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Evening public ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, November 12, 1917, Sports Extra, Image 1

Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045211/1917-11-12/ed-1/seq-1/

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?T0U IV.-NO. 51
PHILADELPHIA, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1917
CoMiiant, 10IT. lit Tn rratto Ltmn Coxrixt
PRICE TWO CENTS I
RESIDENT BARES TEUTON
BROTHER ONCE
HIREDMALONEY,
BILL VARE SAYS
Employed Detective to
Shadow Vice Probers,
Defense Alleges .
QUICK NEWS
. 7-"
. bv
WORLD DOMINANCE IDEA
SOCCER SCORES
WEST P1IIXA H.
SO. I'll I LA. II.
1
It -
&
.
ON PLEDGES TO LABOR
ALL POWERS AND RESOURCES
OF U. S. TO CRUSH GERMANY
iStirring Appeal Before American Federa
tion Declares Workmen Can Play
' Large Part in Guaranteeing
Peace Through Victory
"THE COMMONER" IN PHILADELPHIA
BUFFALO, N. Y., Nov. 12.
In the most stirring speech of his career, President Wilson today, addressing
It' American Federation of Labor convention here, pledged anew all the power
resources of America to the destruction of the Prussian military autocracy,
I rletory is the only way to peace and called upon labor for redoubled
i toward the winning of the war.
I? With a fire unparalleled in an nis previous war speccno, the President
I the pacifist movement and made it clear that the patience of the Govern-
nt is near exhaustion in dealing with the obstructionists,
Six thousand delegates and visitors cneered tne r resident witn an enthusiasm
i '- l nl linfn.n in T.A n Tf lnff nn rllllVit nmntir t. i n .,..... nn 4.
I ftU XIUV lUCt UU1V 11 111V WC41. .b lAb UU uvuub U1UUI1 11, O li If U3 tU
i labor is standing in the conduct of the war.
l pnRsinv.MT WTi.snN's spRKr.ir
President Wilson began speaking at 10:20.
"This is a great privilege and a great honor," said the President. "I gladly
rKcepted the invitation because it seemed to be that it was a welcome one.
"I am glad of the opportunity to speak to you some of the thoughts which
ibeen gathering in my mind for the last few months. I would be glad if you
Itwld regard me not as the President, but as a man seeking counsel.
"I take it that in order to realize just what this moment of counsel means
H would be well to remind ourselves just how and why this war came about.
"The war was started by Germany. Her authors deny it, but I am willing
Fto await the verdict of history. Why did Germany start the war? Remember
the position of Germany in the world. The world stood in admiration of her
rjateDigence and material achievements. As a university man I have been
hnrounded by men trained in Germany. Nowhere else could they get such
talking. Her industries were perhaps the most competent in the world. She
ltd access io all markets in the world, but men in those markets feared Germany
use of her almost irresistible competition.
"Her industries were perhaps the best in the world. The label 'Made in
' was a guarantee of workmanship. She had a 'place-in thevsun: Why
KM she not satisfied? What more did she want? There was nothing in the
mid of peace she did not have, yet she was not satisfied.
"There is no important industry in Germany upon which the Government
i not laid its hand to direct and, if necessary, to control it.
"They were the same kinds of competition that we have tried to prevent by
kw. The conditions of competition were thus controlled by the German Govern-
fwt
it "a, comical control wnicn would enaoie ncr to control an or. tne laoor ana
. Industry of the world was behind it.
PEACE TALK INSINCERE
"Look at the map of Europe. Germany, in thrustinc attain her neace nro-
Kposals upon us, talks of Belgium, Northern France, Alsace-Lorraine. Those are
deeply interesting proposals, but they are nbt talking about the heart of the
liiutief.
"Look at the map of Germany's dominion. I saw a map the other day
Continued on Pane (mm Column 11tb
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HHDTv' siiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiftiisiiiiiiiH
, ADDITIONAL RAPING RESULTS
I'ounh Limlico r.ic. 1 1-2 mile We&ty Hogan, 1:30, O'Brien,
1.00, SO.lOj IS.0, won; Omar Khayynui. lUO, Uutwell, SU.-10. 3.lo.
