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The Minneapolis journal. (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, March 07, 1901, Image 8

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1901-03-07/ed-1/seq-8/

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WHEAT LOST A HALF-CENT, MAY CLOSING 74!^c
Decline at Liverpool and More Lib
eral Northwest Receipts
Brought Weakness.
TRADE QUIET IN ALL MARKETS
The Price Current Says Xo Dauase
Reported in Winter Wheat
—iSeruernl Ke\ra.
Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce, March
7.—Wheat eased off this morning on reaction
ary Liverpool advices, and more liberal re
ceipts at northwestern points. May opened
%c lower, at 74%0. The market barely moved
after the opening activity. The range was in
side of %c up to soon. Liverpool closed %d
lower. Minneapolis ran 80 cars ahead of last
year in receipts, the usual light figures for
Duluth making the total receipts in the
northwest fall off to 441 cars, against 721 last
year. "Weather indications point to continued
mildness. Temperatures are higher every
where, "with showers predicted. The Price
Current says the weather has been trying on
the -wheat crop, but it is doubtful If any ma
terial damage has resulted as yet. Chicago
had a little selling pressure at the start but
Boon fell Into dullness. It was extremely
quiet in all markets. Primary receipts ran
lighter than last year, 557,000 bu, against
*48,C00 bu. Clearances, wheat and flour, 357,
--000 bu. Minneapolis received 346 cars and
DuTruth 93, against 266 and 454 last year.
May corn opened quiet at 36% c The tend
ency iras downward in the early trading, the
market striking 86%0. Towards noon there
vnas recovery to 26% c and steadiness at that
figure. «
The market weakened again Just before
tlje close. May closed at 74' st July, 75' i;
X.arch, 73%. May corn lost another fraction,
•losing at 36?&c»
Cash demand was good. Prices were not
much different from yesterday relative to the
option. Millers were free buyers of milling
trades. There was some No. 2 northern re
ceived over the Great Northern that -was
tarely -within the grade, part of It wet and
spongy. These lots stuck and finally sold at
concessions, but aside from this - there was
good trade. No. 1 northern averaged 74% c.
Some No. 1 to arrive sold at 74 3e. No. 2
northern showed a range of 71*ic for very
choice to as low as 6Sc for the poor. No. 3
MM from 62c to 67c. Rejected showed a dif
ference of 540 to COo as to quality, and no
ST'ada sold largely around 54c to 55c.
THE CASH TRADE
$*lax Declines—Floor Quiet—Mill-!
Ktulfs Higher—Corn Steady.
FfiAX— market was weak and lower
ffrora the start, ecoring a loss of 3c to 4c all ,
wound in. the (Jay's trading. Rejected sold at!
. $1.4:? (51.49. No grade sold at $1.42 and to
"wards the close was quoted $1.40 bid. Duluth
May eased off early from $1.61Mt to $1.60 and
made all markets weak. Duluth had a very :
narrow market. Chicago reported fair vol
ume of trade. Local demand was fair. Min
neapolis received 7 cars, against 10 last year. ;
jJuluth reported none.
Chicago received 20 cars.
Closing prices were: Minneapolis cash, ?1.53t !
to arrive, $1.53; May, $1.57; Duluth. cash, $1.56;
Co arrive, $1.66; May, $1.60; September, $1.15. i
FLOOR—The market shows no change in
prices* Demand Is fair. There is some in
crease la domestic Inquiry. First patents are
Quoted. ?4.05@-tls; second patents, $3.85<g4; i
first clears, $2.9u@3; second, clears, $1.90@2. ,
Shipments 42,225 brls.
MIJLLSTUPPS— are again higher.
Millers report continued brisk inquiry and
all the business that they can handle. Nearly
fill the mills are oversold and some will not
book orders for delivery later than the first
Jialf of next month, not caring to book farther
ahead. Bran la bulk is quoted $15@13.23;
flour middlings, 14.50; bulk shorts, $IS@
X 3.26; red dog in 140-lb sacks, $14.60@14.75;
feed In 200-lb sacks, $1 per ton additional;
in 100-11) sacks, $1.50 per ton additional. Ship
ments, 1,371 tons.
FEED AND MEAL—The market hold*
rteady ■without price changes. Coarse corn
deal and cracked corn are quoted $14.25; No.
I feed, $14.75; No. 2 feed, $15.25; No. 3 feed,
$15.75; granulated corn meal in cotton sacks
a* the rate of $1.90 per brl.
CORN—The market showed little change.
No. 5 yellow is quoted 36?4@37c. There were
law Rales at the outside figures. No. 3 corn
is quoted 36i4@56%c; No. 4, 3flc. Receipts,
49 curs; shipments, 14 cars.
GATS— market was fairly active. No.
» white Is quoted 25%@26c; No. 3 oats, 25^4®
zajic Receipts, 26 cars; shipments, 9 cars.
BARLEY— grades are quoted at 40c
to 45c; malting grades, 45c to 51c. For good
seed barley the outside figures are obtain
able, but ordinary will not bring firm prices.
Receipts 4 cars; shipments, I car.
RYE>—The market is quiet around 48@48^c
for No, 2; good No. 2 sold at 4S 1 / ' C. Receipts,
& cars. '" *
.HAY—The market is steady. Minnesota up
land Is quoted $9@10; lowa upland, $9@10;
coarse to medium, $6.50@8; rye straw, $6@
1.50. Receipts, 8S tons; shipments, 10 tons.
Puts and Calls.
t p. ni. report:
Pata— sellers.
7*%®74%c bid.
Curb—74@74%c bid.
Ca*li Sales Reported To-day.
T^X 1 northern, 15 cars .......... JO 74*4
No. 1 northern, 1 car _„. "~l^**l**~ '74%
No. 1 northern, 1 car ..;...... .. "' "7464
No. 1 northern, 6-000 bu, to arrive, .74%
Jno. 2 northern, 27 cars .......^...^,.«^, .71
No. 2 northern, 23 cars .. "*...*' ' '70%
No. 8 northern, 26 cars . IT**"*"*" " 7r>
No* 2 northern, 3 cars .... "***** 69
No. 2 northern, 4 cars .'""""'"**H"T*" *68^
No. 2 northern, 6 eras ... '««
No- 2 northern, 1 car . " .—*?.*" *"v'
No. 2 northern, 7 cars ..!."*" [ll"**** 'mil
•No. 2 northern, 1 car ...._ "' ~—-- "70S
No.'2 northern, 6 cam **~ "*"* 70
No. 3 ■wheat, 1 car ' *~*~ "^
No. 3 -wheat, 13 cars „ HIIIII 65 !
No. 3 -wheat, part car '7* '£ i
<" No. 3 -wheat, 5 cars . «7
No. 3 wheat, 5 cars *£ " " L
•No. 3 wheat, 2 cars .... " —— ♦ •<«>
No. 3 wheat. 1 car -1111111 " 651/
No. 3 wh«at, 6 cars ."""^ZIZ. ' 64
Rejected -wheat, 1 car . ** ****" «0
Rejected -wheat, 1 car .. .. " ***** 59
Rejected -wheat, 1 car .**UHT"!***l!H* .SS
Rejected wheat, 1 car ... . ~* e$
Hej«oted -wheat, 2 care ... ** "**"*" '54
(Rejected wheat, 1 car .. " *•*•"•* "iZ
tßeJectad wheat, 1 car _.. "*"** ***" * fl i
No grade wheat, 2 cars « **"**"*T*T .54
No grade wheat, 3 cars -I* J..^*Z~*l* *56
No gnadew heat, 1 car ._ ••••— "gi
No grade wheat, 1 car ... " **" **""' *4$
>io grade wheat, 2 cars „. *"** :*••** *5
No grade wheat, 1 car f.o !!!""'""* • 5
No grade wheat, 1 car ..^.' .—-•—•• • -
No. a yellow com, 1 car ....H**.*"*!!*." *30%
No. 3 yellow corn, 3 cars ._. ,~ 36%
No. S corn, 3 cars .._ * x Si?
No. 3 corn. 2 cars, r*.*"*m*~ * 36%
No. 4 corn. 1 car ......__.. - -"" l<«iZ
No. 2 rye. 3 cars ***^* " 'Si?
Rejected flax, 1 car .... ~-«~~. 149 2
Rejected flax, part car . *I******** i"«S
No grade flax, 1 car ....«, '7*7*'*****'**"** 1^
No. S white oats, 1 car ».. „.. •*~*"~ JWA |
No. 3 white oats, 1 car „..__ "!****" 2fiv
• No. 3 oats, 3 cars --'- ■-•.,,,,- *" '**—* '~>-JX
• No. 3 oats, 1 car... - ■..I***7* * '*i¥
State Uraln Inspection.
March 6.
