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The Minneapolis journal. (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, March 15, 1901, Image 14

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1901-03-15/ed-1/seq-14/

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14
MAY TURNED STRONG AND SOLD UP OVER 75c
Wheat Market Shows Strength and
Activity on Firmer Foreign
Advices.
ARGENTINE SHIPMENTS LIGHTER
Good Ca»li and Export Inquiry Re
ported—.Menu Stronger on
the Whole.
Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce, March
IB.— combination of a firmer Liverpool
market with light shipments from Argentine,
: and moderate receipts in the: northwest, put
strength into wheat this morning and forced
■and advance of %c. May opened %c up 'at
?4%c, and had worked up to 74% cby noon.
Corn was firm. : Northwest wheat receipts
were 346 cars, against 697 last year. In the
■southwest receipts were 132,000 hu, at St.
. Louis and Kansas City, against 52,000 bu last
year. Liverpool closed *4d* to %d higher.
Antwerp was unchanged, Paris 5 centimes to
10 centimes higher and 15 centimes to 20 cen
times higher on flour. - The market held for
an hour around 74'/£c, when tho Chicago
shorts began to cover, starting the upturn.
Minneapolis followed, May selling to 74% c and
July reaching 7G%c. Weather conditions con
tinue favorable, with milder temperatures In
the, northwest. There were more light snow
flurries in lowa, Indiana . and Ohio. Predic
tions' are for warmef weather generally.
Argentine shipments for the week were 1,248,
--000 bu, against 1,608,000 bu last week, and
2,258.000 bu a year ago. ■■ ':
Chicago had a firmer: feeling, helped along
somewhat by a good cash business. About
200,000 bu were sold early, and the seaboard
reported 30 loads worked. Towards noon Chi
cago turned stronger "on bidding by shorts.
St. Louis ' also - showed strength on short
covering, induced by the good cash, busi
ness there, and renewed reports of export
Inquiry in Chicago. Primary receipts were
628,000 bu, against C 14.000 last year. Clear
ances were not obtainable up to noon, but
" were reported heavy, about 300,000 bu going
out of Galveston. Minneapolis received 287
oars and Duluth 59, agaiust 303 and 294 last
year.
May corn, opened firm and steady at 37^»c
and sold to 37Vic, where it held, making a
later advance to 37% c.
The market continued . gaining in strength
towards the end. Bradstreet figures for
wheat and flour exports for the week showed
4,694,000 )>ushels. Clearances wheat and flour
&96.000 bushels. May wheat passed 75c just
before the end and closed firm at 75@7"!,'.
July closed at the high point, 76%@76%c.
March closed ■ at 74Vgc; May corn, 37% c.
Business in the cash; market was on un
changed basis with most of the sales at %c
over May for No. 1 northern and the bulk' of
trades on the early.quiet option. For No. 1
northern 75c was the ruling figure, ■ although
a few late sales, made after the strength de
veloped, showed prices of 70V2C to a shade
better. No. 2 northern sold at 71c for nearly
everything. Some of the ordinary sold vat
7OV2C, while selections went at 71% c. No. 3
.wheat showed little change, going at 66c to
68c for the best and 64c to 65c for ordinary.
Rejected showed a range of 54c to 62c. No
grade sold from 52c to 56^c for the bulk, an
occasional good lot touching.sSe.
THE CASH TRADE
Flax Easier-Flour Firm-Corn and
Oats Higher.
FLAX— Sixteen cars came into Minneapolis
but went, in large part, for delivery on pre
vious sales. The market was a little weaker.
Rejected sold at $1.40 for fair quality and
good rejected- brought $1.44 and $1.43. One
trade was reported in No. 1 seed at $1.50. Min
neapolis received 16 cars, against 1 last year.
Duluth had 1 car. . >.-
Closing prices were: Minneapolis—Cash,
$1.52%: to arrive, $1.52£; May, $1.57%. Du
luth— $1.55%; to arrive, $1.55 li; May
11.59 September, $1.12%.
FLOUR—Millers report prices now 10c per
Drl higher all around. The strength in wheat
lhas stirred up buyers, who have been holding
off and sales are heavier. First patents are
quoted $4.05@4.15; second, patents, $3.95@4.05;
first clears, $3@3.10; second clears $202 10
Shipments. . 62,473 brls.
MILLSTUFFS-The market is firm and
Bteady with good demand for all grades.
Bran in bulk is quoted $13.25@13.50- flour
middlings, $13.25@13.50; bulk shorts, $13@
13.25; red dog in 140-lb sacks, $14.50@14.75;
feed in 200-lb sacks, $1 per ton additional; in
300-lb sacks, $1.50 per ton additional. Ship
ments, 1,649 tons. -
.FEED AND MEAL—The market is very
firm at the quotations. Coarse corn meal
and cracked corn are quoted. $14 75- No 1
feed. $15.25; No. 2 feed, $15.75; No. ' 3 feed,
$16.25;. granulated corn meal in cotton sacks
at the rate of $1.90 per brl.
CORN—There was another advance to-day
and some good No. 3 yellow earn sold to 38c-
No. 3 yellow is quoted 37%@3?,c; No. 3 corn,
3i%c; No. 4 corn, 37e. Receipts, 43 cars
shipments, 10 cars.
OATS—The market is higher, but shows the
unsettled range. Xo. 3 white sold at 27e- also
some No. 3; other No. 3 oats sold as low as
«4/2^o- Quotations are higher; No. 3 white,
26%@27e. No. 3 oats, 25H@2Ci2C Receipts,
28 cars; shipments, 6 cars.
BARLEY—The market is without special
rhange, but is firmer; Xo. 5 sold at 47c and
at 50c. Feed grades are quoted 4<'(7?46c- malt-'
Ing grades, 46@53c. Receipts, 2 cars. '
RYE-The market is quiet around 4S»ic
for No. 2. Receipts, 1 ear,-
HAY—The market is steady. Minnesota up
land is quoted $10.50@11; lowa upland $10 50
011; coarse to medium, $6.50@8; rye straw
|6@6.50. Receipts, 143 tons; shipments 21
tons. '
Puts and Calif*.
Two O'Cl/oek Report-
Puts—May wheat, 74%@74%c.
Calls—May wheat, 75%@75^e.
Curb—May wheat, 75y a c sellers. W&&'
Cash Sales Reported To-day.
No. 1 northern, 24 cars $075
No. 1 northern, 9 cars ;!;!! '751/
No. 1 northern, 1 car ,!! '7514
Xo. l northern, 3,000 bu, to arrive!!!!!! !"5 •
No. 2 northern, 3 cars '.'.'.'." '7114
Xo. 2 northern, 31 cars ..1............. \7i
Xo. 2 northern, 3 cars .....;...;"'" "70*4
Xo. 3 wheat, 1 car ...!!!!!!!"* 68
Xo. 3 wheat, 16 cars )*" 'CG
Xo. 3 wheat, 4 cars "" *65
Xo. 3 wheat, 6 cars ' C 7
Xo. 3 wheat, 1 car ..... . " ' *64
Rejected wheat, 1 car ...... !!!!"""-:'g4
Rejected wheat, 1 ear '"* **
Rejected wheat, 1 caf».... .!!!"""" "go '
Xo grade wheat, 1 ear ... !!!!!!!!!' "59
Xo grade wheat, l car ."-•*•■ '?;««.
Xo grade wheat, 3 cars ........ '. " 55"
Xo grade wheat, 3 cars .... " •••••••• *m
Xo grade wheat, 4 cars ... ' "" 53
Xo grade -wheat, 5 cars ...."""" "54
Xo grade, wheat, 4 cars :...'"*"""" 're
Xo grade wheat, part ear ... '" -48i/
Xo grade wheat, 1 car .....Y""""" "«i?
Xo grade wheat, 1 car .... " "•" 'eg
Xo grade wheat, 2 cars ...!!"""""* '501/
Xo. 3 yellow com, 1 car ... •••••... .00^
Xo. 4 yellow corn, 2 cars . '"" *"* Vv
Xo. 3 yellow corn, 2 cars . '" %-{%
Xo. 4 yellow com,- 1 car "" a- .
No. 3 oats, 2 cars ..:.....""" "" pi
No. 3 white oats, 1 car •- ••••••••••• V-
No. 3 oats, 3 cars'..... A ;. " ■""•••• ,i v
No. 3 oats, 3 cars •••"•• £:?
No. ■■ 3 oats, 2 cars .:....;.•" - """:". o|3
No. 3 white oats, 2 cars ... !!v!!'"""'" "v;*"
No. 3 oats, 3 cars ..;..;.; ""' 'og
No. 3 oats, 2 cars, o w b!!. '" ' 97
Rejected flax, 1 car """ , 1
Rejected flax.l car ..... •••••••.... i.w
Rejected flax, 2 cars !;!!!!!!!!!!!! 144 '
No. 1 seed flax, l car *■"*-"** 150 |
Receipts and Shipments.
