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Evening public ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, January 13, 1919, Night Extra, Image 9

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EVENING PUBLIC LEDGER PHILADELPHIA, MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 1919
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JUST GOSSIP ABOUT PEOPLE
Nancy Wynne Speaks of the Return Home of Several Men Who
Have Been Mustered Out Some Are on Leave.
She Talks of Next Year's Debutantes
WITH the close of the holidays and the
return of the youngsters to their vari
ous schools and colleKes, entertaining on
tho Main Lino has taken sortVf a slump.
Tho women are nil busy attain with their
different kinds of ,war work, particularly
tho canteen service. Every day brines
more and more returned men. Families
are Betting the most thrilling surprises In
the form of cablegrams and telephone mes
sages telling of the return of somebody
from tho war, and sometimes the man him
self. In some cases they have received
their marching orders so quickly that they
have not had tlmo to communicate with
their family and Just arrive!
Some of the men who have been mus
tered out of tho service are Major Archi
bald Barkllo, of Invor House, Wayne;
Colonel Robert B. Montgomery, of Ardres
san, Radnor: Ensign William A. Rolln, of
Strafford: Lieutenant John Forsyth Meigs,
2d. of Ithan: Lieutenant F. G. Roberts, of
Havcrford; Captain Faul Denckla Mills, of
St. Davids, and Major Burton Chance, of
Radnor. Mr. Georgo L. Justice and Mr.
Samuel Chew, who were doing Red Cross
work, havo also returned. Major John R.
Valentine expects to be murtereel out tho
end of this month, and ho and Mrs. Valen
tine nro going South for a few weeks. Mrs.
Channlnc Daniel, who will bo remembered
as Katherlno Verner, of Wayne, has had a
cable from her husband, Lieutenant
Daniel, stating that ho is on the way
homo. Lieutenant W. Kemble Yarrow, of
Strafford, who has been In the sen-Ice for
twenty-two months, Is expected to arrive
any day, and Major Anthony Geyelln ar
rive at his home In Bryn Mpwr this week.
rT MUST bj hard for tho kiddles to go
back to school after such a good time
In the holidays, for with tho armistice
every ono seemed to feel as if they could
begin again to entertain, and It being holl- .
day time for tho children, they promptly
did. Luncheons and theatre parties, din
ners and dances ono after another, until
1 should think study would be a hard thing
to take up ngaln.
My, but some of those girls around fif
teen and sixteen are pretty! I saw Rose
mary Howe for tho first time since she
' has been wearing evening frocks the other
night nt a dance, and attractive? My
dears, I should say so! She has tho love
liest curly hair and such v. pretty littlo
figure.
She had on a frock of pale blue tulle
trimmed with silver bands and tiny pink
rosebuds, and she danced beautifully. That
young lady is sure to bo some belle when
ehe comes out! She is tho daughter of
Mr. Arthur Howe, and her mother, who
died some years ago, was Miss May
Denckla. a tlster of Herman Denckla, so
Rosemary Is a cousin of Mary Denckla
Packard and Pauline Denckla. She has
gone back to boarding school slnco the
holidays; but nover mind, boys, she'll be
back for the Easter parties, and I doiVt
blame you ft- wanting to dance with her.
She Is so snect and pretty and has such
a lovely mat.nor.
As I heard ono mother say, "Rosemary
Is such a littlo lady."
Speaking cf future belles, did you know
that there will bo some real comlngs-out
next year? Yes, Indeed, and there cer
tainly will ho a handful of pretty girls.
There's Katherlno Coxo and Nanoy Dun
ning and Polly Thayer and Hannah El
liott! And there'll be more than over be
fore, for thoso who wero old enough to
come out this year and did not on account
of tho war will still bo young enough to
vje presented, and so thero'll be a sort of
innblA effect next season. And thero'll bo
ft number who will have big parties given
for them. So It's going to bo bomo winter,
believo me.
I WAS sorry to hear that Doctor Drinker,
who is president of Lehigh University,
was rather badly injured by n, fall on the
Ice on Friday. He was taken to St. LukCs
Hospital In Bethlehem. Doctor Drinker
U the father of Ernesta Drinker, who mar
ried Willie Bullitt, and of Jimmlo Drinker,
whoso wife was Mary Frances Fisher. His
oldest son is Henry S. Drinker, Jr. He
married Sophie Hutchinson. Doctor
Drinker is such a courteous gentleman.
I hope his accident Is not very serious.
YOU know there are dances overy year
up at St. George's Ejchool, In Newport,
and girls from here always go up to them
and incidentally have tho tlmo of their
young lives. A lot of Philadelphia boys
go there to school, and of course they al
ways have to have girls from their "home
town." Peggy Thayer went up on time
last winter, do you remember, and had a
wonderful time. Well,, this year they are
Jessie Da Costa, Jano Hepburn, Ellzabet i
Jeanes, Edith Hutchinson and maybe
Sarah Duane, Sarah's mother, Mrs. Rus
sell Duane, was going with them as chap
erone, but she's rather undecided now, so
they aren't quite sure who's going to
-chaperone them. But they know they
R'are going to havo one, and they also feel
erfec.Uy convinced that a marvelous
wbun: time Is waiting for them. The dance
on, Friday, the 24th, the uamo night as
Irs. IVurts's next class.
NANCY WYNNE.