Inspected In—Wheat—Cars-
Great Northern—No. 1 northern 26' No ■>
northern, 36; No. 3, 11; rejected, 1; no' grade,
Milwaukee—No. 1 northern, 20; No. 2 north- I
crn, 29; No. 8, 15; rejected, 4; no grade 3
St. Vault*- No. 1 northern, 7; No. 2 north
ern, 8: No. 3, 3; rejected, l; no grade, S.
boo Line—No. l northern. 2j No. 2 north,
em, *: No. 8, 3.
Nortfharn Pacific— 2 northern, 1- No 3
&J rejected, 2; no grade, 6. - " ".
Omaha—No. 1 northern, 9; No. 2. north
ern, 14; No. 3, 8; rejected, l; no grade 3
St. Paul & Duhith-No grade; 1
ofiT*^ 11 X rth«r nt 64 No-' 2 northern,
85; No. 3, 44; rejected, 9; no grade, 35.
Other O*B.lns— 3 winter wheat, 2 cars-
No. 8 yellow corn, 15; No. 8 corn, 29- no grade
corn, 4; No.. 3 white oats, l; No 3 oats' 17•
No. 2 rye, 2; No. 3 rye, 1; No. 3 barley, 1-
No. 4 barley, 4; no grade barley, 1- rejected
flax, 6; nx> grade flax, 6; No. 3 white corn X.
Cars Inspected Out—No. 1 northern wheat.
17; No. 2 northern, 23; No. 3, 7; rejected 11*
no grades 16; No. 2 winter wheat 11 • No 3
yellow corn, 7; No. 3 corn, 18; No. 3 white
oats, 5; No. 3 oats, 14; rejected flax 25
Receipts and Shipments.
. March 6.
• Recalv&d—Wheat, 346 cars, 280,260 bu- corn
42,140 buj oatt, 35,88U bu; barley, a 000 bu'
rye, 1,770 bu; flax, 4,270 bu; flour, 1,083 br!s:
millstuffß, 105 tons; hay, 88 tons; fuel oil'
135,400 gals; merchandise, 1,869,384 lbs; lum
ber, 20 cars; posts and piling, 1 car
barrel stock, 1 ear; machinery, 505,300 lbs
coal, 1,388 tons; wood, 322 cords; brick, 57 000:
lime, 1 car; cement, 125 brls; household goods
100,000 lbs; dressed meats, 139,434 lbs; railroad
materials, 13 cars; sundries, 25 cars- car lots
763.
Shipped—Wheat, 19 cara, 15,680 bu: corn
12.740 bu; oats, 11,160 bu; barley, 780 bu; flax,
RANGE OF WHEAT PRICE IN MINNEAPOLIS
Open. High. , Loir. JPbday/ . Yesterday- Year a.«j.
Mar..s ■■.'..:.'...« $ .....:....* ...■..'.../$. 73% '. $ .73%": '$ ';|'-
May.. .74% . -.74«4@74% -74%' .74% .74% ..64%©6i%
July.. .75% .75% - .75% j -.75% .75%@75%' .Gs%@Cs^
On Track— 1 hard, 75% c; No. 1 northern. 73% c; No. 2 northern, 68%@70%c,
THE DAY'S RESULT.
May Wheat. Minneapolis. Chicago. Duluth, . St. Louis, New York,
Close to-day $.74% , $ .75 .©75% .75% $.73% > $ .79%
Close yesterday.... .74% .75% .76% .73% .79%
2.610 bu: flour. 42.225 brls; millsturfs, I.JJI
tons; hay, 10 ions: fruit, 89.25S lbs; mer
chandise, 1,(J5(i.420 lbs; lumber, M cam; ma
chinery, 39<U0(> lbs; brick, 11,000; cemei
brls; household goods, &.400 lbs; linseed oil,
312.830 brls; oil cake. 220.000 lbs; bides, Delta,
etc., 40,600 lbs; railroad materials, . ears;
sundries, 19 cars; car lots, 70'.t.
"Wheat Movement.
The following are the receipts and ship
ments at the-principal primary wheat mar
kets:
Receipts. 'Shipments.
. . Bushels. Bushels.
New York 5,400 104,810
Philadelphia ..^........... 11,203 28,574
Baltimore ....„ „.. 15,604 24,000
Toledo _»,„...... .-».. 12,200 26,000 i
Detroit ....... 9,075 None ',
St. Louis ................. 38,000 83,000
Boston .«......_. 48,483 None
Chicago 53,700 31,449
Milwaukee ...v^..... 46,500 2,250
Duluth ~............ 80,338 1.8U3
Minneapolis .._......... 280,600 15.550
Kansas City 85,600 45,000
"Wheat Movement by Hoods.
March 6.
Received—Milwaukee, 76 cars; Omaha, 65;
St. Louis, 28; Great Northern, 128; Northern 1
Pacific, 3; Great Western, 6; Burlington, 22;
£00, 18.
Shipped—Milwaukee, 7 cars; Omaha, 2; St.
Louis, 6; Great Northern, Great Western,
2 cars.
RANGE OF MAY WHEAT
f3J> /os>o //. ? p /as/, /a<
_
j7^( — j I (~ _j
OTHER GRAIN MARKETS
CHICAGO GRAIN
Lively Local Trade in the Grain Pit
at the Opening;
Chicago, March 7.—There was a lively local
trade in the grain pits at the opening to-day,
and considerable activity and strength in the
provisions market.
_ -May wheat opened %@%c lower, at 75%<g>
7514 c, on lower Liverpool cables, liberal
northwest receipts and milder weather. Com
mission houses sold heavily and May touched
75%@75'.40 during the first half hour. Con
certed action by the bulls met the decline
and the market -was forced back to 75%©
75& c. The Price Current said the -weather
had been trying to wheat, but that it was
doubtful if any material harm had been done.
Local receipts were 43 cars, 3 of contract
grade, while Minneapolis and Duluth reported
441 cars, against 282 last week and 524 a year
ago.
Weakness in the coarse grains affected
wheat May declined to 75c and closed %@
%c under yesterday, at 75<§75;
Cash Wheat— 2 red, 74%@76y<c -No 3
red, 72@75%c; No. 2 hard winter, ~71^@73e;
No. 8 hard winter, tiß^@72c; No. 1 northern
spring, 74&@76y 2 c; No. 2 northern spring,
74%@76%c; No. 3 spring, 66@74c.
Trade in corn was brisk at the Start, but
prices were under yesterday's level. Country
acceptances were larger and cables lower.
May opened Vs@^-c to %c lower, at 405 i to
40% c, and under selling led. by commission
houses declined to 40%@40%c. Bulls gave the
market active support at this dip and prices
reacted to the best opening figure. Receipts
were 325 cars, 1 cf contract grade.
Corn broker later, in sympathy -with the
weakness in oats, and closed ie lower, ac
40%@40%c.
Cash Corn— 2, 89c; No. 3, 38%@S8?ic
May oats opened unchanged at 25V 8 c. Offer
ings at that price were liberal and the market
sold a shade lower early. A good demand ex
isted, however, and the shade was regained.
Receipts were 155 cars.
. Cash Oats—No. 2, 25% c; No. 3, 25%«.
The following was the range of prices:
Wheat— March. May.
Opening «. 73% 75 3 8 <S vi
Highest M „ 7: " 7.V.,
Lowest M ...,..^... „ 73V- 75
Close-
To-day .....,„„.... „ 73^ 75@75%
Yesterday ...» . 74 75%
Year ago ~ ~.«... 65%@-% 66%@% j
Close-
Opening „.,■,,„ „^. 111111 40%©%
Highest „^.« 40%/
Lowest „^., M , _.._ 40%@%
Close— : ,
To-day ....^.^...^. „ 38% 40%@%
Yesterday »..._.^ „.. ;taVs 40%®%
Year ago —„~._.......... £4 35 1
Oats-
Opening .r,,..,,,,.,^ L , „,n sna 25^
Highest w..»».^.».^....^,.^. ........ 25%@ii'
Lowest --t ......... ■ »_»*».^ M . ''is..
Close— ~'- ~~ ",f .
To-day ....^^^.^,......^ 24 24%
Yesterday ..^^.^....^.^ 25%
Year ag.o ....^.^^ M .^.» Z3?a@H
Uuluttt Grain.
Duluth, Minn., March 7.—Wheat stocks are
estimated to increase from 250 000 bu to
300,00 bu this week. The market opened %c
off, at 75% c, sold at 76c at 9:31, held at that 1
price until 11 a. m., then sold at 75% c and
held steady at that price, closing at 75% c.
Trading was very quiet. Cash sales were
40,000 bu.