March 14. ' '-*-': -
K^eijed-Wbeat 287 clrs, 233,210 bu; corn
21,130 bu; oats, 38,360 bu; barley 1 tun h,,.'
flax, 11.860 bu; flour. . 300 brl?; mlltetSs '6
t^fjjl*/. I£. tO? fuel 011.-43 300 gals- fruit
145,368 lbsumerchandine. 2.(61,424 lbs-lumber
th evßy'%XP\*F?X 3 Cars: Machinery, 4S
000 lbs; ; coal,'Wl tons;.wood, 186 cords- lime
3 : cars; cement;; 540 brls; pig iron 30 cars'•
live stock, 1 car;- dressed meats 96 000 ?h«:
butter 24 000, lbs; . railroad material 'Tear!•
sundries, 18 cars; car lots, 676 • *« '
Shipped—Wheat,- 32 cars,- 28,160 bu- corn
8.800 bu; oat«, 7.360 bu; rye 830 bu- flak 1980
bu: • flour. 62,473 brls; millstuffe 1649 ' tons•
»Si^« ih*^, I™!*' 12S-m lhs ' merchLdTsl'
2,280,730 lbs; lumber, 55 :cars; posts and in
ing, 1 car;. machinery. 651.650 lbs: lime i
car; household igoods. 24.000 lbs; pig iron 20
caw: ; ties, 8 cars; linseed oil. 213,000 brls- oil
cake. 70,000 lbs; v butter, 22,000 lbg- railroad
materials, 2 cars; sundries, '24 cars' car
State Grain Inspection.
V ' - '--'" March U;WBKBKBti
Inspect^ In—Wheat-Cars—Great ■■ North
ern-No. 1 northern, 14; No. . 2 northern. -17;
Ko. 3. 18;-rejected; 5; no grade, 6 ; '
Ca'%- Msi kee & ' St- P»ul-NO. 1
northern, 37;.N0. 2 northern, 27-, No -3 12
--reieotad.,U;; no >grade,• 16. . .*:.'■',*,'•;"'
i Minn«*pgll» t A St. Loulj— l northern;
RANGE OF WHEAT PRICE IN MINNEAPOLIS
Open. ' High. ' Low. . To-day. Yesterday. Year Ago.
Mar.;? ..........$.. $....:..... $.74% $ .73>4 ' $ -05%
May.. .74^" " .75 @75% ,; .74%@74 %. .75 @75% '! .74*4 * '.65
July.. . .7576 .76%@76% • .75%/ .76%@76^ .75&@75% . .66 '. .
On Track—No. 1 hard, 77% c; No. 1 northern, 75% c; N0.,2 northern, 7O^j@72^c.
„ ••■■■.. THE DAY'S nESUi/r.
May Wheat. ] Minneapolis., Chicago. Duluth. St. Louis. New Yorl
Close to-day .....$ .75- <5>75% $ .76% ; $.76% V; $ .74%.' $ .80*4
Close yesterday .74*4 .75%©751^- .76% / .73% .79 7/b
11; Xo. 2 northern, 11; No. 3, 2; rejected, 1;
no grade, 3.
Soo Line—No. 2 northern, 4; No. 3, 2; no
grade, 2.
Northern Pacific—No. 3, 5; rejected, 1; no
grade, 1.
Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis tc Omaha-
No. 1 northern, 6; No. 2 northern, 11; No. 3,
13; rejected, 2; no grade, 8.
Chicago Great Western—No. 2 northern, 1;
No. 3, 1.
Totals—No. 1 northern. 68; No. 2 northern,
71; No. 3, 51: rejected, 20; no grade, 36.
Other Grains—No. 3 winter wheat, 20; No.
3 yellow corn, 8; No. 3 corn, 11; no grade
corn, 4; No. 1 white oata, 1; No. 3 white oats,
5; No. 3 oats, 18; no grade oats, 1; No. 4 bar
ley, 1; No. 1 flax, 1; rejected flax, 1; no grade
flax, 1.
Cars Inspected Out—No. 1 northern wheat,
17; No. 2 northern wheat, 32; No. 3 wheat,
12; rejected wheat, 21; no grade wheat, 17;
No. 2 winter wheat, 6l>; No. 3 yellow corn, 1;
No. 3 corn, 1; No. 3 white oats, 3; No. 3 oats,
20; Xo. 5 barley, 2; rejected flax, 35.
Wheat Movement.
The following are the receipts and ship
ments at the principal primary wheat mar
kets:
Receipts, Shipments,
Bushels. Bushels.
New York 55,800 55,850
Philadelphia 12,137 None
Baltimore 10,89:? 136,083
Toledo 13,000 2,000
Detroit 8,000 None
St. Louis 26,000 74,000
Boston 19,591 None
Chicago 92,994 72,579
Milwaukee 22,600 2,250
Duluth 20,461 None
Minneapolis 238,210 28,160
Kansas City 106,600 iii.ooo
Wheat Movement by Roads.
Received—Cars—Mifwaukee, 95; Omaha, C 3;
St. Louis, 44; Gr»at Northern, 61; Northern
Pacific, 14; Great Western, 5; Burlington, 15;
too, 20.
Shipped—Cars—Milwaukee, 6; Omaha. 4; St.
Louis, 3; Great Northern, 2; Northern Pa
cific, 1; Great Western, 7; Burlington, 9.
RAXGE OF MAY WHEAT
93? JOVO //3A /SU3O tf£ \
/ v - — -—-—-— ••; • •.-
-7*l -— -—— — -y.
-fey—-«=£——■ —— ——
v—EZ2 ,
in- — — i
%— _ J___ps_E__t
Zs|P —d=:p- I—-| 1
OTHER GRAIN MARKETS
CHICAGO GRAIN
Wheat Market Opens Strong—Trade
in Corn Light. v
Chicago, March 15.—Liverpool showed a
sharp advance in the face of the %d decline
here yesterday, and this, combined with light-.
er shipments from Argentina, gave strength
to the wheat market at the opening to-day.
| Trade was light, however, and mostly local*
j May opened %c higher, at 75%@75%c. Selling
by longs caused a dip to 75% c. Local receipts
were Tit cars, 1 of contract grade, while Min
neapolis and Duluth reported 346 cars against
424 last week and 482 a year ago. Argentine
shipments, according' to Broomhall were
1,248,000 bu last week, compared with 1,608,000
the previous week. -.
Shorts covered heavily later, on repeated
rumors that England is to impose a duty on
wheat,.and on good' export sales. May rose
to 76%e and closed strong at that price, l%c
higher than yesterday.
-iH^^^C 3 red« "3@"' l/ic; No. 3 red, 72@
<6%c;: Xo. 2 hard winter, 72%<g.'73%*; No. 3
hard winter, 70@72%c; No. 1 northern spring,
76*4@77%c; No. 2 northern spring, 75 14@76V*,e-
No. 3 spring, 65@74%c. "
Trade in corn was very light on a fairly
steady market, the wheat strength being a
support. May opened %c higher, at 41% c,
touched 41% c and reacted to 41%@41%e. Re
ceipts were 282 cars, 34 of contract grade
May corn closed steady, \i<&\c higher at
41%@41%c. - ' •
No. 2, 40@40%c; No. 3, 29%@39%c.
Oats were dull and a shade easier "May i
opened %c to a shade higher, at 25% cto -»(&■
25V 8 c, and sold to 24%@25e. Receipts were 178
cars. 1
No. 2,-25%e; No. 3, 27@2Sc. ' '
The following was the range of prices:/
•Wheat— March. May.
Opening 76%®% i
Highest ......:............... ... !. 76% .!
Close—. ;■;■;■ •••• •■• — . ,*%«*'
To-day 76%"
Yesterday .'....-... 75%@%
Year ago*;-..:..;;.......... 66% ; 67*4
' Corn-
Opening .i 41%
Highest ...../..... 416*
Lowest ....... .... 41%©% 1
Close-
To-day ....;..; 41%@%
Yesterday 41*,4 --I
Year ago 35% 37% .
Oats-
Opening ... ...... 25%-25@% '
Highest ... 25%
Lowest 24T;@25
Close— ■ , . . . . ;/."*. ,-|
To-day 25Vi@V4 j
Yesterday ....' 25
Year ago ..........■'._. 28%@24
DululU Grain. i
Duluth. Minn., -March 15.—Wheat gained j
%c on the first "fairly active market for a
long time. It opened at 76*40 for May and
gradually hardened till near the . close, whew
it reached 76% c. The close was stronger "at"
76% c; July was also strong and sold up to
77% c. There was a fair business and consid
erable ; rash trading. -
Receipts—Wheat, 59 cars; corn, 78; oats,
8; total, 145. ■*• ■-■■■■.- ■ ■ ' '
Close—Oats— Rye— arrive, oOV-c;
May, 51c. Corn—Cash, 38 1,4 c; May, ' 39% c.