Social Activities
p' The marriage of Miss Winifred Ormsby
Clarke, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Louis
Pemple Clarke, of Haverford, and Lteutcn-
nt Roscoe J, Anthony, u. 3. A., win be
celebrated very quietly on March 4 In the
'Episcopal Church at Palm Beach, Fla. Owing
to the recent aeatn or lieutenant Antnonys
father, no In Itatlons will be Issued. Mr.
and Mrs. Clarke and Miss Clarke will leave
very shortly for Palm Beach to spend the
remainder of the winter there.
Mrs. George Strawbrldge, of Germantown,
will give a dinner before the meeting of Mrs.
Wurts'a Dancing Class on January 24, In
honor of Miss .Alice W. Sailer, daughter of
Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Sailer, The dinner
vwlll be given at the Acorn Club,
Miss Emily Anderson and Mr, William
Latta Nassau, Jr., whose engagement has
been announced, were guests of honor at -a
dinner on Saturday evening given by Mr.
and Mrs. John C. Bechtel, of Allen lane,
t-Mount Airy, The guests Included Mr, and
Mrs. C. Colket Wilson. Mr. and Mrs. WMtanT
1 Latta Namau, Mrs. Joseph Crawford, Miss
Crawford and Miia Bechtel.
i 1 H, ,". ' . e ,' ' r t
"d Mr. HUN Williams's house at 309
fifteenth street for the winter. Their
nl son-in-law, Mr and Mrs. A.
..no and Master Philip Rambo are
. tho winter with them.
Mr. and Mrs. John J. Armstrong announce
the marriage of their daughter, Miss Anna
Beatrice Armtrong, to Lleu'fnant Robert
Cooko Clarkson, Jr., United States army, on
Saturday In tho Church of tho Atonement.
Mr. and Mrs. William H Welsh, of Wavne,
entertained at cards Inst Wednesday evening.
Their guests were Miss Mary llrooke, Mr.
and Mrs. Walter Lohli, Mr. Thomas Frnm,
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Illttell, Mr. Pccliln, Mrs.
A. F. Walker and Mr. Sellers.
Mr. and Mrs. M. Corn In Taylor, nf 736
North Forty-third street. West Philadelphia,
announce the engagement of their daughter.
Mlsi Marv Margaret Taylor, and Enslun
Edward P. B!ls, Jr., United States naval
reserve force, son of Mr, and Mrs. Edward
P. Dllss, of Sharon Hill. Pa. Ensign Bliss has
Just returned from active duty In Prance.
Mr. William Guthrie, of C36 West Alle
gheny avenue, announces the engagement of
his daughter, Miss Ethel Lang Guthrie, to
Mr. John F. Wlcst, ot 1212 West Butler
street, Tioga.
Miss Margaret Young, of WKahlekon,
gave n luncheon last week In honor of Ml"s
Florence Virginia Whiteside, dnughter ot
Mrs. Frank R, Whiteside, of 70: Corinthian
avenue, whoso engagement to Mr. Gilbert
Davis Thomas, of Wlssnhlckon, was recentlj
nnnounced.
Mrs. Elmer Crawford, of West Tioga street,
has returned from Chicago, HI , where sho
hnB been visiting her mother, Mrs. W.
Cooper.
Mrs. Louis niggard will itlvc a luncheon
on Wednesday nt her home. 1822 West Tioga
street. Her guests will Inc'tiele- Mrs. Walter
S. Bauer Mrs. W. 'G. Glbb, Mr. Charles
Thompson, Mrs. Raynor Bowman, Mrs. J. II.
Chadwlck, Mrs. Harvey Cressman, Mrs.
Walter Miller. Mrs. Paul Volght, 'Miss Ida
Dripps, Mrs. Charles Edward llnllowell, Mrs.
Julian Neufeld, Mrs. Horace Davis. Mrs. Allen
Moats, Mrs. C. C. Clegg. Mrs. Thomas M.
Scholcy. Mrs. J. H. Dripps and Mrs. Ralph
Humphre-vs.
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Green, of Tioga, arc
receiving congratulations on the birth o
twins, a son and daughter, Stnnley Ralph
Green and Dorothy Berenice Green, on De
cember 24.
Miss Ktlna. Claw-ell entertained a number
of navy men of the Fourth District on Sat
urday evening at her home, 3C49 rtli
nieventh street. Dancing was followed by
Huppcr, Decorations wero of tho national
colors. ,,, ,, ,
Among those present wero Miss Margaret
Dowries. Worthlngton, Miss Edith I.vnilnle
Worthlngton. Miss Nlt.i Wharton Worthlng
ton, Miss Edna Rati, Miss Wina Flemmer,
Mrs C. K. Dewecs. Jr.. Ijnslgn W. Sartalne,
Iislgn F. . W. Mitchell, Ensign James
Ljnch. Ensign J. LIndqulst and Ensign J.
Green.
R. IS'ORRIS WILLIAMS WEDS
Former Tennis Champion Marries Red Cross
Worker Abroad
Captain Richard Norrls Williams, 2d. aln
to Major General James J. Hurliord and be
fore the war amateur American lawn tennis
champion, yesterday married in Paris Mlsi
Jean Haddock, niece of Mr. und Mrs. Georg
K. Hot', of New York.
The bride Is engaged In French Red Cioas
work. The romance of the couple began on
board an ocean liner In 1913. The bride
groom Is a survivor of the Titanic. His father
was lost on this ship.