-pcotid: Sun JJonr.ott. Ill Lottti. 88.10, third Thm'. .si 4-5.
SCHUMANN-HEINKi: -W SIirO l-'OK SOLDIERS
BALTIWORK. Nov. 1L'. Mnw. Krnestiiio Schumanu-llelnkc, the
culebrated contralto, went to Cami) Mead- tnli nfttiuoon to shig to
th soldiers.
M FREELY OPENS
'UBSETOY.M. C. A.
Jakes Splendid Response to
pfar Work Council's $35,-
W . 000,000 Campaign
$136,629.75 IN FEW HOURS
MISS BIDDLE BADLY
MAIMED BY AUTO
Face Mutilated and Leg In
jured When Dragged
Under Machine
William Jennings Bryan, erstwhile Secretary of State, tarried in the
city today on private business, departing in the afternoon for Lehighton,
where he is to lecture on prohibition tonight.
TEUTONS TAKE
10,000 CAPTIVES
IN PIAVE DRIVE
Austro - German Advance
Reaches Feltro on De
fenders' Left Wing
FLANK MOVE SUCCEEDS
SLAV PARTIES
UNITE TO t)UST
REDS' CABINET
Bolsheviki Government Fast
Crumbling as Loyal Troops
Move on Petrograd
FIGHTING IN CAPITAL
KAISER REPORTED AT ITALIC TrpoNT SHW"
AMSTERDAM:, 'Nov. 12. Kilser VMhelm ua. nt the Ttni'ii
front Sunday, Berlin dispatches declared today.
SUSPECTED SPY ARRESTED IN SEATTLE EXPLOSION
SEATTLE, IIoV. 12. Gus. Vollllcll, foit vrnrn "1H. -" j - '
Oi,"l".,.i hiiy. ivns avrtbicil -Hjrtly Vfoie noon today by 0"rr. .
uytiitss ou u churgo of having been usoiibille fur two tixplosl'n !'
the plant of tliu Olympic Steel Woiks last nisjlit. Volliicli, v'ci n. ,.
to Howard Wright, ol tho Department ot Justt ,-. put some h'g y
Ljploplve acKl in matcruls used at tho plant
U. S. SEIZES 20.000 TONS OF COTTONSEED CAKE
.HOUSTON. Tt.x., Nov. lli.t-Xwiuty Jiou-..iml toi s ot cottonseed
L-jli-j stored at (Jalvi'stou and l'oit Aithur, oujicdHby mutint nations,
Uus boa tvizc(! by tliu Uuvuruinent, n bi-caini- known hem today. It
was niiuouaccd that tht calto will be bhiuind hue for ciushiiifj and
tliu thlju'od to "iu dratiL'ht-.'.ti-irl;u i.'jiuJi it W-si T.lsas to focd
DENIES PROMISING
PAY IN FIFTH WARD
Witness Calls Val O'Farrell
Employe an Agent of
Senator Penrose
SLEUTH HELD FOR COURT
Defendant in State Senator's
Office Day Before Epplcy
Murder, Court Is Told
tattle.
-. .. k A
u. W teM$t&$&j!siUtoll;
.iH
STRIKE TO FORCE CLOSED SHOP ON GOVERNMENT
NEWAIIK, N. J.. Xov. 12. A strike of nil men working on Government con
struction In northern New Jersey w.ts called today. Leaders asserted that more
thnn 10,000 men would lie out In three days. The strike was called because the
Lackawanna llrldso Company Is nonunion. By strikes on all Jobs the men hope
to force the Lackawanna concern to adopt the closed shop.
NOT YET CONSCIOUS
Oa Features of
Y. M. C. A. Campaign
hREXEL & CO. announced as -subscribers
of $100,000.
George H. McFadden gives
50,000.
Subscription of $25,000 by Edward
Bos acknowledged and a similar
Unount from anonymous subscriber.
