'rtst Spielal Sot)i Amrrfcaii SrrU,
UIJCNOS AIRES, Jan 10. General
Pablo Jtlcchlrl. author of Argentine's mill
tary service law. thinks thl form of con
scrlption will eventually be found satisfac
tory for the United States. In an Interview
today he expressod the greatest Interest in
the report from Washington that military
heads favored adoption of the Argentine
idea for America
"Argentina resorted to conscription be
cause it was the only metho1 of maintain
ing a military reserve." the General as
serted. "The results, have bee most ex
cellent demoeratUins our people, improv
ing them mentally and physically and weld
Ini;' together various divers nationalities."
INITIAL PROBE
SHOWS NOTHING
IN LEAR CHARGE
Rules Committee Opposed
to Ordering Congress
Investigation
WILSON'S KIN TESTIFIES
R. W. Boiling Demnmls Apology
for Hint Ho Received Ad.
vancc Tip
tlll.Vi!Tn.V ,lnti HI t the dose of
h, ixecutlve session of ilif House Utiles
"inmltteo II hs learned that thf ffln
rlt of Its members nre opposed to ft
oi ilile lepoft mi the Wood resolution
Kiiik .i cinRressloiml Investigation of the
1. 1; tl infnrmiil'iiii leak from WnslilnRton
Wall Mtppt on President Wilson's ttrnii
'i hehl Hint ho evidence of n roti-
, ii in i hni after. shottlliR where or how
ii bilk- might be discovered anil cheeked
i.,i the future, hud been shown tho Itulen
i.' niiuittee
'I ho Demnctntlc members of the com
inittie. It was learned, take the position
Hi it nil public olllclnls whose names hnve
l kii iiuntloned In the Investigation have
i m eMiiierated. both from nn suspicion
if icpoiisllillity Tnr the "leak" and par
t . ipatimi In profits from such a "leak '
MAY IMIOD I.AWSON
A piobuble campiomlse Rcems to be the
appointment of n committee which would
tr to Ret fmm Unison names nnd definite
Information eoncernlnR tho members of
Congress, Cabinet olilccrs nnd bankers
mentioned by him as belliR responsible for
the 'leak" and prolltinR by It l-iwson has
steadfastly refilled to Rive nny names.
It Is unlikely Hint the proceeding will
ro ninth farther nn the bnBls of the tcstl
iiionv thus far adduced.
Tho Democratic members will consider
their future course during tho nftcrnoon,
ami the whole committee Is under call to
meet nfiain for further discussion.
It W. Itolllng. brother of President Wil
son's wife, first witness beforo tho com
mittee today, opened his statement by de
manding nn apology from Heprcsentntlvo
Wood for bringing his name Into tho leak
probe.
"My name has been mentioned In con
nection with the leak. I hnvo nothing to
nay to that, except thnt whoover Is re
sponsible I believe it Is Itcprcsentative
Wood can send mo nn apology nt the same
time ho sends one to Secretary Tumulty,"
said Itolllng
PGNIKS IMPLICATION
"I know nothing about the leak and had
no Information about tho note In advainjfi."
Tho probu has developed nothing tangible,
and It is probable that It will be concluded
soon, nntl the matter dropped
other witnesses, examined todaj. In
cluded Archie Jamison. Central News re
porter, who said that .Secretary Lansing In
advising the newspaper men of Hie forth
coming note sattl he was doing so to pre
vent "Injurious effect" on the market. Lnns
Ins hail testified he did not have the mar
ket in mind ' when be made the announce
ment, "ther newspaper men and the State
department printers nlso were examined,
but gavo testimony of little importance.
NO KNOWLUDGi: I F NOTB
Mr. Itolllng said he was a member of
tho brokerage firm of F. A Connolly &
Co., Washington
"I had no know ledge of the President's
peace nolo until I reail it ill the papers,"
said Mr. Polling in icspoiise lo n, (incut ion
from Itepresent.itive llcnr
Mr. Polling explained that he became a
( untlllllfil on l'UBK Tntl Column 1l
WASHINGTON "WETS"
FACE $1,000,000 LOSS
20(5 Barrooms and 82 Wholesale
Houses Doomed if House
Adopts Prohibition
fly a Btiitf t'nrrftpondt ,11
WASHINGTON, Jan. tu.-Tltto hundred
and sisty-six barrooms. ninei-i whole
sale liquor houses Olid three breweries will
bo put out of business In the District of
Columbia next November if the House
passes the prohibition bill put through the
Senate yesterday by n vote of 55 to 3i
it is generally admitted b (he "wets' as
well as tho "drys" Urnt the measure will
pass the lower branch of Congress by u. two-to-one
oto If the members are brobght
face to face vvitli, the question. The onlj
hope the nntl-iirohlliltlonists have is that
the District of Columbia Committee, genei
ally regarded ns "wet," win keep tlie meas
ure pigeonholed fur the rest of the session.