Announcement of the engagement of Mis
Haddock to Captain Williams was made last
March. Captain Williams was tennis chnm
plon and a member of tho International ten
nis team In 1913 nnd 1911. He was graduate el
from tho otHcers' training camp at IMatt.
burg. N, Y., and went to Franco as a lieu
tenant of artillery in tho autumn of 1917. Ho
won the French War Cross for distinguished
service In tho second battle of tho Marne. Ho
Is a son of Mrs. Charles Duano Williams, of
this city.
LAND ARMY MEETING HERE
First National Convention Will Open in This
City Tomorrow
Tho Woman's Land Army of America will
have Its first national convention in Phila
delphia tomorrow and Wednesday.
Prominent Americans, nmong them noted
agriculturists, will take part in tho sessions
of the convention and make addresses. The
first session will ho held at the Art Alliance
Club, 1823 Walnut street, at 3:30 o'clock.
In tho evening a dinner will be held at the
Rltz-Carlton, nt which Judge William W.
Porter will preside. John Densmoro, director
general of the United States employment
service, and Nathan Smythe, nss'stant of
Mr. Densmore, will he the principal speak
ers. Moving pictures showing women of
Pennsylvania, many of them socially
prominent, working In the fields will bo known
under tho direction of Mrs. Edward Parker
Davis, who will also give a sketch of their
work. Miss Mary K. Gibson, clialrmnn of
the Pennsylvania executive commltteo of the
land army, also will speak.
Among the Phlladelphlans who will take a
leading part In the convention are: Mrs. J,
Willis Martin, of the national board of di
rectors of the Land Army: Mrs. lloyry K.
Boyer, Mrs. Edward Diddle, Mrs. SJJgar
Balrd, Mrs. Charles M. Lea, Mrs. H. La Barro
Jayne, Mns. Tamuel Pels and Miss Sophie
Cadwalader,
rboto by rnoto-Crefttrs.
MISS ELIZABETH KELLER
Wfewe MUtieauat to Mr. JiweVCiT'
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Reader's Viewpoint
Letters to the Editor on Topids
of General Interest
!..r?.1 "rt;nce snil tnibllention In tht enlumn
'-iff .TO".' b." written on one ildf of th ror.
i . .i-!1 j ,nI?:r.' JA? n'rl eurrent Interest ni
..."'5n"J, w,,h ,h """ ond iMrem of tn
i.-ilT- f. H?nurrlnti will he returned iinlM
!rr."lV . ",.J,,y 'utlelent nntne ami spexUI
I3".1,n.l!!,.f,,c, Publication Invnlvea nn
lnflrement hy thli newipurer of th sentiment
.f.rJIJ"a- Nn ,.Pyrlht matter will b In
1 ,., "V "or wl" rHloui dlicutilom b pe
muttd. Grateful for Article on the Negro
To the Eilllor of the Evening Public t.tAsjcr:
Sir 1 wish to express my appreciation of
the article In the Evening) Puw.ic LEtiaEn
of, Tuesday, the 7th, In regard to the
nrgrocH. Enough publicity has not been
given to tho negro problem to enable tho
public to arrive nt a sano public opinion.
You can do a real service by publishing such
nrucies. j. p. LICIITENUr.ROEIt.
t- of P., Philadelphia. January 9.
More About a League of Nations
To the Editor of the Evening Public Ledger;
Sir Europe Is now In such a state of
flux that wo need not expect any Immediate
or early solldlllcatlon of the political elements
of which she Is composed. The mission ot
the Prcwldfnt is to help Europe to get rid
of the old balance of power system nnd suu
atltuto a league of nations, which shall ever,
more enforce penco upon the earth.
As we wore disappointed that tho war was
so long-drawn-out, so we should be prepared
for nn extended wait for the full accomplish
ment of the President's high purpose. It has
taken our Congress the biggest part of a
yiur to pass the revenue bill now on tho
stocks, so when the i'eace Congress assem
bles and gets to work It Is likely to make a
slow nnd Interrupted progress. Would It bo
a wrong guess that a league of nations will
not be formed at the (list session of the con
fetenco, but a temporary concert of the lead
ing powers will bo entered Into, and the
business carried over for a recond and maybe
a third session?
For one thing, It will tnke a full year for
tho people of Europe to he fed up. and until
they have got enough to eat they will not be
In temper to bo easily satlsfltd with any
arrangement made for their welfare.
It will tako two vears, and may tnko
longer, for Bolshevism to run Its course.
Tho President In Italy said. that tho world
will heieafter bo made up, not of great
nations, but small ones; It may bo so, but
will the wot Id bo galnir thereby? A writer
In tbo Atlantic Monthly nvors that "Europe
will tio ffirttmntn If It MCnnM n Inner uirlna I
of petty wars rising out of tho conlllctlng
historical, ethnographic, economic, religious
and political claims of these new nationali
ties." Of couiso, the President would not
have- Uncli Sam's domains cut up Into smalt
nations , oh, no.
As to the colored races of Asia and Africa,
what will bo done about them to settlo their
aspirations for self-determination of their fu
ture destinies? While settling the affairs of
Europe and securing for the people a future
of liberty, Justice and peace the dark nnd
jellow-skinned people of other continents
must not bo left out of the reckoning.