Teams collect $136,629.75 in first
morning's work.
Total for Philadelphia already
subscribed $336,629.75.
Philadelphia's quota. $2,000,000.
Campaign closes on Monday next.
Philadelphia welcomed the launching of
$11,000,000 national rlrlvn nf thn War
EWork Council of the Young Men's Chrls
1' Association today with open arms.
loiter still, t seemed the "Christian sol-
. ho marched -forth to start gathering
IJ.COO.000. which la thn Phllndelnhla
fist's quota, were met with open pocket-
1 Um of Had K5.7K nMectrft In
TtOtlons hv thA twantv tMnrn In the
'Ort ItULrA rf n tmt.w V.n..
Jta result of the morning's work hardly
en announced .amid thunderous
ftt thfl lllnrhnn nf thn nY.rllllvA
nlttee and teams at the Illtz-Carlton
It VU fnllnwari hv th. nAUa that
l ft Co., bankers, who are acting as
Vfer or the campaign fund in this dls-
ll conirioutea the 1100,000 wnicn
Len announced ns subscribed nnoiivm.
h7 On Rnln.ilBw
fittt H. McFadden. general chairman
J Philadelphia executive committee.
-i . io me iuna loaay,
ward Bok, chairman of the State ex-
j committee, contributed J25.000 on
lth T o,uou anonymous suDscrip-
E ' also was announced today.
QENEROU8 OPPEItS OP AID'
Kartaret Anglln, who Is playing In
ome. Soldiers" at the Little Theatre.
tCOd todAv that Kft rwtr 'n.nt at all
! olBce) sales tor th entire week
given to the fund. In addition,
will fir pacia.l matinee on
uM.o.iiM,oea.wuia.ir ux
I M.
JIIss Sydney Diddle, the beautiful young
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. Mercer Oiddlc,
ot Torresdalc, uas terribly Injured, It bo
came known today, In a spectacular automo
bile accident near her home on Saturday
afternoon. Miss Blddle's face was pitifully
mutilated, her leg Eorlously hurt and, ac
cording to Information received at her home
this afternoon, she has not yet regained con
sciousness. Miss Blddlc rode In a "bkelcton" car of
the demonstration variety, which has very
little body In the rear. It was driven by
Ilalbton Blddlc, a friend, hut no relation of
Miss Blddle. With them was tho joung
girl's mother. Miss Blddlo sat in tho rear
car wrapped In a huge steamer rug. Ac
cording to tho account of tho accident ob
tained at the Blddle home today, the rug
caught In tho back wheel and dragged the
girl under tho car. It was not until they
had passed over her and crushed her that
the mother and Ralston Blddlo realized
what had happened.
"Her leg Is berlously hurt and her face
badly crushed," It was said at the Blddle
home this afternoon, "just how badly we
shall not know until Friday, for Doctor
Billings has just been here, and that Is
the time when tho bandages will bo re
moved for the first time.
"Sydney's mind seems clearer, but she has
not yet regained her consciousness. Wo can
not tell about her condition yet."
Miss Blddle Is about fifteen years of age.
She Is the sister of Miss Harriet Blddle, who
met a tragic death a few years ago In the
New York, New Haven and Harford wreck,
In which many Thlladelphlans prominent
socially were killed. In the same catas
trophe A. Mercer Blddle. Jr., the young
girl's brother was Injured.
Miss Sydney Blddle figured In the news
several years ago when by her presence of
mind Bhe saved Thomas V. Keenan, a post
office clerk of Torresdale, from drowning,
Keenan had dived repeatedly Into Toques
' sing Creek in an Ineffectual attempt to res
cue the slx-year-old eon ot ThomaB Scully,
a teamster, who had fallen In.
Keenan became exhausted and made for
shore when, winded and half frozen, he
showed signs of collapsing. Miss Blddle had
seen the child plunge and summoned Kee
nan When he showed signs of exhaustion
he waded out, despite the late November
temperature, and brougnt mm uintmr to
rt w,..i f. .ipr
LONDON Nov. 12.