The- close: Wheat, cash, No. 1 hard, 74% c;
No. 1 northern, 72% c; No. 2 northern, 67@
70c; No. 3 spring, 63®68c; to arrive. No. 1
hard, 7C%c; No. 1 northern. 74% c; May, No.
1 northern, 75% c; July, No. 1 northern,
76% c; oats, 26@2t>i4c; rye, EOV4c; barley, 35@
55c; flax, to arrive, $1.56; cash, $1.56; May,
$1.60; September, $1.15; corn, 36% c; May, 38c.
Cars Inspected—Wheat, 95; corn, 44- oats 1
Receipts—Wheat, 60.338 bu; corn, 4.158 'bu
oats, 6,882 bu; rye, 5,278 bu: flax, 1608 bu'
Shipments—Flax, 9.520 bu. -"
Liverpool Grain.
Liverpool, March 7.—Close: Wheat—
y 4 @^d lower; March, Os 10% d; May, 5s ll%d;
July, 5s ll%d. Corn— %@»4d lower-
March, 3s B%d; May, 3s 9%d, 7S^'2U lower '
Milwaukee Grain.
Milwaukee. March 7.—Flour, dull ■ Wheat
dull; No. 1 northern, 75@76c; No. 2 north
ern, 7VA><g,rAc. Rye, firm; No. 1, 52c. Barley
dull; No. 2, 57c; sample, 40@51^c. Oats
lower; No. 2 white, 27 / £@2Bc. "
Kaunas City Grain.
Kansas City. March 7.—Close— May
66%@66 1 / July, 66Vin; cash, No. 2 hard «t\l
@69c; No. 2 red, 70@71c. Corn,, May, 37% cl
cash, No, '£ mixed, 853ic: No. 2 white S7e.
Oats, No. 2 white, 27@27%c.
St. Louis Grain.
St. Louis, March 7.—Close—Wheat No '2
Ted. cash, 73% c; May. 73% c; July, 72% c; No. -'
hard, 71%@71%c. Corn. No. 2 cash, 37Sicj
May, 38% c; July, 35%@38%c. Oats NOI2,
I cash, 26c; May, 25% c; July, 25% c; No. 2
•white, 28M>@29c. Lead, J4.22^@4.25c. Spelter
$3.80@3.82%.
... - >
Chicago Seed and Coarse Graiu.
Chicago, March 7.—Rye. March,' 50c; May,
50% c. Barley, cash. 38@57c. Timothy, per 100
lbs, March, $4.40. Clover, per 100 lbs, March
$10.75. Flax, cash, northwest, $1.56; No. l'
$1.54; May, $1.54.
MONEY MARKETS
New York Money.
New York, March 7. —Noon: Money on call
firm at 2% per cent; prime mercantile paper,
3Vi@4Vi per cent. Sterling exchange easier,
with latuacub hwiUTi Sa.Slwf-yg-ddßE'i
•with actual business in bankers' bills at
?4.87%@4.87% for demand and at $4.84i4@4.84*»i
for 60 days; posted rates. H-£5Q4.80% " and
$4.88&. Commercial bills, ?4.83%<g4.54. Silver
certificates, 61%@63c; bar silver, 61c; Mexi
can dollars, 49c. Government bonds steady:
refunding 2s, registered 105%, coupon 105;
35,. registered and coupon, 111; new 4s, regis
tered and coupon, 137%; old 4s, registered 113,
coupon 114; ss, registered and coupon, 11l' + .
Minneapolis Money-.
MINNEAPOLIS — Bank clearings, $1 600 -
366.57; for the week, $9,078,032.49; correspond
ing week, $9,694,009.03; New York exchange,
selling rate, par; buying rate, 40c discount;
Chicago exchange, selling rate. 20 premium;
buying rate, 20c discount; London 60-day
slght documentary, $4.83%.
ST. PAUL—Clearings to-day, $987,55106.
Chicago , Money.
; Chicago, March 7—Clearings, $24,080,224;
balances, $2,704,884; posted exchange, 4480@
4.58&; New York-exchange, 25c discount, r.
THE MINNEAPOLIS JOURNAL.
CHANGES ARE-MIXED
Some Railroad Shares Advance at
the Opening.
.
t::v,; ■■ ■. . ' • „■..-• .. ■ .
FEVERISH THE SECOND HOUR
I iieuulneNM am to the >Souelur> Con
tlitluiiM Is the Cause of
Some Selling.
New York, March 7.—Changes were mixed
at the opening of the stock market. Some of
the railroad stocks, which . have shown re
tent strength, continued to advance, -but
were inclined' to react after the opening, and
others opened lower on profit-taking.,. Amal
gamated Copper was under.pressure and fell
I*4, and American Smelting, after a frac
tional advance, fell away over a point. . The
Steel stocks were almost wholy neglected. .
Speculation was feverish and lower for the
active railroads during the second hour.
Manipulation of the tractions advanced them
l<3V/k without benefiting the general market.
Some obscure stocks were in demand, Na
tional Biscuit, Ann Arbor preferred, Rio
Grande preferred, American Ice and Wheel
ing & Lake Erie first preferred rising I@2.
Smelting was advanced l\->, Kansas & Texas
preferred 1% per cent, but the latter lost the
rise. By noon many of the leading railroads
and specialties, which were notably strong
earlier, had reacted from 1 to a points. Un
easiness as to the monetary conditions
prompted the selling.
| The stocks which advanced so strongly fell
back from 1 to 2%, the latter Tennessee Coal.
Pressed Steel Car lost 2 points. Some of the
railroads touched the lowest. price of the
day, Pennsylvania reaching 2% under last
night's prices.
The closing was dull and about steady.
Bonds were active and irregular.'
Stock quotations reported for The Journal
by Watson & Co., Chamber of Commerce,
.Minneapolis, Minn. ,
I I II —Close-
Sales I Stocks— , Hi- | Lo- J Bid. j Bid.
I I est. | est. |Mch'|Mchg
jAdams Express.! ] 155 | 155
(Am. Express .1 , 187%| 188
1,500) Am. Cot. Oil .; 27%] 20 i 26 I 27
; do pr ! '. | | 85 | 85
I,2VO|Am. Car , 22% 22%| 22% 22%
70TJ do pr i 74V 73% 74% | 73%
[Am. D. T. Co ..| I 36 i«36
3,000 Am- Hoop ! S6%| 36 | 261/ si 36%
300] do pr I 81%| 81% "81%| 81%
, Am, Ice i 38%; 36% ,38% 36%
: do pr GB%| 67% 68% 67
1,400 Am. Linseed ..; 9V B [ B%j B%| 9%
'. do pr ...... i 38 | 37% 37%! 37%
Am. Malting | }' 4% 4%
j do pr | | 25% 25
55,2ttKAnB. Sugar ....142% 140% 141% 141
; do pr iJ 24 I 122% i 123 | 121
|Am. Smelting ' 55 f 52% 54% 53%
| do pr 93%| 92%| .93%] .93%
4,500' Am. Steel & W 39%| 36%] 38% 39%
S,9OOJAm. Tin p-62% 62 | 62 | 62
I.OOOJAm. Tin |' 62% 62 |62 62
300 do pr I 102 . 101% 101%! 101%
17,600jAin. Tobacco . 121 119% 120% 121
i do pr ! 146% 146 116 | 146
Amal. Cop .... 101 99% 100 ,
4,200 Anacoa. Cop .. 48 46% | 47% 47%
32,901) At., Top. & S.F 58 i 56%| 57% 57%
29,800 do pr ....... ; 92% »1% 91% 91%
4,600 Bait. & Ohio „ 94% 93 | 93 , 94%
. 3,900 do pr < 93% 92%j 92%| 93%
9.700 Brook. Rap. Tr. 76%| 75%| 76 I 75%
:Brook. In. Gas 205 j 199 I 204 j 196
Brunswick Co .1 ■9% 9% 9% 9%
400iCan. Southern . 57%| 57% 57% 56%
Can. Pacific j 90% 90%
36,200 Ches. & Ohio.. 45% 43%' 44% 43%
C. & E. 11l | | 106% 106%
I do pr , I 127 : 128
1,900 Chi. & "Alton... 39% 38% 38% 39
MM do pr ....... 75% 74% 74% 74%
34,200!Chi., Bur. & Q. 149% 149 i 147% 149%
900 Chi. Gr. West. 19% 18% 19% 19%
[ do pr A | 79% 80%
100 do pr B ....| ,' 47% 48%
600 do deb ...... j 93% 93 i 9:! 92%
> Chi., Ind. & L. 3:: ; : 32% 32% 32
I do pr ; 71% 71 71% TIM
jC.,C.,C. & St.L., 75%
I do pr ! i 114%!