And what of tho negro In this country?
Is ho to enjoy the same liberty that the whlto
man tnjojs, or Is he to be left to the dis
comforts and humiliation of tho Jim Crow
car, to the mercy of lynching mobs of the
South, to the exclusion from trades and public
houses of the North?
Some time ago, before the nrmlstlco was
entire'd Into. I gave to your paper my views
of tlu kind of settlement that appeared to
mo to be proper Nearly everything 1 rec
ommended proved to be In accord with what
w.ih decided upon nfterward by Foch and
his advisers, but a few things, however.
were ov erleiolted. First, the sinking of the
U-boats, which I recommended; second, tho
destruction of the Krupp cannon factory;
third, the march of an army Into Rerlln.
Thcro fcvems to be no Immediate disposition
to do nny of these things, although it does
look now as If the armies of the Allies will
have to police lierlln and settle the troubles
I hole and hold tho hungry Russian hordes
from trampling over over thing In their
march for full stomachs.
Tho Pence Conference will not fulfill Its
true m'sslon until the hullw of the undersea
outlaws find their proper plnc at tho bottom
of the ocean. Tho future peace of tho world
will not bo secure unless those pirates are
ruled out bj a league of nations, and tnti
bombing of cities piohlblted from airplanes.
Any nation committing su;h Infernal out
rages should be declared outcast from the,
community of civilized proples. Nor should
tho use of poisonous gas In war ever be per
mltteil again.
Of the vassals of Prussia, thoso In the
north, stolen from Denmark, and In the
east, of what was once Austrla-ftungiuy,
should be liberated, Germany, whether pno
ends up a monarchy or becomes a republic,
should never be admitted to the League of
Nations until Wurtemberg. Baden nnd Max.
ony are set free from the bondage of the
Prusslnn barbarians.
"Such times! Such times'" says U S. M.
In Life, "liewllderlrg to the nnNlous, full of
menace to the timid, but freighted with splen
did promise to the eve of faith I"
WILMEIt ATKINSON.
Washington Seiyare, January 13.
As to Teachers' Salaries
To the Editor of the Evening Public Ltdger:
Sir I wish to congratulate you for the
way In which you presented Superintendent
A. S. Martin's article In regard to the In
efficiency of the teachers nnd the poor salary
paid them You are especially to be com
mended when ono considers that this cam
palgn for a 25 per cent Incrnse Is strong y
urged In the city of Philadelphia, the home
of your paper. I have been opposed to this
vicious piece of legislation. I fully realise
that the teachers of this S'ate, especially In
the smaller dlstr.cts and the rural schools, are
very poorly paid for the- great service the
aro rendering to this country. Hurc'y next
to saving souls (Indirectly and directly, how
many souls have been saved just because the
Influence of some Influential teacher was ex
erted upon tho boy or girl Just at tho light"
time, for good), tho work of training tin
minds and hoJIes of the future citizens of the
State Is tho most Important work that can
bo done In the State.
It Is far better to spend tho money rnls a
by taxing tho resources of the State for educa
tion, training tho children to be good, honest,
law-abiding citizens, thnn it Is to spend It
to reform some one who has gone astray, and
that Is what we do when we build Jails and
penitentiaries nnd conllno people In them. I
am convinced that the more money spent
upon education, the less It will be necessary
to qpend upon penal Institutions and other
reformatories. 1 am heart'ly In favor of an
Increase In teachers' salaries, but fe'.l as Mi.
Martin does, that the matter should be taken
tare of in tho local school districts. I think
that I would suggest eve-n higher salaries
than he elo.s, I wou d my the teachers upon
tvvelvo months barls, that I would strongly
urge and Indue by offering a bonus, the
securing of university credits by teachers
during their summer vacation. Very sine rely,
PAUL Y. ECKERT.
Conshohocken, Pa., January 9,
Picks the Candidates
To tho Editor of the Evening Pub'lo Ledger:
Sir Tho next candidates for President and
Vice President on the Democratic ticket will
be; Governor Smith, of New York, for Pros
ldent and Governor Cox, of Ohio, for Vlco
President. READER.
Atlantic City, N, J,, January 8.
Contemporary CIuJi to Meet
The Rev, Dr. Hugh Ulrckhead, of Baltimore
will be the principal speaker at a meeting
ot the Contemporary Club tonight at the
Beilevue-Stratford. Doctor Blrchhead was
an inspector in isurope for the American Red
Cross, "The Responsibility ot America In
BROTHER AND SIFTER
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MISS ALISON G. HARRISON AND MASTER ALFRED HARRISON
Daughter and ton of Ensign and Mr. William I'razier Harrison, of Dceptlene,
Chestnut Hill
SIR CHARLES WYNDHAM,
VETERAN ACTOR, DEAD
Was Widely Known in L. S. and
Served as Army Surgeon
During Civil War
London, Jan. 13 Sir CharliM Wyndham,
the actor, died In London vestcrday morning.
Sir Charles W.vndham, through his visits to
America, covering a period of llfly vents,
was almost as well known to the tbeatie1
goors In this country ns ho wns in bis native
England
Born In Llveipool in 1811, Charlis Wjnd
bam was tho son of a prominent phs!c!an.