Barley— Flax—Cash, $1.56%; May,
$1.55%; September, $1.12; September north
western, $1.17%. Wheat— 1" hard;' cash,
75%0; May, 78% c; No. 1 northern, cask, 73%e;
May, 76% c; July, 77% c; to arrive, Zo%c; No.
2 northern, 67%@70%c; No. 3, 68% C.
Liverpool Grain.
Liverpool, March 15. — Close—Wheat-
Steady, unchanged to %d higher: May, 6s
%d: July, 6s %d: Corn —Steady, unchanged
to %d higher; May, Ss 10% d; July 3s lOd
Kansas City Grain.
Kansas City, March 15.—Close: Wheat,
May, 67%@67%c; July, 67% c; cash, No. 2
hard, 68@70c; No. 2 red, 69%@71c. Corn
May, 37% c: caato. No. 2 mixed, 36%@37e. No.
2 white, 37% c. Oats, No. 2 white, 27%@27%c.
Milwaukee Grain.
Milwaukee, March 15.—Flour, quiet. Wheat,
higher; No. 1 northern, 75%@76c; No. 2 north
ern, 70@73c. Rye, higher; No. 1, 52% c. Bar
ley, steady; No. 2, 57c; sample, 40@54c. Oats
firm; No. 2 -white, 27%@28c.
Chicago Seed and Coarse Grain.
Chicago, March 15.—Rye, March, 50% c; May
51@51%c. Barley, cash, 38@55c. Timothy, per
100 lbs, March, $4.35. Clover, per 100 lbs.
March, $10.65. Flax, cash, No. 1, $1.52; May
$1.51%; September, $1.15.
St. liOnla Grain.
St. Louis, March 15.—Close: Wheat, high
er: No. 2 red, cash, 73% c; May, 74% c; July
73%©73% c; No. 2 'hard, 71%@72c. Corn, No
2, ca»h, 39% c; May, 39%@40c; July, 40% c
Oats, No. 2, cash, 26% c; track. May, 26c-
July, 24% c; No. 2 white, 28% c. Lead, $4.22%
Spelter, $8.76.
yew York Grain.
New York, March 15.—Close: Wheat, March
80% c; May, 80% c; July, 80% c. Corn, May
46% c; July, 46% c. *'
Peoria WLi»kj.
:. Peorla, ; March Whisky on the basis of
$1.27 for >auisl!.§d goods. ■* •
STOCKS AND BONDS
Demand for All Classes of Stocks
at the Opening.
FRACTIONAL GAINS GENERAL
Irregularity Develop* in the Second
Hour's Trading;— Bond a Strong
and Active.
New York, March 15.—There was a good
demand for all classes of stocks at the open*
ing and gains of a fraction were general
throughout the list. Manhattan -sold ex
dividend. Kansas & Texas preferred, and
Chicago.lndianapolis & Louisville rose a point
each. The industrial^ and specialties were
rather neglected.
Some of the stocks which were conspicu
ously strong yesterday were again in demand,
particularly Great Northern preferred, Con
tiental Tobacco preferred, American Ice pre
ferred, Minneapolis & St. Louis and Chicago,
Indianapolis & Louisville issues. Their gains
ranged from 1 to 2Vi and Pressed Steel Car
and Consolidated Gas were also over a point
higher. Among the active stocks Burlington
was supported and touched 153 l 4 while St.
Paul and the Erics were liauidated. Erie
second preferred fell 1%. Other stocks were
feverish and easier, but grew firmer toward
11 o'clock. Northern Pacific rising 1% over
last night, Tennessee Coal 1? 8 and Mexican
Central a point.
Irregularity developed in the second hour"s
trading and the variations either way were
wide in a number of stocks. Manhattan, Peo
ples' Gas, St. Louis & San Francisco and
Great Northern preferred yielded 1 to 2 points
from the best. On the other hand Consoli
dated Gas advanced to 212, Erie second pre
ferred recovered its earlier loss and Ameri
can and Continental Tobacco, National Steel,
Ann Arbor, Minneapolis & St. Louis preferred
and St. Joe & Grand Island second preferred
rose from 1 to 2%. Burlington rose above 154,
but temporary gains in other standard stocks
were not well maintained.
There was very heavy profit taking in the
last hour in stocks which had shown earlier
strength. The reaction reached 1 to V-fa in
Burlington, Union Pacific, Northern Pacific,
Brooklyn Transit, Baltimore & Ohio, Amal
gamated Copper, Tobacco, Tennessee Coal
and Chicago Great Western. In Chicago Great
Western preferred B the reaction was 3, and
in St. Louis Southwestern 2V4. Strength de
veloped in other parts of the list. Illinois
Central was in large demand up to 73% above
last night. Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic
common and preferred rose 2(§3.
The closing was very active and irregular
with one or two stocks at the top, but with
the pressure of profit taking manifest at other
points.
Bonds were strong and active.
Stock quotations reported for The Journal
by Watson & Co., Chamber of Commerce,
Minneapolis:
! ■■--,- -| | : 1 —Close—
Sales; Stocks— 1 Hi- I Lo- j Bid. I Bid.
'•■'' "" I eat. I est. jMhla|Mhl4
: , Adams Exp |...:..|...'... | 155 I 155
I Am. Express .. 194 j 194'
2,100! Am. Cot. Oil .. 28% 27% . 27% 27%
-. - I do .pr '."..'.;. T. . .'.. ....:.... I 85 .',".'..".
--1,5"« Am. Car ....... ; 1 .23% 23%'
. 90u| do pr:....:.. I 1:75% 7: I 75- I' 75::-
Am. I). T. Co.. .(.... ;{.: 36 j , 36
l,loo|Am. Hoop ..;.. 36%j ' 36% 26% ] 36%
J.ioo; do pr ........ 81%, 81% 81% .81%
, Am. Ice ..... 41% *0% 40% 40%
I do pr ....... 75% ! 74 I 75. i 7::%
Am. Linseed .. , , 8 - S%
I do pr -.............'..... 36% j 36%
Am. - Malting .. 6 -5%
I do pr :...:.. 27% 27% 27 | 27
us,oootAm. Sugar .... 141% 139% 139% 140%
: do pr .."...'.'.. .:.-... I 120%' 119
- |Am;.Sia^ting ..' 55% 54% 65 i 55.
. w' I do pr 1 95% 94%; 94% 94%
3,ooo|Am. Steel & \V| 39 . 38% 38% . US%
400j do pr ■ ........ 97% V 97% 97% I - 97
300! Am. Tin ...:...! 62%| 62-62=1 61%
1,700| do pr 102 i 101141 101% 101
69,700|Am. Tobacco .. 126% 123 ; 125% 122%
|Amal. Cop ."... 102% 101 1 101% 102
I,ooo'Anacon. Cop .. 45% 45% 45 ' i 46
16,400 At., Top. & S.F. 58% I 58% ! 68% 58
16,800 do .pr ..'.,... j 93 ; 92% 92% " 92%
7,000 Bait. & Ohio .. 93% ( 92% 92% 92%
3,500 do pr ' 92% 92% 92%...:.
39,500 Brook.. Rap. Ti; 81% 79% 80 % 79%
1 IBrook. Un. Gas ............ j 207 I "04' "
Brunswick Co.. 11% 10% 10% 1«%
10,-SOOiCan. Southern .] 61 59% 60% 59 •
500|Canadian Pac .1...... ...... 1 9<j4i 90
25,000 Ches. & Ohio .. ■49 48 1 "48% 48%
- -An^,& E. 111..,..,! 115 111%) 114% 111
?'^ c• & 1 Alton .:; 40%! 88 40: 9*
.1,6001 do pr 76% 76% 76%'- 7BU
85,500|Chi., Bur. & Q. 155% 152% 154% 152%
ll,000;Chi. Gr. AVest. 24% 22% 23% •%&
100 .dopr A ! :- j 1-. 82y* 1 gtu
200 : ou.o deb ...... ! 94% 94% 94 MS
Chi., Ind. & L. 38% 37 : 37% 36%
! do pr ! 74 i 73 72* 79.V
2,300 C C..C. & St.L. 78% 77% 77% 77%
v : do pr • :•• 115 114
Cle.,.Lor. & W. 1 35% 36%
I do pr .....'........ I 751/ 76 *
Chi. Term 16% 15% 16%- 15 i
, do pr 40% ■ 37% 40a& 37V&
Col. Fuel &I. 46 45% 45% 44%
I do pr ! .' ■ j 118- 118
22,400 Col. Southern ..I 11% 11% , 1114 10 7-
I do Mpr ... 47 : 46% | 46% 46%
i do 2d pr .... : 21% 21% 21Vi ■>!