Cle., Lor. & W 36 j 36%
; do pr i 75% 76Vs
Chi. Term , : [ 13% 13%
i do pr j 36 I 35% 35% 35%
,Col. Fuel & I. 46% 43% 45% 44%
! do pr i 115 117
l,9oCyCol. Southern .. 9% 9% 9% 9%
| do Ist pr ... 44% 44% 44 44%
, do 2d pr ....; ' 18% 1 18%
22,900 Consol. Gas ... 208 1201% i 207% 201
9,300 Cera. Tobacco .. 46% 45% 46% 46%
| do pr ' 1 100% loo 1;,
1,000 Del. & Hudson.l 166% 166 165% 106 l;
loo|Del., L. & W. | ; 193% 193%
700 Den. & Rio Gr. 39%! 29 39 ' 39%
900! do pr ] 88%) 88 88% . 8814
Dcs M. & Ft. D.] ! 23% 23%
; dO Pi" I 121 120
Du., S. S. &At 1 ; 5% 5%
j do pr I : 14% 14%
0,300 Erie ....~ | 28% 27% 27% 28%
6,200| do Ist pr ... 66% 65 65 | 66
I do 2d pf ..... 43% 42% 42% I 43
|Ev. & Terre H | ....\ 50% 51%
■ j do pr ...., .J.V.... 85 | 86
2,800 Fedreal Steel .. " 44% 43% 44 4:: 4
9,900 do pr . -.; 89%] 88% 89 ' 88%
2,200 Gen. Electric .-! 216 ; 214 i 214"-4.: 213%
500 Glucose 4 j ' 47 I 46%
do pr f I : j 93% 92 "
pJGreat Nor. pr.. 198% 198% 197% 198
2,3oft*«ocking Valley 50% 50 ;; M 50
1,200 do pr | 75% 75 -75 75%
1,200 Illinois Central. 181% 131 : 130% 131%
lowa Central ..1... — . j27 27
• do pr — _ 53 53%
l,4oollnler. Paper ...1 23 22% 22% 23
j do pr } 75 | 74% 74% 74%
K. C. & South .V.;.". 38% 18%
I do pr ■ 40% I 40% 40% 40%
,La Clede Gas ... ...... ...... ~ 81% [ 81%
! do pr .._ .. 97 98
ICOILake E. & W.. 41 41
I do pr 11l 111
! Long Island .. ...... ..' «... 74 75
17,200 Louis. & Nash. I 94% 03% 93% 94%
100 M., St. P. & soo. ...;.. :;..... 17% 17%
I do pr j 49 | 50
34,000|Manhattan ••-■.. ; 120 i 118% 119% 118
4,7oo|Met. St Ry ... 164% 162% I 163% 162%
. 500 Minn. & St. L. 77% 77 i 76% 77%
I do pr ; 108% 108%
4,500 Missouri Pae .„ 90% 89% 89% 90%
2,900 M., K. & T....J 21% 20%] 20% 20%
12,000 do pr | 56 , 54 | 54% • 54%
Mexican Cent.. 17% 17% 17% 17%
Mex. Nat .'..:.. 6% 6 6% 6%
400 Nat. Biscuit ... 40 39% 39% 39%
i do pr .....: ] 94 | 94%
400|Nat. Lead I■l6 ' 15% 15% j 15%
100 do pr ■ _ 86%..-.
2,200 Nat. Steel 46 45% 45% i 45%
1 do pr 102% 101% 102 " 101%
- Nat. Tube 54 : . 58% 53% 53%
do pr 1 ! 102% 102%
Nat Salt f 44% 431% 44 .43%
I do pr : ......j;.:....|. -70 j 71%
300|N. J. Central |....... j 155% 155%
6^600, Norfolk & West 49 j 4S 54 4S>4 48%
100 do pr ......1.....'. 85* S4 '
- N. A. Co., 7ie>v ....'..i...... 75 75
'.'.Mil Northern Pae . 85 83% >.:". 84%
2,000 do pr ...... 88 ' 87% 87% „ 87%
2,1001 Northwestern ..! 174 , 172. 17:: 172%
N. V. Air Brake k i 155% 153
NY. Central. 144% 143% 143% 144%
IN.V..C, &SI 1. ! 20 19%
I do. Ist pr...[....,.1 98 ,98
j do 2d pr 49 48%
Omaha 125 125"
Hdo pr .; 175 175
Ontario & W.. 32% 32 32% 32%
Paper Bag ..... ir,% ie
] do pr ■'.'. ' it 7*14
I,6oo!Pressed Steel . 31% 30 30%' 82%
-"■■' do pr " I-.74.J 73% 73' j 73%
Peoria & E..... 27% 26 27%.-.
200 Pacific Mail "•! ■ 35% ~ 35% 35%1 35%
274001 Perm.. R. R...J 152% 150% 151% i 152%
P..C..C. & St. 1 59 . 58
; do pr ......J...... . . 92 92
11,200; People's Gas ..(104% 102% 103 1 102%
2,1001 Pullman ... 206% 200*4 206 200
Heading ....:... ' 32% 31% 31% 32%
5,500] do Ist pr...l 71% : 71 71% " 71'
1,700 do 2d pr.... VI 41% !1"fl i<2%
17,100 Repub. Steel .. 17% Js', 16% 16%
11,800 do pr ..:... .68% 65% 67% 65%
7,700 Rock Island .. 123%; 124% 124% 125%
St. L. & San P. 39% 38%] 35% 38%
i do Ist pr ... 82% '81% ;82 "82%
! do 2d pr .... 67, M 66%... .
2,300 St. L. & S. W. 26% 26%
4,300! do pr I ; 58 " 58%
24,70ft|St. Paul 154% 153 ■ 153- I 152%
. 300 do pr ....... 194% 194;. I ,194 "i9;JU
.Stand. K. &T. ...-..-....;.-: "3% 3^
21,700 Southern Pac .. 45%, 44% '43% 45%
12,300 Southern Ry .. 25 24% 24% •>:.<
19,800 .do pr .....;.. »%i 75% -479-t j i-»«
32,l00fTenn. Coal & i 66 I 49%! ' S4V4 -50%
2,7oojTexaß & ac .: , 29til 28% 284 ■"■' •
200 Third Ay. ,Ry .. «... :..... ' 120 , : 119-;
' Twin-City R.T.I ...... ...... 72- I ~ 72? i
Tol., St.L. &W. ! ......1...... 13% i"?
i .do-pr ....... ; 34% 34 34% 34U
.(union Pacific .. 92Mi 91 ■ 91% 92Vi
bo pr ....... 86' i 85V* ,', *85 ■•,
600 U. S. Leather:. 12% 12% 12% 12%
800 do pr 75 74% 74% 74f- a
400 U. S. Rubber., 1914 i*V 19 , 19
.1,500 ■-•do •pr v.;.:.f. < 58% "58 • '58 « • 55%
U.S. Express.. I ">B>, !&\k
2,000 Wabash ... ...! IS' 17 16% 17%
12,600 do pr .:..... 32% '31 31% 31%
Wells-Far. Exp 137 ' 137
6,800 Western Union.. 88% 88 88% ;87%
2,300 Wheel. &L. E.. 1 ■■' ■■ 16 15 11%
. 100 do Ist pr ... 56 54%
do 2d pr .... 32 31 31% 31
Wisconsin Cent. 18% 18% 18 18%
do pr ..„. 1 j 42% 42?ij
Total sales, 838,700. ■
Chclago stocks: Diamond Match, 136; Lin
seed common 8%, preferred 37%; Biscuit com
mon 39%, preferred 94%.
GENERAL PRODUCE
The >iiiin<-ii|*olii Market.
Thursday, March 7. \
Butter shows further weakness this morn
ins; and is quoted at Ho for extra creameries.
There-is no particular increase in receipts,
but demand has (alien oft somewhat, making
an easier feeling general.
Eggs are steady and a little firmer at 13% c
for strictly fresh. ........
Poultry is linn and fancy turkeys and
spring chickens are quoted a shade higher.
Fruits are steady.
Onions are higher and are now quoted 11.50
per bu.
BUTTER—Extra creameries, per," lb, 21c;
firsts, 18@18%e; seconds, 14@14M>e; imitations,
firsts, 15@16%c; seconds, 12% c; dairies, ex
tras, 17@18c; firsts, 14@15%c; seconds, 12c;
roll, fancy, 14@15c; choice, 12c; ladles, firsts,
12%@13e; seconds, 10c; packing stock, fresh,
lie..
EGGS—Strictly fresh, cases included, loss
off, 13%e; dirty, fresh, B%©9c; checks, 8@
B%c.