Ills parents Intended him for tho church, nun
there was great constei nation In the family
when he displayed his predilections for tho
life of nn actor. To appease his father bo
agreed to study medicine, anil abouf coin
cident with tho time of re-celvlng his ih'grte
he married Emma Sllbonmd, the grand
daughter of a German baron.
In 18C2 he made his first professional ap
pearance nt the old Rovalty Theatre wli-n
tho company Included Ellen Terry, W. R.
Kendal and David James.
Ho found tho Civil War In America o:
absorbing Interest nnd postponed hlw the
atrical ventures in favor of seivlco as an
army suigoon. In this capacity he was
present at tho engagements of Chancellors
vllle, Frederieksburg and Gettysburg, beslfto
serving nil thtough tho Red River campaign
under General Banks
On emitting the hi my ho returned to the
stnge and at the Olvmplo Theatre, October 8,
JS63, ho played In "Brother and Sister." Two
years Inter ho was back ill England, and
soon afterwanl appeareil with Henry Irving
nnd Ellen Teiry In numerous plays.
When In- reappeared In New YurU nt Wal
laces Theatre In 180'J he readily established
a reputation ns a light comedian and oigau
ized a touring company of his own which
covered nil the cities In the I'nlted State's.
Sir Charles was a favorite in fashlonnblo
society oft as well as on the stage. The lato
King Edward bestowed knighthood upon him
nt the tlmo of the coronation In 1902. On
March 21, 1U 16. Sir Charles married Miss
Mary Moore, who for thirty years had been
tho leading lady In his company.
JOHN MASON DEAD
Widely Known Actor, Who First Appeareil
in Philailelphia
New York, Jan. 13. John Mnson, em of the
most widely known actors on tho stage, died
yesterday In a sanatorium nt S-amford,
Conn. Ills real mine w.ib Hill Belcher.
Mr. Mason, who last appear) d In New
York at tho Forty-eighth Stiect Theatre In
"Tho Big Chance," suffered a nervous break
down In Prov'denco two weeks ago.
His long career on tho stage began In 1S78,
when he act d for the first time nt tho Wal
nut Street Theatre In Philadelphia. Ho was
horn October 28, 185S, In Orange, N. J. He
achieved fame as a member of the Boston
Museum Company, which grew when ho
Joined the Union Square Thea'ro Companv
In this city. Beginning In 1881, a revival of
"The Manlcheffs," he played through one
season.
Later Mr. M-isou Jo'ned Steele Macknvc
at the Lye urn Theatre. Ho nctcd subse
quently In Edwin Booth's companies and
mad" a success In London In Hiiildon Chnm
bers'a p'ay, "The Idlers " He also was taken
to London by li S. Wllllird to act In "Ala
bama." ,
Audiences of the dny will remember Mr.
Mason best for his appearances In "The
Witching Hour," As a Man Thinks," 'The
Yellow T'ckct" nnd "Common Clay."
TO AID SHORE NURSES
Entertainment Will Call Attention to Work
Being Done by Society
Atlantic tity Jan. 13. To call tho atten
tion of Phlladelphlans and oth-r vis'tors
here to the Important work being done by
the Visiting Nurses' Association of Atlantic
Cltv at, elaborate enti i-talnment In id of
that organlzat'on will bo given In the Rose
Room of tho Traymore on Thursday, January
23, at 3 p. m. Records show that nurses of
the association, of which Mrs. Sarah W
I-eds Is hono-ary preMdent and Mrs Eph
ralm Glover Shreve acting president, mado
264 vlsl's In January, 277 In February, 400
In March, 444 In April. 592 In May, S42 In
June, 834 In July, 827 In August, 0)9 In Sep
tember, 350 In October, 347 In November and
336 In December. Miss Jane Wick Is tho su
perintendent In charge.
Miutlo Ailami 111
Iloston, Jan. 13. Miss Mauds Adams,
the actressi, la ill at the home o( Miss
Phyllis Itobblns here, where she Is under
I the care or a specialist lor nervous break'
HELPED SUPPLY FOOD
TO FRENCH PRISONERS
Bordeaux Girl Sent Boxes Every
Two Week- to Fifteen
Poilus
Packing boxes for the French prlt-onera
hi Get many was the special form of war
work done by Miss Suzanne Dulireullh, of
Botdoaux, who camo to Philadelphia, Satur
day, with her brother-in-law, M. Emanuel
Chahtand, lecturer for the McAll Mission.
Miss Dubreullh Is a charming young
French girl, with gentle manner and keen,
Intelligent eyes
For four e.ira she devoted herself to
war wotl; In France, going every morning
to the hospitals as a nurses' aid, and doing
tbo varied tasks which have fallen to the
French women during the war.
Ten months ago, Mie came to America,
having an exchange scholarship at the Uni
versity of Cincinnati, Ohio. She knew little
English then, but she has iiukkly picked It
up, so that she now speaks easily, although
with a manner of twisting her words about
a bit, which Is rather chaimlng as alio does
it. Her father Is a professor In the Univer
sity of Bordeaux.
The war work which she was most Inter
ested In w.m packing boxes for tho French
prisoners, who wero but scantily fed and
eioihe'd hy their German captors. She sent
boxes every two weeks to fifteen soldiers,
many of whom n.ild afterwards that they
feared they might have starved had It not
been for the aid given them by thu French
women. Tho poisonal touch of receiving
gifts nlso meant much to them In the long,
die-ary months of their Impilsonment.
rilll.ADI-.I.I'HIA'.S I.BADINC1 THRATKUS
DliiMlli.n I.Ci: , J J MIMIKUT
ADELPHI '..,,,; t8iUSjI!.