"Dry" leaders say that If that Is at
tempted they will get a rule from the Itules
Committee, forcing the District Committee
to report the measure to the House. It is
asserted confidently that the "drys" have 4ie
majority of four on the Hutes Committee,
and that It vlll be impossible for the District
Committee to smother the bill. A poll of
more than forty members of the House
taken today shows that the prohibition
measure will pass there on a rollcall vote
by at least two to one
Some of the business Interests of jfle
District of Columbia, which are big tax
payers, are opposing the prohibition meas
ure. The saloons and wholesale houses of
Washington now pay approximately a half
million dollars In licenses each year. X'nder
the half-and-half agreement, whereby the
CenUaued eu I'sxe 1'lie, Cgluum Tog
QUICK
"fOHI'SK" JNTRHRUPrs HER OWN HWFFM
intUWNBWOUD, 'JV.. d.m. 10. Arising rrwit Iwi Vi ,k
-uitr' for Her ftiiKint began, Mrs. Orncc Jones Fhcuicil btiirj im
'tt alive by a matter of mlnttttH. Mrs .tmir-j. wiis pvouimtt r0 t.,?tl
ff 1'inumtuiln by tiliyrinut.
ASKS LIMIT OF U. S. RAIMIOAD KEGULAriON
WASHINGTON, Jan. 10, Definition of Ihr- ptrtn to winch
i- vrrnment ffgtiiniion of railroads may go before lutciffrtng vtiu.
piM.nr" mrttiitrmhnit was niibJ by JPrnnlt C. tlagemmn. opfriAt
A v uji Attornry Qniemt, in hl closing arsumciii for ihr Oov
. imnciit lit tile Aitntimon law tnso In tli" Supreme Cdiirl twtny.
ADAMSOH LAW HI HANDS OF SUPREME COURT
WASHINOTON. Jan. 10. Thp Adnnwon railroad law p I He
hand', of tlir UnOrd Slates Supremo Court. TUr rotifi Is lo rtertrl
whether tltih ttattite, ptihocd under bCt.nlioiiiil rirrumst tmw vA full,
P i nvrtf painlys-itt of ibr itatinn'!, roinincrrr higlnny. u. comtiiu
tituil. Tfunk C. Uagcrmiiu. tipccltil nssihtant AHQinfi U-iiemi, reu
eluded hi arcitinrnts to the roun try's higliett Irlbunal at J lb this
aff c moon 4and the court formally took the matter under coiii.ider.i
tion. VUmi a declbion enn be expected is merest upcctilatiou, both
Oovsrumctit and railroad attorneys agreed tliito afternoon.
UNION CASUALTY REPLIES TO RECEIVER PLEA
liAltlllsmritCi. Jim. lu. -The 1'nlnn Casualty Coinimiiy, nf Phll.itlulpliia, today
tiled brlofa III the Dauphin County courts In Its exceptions against the decree of
receivership ki anted at the rcinicst of thu Stnto Jnsur.incc Department. As Is
customary, the Court did nut make the papers public
SUES HOTEL MEN FOR BROKEN BACK
I.AN'CASTKIt, Pn., Jan. 10. Hairy Young tod.iv brought suit against Horburt
J. Ilellly, of Media, former ptoprloior of tho Lincoln Hotel, Lancaster, anil Fordliinnd
tirehe, Its (inner, to lecover 15,000 tlamagos fur jiersonal Injuries. A oar uro
Voiiiik's back was broken when liu was caught liutvvcon n coal wagon ho was
driving and tho top of a doorway In a shed on tho hotel property. Ho says thu
entrance, was not a aultablo one.
12,000 N. Y. SHIRTMAKERS OUT ON STRIKE
NEW VOItK, .Inn. 10. Twelve thousand slilrtmaliora went on strike today for
a llflj -hour week, a $2 week Increase in wages and a twenty per cent increaso on
piecework.