CHEESE— Twins or flats, fancy, lb, 12% c;
twins or flats, choice, lb, 10@10%e; twins or
flats, fair to good, 6@7c; brick, No. 1, lb,
12%@13e; brick. No. 2, 10@llc; brick, No. 3,
10c; limburger. No. l, 13c; llmburger, ..o. 2,
8%@9%c; primost, No. 1, per lb, 8c; pri
most. No. 2, per lb, 6c; Young America, fan
cy, lb. 12%(&13c; choice, 10%@llc; pultost,
9@loe; Swiss, No. 1, 13%@14c; block Swiss,
No. 1, l*^@l3c; No. 2 block, 9@loc.
DRESSED POULTRY—Turkeys, dry picked,
fancy, medium weight, per lb, 10c; turkeys,
dry picked young loins, 7%c; fair to good,
mixed, 7@7%e; turkeys, thin, smal, bruised,
4@sc; spring chickens, fancy, 10%@llc; fair to
goOd, y@loc; springs, off stock, 4@sc; cap
ons, 13@14c; fowls, fancy, B@9c; fair to
good,- 6@6%c; ducks, fancy, lie: ducks, fair
•to good, B©9 C ; geese, fancy, 10c; geese, fair
to good, 7@Be.
DRESSED MEATS—VeaI, fancy, 100 to 125
lbs, isc; veal, fair to good, 7@7 1, 2 c; fair to
overweight, 4%<@sc; mutton, fancy, country
dressed, Gc; thin or overweight, sc; lambs,
fancy, 8c; lambs, thin or bruised, 6c; hogs,
according to weight, 5%@6c.
GAME—Rabbits, jack, per doz, - $2.50@3;
white rabbits, 75c;- cottontail, 80c#Sl; squir
rels, gray or black, per Uoz, 30(£j40c; red, doz,
20c.
PIGEONS— Live, per doz, $1; dead, per doz,
50c; squabs, per doz, $1.
FlSH—Pickerel. 4@4%c; herring, 3c; her
ring, skinned; lb, 4c; lake trout, lb, 10c; frogs'
legs, per doz, as to size, lot.
POTATOES— Burbanks, car lots, 36@38c;
Rurals, 34@36c; Ohios, 44@'46c; mixed white,
34@36c; mixed red, 34@38c; small lots sell at
s@loe per bu higher than these figures.
SWEET POTATOES—Illinois, per brl, $3;
Muscatines, per brl, $2.00.
BEANS—Fancy navy, per bu, $2.25; choice,
bu, $2@2.10; medium, hand-picked, bu, $2;
brown, fair to good, $1.50@2.
ONIONS'—Red Globes, car lots, per bu,
$1.50; Red Wethersflelds, bu, $1.50; Yellow
Globes, car lots, per bu, $1.50; white, per bu,
$1.50.
DRIED PEAS—Fancy yellow, $l@l.lo per
bu; medium, 90c@$l; green, fancy, $1.25®
1.35; green, medium, 9l>c(gsl bu; marrowfat,
bu, $2. «-t
APPLES—Russets, $3.25@3.50; Ben Davis,
brl, $3,75@4; Greenings, brl, $3.75@4.25; Bald
wins, brl, $::.75&4.25; Northern Spy, $4.75@5;
Jonathan, $5.50ig.'6; western box apples, bu,
$1.75@2.
CRANBERRIES—Cape Cod, per brl, $9;
Jerseys, $8.50^9; bu crate, $3; Wisconsin
cranberries, $8.50@9.
FIGS—New California, 10-lb boxes, 75@85c.
ORANGES—California navels, 80s, .$2.75;
California navels, 965, $2.75; California navels,
1265, $2.75; California 150s, J3; California
navels, 176s to 288s, $3.25; California seed
lings, all sizes, $2.25; California tangerines,
half box, $2; grape fruit, SOs to 965, $4@5.
LEMONS—Messinas, 300s or 3605, fancy,
$3.50@3.75; choice, $3.25@3.50; California,
fancy, as to size, $3.75; choice, $3.50.
GRAPES—Malagas, per keg, $6.50@7.50; per
keg, extra fancy, $5@8.25.
STRAWBERRIES—Fancy Florida stock, 40
@50c qt. i .' ; :*..-. /•.: :,:■■
PINEAPPLES—Per doz, as to size, range
from $3.75 to $5.25.'
BANANAS—Fancy, large bunches, $2@2.25;
medium bunches, $1.75@2; small bunches
$1.50.
HONEY—New fancy white, 1-lb sections,
18c; choice wl ite, 15@16c; amber, 13@14c;
golden rod, ll@12c; extracted white, 10@llc:
buckwheat, 10;'ul2f ; extracted amber, B@9c.
VEGETABLES—Beets, bu, 30@40c; cabbage,
crate, $1.75@2; carrots, 55<g60c; cauliflower,
per doz, $1.50; cucumbers, doz,' $1.75@2.25;
egg plant, doz, $1.75@2; green onions, doz,
50c; Spanish onions, per bu crate, $2; lettuce,
doz, 35c; head' lettuce, doz, 40@45c; pars
ley, ; 30c; parsnips, bu, 50@60c; rutabagas,
bu, 40c; watercress, doz, 30c; wax beans, $3.75
@4; mint, doz, 40c; turnips, new, bu, 60c; new
Bremuda potatoes, per bu, $2.75© '■',; California
celery, doz, 60@80c; new carrots, per bu, 55
grown pie plant, per lb, 8c; horseradish, per
@60; Florida tomatoes, basket, 75@S5e; home
in 5-lb baskets, $1.50.
'Sew York. Produce.
New York, March 7.—Butter—Receipts, 1.759
pkgs: firm; fresh creamery, 17@22c; June
creamery, 15@20e; factory, ll@lsc. Cheese-
Receipts, 1,250 pkgs; strong; fancy large, col
ored and white, ll@ll%c; fancy small, col
ored, 12% c- fancy small, white, 12@12%c.
Eggs—Receipts, 7,727 pkgs; unsettled; wes
tern, at mark. 1514 c: southern, at mark,
14%@15e. Sugar—Raw, steady; fair refining,
3%c; centrifugal 96-test, 4%c; molasses sugar
3%c; refined, Quiet; crushed, 6c; powdered'
5.60 c; granulated, 5.50 c. Coffee—Quiet.
: Chicago Produce.
Chicago, March —Butter—Quiet; creamer
ies, 15(&22c; dairies, 10@19c. Cheese—Quiet;
10%@11%c. Eggs—Quiet; 13% c. Dressed
Poultry—Quiet; turkeys, 8@10c; chickens, 10c.
MISCELLANEOUS
>e\v York Cotton.
New York, March 7.—Cotton- opened steady
but down li§6 points.-under pressure from the
talent and in the absence of buying from any
quarter. Room sentiment' was extremely
bearish in view of a decline of 2@3 points in
English futures and a drop of 3-32 d in. spot
■cotton. ■■ ?■;■-.
Cotton, spot, closed dull, l-16c decline;
middling uplands, STic; middling guUf, S»%c.
Sales, 500 bales.
Peoria Whisky.
■ Peoria, March 7.—Whisky on the basos of
$1.27 for finished goods.
London Consols.
London, March 7.—Consols for money,
96 11-16; consols for the account, 96 15-16.
Hides, Pelts*. Tallow and Wool.
N0.1.N0.2.
Green salted heavy steer hides 8% . 7%
Green salted heavy e"ow hides ...... 7, 6...
Green salted light hides 7% 6 1
Green salted heavy cow and steer
hides,: branded .-.. 7 6
Green salted bull and oxen 6% 5%
Green salted veal calf. 8 to 15 1b5....10 8%
Green salted veal kip, 15 to 25 1b5.... 914 "7%
Green salted long-haired or run
ner kip 7% ,6%,
Green salted deacons, each 50 '40
Green cattle hides and skins, l@l&c per
lb less than above quotations.
Green salted horse or mule hides, *.
large $3.10 2.25
Green salted horse or mule hides,
medium 2.50 1.50
Green salted horse or mule hides,
small ......... ....1.73 1.00
Dry flint Montana butcher hides 13 ©1,4
Dry flint Minnesota, Dakota and
Wisconsin hides 11 9
Dry flint calf skins „. 16 "12-
Dry flint kip skins 14 ."'ll'.
Green salted pelts, large, each. $0.85@L00
Green salted pelts, medium, each.. .50@ .75
I Green salted pelts, small, each ...... .20@ .40
i Dry flint territorial pelts, butcher.. 11 @12
Dry flint territorial pelts, murrain.. 10 11
Dry flint teritorial shearlings 6V£<g» 9
Tallow, in cakes 4% -4 I.
Tallow, in barrels '.. 4' 3%
Grease, white".. ...4 8%
Grease, dark: 3% - 2%
Wool, medium, unwashed ..".14^@15V2
Wool, coarse, unwashed ............14 @15
Wool, fine medium, unwashed ...... i;!Vi@l4 l/£ '
Wool, fine, unwashed .- IOY*@I2M 1
Wool, broken fleeces, unwashed 12 <Sl4
Wool, seedy, burry, unwashed.. 12-©13% ;
Bright Wisconsin and similar grades, l@2c
higher than above quotations.