"The usual mutual artillery firing,"
was all Field Marshal Haig had to re
port from the British front today.
"TaIIIS. Nov. 12.
There is a lull in infantry fighting on
the French front. The only thing re
ported by the War Office today was
artillery fighting on the Verdun front
around Bezonvaux and Chaume Wood.
BKR.LIN, Nov. II.
German-Austrian trooos hao reached
Fcltre, on the left wing of tho Italian po
sitions along the riae, tho War Office an
nounced today. "
Ten thousand Italian poldlers surrendered
Irt the upper I'lave valley. The troops found
their retreat barred near Longarone.
Feltre Is on the right bank of the upper
riae. about twenty miles southwest of
Ballun.. which was yesterday reported cap
lured bv the Teutonic advance. Longarone
Is about ten miles north of llalluno.
HOME. Nov. 12.
The Inter -allied military commission,
vhlch Is directing the campaign for the
salvation of Italy, Is today delivering Its
first blow against the invading Austro-Ger-man
armies.
Along the lower Plave Illver and upon
the Aslago Plateau (south of tho Sugana
valley). Italian troops and their allies have
followed a bombardment of the Teutonic
positions with sharp thrusts and at some
points the advance guards of tho Invaders
wcio thrown back, said advices from Rome
today. In the Sugana valley, which crosses
the frontier from Austria-Hungary Into
Italy northeast of Hoercto, advancing Aus.
tro-German forces were halted and some
of them captured by General Diaz's Her.
sagllerl. If. as the German War Office
asserts, the Italian towns of Helluno nnd
Vldor have been captured by the Teutons,
a new menace confronts the Italian armies
holding the Plave lino north of Vldor and
serious obstacles have been placed In the
way of their retreat southward.
With Increasing pressure against both
flanks of the Italian armies on tho Plave
River, a new strategic retirement may be
Centlnuwl on fate Four Column Tho
URGE CENTRAL COMMISSION
FOR WAR RELIEF EFFORT
U. S. TO BE REPRESENTED IN ALLIED WAR COUNCIL
LONDON, Nov. 12. The Interallied War Council which Is to sit regularly at
Versailles, will have representation from the United States, Foreign Minister Balfour
announced today. The meetings will be held monthly, or oftener, If necessary, ana
the closest unity of action will result.
U. S. PER CAPITA CIRCULATION $47.03
Tho prosperity of the country Is reflected In the money circulation statement of
tho United States Government as of November 1, which was issued today. Secre
tary McAdoo reported that on to first day of this month the total circulation was
$5,768,711,565 as against M.780,778,487 on November 1, 1916. With tho population of
thn nntlnn estlmuted nt 104. 719.000 persons theso figures would Indlcnte that there
is in circulation $47.03 for each man, woman nnd child, as compared with $41.18 a
year ago.
STANDARD OIL GIVES $100,000 TO Y. M. C. A. FUND
NEW YORK, Nov. 12. The Standard Oil Company of New York has contributed
$100,000 to tho Y. M. C. A. fund.
COPENHAGEN, Nov. 12.
Moderate Socialists and representa
tives of the Center group have formed
a coalition in Petrograd with a view
to establishing an anti-llolshcviki Cab.
inet, according to a press dispatch re
ceived here today.
PETROGRAD (byw7reless to London),
Nov. 12.
No communique was issueH frnm
headquarters today.
This Is the first word receded direct from
Petrograd since Sunday afternoon. Non
Issuance of nn official Matement may mean
the Kercnsky government desires to with
hold information as to troop moemrnts
from tho Bolshclkl In Petrograd, with
whom they aro probably at this moment
fighting.
MOSCOW, Nov. 12.
The army garrison today transferred Its
allegiance back to the provisional Govern
ment, forcibly ejected Bolshevik! leaders
irom tne various olllccs and droe them
fighting back Into the Kremlin.