6.400;C0n501. Gas ...,212 - 209% 210% "OSl^
9,800 Con. Tobacco .A 47 ; 45% 46% "4k
.2,100 do pr ....... i 108% 107 107% 105%
4,600 Del. & Hudson. 167% 166% 166% 167%
Del., L. & W.: ...'... ....'.. 194, ; losi-,
: 300 Den. & Rio Gr. 40% 40% 40% 40%
1,4u0 ; D^Mp^Ft;b: II V 88% 88% 89
: Des M. & Fr. I). 28 | 25% 25% 2 5%
; D^s p^Ai:-r-6% 12 7 1% 1 ir
■Du.. S. S. & At. 8 I • 6% ; 'IVs' 6
i 0,200 Erie .." ;.. 30% 29^4 - 29T4 007/
23,100 do Ist pr ... 69^ ': 67%; 67% 67%
do 2d pr .... 50% 47% 48% 48%
Ev.&Terre H.i 54%| 54%| 54% 53%
do pr 87 • sfi
2,900 Federal Steel .. 43% "42% 4074: 4° .
4,400 .do pr -..;-...-. : 90 i 89% 89% 89%
1,600 Gen. Electric -.: 212 . 211 I 211 m
: 200 Glucose ...,...; 1 ...... -v^. Z\l . 1 ',- *
I do pr :.. ...... . 94.., •: 94; "
Great Nor.,'pr. 208 I 206 206% ->i»r,v
2,2oolHocking Valley 55V tj "Sj W "*$
1,000 do pr I 75%| 75%! 757/J 751/
17,000 Illinois Central. 135% 1 132% 135141 132%
lowa Central .. > 31%! .10% 30% 31%
onnT do pr ■■•'■ ! 60%' 60 1 -59% 69%
- 200 Inter. Paper .: ...... ...... ; 23% | 23*
•do pr...... , ......,.;... 73V- 1 75^7
1 K. C. & South ............ 20% M
} do pr ...... 45 44% 44%, 44%
j 20OLaClede'Gas .......... =.. 80% 80
do pr 1 95 j 99
• 400 Lake E. & W 45 44% 45 ' 45%
I. do Pf •• 116 j 115
Long Island .. ....'.. ....... 75 75
6,200 Louis. & Nash.. 95% 95 ' 95% * 951/.
200 M., S. P. & S6O 19 18% 18% 18%
do pr 1 ..50 47
22,800 Manhattan ..... ; 121>4 120% 121 V, 120%
4,200 Met. St. Ry..:.a67 166 166% 165%
2,300 Minn. & St. L.. 83 I 81% 81% 81%
do pr ...... ! 114 ' 111% 112 in'
' 4,700 Missouri Pac .! 93% 92% I 92% 92^4
7.100 M., K. & T.... 24 22% 22% 23%
13,600 do -pr :..::. 58% 57% 67% 67%
Mexican Cent ... 21% 19% 21% 19V4
Mex. Nat...... 8 ! \ 7% 7% "7%
4,800 National Biscuit 40%. 40-% 40% .40%
• do pr ...;.....-.......: 94% 94
100 Nat. Lead ...'.. .." ! 15 '15
. 400 do pr....... 88 86% ' 85% ' 87%
3,300 Nat. Steel ..... 46 "4514 ' 45% 44%
do pr ...... 102% 102. 102 102.
Nat. Tube ..:. 63% 53 53 52%
; do pr ...... 101% 101% 101% 101
Nat. Salt ...... 44% 44% 44% ...*„.
! do pr ..1.....:.......... 77 ...:;.
200 N. J. Central;. .:. ;.'.. 155: 155
8,400 Norfolk & West 52% 52 52% 51%
do .pr :'.. .......:.. 86 .85
Xo. Am. Co.new ..........;. 76 76
33,900 Northern Pac .. 85% . 84% 84% 84%
1,200f do pr...'..'.1 88% 88 ! 87% 87%
: 700 Northwestern .. 173% 173% 173%) 172%
X.Y. Air Brake ..:.:. j "...... 164 164
4,1001 X. Y. Central., 145 : 144 144% 144%
Omaha .....".■..■...-...: ' ...... 125 "120
do pr ■.-.*. ' :.... ...... 170 ,- 170
10,500 Ontario & W.. 33% 32% 32% 32%
■■■■■■• Paper Bag ■........:....;.-. 15% 15%.
do pr ...•...;.•..;.;...-... 70% 7214
2,100 Pressed Steel .. 37% 35% I 37%1 35
. SOO <lo pr ....v.. 76% 74% , 76% 74 '
Peoria & E....J 28% 27% 28 •' ' I
|Pacifio: Mali . ..|............. 34 | " 34% 1
THE MINNEAPOLIS JOUBNAL.
11,200 Penn.R, R.... 152%1 151 % .151% 151%
P..C..C. ft St.L. ...... ...... 60 60 :
■ I do pr /,*...•. -• ■ ...... 92- 92
U. 300 People's!Ga« ... 'i 05% 104% 104% 106Va
:::•- Pullman ...::; 206 205
| 9,000 Reading...;.... "3314 33 33% 33%
38,000 do Ist pr ... 74% 73 73% 73%
20,400 do; 2d pr .... 45% 44% 44% ..;.':.
1,800 Repub. Steel .. 16% 16% 16% 16%
,' do pr ....... 66% 64% -.64% 66%
Rock Island ... 125% 125 125 | 125%
St. L. & San F. 44% '* 43 43 44
I do l&t pr...... ;,:..-. ;..-.'.: :'85%. 86%
I do 2d pr 71% 68% 68Vir 70? i
2,400 St. L. &S. W.. .35% 33 33% 33V'.
3,000 do pr.......... 04% I 63% 63% '63%
19,400 St. Pau1.....;., 150% 149% 149% 150%'
6,300 Southern Pac... 45% 44% 45. 45%
16,000 Southern. Ry.... •>; - 24% "'24% 24%
: 3,300 do ipr.r.-..;:„; y79 "78% .79% 78%
7,900 Term. Coal &1. 56V2 • 54%; . '55 - . 54%
7,800 Texas & Pac... 31% '-30% 30% 31%
Third Aye. Ry ',;..-. ...... \ 121 j 120
. . To.St.L. & 9 W.. * 18% 17%; 18% 18%
, 0 nftA i IT d? i PrJL- -*• ••-... ,• 35% ; 34% -35 I : 35%
28,300 Union .Pacific... 92% 91% 91% 91'/ s
4,100 '-do-pr.......... So 85 85 .......
1,300 U. :S. ■■ Leather.. 13' 12% '12% -12%
I- do pr.................. ..r.V, ,74 "75%
W. S. Steel:;..-. .;.... ..;:.. • 38% .V
I do pr , .;........ 83 I ....;.
100 U, S. Rubber.,. | 18% 19
: do ipr .V;....;. j"....! .'..-. ; 168% 58%
|U. S. Express.. 65 64% 63% 64
9,200! Wabaah •;;:.•.... | 19% | ,19-19 j 19%
25,600- do pr.......... | 35% 34%] 34% 35
I Wells-Far. Expl .....: | .;..:: I .142 .142 ;
3,000 Western Union., 89 I 88% ; 88% 88% I
5,200 Wheel. &L. E.h'ls%| 15 j 15%| 14%
600 do Ist pr.;.... ■ 56% 55 . I 56 i 54% I
' do,2d pr .32% 32- i -32 | 31% 1
- Wisconsin Cent, f" 21% 20% p 20% ..
„ I do-pr.....^. ;.| -48% 47% 47%! .I/:..
,- Total sales, 1,204,900. -;-. ... ;■
Chicago; stocks: Diamond Match. 135%;
Linseed, preferred, 37; Biscuit' common 40%,
referred, 95%.
debentures, 62%; Peoria & Eastern
2ds, 62; St. Louis & Southwestern 2ds, 79%.
GENERAL PRODUCE
The Minneapolis Market/
... .: . Friday, March 15. -.
The egg marketis again weaker. Strictly
fresh - are quoted this morning at ll@ll%c.
There is • moderate demand and,receipts are
running large, causing some accumulation.
Butter" remains steady and nominally un
changed, but retailers are ; holding ott and
( buylHg small lots, hoping for a decline."