OPENING TONIGHT
THIS AND Ni:.T WT.I'.K ONLY
FIRl'T SI on MAT THURSDAY
Miiswns i.ni; a j j, Hiirncnrs
Men crt Musical Comedy
with Justim Johnstone
Frank Fay, Helen Shipman,
Harry Conor
and a uay nrr.iy of ntMoeiate nrtls-n
Klevercst Sii'ging and Dancing
kuuhus KUiNCISIVABLE
bau5,j SHUBERT TiiBATnc
Uroail ond Locuat St.
J j A ST 6 NIGHTS
jJn WH Sit.Rost Seats $1.50
.vincsiis, i.ni: i j. j. siivriniiT Present
MciNTYRE and HEATH
In tho New Spe taeulnr Mualcnl Comedy
HELLO. ALEXANDER
with a Great Kurportlne Cast of 100
And a Breezy Bevy of Beauties
1 VRIP EvrninfTF nt 8-r.
LiirVil jrnt. WoH ?. Qqf 2(13
cti on MAT wed. '
4 V.' Vy A. Tl Wrvms fr-a-nt.
I KW FIEI DS
', Entire i-v Tim nations pi.ay
Lower FRIENDI V FJKMIES
Floor niAHtm wi.s-.s-iNann
CHESTNUT ST. ,a
NIOHTS II HO. tl OO. 7.V. f.eu-
uvos
"tS10
Mats. II 01), T5r 50o IE Pats. 6 Holidays)
Pop. Mati ee W ed Best Seats $1
Positively Last Two Weeks
F. RAY COMSTOCK A WILLIAM ELLIOTT'S
New York I'rlncess Theatre, Musical Comedy
rrt.
t QA
1 Lb'
Abeolutsla Identical Nsw York Cast
f
pi
i.fli?
DISPLAY SERVICE FLAGS
TILL FRED DATE, URGED
War Camp Community Board
Suggests Demobilization on
Washington's Birthday
Don't tako down your service flags yet,
nnd don't keep them up until they gradually
disappear, weather beaten, ta'tered nnd un
noticed. This Is tho plea of the War Camp
Community Se-vlce, which does not believe
that these emblems of nil our hopes and
fears during our nineteen trying months of
war should bo laid aside without fitting
ceremonies.
Instend, of taking down tho flags ono by
ono as fnst ns tho boys hro mustered out or
the stnrs have turned to gold, the War
(.amp Community Service urges that their
proud possessors should keep them exhibited
until a fixed dato when they can be demobi
lised at a public ceremony.
The service flag hns been tho one central
emblem that has represented the sons, the
brothers, the fathers and the sweethearts of
thoso who havo remained behind. It has
appeared everywhere throughout the country
as n great sign of reverence, an emblem of
prldo and hope. Great mansions and Iso
lated little huts have displayed it alike, and
fine has waved to flag from the humblest
milk wagon or peddler's cart to the most
gorgeous IlmouslneH.
War Camp Community Servics suggests
the period In which Washington's Birthday
falls ns a fitting occasion for the first cere
mony of t' o "demobilization of the service
ting" F hruary 22 Is n national holiday,
and on Friday the 21st tho schools will no
holding Washington's birthday programs. On
this same day, factories, department stores,
office buildings, banks. Industrial Institu
tions and fraternal orders might well also
havo tho exercises of tho "demobilization of
tho service flag," It Is pointed out. On
Sunday, the 23d, the churches should have
their demobilizations, It Is contended.
Tho service does not put this forth ns a
vacuo suggestion, but has planned a well
defined program for these three davs Serv
ice bars should bo pinned (and later sewed)
across the stnrs which represent the boys
who have come homo. For the flar.s with
stars which have turned to gold a specially
designed permanent service flag, to bo known
ns ."Gold Glory" should be substituted, and
these should bo kept on public exhibition as
long as the mind of man retains the mem
ory of this most Just of wars. The chief
fenturc of the celebrations nt which these
ceremonies take place should be community
singing.
The following program could bo arranged,
It Is said, If tbo Maors of cities and Gov
ernors of State s nnd President Wilson him
self, back from planning tl, great penco,
would include In their Washington's Birth
dny proclamations a plea for Its fiitlllmenf
The singing of "America ;" ten minutes of
community singing; ten-minute address by a
civilian; ten-minute response by a service
man; solo; ten more minutes of community
singing; fifteen seconds of silent tribute to
tbo men who have fallen; demobilization of
the service flag stars for those men who
have he-en mustered out; prayer; eommunltv
singing, ending with "Home, Sweet Home,"
and the "Star Spangled Banner."
Only those stars should bo demobilized
which represent cither death or discharge
from the service. In tho former case "Gold
Glories" should bo hung hj a place for per
manent exhibition. TheW demobilization
ceremonies should be repeated several times
during the year. Until our army Is de
mobilized, it Is said, there should be at
intervals of several months 'service ting
demobilization" nt block parties, churches,
ollieo liulldlngs, department stoics, fr.iternal
orders, high schools, colleges, small com
munities and nt every place where there
la a service Mag.