It Is reported here that General Kornllolt
has escaped from Bkhoff and will aid
President Itodzlanko of tho Duma In form
ing a government at .Moscow.
General Kaledines. of tho Don Co-Jsacks.
has declared himself leader of the All
Cossack tribes.
The food Mtuation here Is most serious.
The city, howcer, remains comparatively
quiet.
LONDON. Nov 12.
Tho BolsheUki "goernmcnt" of Russia
is crumbling fast. It may have already
crumbled away. Kercnsky Is reported
mnrchlng on Petrograd with an army of
200.000 men.
There is every probability that the ex
pected battle between Kerensky's loyal
troops and the Trotzky-Lcnlne factions Is
now In progress.
Not since Sunday forenoon have any de
tailed dispatches come through direct from
Petrograd. This silence, as London Inter-
ATLAS POWDER COMPANY RAISES SALARIES
NEW YORK, Nov. 12. In order to adjust the remuneration of its salaried em
ployes to conform with the ndvances granted Its plant operatives, the Atlas Powder
Company has announced nn Increase to the former of 10 per cent of their monthly
salaries, effective as of November 1 last. The 20 per cent emergency pay awarded
early this year to employes because of the high living costs will be continued until
further notice.
FIRE DESTROYS $30,000 STOCK OF GRAIN
I'OTTVILLE Pn., Nov. 12. A $30,000 fire occurred at Tamaqua today, when
the Boyer granary and office were destroyed. Ten thousand bushels of oats, six
cars of flour and other grain In largo quantities wero consumed. C. . Boyer is the
owner. The loss Is Insured.
BRYAN IN CITY ON BUSINESS TRIP
Ex-Secretary of State William Jennings Bryan came to Philadelphia today on a
private business trip. After remaining a few hours, he left for Lehighton. Pa., where
ho will deliver an addiess tonight on pronation.
Lutheran Ministers Declare There Are
Too Many Organizations Working
at .Cross Purposes
There are too many organizations work
ing at cross purposes in war relief matters
and the work should be co-ordinated by
the formation of a central commission com
posed of representatives of all the churches,
according to the opinion expressed at the
meeting of Lutheran ministers held at the
Continental Hotel this morning. Resolu
tions adopted at the meeting favored the
immediate formation of such a commission.
It was announced that there will be a
meeting of the laity ot St. Paul's Lutheran
Church, Camden, on November 20, and also
that al future ministers' meetings will be
held In, the Y.'SI.C,- A. building. An ad-
4naa;wMteuvefM byrtlie Jtevu. it BoU
Continued on face Four Column Two
HUSBAND AND WIFE
DIE ONE HOUR APART
Mr. and, Mrs. Horace Roland, of Read
ing, Victims of Grim
Reaper
TROOP TRAINS COLLIDE; THREE KILLED, MANY HURT
SALIDA, Col.. Nov. 12.-Three boldiers aro reported killed and many others
Injured In a rear-end collision of two troop trains eastbound on the Delver and Rio
Gt ando Railroad near Cotopaxi. a small station In Fremont County, early today.
Relief crews are being rushed to the scene of the disaster.
NORTHCLIFFE ARRIVES SAFELY IN ENGLAND
NEW YORK, Nov, 12. A press cable from London Bays that Lord Northcllffe,
British' Commissioner to tho United States, accompanied by Lord Reading, arrived In
England today.
D L. AND W. FREIGHT HANDLERS GET INCREASE
jniANTON Pa.. Nov. 12. Granted an Increase of 2V4 cents per hour, freight
bnmilers at the stations of the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western nallroad here.
who had been on strike, returned to their places today. Refusal of union teamsters
and chauffeurs to move freight handled by strikebreakers, white and black, brought
hero from New York, hastened tho company's decision to grant the demands of
tho men.