BUTTER——Extra creameries, per Ib, 20^c;
firsts, I8@19c; seconds, 14®r14%c;- imitations,
firsts, ' lS^fiJlo^ic; seconds, 12% c;» dairies, ex
tras, 17&iSc; firsts., 14<&15%c; seconds, 12c;
roll, fancy, 14@15c; choice, i2c; ladles, firsts,
l2Vi<§>l3c; seconds, 10c: packing stock, fresh,
12c. '"' 'TTjnntolTO4JMjMf"»nß?l*l^WP^M
EGGS—Strictly fresh, cases included, loss
off, ll@ll%c; dirty, fresh, 8c; checks, Be. '.
CHEESE—Twins or Hats, tancy, lb, 13c;
twins or flats, choice, lb, )0@10«>e; twins or
flats, fair to good, 6@7c; brick, No. I,lb,
12'/2<S*l3c; brick, No. 2, 10@llc, brick, 'No. 3,
6(&ie; limburger, No. 1, 13c; limburger, No. 2,
8%@9%c; pnmost. No. 1, ; per lb, 8c; pri
most, No. 2, per lb, 6c; Young America, fan
cy, Mb, -12%<&>13c; choice, 10y*@llc; pultost,
9(&10c; Swiss, No. 1, 13%@14c; block Swiss,
No. 1, 12%@i3c; No. 2, block, 9@loc. :
DRESSEu POULTRY—Turkeys, dry picked,
fancy, medium weight, 1b,10%c; turkeys,
dry . picked young toms, B@9c; fair -to good,
mixed, 7@7%c; turkeys, thin, small, bruised,
4@sc; spring chickens, fancy, 10%@llc; fair
to good, 9@ioc; springs, off, stock, 4ffl'sc; cap
one, 13@14c; fowls, fancy, B%@9"c; fair to
good, Italic; ducks, fancy, lie; ducks, fair
to good, B@9c; geese/ fancy, 10c; geese, fair
to good, 7@Bc. :
DRESSED MEATS—VeaI, fancy, 100 to 125
lbs, Sc; veal, fair to good, 7@7%c; fair to
overweight, 4%@5c; mutton, fancy, country
dressed 5%@6c; thin or overweight sc; lambs,
fancy, 8c; lambs, thin or bruised, 6c; hogs,
according to weight, s@6c.
GAME—Rabbits, jack, per doz, $2.50@3,
white. rabbits, 75c; cottontail, 80c@$l; squir
rels,-gray or black, per doz, 30@40c; red, doz,
20c. •■ • ' .* •
PIGEONS—Live, per doz, $1; dead, per doz,
50c; squabs, per doz, $1.
FlSH—Pickerel, 3y 2 @4 l,ic; herring, @3c;
herring, skinned, lb, «c; lane iroui, ,lD,"iuc;
frogs' legs, per qoz. as to size, s(gloc.
POTATOES—Burbanks, car . lots, - 35@37c;
Rurals, 33@S5c;: Ohios, 44@46e; mixed white,
34@36c; mixed red, 34@36(»; small ots sell at
I s(gauc per dv higher man these iigures.
SWEET POTATOES—Illinois, per brl, $3;
Muscatine3, per brl, $2@2.50. -.' ' "
BEANS—Fancy navy, per bu, $2.25; choice,
bu, $2<&2.10; medium, hand-picked, - bu, $2;
brown, fair to good, $1.60@2. •
ONIONS— Red Globes, car lots, per : bu,
$1.C5@1.75; Red Wethersfields, bu, $1.65@1.75;
Yellow Globes," car lots, per bu, $1.65&1.75,
white, per bu, « $1.65@1.75.
DRIED PEAS— yellow, $l@l.lo per
bu; medium, 90c@$l; green, fancy, - $1.25®
1.35; green, medium,^9oc@Sl bu: marrowfat,
bu, $2. ■'■ .', ■-. j- ■- :•> -.
APPLES—Russets, $4; Ben Davis. $4.25@
4.50; Greenings,. brl, $4.5u; Baldwins, brl,
$4.25'g4.50; Northern Spy, $4.75@5; Jonathan,
$5.50@6;, western box apples, bu, $1.75@2. *
OKAN BERRIES— Caoe Cod..' per brl, *9;
Jerseys, $5.50@9; in crate, $3@3.50; Wisconsin
cranberries, $s.6o@9. a' • T . "
FIGS— New California, 10-lb boxes, 75@85c.
ORANGES— navels, v 80s, .$2.75;
California navels, 965, $2.75; California navels,
1265, $2.75; California 150s, $3; California
navels, 176s to 288s, $3.25; California seed
lings, all sizes, $2.26; California tangerinies,
half box, $2; grape fruit, 80s to 86s, $4(g5. -
LEMONS— 300s or 3605,. fancy,
$3.50@3.75; choice, $3.25@3.50; California,
fancy, as to size, $3.75; choice, $3.50. :
GRAPES—Malagas, per keg, $6.50@7.50; per
keg, extra fancy, $8@8.25.
■ STRAWBERRIES—Fancy Florida stock, 30
(&45c per qt. ...
PINEAPPLES— doz, as to size, range
from $3.50 to $5.
, BANANAS—Fancy, large, bunches, $2@2.25;'
medium;;bunches, $1.75<g2; , small bunches
$1.50. - - .. ,- r . ; ,„, : ... . . ■■:'■, , • ':
HONEY—New fancy white, 1-lb, sections,'
18c; choice, white, 15@16e; amber, 13@14c;
golden rod, ll@12c; extra white, 10@llc;
buckwheat, 10® 12c: extracted amber,'B@9c
VEGETABLES— Beets, bu, 30@40c; cabbage,
crate, $2.23; carrots, bu, 55@C0c; cauliflower',
per-''doz;'- $1.50;- cucumbers,' per doz,- $1.75;,
egg plant, doz, $1.75@2; green onions, doz.," 1
bunches,soc; Spanish onions, bu crate, $2; let-'
tuce, doz, 35c; head lettuce, i doz, 45c; pars
ley, 30c; parsnips, , bu, 50@60c; rutabaga*,
bu, 40c; watercress, doz, 30e; wax beans, $3.75
@4; mint, doz 40c; turnips, new, 55@60c;' new
Bermuda potatoes, per bu,'52.75; California
celery, doz,'6o@Boc; new carrots, bu, 50(g60c;
j grown pie plant, per'lb/T^jfgSc; horseradish,
J lb, 8c; Florida tomatoes, basket, 75c; home
j in 5-lb baskets, $1.50.
.New York Produce.
New York, March 15.—Butter, receipts, 3,354
pkga; irregular and unsettled, fret-h cream
ery, 16@20c; June creamery, lifiisifr ; fac
tory, 10@14Vic Cheese, receipts, 1,800 pkgs;
flrni; large fancy colored and white, ll(§>il»£c;
fancy small colored, (s%c; fency smalTwhite,
12@12Vic. Eggs, receipts, 8,785 pkgs; barely
steady; western at mark, 14; southern at.
mark, 13@13%e. Sugar, raw, steady; fair re
fining, 3y 2 c; centrifugal, 9« test, 4c: molasses
sugar, 3V»c; refined steady; crushed, 5.75 c:
powdered, 5.35 c; granulated, 5.25 c. Coffee,
steady.
fhicaco Produce.
Chicago, March 15.—Butter—Dull; cream
eries, lo^Ufcc; dairies, ll@l9c. Cheese-
Quiet; IDV 4 SII%c. Eggs—Dull; ll%c. Dressed
Poultry—Active; turkeys, lOViigllc; chickens
10V2@Hc.
Hides, Pelta, Tallow and Wool.
N0.1.N0 2
Green salted heavy steer hid&s BVi 7'i
Ureen salted heavy cow hides 7^4 6i f
Green salted light hides 7^ 6^
Green salted heavy cow and steer
hides, branded 7 g
Green salted bull and oxen 6^- 63/
Green salted veal calf, Bto 15 lbs 10 gil
Green salted veal kip, 15 to 25 lbs $1/. 7aT
Green salted long-haired or run
ner kip ... • • ■ ■ 734 6 \i
Green salted deacons, each 45 gg 7*
Green cattle hides and skins, l&iu,, Dpp
lb less than above quotations.
Green salted horse or mule hides,
large" •••• • $3.10 225
Green ■" salted * horse or mule hides,
medium .'. 2.50 leo
Green salted horse or mule hides,
small ;....•...^.............. .1.75 i oo
Dry flint Montana butcher hides..... 13 »V/
Dry flint i Minnesota. Dakota-. and **
Wisconsin hides :..................,11 9
Dry flint calf skins ...'........... .....16 12
Dry flint kip skins ........:.....,...- 14 £ ;
Green salted pelts, large, each......50 75 100
Green-salted pelts, medium, each.. .50® '73
Green salted pells,* small, each.."..;.' .20® 'in
Dry flint territorial pelts, butcher. .11 @io
Dry flint"territorial pelts, murrain.; 10 ®n
Dry flint territorial shearlings...... 6^@ 9
Tallow, in cakes ................,\f.;; 414..; .