... . . w - . - t ... ", „:.■,■,.!
' " -New York Grain. I
'■.'•■:-■-■ ■ + ■ .. ■ . '. - - ,■■;.,..', i
1 'New. York, March 7.—Close: Wheat;" March ,
79c: May, 79V£c; July, 79c. Corn, May, 45Tc' '
, July, 45c .-..-..-• ■■?, ■-■-<--> • -■■-..--• •;.-. ■•-■■■■-.'. J
HOGS UP A LITTLE
Sales Rule 2 1-2 C Higher on Small
Supply.
NO FRESH SHEEP ARRIVALS
Price* Continue Steady on, the! Re
cent !.",«• Advance- Veal
• .Strong. ■
South St. Paul, Minn., March 7.— Receipts
to-day were 150 cattle, 50 calves, 1,000 hogs
and no sheep.' ■
The following table shows the receipts from
Jan. 1, 1901, to date ,as compared with the
same period a year ago:
Year. Cat'.le.Calves.Hogs Sheep.Horses.
1901 ....25,434 5,318 118,386 5b\909 399 2,781
1900 ....17,432. 5,728 94,562 84,461 1,745 2,495
Dec ........ 410 ...... 25,t"<62 1,340 ....
1nc ..... 8,052 .... f23,824 ...,'- ;... 286 j
The following table shows the receipts for
the month of March to date, iits compared
with the same period a year ago:
Year. Cattle.Calves.Hogs. Sheep.
1901 .... 2,061 74:. 8,50'j 2 942 ... 208
1900 .... 1,201 316 7,359 951 324 173
Dec . ...
l!V ..... ' 860- 429 1,147 1.991 ... 35
Receipts:
Date. Cattle. Calves. Hogs. Sheep. Cars.
Feb. 28 348 . 122 2,746 8 47
March 1 103 41 2,246 3*3 35
March 2.... 25 r, 1,999 _'t> 28
March 4.... 235 40 1,129 538 29
March 5.... 897 429 1,904 I^7ll 70
March 6 802 220 1,2:10 43 46
Estimated receipts by cars . to-day of the
railroad*! centering at these yards: Chicago
Great Western, 2; Chicago, Milwaukee & St.
Paul, 3; Minneapolis & St. Louis, 2; Chicn^o,
St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha, 6; Great
Northern, 2; Northern Pacific, 2; total, 17.
Disposition of stock March 6:
Firm— • „y.•.-.•: Cattle. Hogs. Sheep.
Swift & Co 160 . 1,149 683
Estate of I. Staples 22
W. E. McCormick 3 ....
Elliot & Co., Duluth 7 ....
Stimmer & Thomas 240 ....
J. A. Steel 107 .... ...
J. B. Fitzgerald 10 ..„.
Hankey Bros 26 .... ...
Peter Evan 50 ....
H.Friedman..... 15 ....
J. E. Boltou ' 8 ....
R. N. Katz 4
King Bros 19
Haas Bros ..-s. 29.
J. T. McMillan 92
Weirs , 3s
Country buyers .......... 175
Totals ..." 927 1,308 702
CATTLE—There were only a few loads of
cattle received fresh in yards to-day. There
was a very small percentage of killing kinds
included, and they were on the common or
der. The demand for all killing grades was
very keen at prices firm with the strong
tone of the o>ast week. Veal calves were in
very strong demand at steady prices. ' The
stocker and feeder trade was very slow on
the common kinds, while fair to good ones
sold readily at steady prices. Sales:
Butcher Cows and Heifers-
No. . Ay. Price. Ay. Price.
1 910 $3.00 I] 2 880 $2.35
18 992 3.85 I 2 .... 1.055 3.50
0 1,173 4.40 |i 3 1,066 4.00
3 843 : 2.35 || 3 1,070 2.75
2 1,050 2.10 |j 1 1,000 2.50
1 1,270 3.00 *lj 1 ........ 820 2.35
1 1,240 3.25 || 1 '..900 2.50
1 .... 1,250 250 || 1 920 1.75
1 830 1.50 I]
Beef and Butcher Steers—
No. . Ay. Price.' Ay. Price.
2 1,050 $3.55 ii 1 1,040 $3.40
1 ...: 1,050 3.00 i|l 810 3.00
Milkers and Springers-
Four cows and three calves for $130.
One cow for $40.
One cow for $34.
One cow for $28.
One springer for $34.
Stockers and Feeders-
No. Ay. Price. .No. Ay. Price.
10 278 $3.40 |J 5- 616 $3.50
3 933 3.10 || 3 .... 816 3.00
IS _ 808 3.75 (163 340 3.50
2 770 3.00 j 8 549 2.50
6 1,073 3.75 :1. 990 3.75
1 ...520 3.40 Il* CBO 3.00 i
1.. :. 500 2.00 J2 560 2.00
2 ....640 2.65 ii 3 653 2.65
Feeding Cows and Heifers—
No. - Ay. Price. [No. Ay. Price.
5 600 $3.00 | 2 380 $3.00
2 1,030 3.00 2 570 2.75
3 386 2.50 !11 381 3.00
7 564 2.50 1 850 2.75
1 330-2.25 [1 .940 3.00 (
1 540 2.25 ; 1 780 2.20
1 300 2.50 |1 . i
Feeding Bulls— I
No. Ay. Price. Ay. Price.
2 740 $2.10 ii 2 805 $2,10
1 880, 2.35 Ij ' n
Veal Calves—
No. Ay. Price. 11 No. Ay. Price.
1 ♦ 2130 $5.50 jj 1 130 $5.00
1 120 5.00 1 HO 5.00
1 390 4.00 [| 3 230 3.75
HOGS—The supply of hogs received at the
leading markets to-day was about 45,000,
against 74,000 last Thursday and 58,000 a year
ago. Conditions at all points developed
strength on best quality, but ruled weak on
others. The demand here on account of the
small supply, was unusually strong, and sales
generally ruled 2^c higher. Quality was fully
5c per 100 lbs better than yesterday's offer
ings. Best sold from $5.40 to $5.42 Ij>. with a
top at $5.50. Mixed grades sold from $5.37% to
$5.40, and roughs at $5.25. Sales:
Hogs-
No. Ay. Pri-ce. j No. Ay. Price.
70 .„ 245. $5.50 j! 55 265 $5.50
72 181 6.47% 44 177 5.45
71 215 5.45 || 83 .212 5.42 Vi
50 ..' 203 5.42% 61 ...;.... 231 5.42%
51- 221 5/42% 15 198 5.42%
44 ...257 5.42% 56" 171 5.37%
26 161 5.35 |S3 179 5.35
Pigs and Culls — ,;:
No. Ay. Price. II No. Ay. Price.
3 493 $5.25 I 2 365 $5.25
1 290 5.00 I 6 '. 106 475
S ...■ 99" 485 II •
SHEEP—There was practically no fresh ar
rivals offered.on sale in the sheep division.
Local buyers had urgent orders to fill and
were compelled to go to local feed lots for
their supplies. Choice fat lambs ruled strong
and choice fat ewes and wethers held fully
steady with the recent 15c advance.
Sheep-
No. * , .'■-'. Ay. Price.
133 lambs .....81 $5.00
10 lambs 80 5.00
6 yearlings 76 4.65
On the market: Larson brothers, Isanti;
W. B. Beatler, Villard: E. R. Cante & Co.,
Elk River; F. H. Dammann, Plato; G. W.
Gove, Kasson; Brabec & M., Waverly; F.
Ahrens, Pratt: Wm. ■ Bergman, Comfrey;
Erickson Brothers, Batavia; O. J. Thompson,
Merton, lowa. •
Sioux City Live Stock.
Sioux City, lowa, March 7.—Receipts—Hog3,
1,500; cattle, 400. • ■ ,
Hogs—Steady. Sales:
No. Ay. Price.
63 220 $5.25
56 247 5.27%
59 276 5.30
57 270 5.35
Cattle—Steady. Sales: .
*°- Ay. Price.
2 canners 900 $2.50
10 cows ..* 1,020 3.7"
6 stock heifers, ; ....450 2^75
5 stock heifers 540 3.00
2 bu115....... 910 KM
2 bulls „... 1,000 ,3.00
2 bulls ;.r..v;:l,loo 3.25
10 stockers 940 3.50
6 stockers 820 4 00
6 yearlings ...'..,Y 660 3 25
5 calves „ i 530 00
6 calves ;. 350 3.50
5 calves .........i. 320 4.10
Sheep—ln demand; $3.50@4.75.