BALDWIN'S TO MAKE SHELLS FOR BRITAIN, IS REPORT
According to dispatches from Washington, the British Government Is negotiat
ing with the Baldwin Locomotive Works to undertake the manufacture of a large
amount of 6-inch shells. The amount of the contract Is said to be in excess of
$10 000 000. William De KraITt, treasurer of ,the Baldwin Locomotive Works, would
neither confirm nor deny the Information today, saying that tho concern had re
ceived strict orders from the War Department to give no Information regarding
negotiations with any aovernmem.
m
M
Congressman William S. Varo was the
first witness nnd chief figure today at the
long-deferred hearing of the "Bloody Fifth"
Ward murder conspiracy charges against
cx-H irbormastcr Samuel G. Maloncy, before
Magistrate Witson, at the Central Station,
which resulted In Maloney being held In
$10,000 ball for court.
Under a severe cross-examination by
counsel for the defense, Vare admitted that
his brother. State Senator Edwin H. Vare,
had paid about $400 to xlaloney, city man
ager for the Val O'Farrell Detective Agency,
for detective work about six months before
the murder ot Acting DetectKe George A.
Epplej; by Imported Frog Hol'ow strona
arm men.
"Ask Senator Vare." he said, when asked
what the work was for. Maloncy's counsel
endeavored to proe that the detectives
were hired to shadow Department of Justice
agents Investigating vice conditions In the
Vare political stronghold. South Philadel
phia, to guard the Philadelphia Navy Yard.
An interesting legal question arose as to
the effect on Congressman Vare's status an
a member of tho national House of Repre
sentatives if it appeared that he had had
knowledge that tho money paid by his
brother to Maloney was to be used, as waa
alleged, to obstruct the work of United
states secret service men. Well-known
lawyers to whom the question was put
stated that If the Congressman'!; knowledge
of the purpose of the payment was such-asr
to make htm an accessory to the offense
against the United States authorities ha
would clearly, be subject to proceedings to
unseat him n a member of tho House, be
sides being amennble to the Federal law
as an accessory to' the offense. '
The testimony of Congressman Vare. how.
ever, was positive In denying any knowledge
as to the uses to which the $400 paid by
his brother to Maloney was to be put.
Representative Vare characterized Ma
loney as the "agent" of United States Sena
tor Penrose. He denied that either he or
his brother had promised any money to
Maloney for hiring the "strong-arm" men
for the Fifth Ward primary election, as
Maloney had testified In the murder con
spiracy hearing of Mayor Smith. Maloney,
he said, did ask about payment, but waa
rebuffed.
RILKD AT PERSONAL QUESTIONS
Indignant at many personal question
thrown Into the cross-examination. Con
gressman Varo denied that he had ever
jiald ward leaders money to carry election
or that he was a member of the contracting
firm of his brother. Frequently Magistrate
Watson sustained objections made to ques
tions asked by Matoney's counsel.
Damaging testimony against Maloney waa
given by Henry Herbert Simons, a former
Vnl O'Farrell employe, who said that Ma
loney told him that James A. Carey, the ,
Penrose-McNichoI leader of the Fifth Ward,
had "lived by the sword all his lite and
by the sword he must die."
Maloney, Simons testified, gave orders
that the Flnletter Republican Club, Carey
headquarters, must be "cleaned out" and
that the hired "strong-arm" men raided the
place under lilt- orders. e
.5 P
. af.
KS
&g
VARE SLEUTH'S REFERENCE
Representative Vare and Judge MacNeills
were named as references, together with
a letter of recommendation from Director of
Public Safety Wilson, when Simons applied
for work with Maloney, according to 81
mons's testimony.
Deputy Coroney Jacob O. Schick, of Read
ing, a former Fifth Ward leader, testified
that Maloney told him he would "get e-en"
with Carey and 4hat Senator Vare had
spoken ill of Maloney. Others asserted that
Maloney, after the killing, expressed regret
that it was not Carey Instead of a policeman
that was killed.
All of the witnesses were those presented
by John R. K. Scott, a Vare leader, October
II, when he, as counsel for the police, waa
ousted and the prosecution was turned over
to District Attorney Rotan.