Tallow, in -barrels ..............;....; 414 01/
Grease, white 4 314
Grease, dark ..;....... Z\i 2 £*
I Wool, medium, unwashed ......*..;.'.i4U©isr»
Wool, coarse, : unwashed '...;...;,.;. 14 ©15
Wool, fine medium, unwashed... 13V40141'
Wool, fine, unwashed ............ioS@i2t4
Wool, broken fleeces, unwashed ..v.l2' @14
.Wool,- seedy, burry, t ,unwashed...... 12 @13«
Bright Wisconsin and similar.grades I@> C I
higher than above Quotations. : •, ■■,'■■•• j
Smallpox Situation Inchansed. i
Special to The Journal.
Aberdeen, S. D., March 15.— smallpox
situation in Aberdeen " has undergone no
change", f or! the ; past ; two. or : three ; days. ' \ The !
McCheaney house, on ; the outskirts: of the '
city, has been secured ; and will be fitted up '
and , used ■as * a place \of detention 1 for persons
who have ibeen exposed. The authorities are ."
confident that no new cases will'appear. jl
BUT FEW CATTLE
The Inquiry Was Keen With Pricse
Unchanged.
ONLY ONE LOAD OF SHEEP IN
Local Supply of Hog* Moderate with
a., Good Demand for
- Them. .
South St. Paul, Minn., March 15.—Receipts
to-day were 200 cattle, 50 calves, 1,700 hogs
and 100 sheep.
The following table shows the receipts from
Jan. 1, 1901, to date, as compared with the
same period a year ago:
Year. Cattle.Calves.Hogs. Sheep.Horses.Cars.
1901 27,712 0.277 130,927 59,908 402 3,000
1900 19,005 6.598 105,377 86,040 2,067 2,734
Dec 321 26,132 1,665
lnc 8,707 25,550 272
The following table shows the receipts for
the month of March to date, aa compared
with the same period a year ago:
Year. Cattle.Calves.Hogs. Sheep.Horses.Cars.
1901 4,289 1,704 21,047 3,941 3 433
1900 2,774 1,186 18,174 2,530 646 412
Dec 643
lno 1,515 518 2,873 1,411 ... 21
Receipts:
Date. Cattle. Calves. H<#gs Sheep. Cars.
March 8 138 37 1,938 136 31
March 9.... 180 96 1,598 6 27
March 11... 124 6 1,184 ... 20
March 12... 931 551 3,160 207 85
March 13... 302 172 1,914 14 37
March 14... 334 43 1,680 ... 38
Estimated receipts by cars to-day of the
railroads centering at these yards: Chicago.
Great Western, 4; Chicago, Milwaukee & St.
Paul, 6; Minneapolis & St. Louis, 3: Chicago,
St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha, 6; Great
Northern, 9; Chicago, Burlington & Quiney,
2; Northern Pacific, 4; total, 34.
Disposition of stock March 14:
Firm— Cattle. Hogs. Sheep.
Swift & Co 172 1,603
Stimmer & Thomas 32
Peter Evans 13
J. E. Bolton 8
King Bros 10
R. N. Katz 5
J. R. King 2
J. T. McMillan 175
Weirs 33
Country buyers 235
Total .................. 477 1,811
CATTLE—The local supply was very light
and consisted of . only a few small bunches.
Receipts at all outside markets were very
small and prices generally quoted unchanged.
Quality here of killing. kinds was mostly
common to fair, with some pretty choice fat
butcher heifers included that were good
enough to top the market at $4. .Trade in
stock and feeding cattle was slack on account
of the few head in the yards. • The inquiry
for good kinds was keen, at prices fully
steady with the recent 10@25c advance.
gales: ....•■
Butcher Cows and heifers—
No. '.' At. - Price.[No." Ay. Price.
2 1,085 $4*oo '2 1,110 $2.75
1 ........I,llo' 3.00 ||l ;■/.: 1,180 3.40
1 1,280 3.40" ]\ 1 ........1,240 3.75
1 760 1.50 || 1 890 1.75
1 1,300 3.50 I] 1 950 2.76
1 ........ 1,020 2.25 i! 1 ........1,100 2.50
1 .."....;.1,110 3.00 ! | 1 ........1,070 2.75 ■
1 ........1,000 2.25 ||1 630 1.50
Beef and Butcher Steers-
No. Ay. Price 11 No. Ay. Price
19 1.069 $4.25 il 1,140 $4.00
2 ........ 985 3.80 "II :
Milkers . and Springers—
One cow for $40. ;
• One cow for $38.
One cow for $27.
One cow and one calf for $27. •
Stockers and Feeders— •.'••
No. Ay. Price. j| No. Ay. Price.
» 879. $3 75 |j 4 > 997 $3.90
3 756 3.90 i| 2 ... .1,100 3.60
2;-.;...... 990 3.60 | 4 1,062 -3.10
0 .....:.. 386 3.55 29 1,141 3.90
5 496 3.60 |j 4 .... 317 3.50
2 670 3.00 n 4 867 3.80
17 644 3.80 i| 4 .'.: 887 3.80
1 ...•..:." 840 3.00 ||1 740 3.10
1 -.......-. 280. 3.00 \j>
Feeding Cows and Heifers—
No. ■ A\. Price. N No. ' ; Ay. Price.
3 ........ 343 $3.25 j! 3 ........ 313 $3.00
2 .V..1^:.. 320 3.00 l| . ;
Feeding Bulls-
No. . . ■■ _. Ay. Price.
1 '„. .> ...-910 $2.50
Veal Calves-
No. ; Ay. Price. |! No. A v. Price.
3 ........ 120 $5.75 |!1 •..:.:... 100 $5.00
HOGS—There was not, a xery large-supply
in sight to-day. The local supply was mod
erate and, ' with good local demand, the mar-'
ket opened fully ' steady,' with many cases
that were considered strong to a shade high
er. Quality was not as good as yesterday.'
Trade opened late, but traders soon got to
gether and cleared up the yards. Best sold
largely from $5.52% to $5.55, while mixed
grades sold from $5,474 to $5.55 and roughs
at $5.25. Sales:
No. Ay. Price.; | No. " ~\ Ay. Price.
78.. 218 $5.65 80........ 212 $5.60
TO .'.231 5.60 f 35. V.....'. 196 5.60
80 187 5.57 M: I 76........ 230 . 5.67%
79....;... 229 5.5*% i 70.. .177 5.57 V»
49..."..... 19,1 5.55" 153 ....168 5.55
14 171 5.55 27.:.' 183 5.55
57.;.....:. 194 5.55 . i 74........ 194 5.52%
22......... 188 5.50 ||
..Pigs ami Culls— - : "
No." Ay. *.■Price. [No. Ay. Price.
- 2 .385 $5.30 1 490 $5.30
■1........390 5.30 |j 1 370 530
1.....V..M60.. 5.00 |j -1.-....... 420 4.75
1..:.... 110 5.00 II
SHEEP— Receipts to-day consisted of only
one load.': There .'were light receipts at alt
outside, markets and prices generally ruled
firm. There was a good local demand for
choice, fat, lightweight lambs and sheep at
firm prices. _■ ■
NO. Ay. Price.
92 lambs 82 $4.90
24 sheep SO 4.15
6 5heep":........ ...'........ 103 4.00
On the market: M. Uhlman, Roberts, Wis.;
J. B. Dolly, H. E. Williams, Hasty: Riley
Bros., Ellsworth, Wis.; S. Hughes, Stamon;
Bauer & Berg," Montgomery; - Loghlin $■
Thompson, Owatonna; J. A. Harris, St.
Cloud; J. E. Clidy, Becker; A. Bur, St. Peter:
C. O. Martin M Madelia: M. K. Wolfe, Kellogg:
Bank, of Mazeppa, Mazeppa..
Sioux City Live Stock.
Sioux City, lowa, March 15.—Receipts-
Hogs, . 1.500: cattle, 300. -
Hogs—sc higher. Sales:
I No. . . Ay.' Price.
56 235 $5.50
57 . 230 . 0.52*2
65 233 5.55
59 : 259 5.60
, : Cattle—Steady. Sales:
Xo. • ' ■ Ay. Price.