Chicago Live Stock.
Chicago, March 7.—Cattle—Receipts, 9 000
--steady; good to prime steers. 15.05^6.26; poor
to medhirn, $3.65@5; stockers and feeders,
$2.75@4.60; cows and heifers, $2.70@4.50; can
ners, $2@2.<i5; calves, $406.25; Texas steers
$3.35@4.90.
Hogs—Receipts to-day, 18,000: to-morrow,
22,000; left over, 2,550; 5c higher, closed ad
vance lost; mixed and butchers, $5.37 1 2 ii}
5.62' ii; good to choice heavy, $5.55@5.60: rough
heavy, $5.35(g.5.45; light, $5.37V55@5.60; bulk of
sales, $5.50@5.57V2.
Sheep—Receipts, 15,000; steady; sheep, $4@
4.85; lambs, $4.50@5.25.
Official yesterday: Receipts—Cattle, 15,779;
hoga, 24,556; sheep, 10.308. Shipments—Cattle,
3,322; hogs, 3,582; sheep, 1,062.
Omaha Live Stock.
South Omaha. March 7.—Cattle-Receipts,
2,300; steady to Stronger; native steers, $4®
5.40; western steers, $3.70@4.60; Texas steers,
$3^x3.90; cows and heifers, $3@4.10; stockers
and feeders, t3-25#4.50.
Hogs—Receipts, 6,u00; higher; heavy, $5.37V6
M. DOR AN & CO.,
The Oldest Firm of
Bankers and Brokers
IN THE XOHTHWEST,
. Have removed from their old quarters
■ • >. on Jaolwon Stress to the- . \
Uemuia UA Baiidtn*. or. 4th •
and Minnesota *U »*. P»«l. Ulna.
THURSDAY EVENING, MARCH 7, 1901.
@5.45; mixed, $5.32'/i@5.37.3; Isght, $5.30(g3.55;
bulk or sales. $5.32%@5.40.
Sheep— Receipts, 6,268; steady!; :sheep, $3.C0
1.80; lambs, $4.25@5.10.
St. I.oulh I,tv<* Stwk.
St. Louis",' '7.— Cat Up— Receipts,: 2,500;
steady; native 5teer5,".53.50@5.65; > tockers and
feeders, $2.50@3.60; cows and heifers, $2®
4.75; Texas and Indian steers, $3.»0@4.70. '
Hogs^Recelpts,, B,OQQ;» steady: •> pigs- and
lights, $5.40@3.45;'packer5,'55.35@5.50; butch
ers, $5.50@5.60. v
Sheep— Receipts, 300; strong; muttons, $4<a>
4.35; lambs, $4.55@5.25.
KaiinaM City Live Stock,
Kansas City, March 7.—Cattle—Receipts,
4,000; strong; native steers, $4.7505.65; Texas
steers, $3.90@4.75; cows and heifers, $2.50®
To; stackers and feeders, $3.80<g)5.
Hogs—Receipts, 10,000; steady to 2%c high
er; bulk of sales, $5.35@5.45; heavy. $E.35@
5.52%; mixed, $5.3005.15; light, $5.30@3.40.
Sheep—Receipts, 1,000; strong; muttons,
|3.90®4.60; lambs, ?4.90®5.
PROVISIONS
Chicago l*ruvlMlonn.
Chicago, March 7. —Provisions were active
and strong. The opening was firm because
or' light hog. receipts and a firm market at
! the yards. Packers bought freely and shorts
began to cover. On this buying the market
moved rapidly upward^ May pork opened
2 1 / £ c higher, at $14.25, and advanced sharply
to $14.50. May lard opened 2^@sc. up, at
$7.50, and sold to $7.55. May ribs opened
2i£c better, at $7.12 I,£, and advanced to $7.20.
Close—Pork, March, $14.35; May $14.52V>.
Lard, March, $7.60; May, $7.52}i@7.55; July,
$7.50; September, $7.67'/ Ribs, March, $7.15;
May, ?7.17»0@7.20; July, $7.25; September,
$7.30.
Boston Mining Stockn.
Boston. March 7.—Adventure, 13; Arcadian,
LMVi: Arnold, 5; Atlantic, 34' i; Baltic, 4tj;
Montana, 357; Butte, 99; Calumet, 859; Cen
tennial, 2r,:,v, Franklin, 23; Isle Hoyale, i%%;
Osceola, 92%; Quincy, 174; Mohawk, 29%;
Rhode Island, 8; Tamarack, 349; Wolverine,
54; Amalgamated, 99%; Old Dominion, 37V»;
Parrott, 32%; I'tah, U5; Zinc, 9; Cocniti Gold,
W4; Liomiuoin Coal, 35»4; Blngham, 2iy 2 .
INVESTMENT GOSSIP
Earnings, Great Northern, month of Febru
ary, $1,740,508, decrease $87,022.
Earnings C, C. C. & St. L., fourth week
of February, increase, $1!<,561; month, in
crease, $48,y44.
Waldorf gossip to Watson—The fact that
money is somewhat firmer and that the banks
have loat this week to the treasury about
$3,000,000 are considerations which give some
concern to many traders. At the same time
it is argued that the heavy operators and large
interests would not have renewed their opera
tions for the rise, as they have done in the
past days, did they not know from what
source, should the necessity present itself,
a fresh supply of capital can be obtained.
Hence sentiment continues conservatively
bullish.
New York to Andrews & Co.: The stock
market is a puzzle. Stocks look too high
and it is not easy to see how they can so
still higher, yet M» Morgan believes that
the general trend will be upward for the
next year at least. Personally 1 feel like sell
ing some of the railroads short but it is hard
to advise counter to Morgan. His hand can
be seen in the continued ease of money when
all indications seem to hinder. He evidently
does not intend either to permit tight money
or any material decline in the stock market
while his trust is in power. March is a
month when government receipts are usually
greatly in excess of expenditures. The sub
treasury is absorbing large amounts of money
every day from the local banks and it will
be a mystery if next Saturday's bank state
ment is not extremely bad.
SPECULATIVE GOSSIP
Price Current: Weather trying on wheat
crop, but doubtful if material harm done
yet. Fair movement of corn, but liberal
quantity held firmly for feeding. Farm sup
plies at least 850,000,000 bu; packing, 500,000
bu. against 350,000 bu.
St. Louis receipts: Wheat, to-day, 38,000
bu: last year, 14,000 bu. Corn, 188 bu; last
year. 77,00u bu. Oats, 44,000 bu; last year.
48,000 bu.
Stephens, from Mcßeynolds. Chicago:
"Dake Schreiuer has a letter from Minne
apolis, Kan., that says farmers' reserves of
wheat are very small. Recent shipments
have beeu heavy to avoid taxation."
Logan, Chicago, to Jolley: 'About all the
floor traders are working the bear side; in
fact, it looks like Phillips was the buyer and
that the balance of the crowd in the pit was
on the other side."
Verhoeff, from Milmine: "Marketa all soft.
Liberal Selling of wheat by the larger com
mission houses. General selling of corn at
opening."
The Times-Herald publishes the following
from J. Ogden Armour: The firm of Armour
& Co. is operating grain warehouses, and
necessarily is more or less In and out of the
market. But 1 would like to have it made
plain, as coming from me. aside from the
part I am compelled to take in the regular
course of my business 1 am not in the wheat
trade either as buyer or seller. The role of
speculator is not to my liking, and as 1 am
not playing it, I would like to have the talk
in that direction auieted.
Broomhall cables: The opening Liverpool
declines this morning were due to a poor spot
demand, while later in the session, owing to
the little outside interest shown in the mar
ket, prices further eased off %(g\ie. Free
offerings of corn from Argentine caused the
opening decline of Vfcc to-day, as well as lafer
decline of %c.
Primary receipts and shipments: Wheat-
Receipts to-day 586.000 bu. year ago 648.000
bu; shipments to-day 179,000 bu, year ago
171,000 bu.
Clearances, wheat and flour, 387,000 bu;
corn, 363,000 bu; oats, 35,000 bu.
PRAIRIE DOG NUISANCE
Poisoned Grain and Bisulphide of
Carbon Recommended,
Special to The Journal.
Brookings, S. D., March 7.—Stock and grain
farmers in the northwestern states will be
interested in a new bulletin of the United
States department of agriculture, just re
ceived at the state agricultural college here,
which gives directions ror the destruction of
prairie dogs. Keepers of fattle ranges and
cultivated ranches in all of the western states
have been troubled more or less with these
dogs. The division of biological survey of the
department, at the request of Secretary Wil
son, has made careful experiments and in its
final report says it has been learned that of
the various agents that have been used for
the destruction of prairie dogs, poisoned grain
and bisulphide of carbon are- the most effect
ual and economical. Poisoned grain is the
less expensive of the two and is most efficient
iv early spring when food is scarce. At that
season, by its proper and systematic use, SO
to HO per cent of the animals may be de
stroyed at a cost of about 10 cents per acre.