Their evidence against Maloney. who waa
the principal witness against Mayor Smith,
was not necessary to make out a prima
facie case, according to Assistant District
Attorney James Gay Gordon, Jr., who asked
that Maloney be held.
"AVe have a perfect link around Ma
loney," he said.
FIRST WITNESS CALLED
Assistant District Attorney James Gay
nnnlnn. Jr.. conducting tho prosecution.
opened the hrarlng by stating that the at-v;,
inrnivi for Maloney were willing to admit '"!.
that the witnesses to ine actual uiuing oi.
f.
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READING, Pa., Nov. 12. Horaco Roland
and wife, prominent residents of this city,
both died this morning. Just one hour apart.
Mrs. Roland's death occurred at her home,
at 117 North Fifth street, at 4 :10 o'clock, as
the result of valvular heart disease, and
Mr. Roland died In the Reading Hospital
At 5:10 after an operation.
Mr. Roland was a prominent attorney of
the Berks County bar and began the study
of law under the late George F. Baer, presl.
dent of the Philadelphia and Reading Rail
way Company.
Dr. Charles Roland, city health officer,
and Arthur C. Roland, of Reading; Cor
nelius F. Roland, of New York, and Mrs.
H Belln Voorhees,. of Baltimore, oVe the
.iirvlvlna- children. -Henry, Roland; 'of New
Puequehanna,- vi Hoi.twter Coity, Is ;, brother of 1 fiJ
NUMBER THIRTEEN NO JINX TO
BABCOCK AT PIMLICO TRACK
PJMLICO, Md.. Nov. 12. The three-year-olds-and'up
led off here today. The two-year-olds
have been going to the mark In
the opening events quite regularly, but this
afternoon the three-year-o ds started the
program and Babacock. with Walls in the
saddle, was the first under the wire, with
Sandale and Trumpator in close pursuit.
The fine weather and excel.ent condition
of the track brought forth a large field of
starters, with Beau of Menlo and Saturn
finishing among the Un also ran.
maiden three-year-olds and up.
FIK8T RACE,
b luoonni
Alt
i '-'j
W
V
is.40 I. w, ii.ee
W i-tatSi
:8
Time. 1:18 1-3. Mint riron. 'Tom tawry,
Ilfiu of JUnlo. Lynette, llovil York. Saturn,
Canterbury Tales. Klelcr II, I'ollyanna and
'lilekorynut alao ran. Kleld.
8ECli.NI RACK. Kmeraon Rtrrpltchape, maid
ens and winner of one raco, tnret-year-oids and
nu. m mllei:
Capt. Farr. 148, O'Conntr.... $13.40 13.00 14.JO
Kins tllmon. 154, Well. 4.00 a.xo
Tl) Carmet. 144. Stevtnaon 11.10
Time. 4-01. Dolly Madlaon. Iuk of KoV.
folk. Max Mradowi, Jimmy Hoy, l.ady Edwlna,
Kill and Chancty Fellow alao ran.
THIRD RACE, atlllnr, two.year-o)df. S fur-
HlaVPas. 10T. 8chuttlnsr.
Ulitun to On, 103, A.
Cnlllna
Anncn.n. 10R. Wall..
:i4..
Tim.
,l.00 $5,10 14.00
s.40 Vea
s
A. camlaasr. T
Detective Eppley would testify the same as rN .
.l .- -- j v-nB IttAtrm TtnMun In ,, rmiilAV
conspiracy cases against Mayor Smith. "Wit- , J
Ham E. Flnley, Isaac Deutsch, L-eutenant jfj Sj
Bennett and nve policemen, tie siniea in,
for this reason he would not call the
witnesses before Magistrate Watson, i
The testimony of Maloney before Judm
ZM
Continued on rato Hevea. Column i
THEWEATHER
1 b
FOJIECABT
For Philadelphia and vlcinltv: Pfrttyfg
cloudy tonight: Tueido;( unset tied, toi
probably tome tght rain; moderate ffj
peroture-.' penue variqpie scjfesu
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Ur sraur,. .
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