2 ranners 890 $2.25
4 rows 910 ' 3.51)
- 6 stock heifers 360 2.75'
5 stock. heifers 300 3.00
2 bulls .....:... :. 920 2.75
2 bulls 1,020 3.00
2 bulls ..-.......: 920 3.25
10 stockers-:~*.'.T;.T.":"..... 840 3.40
12 stockers 900 \ 3.75
6 yearlings 560 3.75
9 yearlings 350 4.10
8 calves 300 ; - 3.50
10 calves 325 4.25
Sheep—ln demand; $3.25@4.75.
Kansas Ctty Live Sto<>lc.
Kansas City, March 15.—Cattle—Receipts,
1.500; steady; native steers, $4.50<g.5.60; Texas
steers, $3.80@4.85; cows and heifers, $3,250
4.75.
i Hoga— Receipts. 8.000; strong; bulk of sales,
i $5.55©5:6fi; heavy, $5.60@5.70; mixed, $5.50@
5.65; light, $5.45(35.55.
Sheep Receipts, 1.500; strong; muttons, $3.80
i@4.90; lambs, $5@5.25.
St. Lonti Live Stock.
St. Louis, March 15.—Cattle—Receipts, 1.000;
steady; native steers. ?:!.50@5.65; stockers
and feeders, $2.45@4.t;5; cows and heifers, $2
04.76; Texas and Indian steers, $3.40<g>4.75.
Hogs—Receipts, 6,000; strong; lights, $5.50
06.70; packers, $">.50@5.72V4: butchers, $5.75
@5.85.
Sheep—Receipts, 200; market strong at yes
terday's prices.
Oinalia Live Stock.
South Omaha. March 15. —Cattle receipts,
700; stronger; native steers, $4@5.3&; western
steers. $3.70@4.60: Texas steers, $3@3.90; cows
and heifers, $3.2504.25.
Hogs, Receipts. 5,100; strong; heavy, $5 55
<§5.60: mixed, $5.55@5.?7' 2 , light, $5.f>0@5.55;
bulk of sales, $5.55® 5.57^.
Sheep, receipts, 5,?00; strong; sheep, $3 75
<g5; lambs. $4.20@5.25.
Chicago Live Stock.
Chicago, March 15—Cattle—Receipts, 1,500;
steady to strong; good to prime steers $4.90
tfrti: poor to medium. $3.65@4.80; stockers and
feeders, $2.75^4.50; cows and heifers. $2.65<3>
4.70; Texas steers, $3.35@5; canners, $2@2.60;
calves, $4@5.
Hogs—Receipts to-day, 15,000; to-morrow,
M. DOR AN & CO.
'. The Oldest Firm of
Bankers and Brokers
; IN: THE NORTHWEST. :
••■:• Have removed from their old quarters!
. , ; .t ;, on Jaokion Street to the
Uermanta Life, Ratldiug. or. f 4th
and' Minnesota St, St. Paul. Minn
FRIDAY EVENING,
15,000; left over, 6,467; shade higher; mixed
and butchers, $5.00@5.52y 2 ; good to choice
heavy, $5.60@5.5U; rough heavy, $5.5Q@5.62%;
light, $5.50@5.75; bulk of sales, $5.62M:@0.72Mi.
Sheep—Receipts, 4,000; strong; sheep, $4®
4.80; lamba, $4.75<f5.40.
Yesterday's official: Receipts—Cattle. 7,985;
hogs, 23,635; sheep, 4.820. Shipments—Cattle,
4,600; hogs, 6.421; sheep, 1,869.
MONEY MARKETS
Jf«W York. Money.
New York, March 15.—Noon—Money on call,
nominally at 2»4 per cent; prime mercantile
paper, 3V2@4^i per cent; sterling exchange
strong, with actual business in bankers' bills
at $4.87Vj@4.87\ for demand, and at $4.84%®
4.84f-i for sixty days; posted rates, $4.85®
*.s&*,* and $4.88%; commercial bills, J4.B3Mi
(54.54; silver certificates, 6H4@63; bar silver,
60%; Mexican dollars, 49; government bonds,
steady, refunding 2s, feg., 105H; coupon, 106;
:is, reg., Ill; coupon, 111; new 4s, Teg., 138;
•■oupon. 138; old 4s. reg., 113; coupon, 114;
6s, reg., lllVi; coupon, 11U4.
Minneapolis Money.
MINNEAPOLIS — Bank clearings $1 282 -
528.78; for the week, $9,493,802.26; correspond
ing week last year. $9,796,981.92; New York
exchange, selling rate par, buying rate 40c
di3couni; Chicago exchange, selling rate 2'Jc
premium, buying rate 20c discount; London
60-day sight documentary, $4.83%.
ST. PAUL—Clearings to-d?y, f«2,7K.M.
Chicago Money.
Chicago, March 15.—Clearings, $21,C96,303;
balances, $1,882,583; posted exchange, $4.86©
4.88 Vi; New York, exchange, 10c discount.
London Connols.
London, March 35. —Consols for money,
86^i; for the account, 96 11-ltS.
MISCELLANEOUS
\>w York Cotton.
New York, March 15. —Cotton opened steady,
with prices two points higher to two points
lower, and slumped back immediately after
the call, under bear selling and indifferent in
vestment support, due to heavy receipts.
Cables were bullish, but had been discounted.
Before the close of the first hour, the market
was firmer again on more active foreign sup
port. May advanced to 8.42 c and held steady
during the rest of the session.
. Spot closed steady; middling uplands, 8%o;
middling gulf, 9c. Sales, 11,600 bales.
Futures closed steady; March, 8.32 c; April,
8.32 c; May, 8.36 c; June, 8.38 c; July, 8.40 c;
August, 8.14 c; September, 7.77 c; October,
7.67 c; November, 7.58 c; December, 7.55 c; Jan
uary, 7.55 c.
PROVISIONS
Chicago Provisions.
Chicago, March 15.—Provisions were active
and strong; the market opened higher on
light hog receipts and higher prices at the
yards. Ribs were sold heavily but were well
taken. May pork opened 15c higher at $15 47%
and advanced to $15.50. May lard p.nd May
ribs each opened 5t up at $7.70@7.72',4 and
$7.45 respectively.
Close—Pork, March, $15.45: May, $15 60-
July, $14.95. Lard, March, $7.7^7.77%; May,
$7.75<g7.771 2 ; July, $7.77^:37.30; September'
$7.82V0. Ribs, March. $7.50; May, $7.50- July'
$7.47 1-.. ' "
Midway Horse Market.
Minnesota Transfer, St. Paul, March 15.—
Barrett & Zimmerman report that the buying
of iarm chunks and light horses in general
was much improved. Although trade was
entirely on retail basis, the buying was active
and full of strength, which indicates a fair
opening of the spring trade. Horses were
plentiful. Values:
Drafters, extra .'<. $1300160
Drafters, choice 100@130
Farm mares, extra 100@120
Farm mares, choice 85© 100
Farm mares, common to good 50@ i:>
Mules Bj@l4o
SPECULATIVE GOSSIP
Total clearances, wheat and flour, 596,000
bu; corn, 239,000 bu; oata, 14,000 bu.
London Cables—ln portions of Argentine,
Santa Fe, wheat arrivals are of inferior qual
ity throughout southern Argentine; Buenos
Aires quality is generally good.
Argentine shipments since Jan. 1, wheat,
aggregate 9,248,000 bu, compared with 17,432,
--0W bu same period last year. Since Jan. 1,
corn, 1,512,000, against 4,352,000 last year.
Verhoeff, from Milmine: Wheat strong;
better inquiry here from seaboard for No. 1
northern at relatively better prices.
Logan to Jolley—l am told there has been
20n,000 bu wheat sold lor export and SO loads
taken in New York to-day.
Chicago, to Andrews: "Heavy buying of
wheat against heavy sales reported for ex
port. Local crowd is short und skeptical of
any bull turn."
Primary receipts and shipments: Wheat —
Receipts to-day. 528,000 bu; year ago, 614,000
bu; shipments to-day, 260,000 bu; year ago,
116,000 bu. Corn—Receipts to-day, 442,000
bu; year a,go, 634,000 bu; shipments to-day,
287,000 bu; year ago, 435,000 bu.
Bradsteet's exports wheat and flour, this
week, 4,694,000 bu: corn, 3,246,000 bu.
Kansas City receipts of wheat were 106,000
bu, agaiust 31,000 bu. .
St. Louis receipts of wheat were 26,000 bu,
against 21,000 bu.
Argentine flax shipments for the week are
222,000 bu, against 299,000 bu last week.
St. Louis wires to C. K. Lewis & Co.: A
leading elevator man with a large system in
the southwest says the wheat around Okla
homa City is not looking well. The season is
very dry.
Broomhall rabies: Present visible supply of
wheat in the chief ports of Argentine, 4,784,000
bu; corn,' 520,000 bu.