The remainder may be killed by the use of
bisulphide of carbon, the cost of which will
vary according to the number of inhabited
holes.
The greatest care should be exercised in
handling both the poisoned grain and the bi
sulphide. Bisulphide is inflammable and
highly explosive and should never be opened
in the vicinity of a light or flre. The poi
soned grain should never be placed where it
may be reached by cattle, hogs or poultry.
FOIR BABIES IN LESS THAN A YEAR
Growth of Population In X. D. Not
Attributed to Immigration Alone.
Special to The Journal.
Fargo, X. D., March ".—Xorth Dakotans
are proud of the rapid growth of the
state, but the influx of settlers is not en
tirely responsible for the increase. Eleven
months ago the wife of Thomas Graham of
Knox in Benson county, gave birth to
twins. Last week she made Mr. Graham
the happy father of more twins. Four ba
bies in less than a year is not bad, and
Mr. Graham is being congratulated.
At Bowbells fecently a wife of a new
settler gave birth to triplets, and the lit
tle ones were given presents by Immigra
tion Agent Casseday of the Soo, who used
the fact as an argument in favor of immi
gration. An unusually large number of
twins has been reported this winter, but
Mr. Crruham and his good wife seems to be
entitled to the championship so far.
GEORGE WELTOX'S ESTATE
Telephone Girl at Farg-o May Prove
Her Right to It.
Special to The Journal.
Fargo, N\ D., March 7.—There was a de
ckled sensation in Fargo last night when
it was learned that Miss Nellie Cass had
filed a petition for the probating of the
last will and testament of George H. Wel
ton, who died of apoplexy here last week.
Welton left a widow, an aged woman, who
was in Florida for her health, two mar
ried daughters and a married son, near
Fargo. It was supposed that he had died
intestate and the children were preparing
:; ■" - ' —— i 5 UT&BUSIIS 1879 '"-'"'''' ' '' : -■"'*■
WOODWARD & CO.
—— QRAIN COMMISSION «*«™
i BBAUCHES-cmoago art Mi:*»*j««. ' Ordari tot futur» d«Urecf «»cuW4 la an market*
CBAS. E. IEWIS
SCO.,
GRAIN COMMISSION
aid STOOH BROKERS,
i,2 and 3, Chamber ©I
commerce
Private wires to AllMarkutm*
FIRST NATIONAL BARK
OF MINNEAPOLIS.
Phoenix Building 4th St. -and Ist Aya
0. S. IEPOSITORY.
CAPITAL.. $1,000,000
Swim. ant UadMiiei Profits.. 4150,000
OFFICERS.
John Martin I C.T.Jaflray,Ca»Hl«r
J. F. R. Fo«s, ) denta. | A«it Ca»h!er§
- DIBECTOKS.
Geo. C. Bagley, . . 8. i). CaririU. H. H. Cbute.
HofLJotuTl.tfuaiUD. John Martin.B.G.Palmer.!
¥ on« J -™ P3,/y- EJ'«?nin?toß,O. T. Sweet,
A. M. Woodward. F. B. Wells, F. M. Prince
Vice President; J. F. K. Foss- Vice President-
C. T. Jaflray. Cashier.
THOMAS & Go
Grain Commission and Stock Brokers.
Write for our dally market letter, whioa we
mall FREE on application.
Members Minneapolis Chamber at Com
merce. Telephone—Main IS&7-J,
ft cHAMisSB OX flovicnn.
EXPERT GRAIN CLEANERS.
j|£?3r™B3 SHHI Elevator and Farm
Jaß^S* B sizes—24-ln. to 72-In.
MM sieves. Separates
•Sti wheat and oats, flax
SSj awl wheat, clover,
Hli^^ timothy, etc.
tBS^FiH jBiB Grain Buyers
E leJaS [- should consul: us on
KI^IS work.
_fil *B^^ Implement Dealers
Should carry the farm
Sizes. Made by A. V. CLELAND,
81-83 Western Aye., Minneapolis, "linn.
to have the estate probated. Mis« Nellie
Cass is an employe of the local telephone
exchange end through her lawyers had
what purports to be Welton's will. It is
written in Welton's handwriting on a let
ter head and was dated during the month
of January.
Miss Cass .contiues in the telephone" of
fice and calls "number please," just as if
she was not. to be an heiress to a large
estate. She refused to be interviewed as
to her relationship to Welton, or to make
any statement that would bear on the case.
Ter attorneys were equally reticent, but
say they believe the will is valid despite
the fact that neither the widow nor the
children are mentioned. •;•■"-■;
Welton is supposed to have left a large
estate. He was secretary of the Fosston
Wind Stacker company, and is said to have
had large investments in the east.
FISH AND GAME WARDEN'S
Recent Appointments by Herreld—
\eiv Companieii Organized.
Special to The Journal.
Pierre, S. D., March 7. Governor Her
reid has appointed as fish and game war
dents: For Beadle county, J. B. Comer,
Huron; Clay county, I. M. Howard, Ver
million; Hutchinson county, Hugo Spana
gel, Olivet; Lake county, A. . R. Fuller,
Madison; Walworth county, Matt Haura
han, Bangor.
The state land department has issued
five patents on final payment for state
I lands purchased. Three of these went to
[ Yankton, two to Union, two to Bon
Homme, two to Miner, and one to Clay.
The department has had caljs for $1,600
of the permanent school fund, of which
$1,250 was called for by Gregory county.
and $360 by Fall River county.
Articles of incorporation have been filed
for the Webster Telegraph company, at
Webster, with a capital of $10,000. In
corporation, Alexander Ross, Mrs. Emma
Ross. Mrs. Mary C. Ross.
For the Crow Creek Stock company, at
Gann Valley, with a capital of $10,000. In
corporators, L. B. Laughlin, D. Moore and
J. C. Thull.
For the Storla Co-operative Creamery
company, at Storla, Aurora county, with
a capital of $750. Incorporators. Martin
Tufts, T. O. Storla, Arthur Struck, Thomas
Johnson and A. L. Peterson.
For the Clark County Land and Loan
company, at Clark, with a capital of $50,
--000. Incorporators, William McGann, Ran
som H. Mann, and Samuel H. Elrod.
SUICIDE. SAYS THE SHERIFF
Official and Coroner's Jury Do Not
Agree in the Case of Bennash.
Special to The Journal.
Huron, S. D., March 7.— J. J. Bennash.
who fell dead soon after being arrested
near Edgeley, N. D.. proves to be a man
wanted here for running away with mort
gaged property belonging to Gerner &
Snyder of Wolsey. Sheriff George Kerr
has returned from Edgeley. and says Ben
nash evidently committed suicide, although
the coroner's Jury did not return such a
verdict.
Colonel George W. Bain of Kentucky, de
livered the fourth in the course of lectures
by Huron College Y. M. C. A., before a
large audience Tuesday evening; subject,
"The Xew Woman and the Old Man."
Made Money In Alaska.
Special to The Journal.
Marshfield. Wts., March 7.—Captain and
Mrs. William Moreland arrived in the citj
to-day from Alaska and are now visiting
the latter's parents, who live at Granton
Aboui four years ago Mr. and Mrs. More
land left for Alaska, in poor circumstances.
On their return, the captain places his wealth
at ?1'5,(W0 aud takes pride in telling that his
wife was one of the first women to cross
Chilkoot pass.
Held for Horse Stealing.
Special to The Journal.
Dickinson, N. D., March 7.—Paul Trygum
and Reginald Brlghtman were arrested o:i
charges of horse stealing and bound over to
the district court without bail. Tygum came
from Madison. Wls.. two years ago, and
Brightman halls from northern Minnesota.
Watson & Co
Broken In Grain, Provisions,
Stooks and Bonds.
Members N. Y. Stock Exchange
Chicago Correspondents— Schwartz.Dupee & Co.
Private wire Chicago & New York. Tel. 60S Main.
35 Chamber of Commoroe,
\ EDWARDS. WOOD &' Co.\
\ STOCKS, BONOS. GRAIN, VISIONS- \
\MdißEiis /BOIRD OF TRADE CHICAGO. \ I
\ MEMBERS \ CHAMBERCF COMMERCE MPLS. \
V 312 GUARANTY LOAN BLDC MINNEAPOLIS. \
M. E. DORAN * CO.,
Successors to Geraghty, Doran A Co.
StQch BANKERS aud "oi^T
Bonds ™% ; ProTUlou
'Cotton Mina-p»"«. coffee
UUUUU > (Century Building.) ________

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