KERN PREDICTS EXTRA SESSION OF CONGRESS
WASHINGTON, Jan. 10. Senator Kern, majority leader In the Senate, said
today he could not Ileum out how an extra session of Congiess could he avoided,
lie blamed It on the i tiles of tho Senate, which penult unlimited debate, and filibus
tering tactics.
MISSING LINER REPORTED IN BERMUDA HARBOR
NKXV VOKK. Jan. 10 The" Lampoi t and Holt liner Voltaiie, now llilrtj-nine
tlayu overdue, which we believed to hnvo been captured by a German raldor, J
reported today to have been retaken by tho llrltlsli and eonvojed into llennuda
harbor.
BRITISH CRUISER SUNK BY A JUNE
ISKKLIN, Jan. 10.- The lliltlsh armored cruiser Hlianuou. of 14,800 tons, vynsj
sunk lost November bv a mine explosion, aivurding to a statement from the news
paper Ilasler AnsteigHr, circulated today by the ullictal press bureau.
516 WAGE ADVANCES IN TWO MONTHS; STRIKES WON !)!
WASHINGTON. Jan. 10. -Great tin-leases in wages In November and Doeombcr
no shown in reimrts l the Department of Labor. In Nov ember there wero 213
wago increases, of vvlih h tlfty-seveu resulted from mutual ngi cement, sixty -six from
strikes and seventy-two fiom .oliiiiintv aetluii by the employer. For the remain
ing seventeen there ure no leports. In December 173 increases vveie voluntary
and only Ihlrtj-thret tallied by strikes In December there were S04 increases Jrj
tho bis trades.
PRESIDENT NAMES ARMY INSPECTOR GENERAL
WASHINGTON. Jan .0 Tl President today sent to the Senate the follow
inc nominations; To be iiupectoi gemrul of the nim. with the rank of brigadier
general, Colonel John . Chamiwi lain: to bo a member of tho California Debris
Commission, Colonel Hdvvaid Hurr, engineer corjM. I'. 8. A ; to be Secretary of
Tternlory of Hawaii funis prehu luulteu, of Hawaii.
WAR DEPARTMENT ADOPTS NEW COAST DEFENSE PLAN
WAHHl.NOTON. Jan. JO.- Following a study of Kuiopean war methods the
War Hpnartmont bus under construction a. IC-liieli howitzer nnd a Hinch rjflj
for tnobilo oarriaes on iallroal tracks fin. coast defense. A IS Inch lunvitzer, to be
used on ordinary rouds, with a caterpillar tractur, has ulready been constructed.
JAPAN RATIFIES ALLIES' ECONOMIC POLICY
LONDON, Jan. 10. The Foioign utile announces that Japan has sigiiiiita her
adheieuce to the economic agi cement arrived at by representatives ut tho Entente
Towers at tho Paris confeicuce. The aKi'eeinent provides for unification of la,s
reguluUnR tradlns .with hostile cuuntriea, measures of economicu;, tnoustrtal. agri
cultural and maritime reconstiuctlon uf the Kntcnto, allied countries after the war
and jisrman&nt commercial collaboration among the Allies.
GERMANY TO RETURN BELGIANS, DUTCH HEAR
TUB HAGl'B, Jan. to. Germany Is preparing to cease the removal of Belgian
vwirkmen and to return to their homes those that have already been sent Into Ger
many, according to tho Nieuvve Courant. It adds that Germany lias a plan to
co-operate with Belgian communes to provide woik for the Belgians in Belj-ium
FRANCE REQUISITIONS ALL SURPLUS ALCOHOL STOCKS
PAWS. Jan. iu. rtii siucks 01 mvuimi
been requisitioned (throughout France.
GERMANY BREAKS STEEL PRODUCTION RECORD
WASHINGTON. Jan. 10. A teport received by the Department of Commerce
from Germany savs that a record in steel production was made n October, when
1,433.53$ tons were produced. The production for September was 1,396.186 tons. In
October the average dally production was 64,751 tons and in September it was
S3.&S4 tons- For the ten months ended with October, the total -was 1J.J4M1S tons-
1
NEWS
n 1 ikiihiii uou sauons) have
ENTENTE REPLY
TO WILSON MAY
BE SENT TODAY
Publication of Allies' Terms
Likely to Elicit Answer
by Germany
PEACE TALK TO CONTINUE
President Seems Victor in Effort
lo Obtain Statements
From Powers
The world will probably know tho
lentntivo terms of both groups of com
Lalants in the Kuropenn war within tho
noxt ten Ilnys. Dispatches indicate
that thu Kntcnto reply to Presi
dent Wilson's peace suggestions, which
may bo hnnded lo Ambassador Sharp ,
nt Pnrin today, will outline in detail
thu aims of the Allies, and that tho
publication of the note will bo followed
by it declaration of tlto war obj'ects of
tho Ccntial Kmpites by Chancellor von
liethmann-HollweF; in. the Keichstnc;,
supplemented by another German com
munication addressed to neutral
powers.