WAR NURSE DIES IN FRANCE
Mrs. Adeline Pepper Gili.-on, of This Citj,
Victim of Pneumonia
A cablegram from France nunoune.rti the
death In N'nntes of Mrs. Adeline Pepper lllb
son, daughter of Mrs. J. Howard Clbson, ot
2001 Walnut street.
Mr.s. (libson's ebath vns elue to pneumonia,
after a brief Illness, during which sbo was
tre-ated by tier brother-in-law. Major J. Noi
uian Henry, l'JAG Spruce street, who Is In
the medical corps of Pershing's arm She
went to France nearly a jear ngo and since,
had besn doing heroic work In nursing wounu
ed soldleTS Her brother, Henry (.'. Cllbson.
also is in France nnd had been fighting In one
of tho batteries.
Mr.s. (libson's mother, who before her mar
riage was Miss Susan Worrell Pepper, Is a
sIsteT of John Worrell Pepper, who died nt
his home, Fair Acres, JcnMutowu, on Nov err -bcr
10 last.
MAItKHT
HTHKirr
a no vis
lliTH
li sir,
A. M.
TO
ii:tr,
I" M
.11,1, TIMS Wi:i2K
A M'llUKN CLASSIC
NC rnODCe'TION'
N A Z I M 0 V A
In Inltlul rrerentatlon of
"EYE FOR EVE"
ADAI'TIID KltOM IOCCItlKNT, A
X EIIY SCCCIISHKl'I, DRAMA
Next VVee-k Wllilxm t'liwrihain In -Kilter King"
PAL A(T F
ism M.vitKirr STnnrrr -
lo a M to u tr, r. m
NORMA TALMADGE
Supported l)J- 'I1IOMAS MirGIIAN In
"Txiti FORBIDDEN CITY"
Thurs.. 1V1. hat KVm.YN M:siiiT and Her
ban KL-bdUH. THAW In "Her Mistake"
A R C A D T A
CIIRSTNfT nrctOVV 'flTl!
10 A M, 12. -.', :i AT,. .-5HS. T!4n, p-,10 p M
PAULINE FREDERICK
In First Showing of
"OUT OF THE SHADOW"
Next Week- "J.ITTLIJ VtOMII.V
From lxiula M Alcotts Notel
VICTORIA'M
tom mix - ? . n;;:;;:
Artilcl "Connlh of the Sooth ."i I ""
Next Week ANNHTTi: KRr,I,5IIMAV"
in 'qt'Ki:x of thisi:a"
rT,T,Mf MAIII.-T-" t-x
rCUClN I
MA-r.A!-V!SS.f?
Added-Houdlnl. 'Master Mystery."' 3d rinl.e.,?..
MMth'ET STtlERT
11 A M lo 11 I
npn
xt 10 it r m.
CONTINUOUS .
VAirnvvir rv
"OTT WTTAT A NICIIT"
ROLAND WEST CO. OTHERS,
CROSS KEYS B ;"t.i.,v7Wii
"CHILDHOOD DAYS" y
BROAPWAY ""oado BNvnrif aVe.
"TTTT? CM'TyV !TTOp" M
'UNDER FOUR FLAGS" official
FILM
Dancing
CORTISSOZ
1UKEH nLDO
1580 Chestnut fir
I'rlvats lersons dally.
0l30 A, M, to n J, M
ORPHEUM ""iSS.ariLrs 5c3i-0oo
MA?..?eDrf.'nND The Old Homestead
January 20th "JOHNNY PET YOUIt GUN"
G&MO
LADIES' MAT. TODAY
"Hello' America"
Walnut Above Sth Bt.
witn Mwis ana Dear
fm
fax
rAT
MOTORTRUCK OWNERS
TO DISCUSS PROBLEMS
Governor-Elect Sproul Asked to
Address Meeting at the
Beilevue-Stratford
Discussion of problems connected with the
automobile Industry will be a part of the
program for u meeting Wednesday evening
at tho Beilevue-Stratford Hotel of the Motor
truck Owners' Association of this city. "
It Is expected nearly 6060 autotruck owners
will be present. The following men have been
asked to speak: Wllllnm G. Sproul, Gov.
ernor-elect: Lewis S. Sadler, State Highway
Comnilasloner-e lect ; John Irwin Bright,
chairman Philadelphia Chapter of the Insti
tute nf Architects, nnd Harold S. Shcrtz,
executive secretary of the same association,
vvhoe subject will be "Tho Alms and Objects
of a Motortruck Owners' Association.
Such problems as Insurance, tramc regul
tlons, the chauffeur question, operating cost
systems nnd highway Improvement will be
discussed.
The motto of the as-eiclation Is "Keep the
Wheels Turning nnd Earning," nnd the dis
cussion nt this meeting will attempt to show
how this Is possible.
ROOSEVELT TRIBUTES HERE
Dead Former President Lauded at Memorial
Services in City
Former President Roosevelt was lauded
In sermons at special memorial services jes
terday In various Protestant churches.
A Roosevelt memorial service was con
ducted In St. Stephen's Episcopal Church,
Tenth street below Market, hy the Rev. Dr.
Carl E. Orammer. president of the Inter
church Federation, who spoke of Mr. Roose
velt ns an entirely new typo of American
life.