Xew York reported 30 loads wheat and 22
loads of corn for export.
Argentine shipments: Wheat, this week*
1,424,000 bu; corn, 224,000. Last week, wheat,
1,208,000; corn, 226,000. Last year, wheat,
2,528,000; corn, 56,000.
The cash business in Chicago yesterday
was: Wheat, 190,000 No. 2 hard winter, 40.000
No. 2 red and 120,000 No. 1 northern, a total
of 350,000. This included 40,000 hard winter
at Buffalo. Sales of corn were 400,000, and
200,000 oats. At the seaboard exporters
bought 200,000 wheat, 184,000 corn and 200,000
oats.
INVESTMENT GOSSIP
Northern Pacific, first week, increase $22.
--753; from July 1, increase $1,443,3-11
New York to Watson: Buying of Canada
Southern is good and we expect to see it
sell higher. It is one of the few stocks that
has not advanced in proportion to the rest
of the list and is a Vanderbilt property of
merit.
Ver'noeff, from Milmine: London prices %d
higher and firm. Market will be Influenced
by the dividend of St. Paul and the fact of
uo strike of hard coalers. Would buy good
stocks on all declines. Higher prices for the
Erics, Heading, Ontario & Western, American
Car Foundry, Mexican stocl*. Vanderbilt
low-priced stocks ready for good upturn.
Louisville & Nashville and Ait-bison go
higher.
REFUND LICENSE MONEY
\\ iiiUuiu May Have to Do It aa a Re-
null of Tuesday's Vote.
Windom, Minn., March 15.—Since the
village voted against license on Tuesday
the people are 3omewhat disturbed by the
probability of having to refund to the
saloon men a prorata amount of the
license money paid a year ago. Licenses
were granted the last day of April and
the saloons under the license have about
fifty days yet to run, but the law pro
vides that when a town votes against li
cense it shall be unlawful to thereafter
sell liquor, and that the council shall
refund the prorata amount of the license
money.
Whisky troubles have been uppermost
for several days. Blindpiggers have been
brought to Windoin from different parts
of the county for selling without a li
cense, for selling on Sunday, to minors,
etc., and either held to the grand jury
or punished as the offense demanded.
More prosecutions are in sight, and pos
sibly some for Windom saloon keepers for
selling after the town has voted against
license.
George Macomber has just sold a farm
of 120 acres adjoining Windom for $5,000,
and Ezra McLain, who lives a couple of
miles from town, sold his quarter sec
tion this week for $45 an acre.—An auc
tion at a farm near here the other day
developed great prices for cows, some
of them selling for $150 each. A spring
calf sold for $46. »
Last summer the village council refused
to give the people more water, the pres
ent system not being sufficient to sup
ply the needed amount. At the recent
caucus the voters unanimously directed
the council to provide a sufficient water
supply, and nominated without opposi
tion the members of the old council who
favored the water supply last summer,
and chose other members who are favor
able to it.
'. /:■;■■ . "', Hi—=^g SSVASIiZfiSSO UTS j. ti . /Tl .;■ ' '"; ,:-
WOODWARD & CO.
«■«». GRAIN COMMISSION »«<"»
BIU.XCH£S-Cliloas» vi MUwiokM. Oi4*rs tec tutor* MUYta ««cut«4 la «H aarktt*
MARCH 15, 1901.
Qhas E. Lewis ; MS(
&Co - Bonds,
1,2 and- 3 Chamber of • .
Commerce, Minneapolis. f!()ttfl{]
GRAIN, PROVISIONS.
New York Correspondents,
Clark, Dodge & Co. .
, Chicago ( Harriett, Frazler & Co.
Correspondents, '( J. p. Harris. ■_
Dally Price Current mailed free* on ap
plication. « *~"? %
FIRST NATIONAL BARK
OF MINNEAPOLIS.
Phoenix Building, 4th St. and Ist Ay&
0. 8. 9EPOSITORY.
CAPITAL .SIOOOBOO
siniu uiuiflMui Proatß..-ii5o!ooo
tv '« « OFFICERS.
John Martin; President. 1 O.T.JaffraT Cashlar
F.M. Prince. I Vice ID. Maoketchar
J. F. K. Foss. ) denti. | A M t Cashiers
_ DIRECTORS. .
s-Fos8'VICB Pr"^
THOMAS A Oo
Grain Commission ail Stock Brokers. I
Write for our dally market totter, walou we H
mail FREE on application, if
Members Minneapolis Chamber «C Com-11
merce. Telephone— Mam 1897-J. ES
a oaAJCdam or soutaMa i
MOSHER GOES BACK
Deputy Warden, Fired by Freeman,
Is Reinstated.
UPPER MICH. PRISON TROUBLES
Breeding of- Belgian Hare* Hunt
Number of Hound*
to Be R&duced.
Special to The Journal.
Marquette, Mich., March 15.—The board
of control of the Marquette branch of
state prison has reinstated Eugene
Mosher as deputy warden. Mosher was
removed by Warden Freeman the day
after ex-Governor Pingree's charges
against him were made public, the people
being left to conjecture that Freeman was
convinced that Mosher had labored to un
dermine him by furnishing the informa
tion on which Pingree's' allegations were
based. The general public has stead
fastly refused to regard the matter in
that light and it has been asserted on all
sides that the warden was laboring under
a halucination or misapprehension when
he thus summarily proceeded against his
deputy. All through the investigation
this was a common opinion and the peo
ple who have followed the case believe
that Mosher's conduct has been entirely
honorable and above board.
The* result of the investigation being
practically an Indorsement and vindica
tion of Warden Freeman, the only suf
ferer from the vigorous prodding of the
prison affairs was Mr. Mosher, and his
friends immediately interested them
selves in seeing what could be done to
have him reinstated. Mr. Mosher was
fortunate in possessing the friendship
and confidence of members of the board
of control. They saw the injustice of
making him the only sufferer from the in
vestigation and speedily came to the con
clusion that the only way in which to
treat all persons concerned fairly was to
reinstate him in his former position. This
was accordingly done, and now every
thing at the prison will be on its old
footing.
The report of the joint committee on
investigation was read and discussed yes
terday, particular attention being paid to
all recommendations. The breeding of
Belgian hares at the prison Is to stop at
once. The board placed the seal of its
disapproval on all horse trading and here
after only the state horses or those busy
with prison work will be kept on the
premises. The number of bloodhounds at
the institution Is to be reduced, although
the board will keep four or five about the
place, regarding them as an excellent
deterrent to keep the prisoners from at
tempting to escape.
. Hereafter a large percentage, which
will include all but a limited number of
the dangerous men, of the prisoners will
be given Saturday afternoon recreation
in the yard, this being one of the points
on which the committee's report made
suggestions. For a couple of years past
the inmates of the institution have only
had this privilege on the" afternoons of
legal holidays. The board or control has
also decided to take steps to abolish cell
feeding for the great majority of the in
mates. The legislature will be asked to
make an appropriation for the erection
of a structure to contain a dining-room,
that formerly in use being now occupied
for shop purposes.
Thus, as a result of the investigation
of the prison, a number of important
changes will be inaugurated which will
doubtless tend to ~ make the institution
better and which will certainly work to
the Improvement of the condition of the
inmate*.'
First Commencement Announcement
Special to The Journal.
Spearflsh, 3. D., March 16.—The baccalau
reate sermon at the normal graduating ex
ercises will be delivered by Rev. H. L. Ma
hood, pastor of the Methodist church of Lead.
The graduating class this year it a larg« «n«.
Rallying of Old Settlers.
Special to The Journal.
Milbank, S. D.. March 16.—An enjoyable
day was spent at the Old Settlers' reunion.
Fully two hundred were present, and with
an elegant dinner, a literary, musical ana
story-telling program, the day passed off very
nirely.— Several sales of quarter section* at
from $4,000 to $5,000 have been made.—Many
citizens are investing in the new town of
Evans, on the- Missouri river, and it is
thought to have a bright future.
Watson & Co
Broker* in Grain, Provisions,
Stooks and Bond*.
members N. T. Stock Exchange
Chicago O©rra>pondenU-Scliw«ti.Dupea & Co.
PrlTafe wlr« Chicago h N«wYo«t. Tel. 906 Main.
35 Chamber of Oommoroo. ,
\ uriiornc /IqaM) V TRAbE CHOAQC. A
\MEMBERS IcfIAMBEBCF CCMMERCE MPtt. \
M. E. DORAN & CO.,
Successors to Geraghty, Doran A Co.
IS" ban™ and: "ST
Bonds i3HUJLhKb' Profisioas :
Cotton I ■ iX, 001166
UUiiUll I (Century Building.)

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