Although tho outlook for an early
end of the European war still remains
dark, developments point conclusively
to thu fact that discussion 0 peace
will not be tei minuted. Ptesident Wil
son, for one, is. determined to push
peace talk to tho front, in the hopo
that it will lead to uninterrupted cs
chanRcs of opinions, official and unof
ficial, between the bellip;crents and may
ovcnuully icsult in a confeience.
Although n large measure of the de
bate at the Allied conference in Homo
was devoted to military problems and
the question of "unity of action on a
unity of fiont," it is clear from a state
ment issued by the Italian Minister
Iiissolati that the question of peace
was jrone into thoroughly. Iiissolati
assorted that any hope of a separate
pcaco with Italy entettained by tho
Central Kmpires has been dispersed by
the action of the conference, but ad
mitted that tho Entente reply to Presi
dent Wilson's note will contain a clear
and definite statement of terms.
In view of the foregoing, it appears
that President Wilson's initial move in v
the interest of peace in calling for
declarations of terms and intentions by
all belligerents is to be crowned with
success, despite tho vituperative com-
ments elicited by it 11 1 the beginning
in tho Allied press.
U. S. ENVOY IN PARIS
WILL GET ALLIED NOTE
I.onpu.S", Jnn. 10
The Allies' answer lo President Wilson
will be hnnded to Ambassador Sharp at
Paris possibly today. It. will not bo mads
public for several dus, an agreement for
simultaneous publication in America and
Kurnpe having been inn tie.
Delay in sending the leply has not been
due to any differences between tho IJntente
nations as to the general principles to ba
enunciated ia the document Complete
agreement on this general outline, has been
manifest from the tine of the first tliaft
Utit exchanges of views as to tho phrase
ology with which these general alms were
to be presented and ileslro to polish oft
I ho verbiage consumed some time. The note
will detail the Allies' wur ulrns and pui
poscs, and fur this reason It is desired to
make the text absolutely perfect nnd cap.
able of '110 misconstruction or mlsconceu.
tiou
An Important "statement" will be made
by liuperiul Chancellor von Pethmann
Hotlweg about January' 15, special dis
IKUches asserted today. The Chancellor, It
was asserted, will undertake to analyze
the various peace moves which have already
been made and may mnko another an
nouncement. Arrangements for the Heidi
stue meeting, at uhUh this statement is to
be made, are being held in abeyance, it was
said until Germany leurns the form of ihe
Allies' answer u President Wilson's peace
suggestions.
Thu Merlin dispatches usscrted that the
further peace move whU.h was planned by
l'ontinuril on i'.icr Fuur. Column Thrre
FIGHT ON LEASE OF WATER
POWER SITES IN SENATE
States" Rights Advocates Oppose Meas
ure Designed to Turn Over Re
sources to Private Companies
WASHINGTON. Jan 10
'J'Uu Senate turned Its attention today
to the long-neglected conservation program
by taking up the water power bill, provid
ing 'or the leasing of water power sites
to private companies on public lands in the
West
"States' rights" Senators were allied in a
combination to light the measure on the
ground that the Federal Government has
no jurisdiction over the leasing of water
power sites, the public domain in the var
ious States. Long debate on the measure
is expected
On account of the crowded condition p(
the Senate calendar. It is probable that the
water power bill will be the only conserra
tion measure to be acted on at this session,
although the steering committee last Sep
tember voted to give conservation a prefer
ential place on the legislative program.
Delaware Deadlock Unbroken
DOVKH, Del Jan, 10 The members of
the Delaware Senate took eleven fruitless!
ballots for president pro tern this raoraing
without- breaking the deadlock, the three
hold-out mem tiers standing imi The Sea
kU then ted, a reosss until utnorrew
moj-uinif.
m
A
i'-i - it if"--"'-;

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