"Wo have had many Inspiring example
of men born In poverty and reared amid
privations who have climbed to the first
seats of power and Influence," he said, "but
Theodore Roosevelt wan our first example of
'n man born In the purple who became a su
preme man of the people. His splendid social
position, wealth, culture and hereditary ad
vantages never separated him from his fel
low men. These distinctions were all dis
solved In the warm currents of his glowing
humanltv. He was first of all and above
everything else a man, and every human be
ing, especially every American, wns to him
Interesting nnd closely related. He was a.
real hero, a modern knight-errant, a paladin
of romance In politics. No one can measure
jet tho full extent of his Influence."
rilll.AFjni.l'HIA'S FOHUMOST TIIEATISCa
DD O A H La9t 6 Ev8s- at 8. 1 0
JlVrl MATS, WED. and SAT.
Uroad and Locust
GEORGE ARLISS
(Direction ot Ceorce C. Tler)
ND I1H1I.MANT ASSOCIATE 1'LATEHS
IN "THE MOLLUSC" ANU
Sir Jnmes M Barrio's Latest Playlet
"A Well-Remembered Voice''
ropular Wed. Mat. Pert Beats. 11.80.
NEXT MONDAY, JANUARY 20th'
Mr&Mrs COBURN
Prrsele ihe
SdiTr'Ote
with
Haclyn Arbuckle
m "Old Bill '
Seat Sale Thursday
A COSIKDY
WITH ML'SIC
FORREST
Hrortd and Sansom
GOOD
BYE WEEKS!
matin-bus
wednesday
saturdat
KI.AW & EHI,A VISITS
SlfSICAL COMEDY
SENSATION!
t ii n
VELVET
LADY!
(CHIC and RMOOTIII)
vicTOit iinitnnnT'8
Entrancing Music
PHILLY
SETS
THE
PACE.
NEW
YORK
CALLS
C A D 13 Ti V Last 6 Evenings
VjaIXIXIVIX ItEGULAH MATINEES
Che.tn-.it nnd Juniper . YiS; t-A
EXTRA MATINEE FRIDAY
DAVID I1EI.ARCO Presents
tkiif
a
Will IN.Cl'I.Aini:. CYTUI, SCeDTT. II ItEEVEtV
bMlTH and Entire Orlclnal Now York Cist
NEXT WEEK SCATS THURSDAY
COHAN & HAIUUS
Tresent the Surrnsstnu Survess
A TAILOR-MADE MAN
With GRANT miti-HELL
And the Orlclnal New Yorli Csst.
ACADEMY Or ML'SIC
PHILADELPHIA
r ORCHESTRA
LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI. I'onJurtor
I-ItIDAV AlTEIlNeXlV. JAN. 17. at 3:00.
BATL'HDAV EVENINO. .IAN. IK, ot 8:18.
Soloist I " ACelfES TIIIIIAUD. Vlo'lnUt.
IlKirriHIVEN. Smphony No. B In I
MejZART, Concerto for violin anl Orrnestra.
DKIIl'mY. Three Ni turnes. Willi ctioru from
Mendelssohn Club.
CHAI'SSON. I'oeme for Violin awl Orchestra.
Tickets nt Ilrppo's, It Hi Chestnut Strett.
SE VT SA!,E BEGINS TODAY
Metropolitan no Ofllce, 1I0 Chestnut Strcst
FOIl THE SONU HECITAL OF
GALLI-CURCI
Greatest Coloratura Soprano of a Generation
To be Held Wednesday Evp;., Jan. 22
At the Mo'ropo'itan Opera House
Seats tl. M.CO. 2 ami ti.50.
' METItOI'OLlTAN Ol-EUA HOt-'HE
Metrop'iiuan Tues. Evg., Jan. 2 1 , at 8
SAMSON ' DALILA
Mme. Matzenauer. Mm. Caruso. Couzlnou. Mar-
' clones. Ilelss. Condoctor. Monteux.
Seatn 1101 Chestnut, Walnut ii: Itac 6T.
B F. KEITH'S THEATRE
' EDDIE LEONARD & CO.
In 'DANDY DANS nETUItN"
Lois Jo.tplnne & Tyler Urooke
.inn Lnurio & Alecn Bronson
and Mrs. Jimmy narr-: Dert KsJmar and
Mr.
Jessie llroven.
HrTl MT1T UT WALNUT. Evt. 8 ltd.
W ALil u Mat. Tomorrow, ZSc, 80c, TfkJ,
THE GARDEN OF ALLAH
NIGHTS & BAT. MATINEE. SOo to tt.00.
NEXT WEEK SEATS THUI18DA.Y
In HI New Itomsntlo Farce
'MAlteve in iiAmb
ZrTTi, MINSTnELS. Arch k Oth 8t.
UUmont S TWo rEACK DELEOATES an
HOW TO HTOI THI5 SKU?-HTOP8
HA1UIAIN MATINEE TODAY. 10c. 50c. & .
N!
MilS.
Jane P. C. Miller'
1028 Chestnut St.
DANCES
Tuea., Wet, Frl.. Sat.
to 13 P. U.
(- f
Private Lessons Daily,
A A laT , A sW' l . M.M
v v w t
ftvnp!
WE
mi
,!
s.
Jlc
4ie
1
ii
4
1
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vl
"1
Vv.'
r Uun -. --"' Iw 4 .w.a--
jifljfft.

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