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The Minneapolis journal. (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, May 04, 1901, Part II, Image 18

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1901-05-04/ed-1/seq-18/

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WHEAT CLOSED QUIET AND A SHADE LOWER
Liverpool Declined i i-Bd, and
Brought a Halting Tone Into
Our Markets.
LIGHT EXPORT OR CASH DEMAND
Local Stock* Decreased 649,689 Bu.
•-General New* of a Dull
Session.
Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce, May 4.
—The wheat market had a quiet turn to end
the week, showing a light trade and narrow
price range. The feature of the early news
was the Liverpool oable showing a decline
there of l%d. On this the opening was weak
and lower. July wheat %c down at 74c. The
market immediately took on a tone of inac
tivity and did not vary more than hie up to
the close. During the past day or two there
has been some selling by believers in the
crop situation, which up to the present time
is certainly very fine. Cash business seems
to have stopped off short for the moment,
and there is no increase of speculative in
terest, but on the contrary much of this has
been diverted to other lines. Statistically
there is some improvement In the general
situation. Broomhall estimates 9,000,000 bush
els for world's shipments on Monday, and
predict* only a slight change in the quan
tity on passage. Arrivals in the L'nited
Kingdom during the past week were about
8,000,000 bushels, against 6.000,000 bushels last
week and 4,000.000 bushels a year ago. Da
nublan shipments show 376,000 bushels. Rains
are predicted all over the winter wheat
country. The Ohio state crop report makes
the conditions in that state 82 per cent of a
full average, and says there was an im
provement of about 4 points during April.
Primary receipts were 371,000 bushels,
against 334.000 bushels last year. Clearances
wheat and flour 466,000 bushels. Minne
apolis received 194 cars and Duluth 7, against
221 and 94 last year. The local decrease was
even a little heavier than expected, 549,689
bushels going out for the week, leaving local
terminal stocks of 14,108,799 bushels.
Corn had another very quiet day. The mar
ket opened with light trade and held at 42c,
easing off near the end and closing at 41% c;
July com closed at 42% c.
July wheat closed at 74@74%c; May wheat,
73%@73%c; September. 70% c.
The cash market was fairly active. No. 1
northern sold at July price for the average.
Some of the ordinary sold at a shade under,
but choice lots brought the full figure. No.
2 northern ranged from 70c for poor stuff to
71%e for the very good. No. 3 wheat sold
from 65c to 68% c. Rejected and no grade
were in firm demand at 60c to 68c.
THE CASH TRADE
Flax Firm—Flour Quiet—Corn and
Oats Firm.
FLAX—The market was firm and steady.
There was demand for good lota. No. 1 seed
sold at $1.71. Rejected held to yesterday 3
level, very nice oars bringing a shade better
figures Sales were made at $1.58 and $l.c>9
for rejected and at $1.40 to $1.43 for no grade
in small lots. Minneapolis received 8 cars,
against none last year. Duluth had 14 cars
and Chicago 4 cars. The decrease on the
we«k was heavy, as was expected. Terminals
lost 121,556 bu loaded out during the week,
most of it for local crushing. This leaves
164,474 bu in etore here.
Closing prices were: Minneapolis, cash,
$1.67; to arrive, $1.67; May, $1.68; July. $1.66.
Duluth cash, $1.70; to arrive, $1.70; May,
$1.70; September, $1.28; October, $1.26.
FLOUR—The flour market remains quiet.
There is a moderate demand. First patents
are quoted $4.10@4.20; second patents, $3.90®
4; first clears, $2.70@2.80; second clears, $2.10
©2.20. Shipments, 44,681 brls.
MILLSTLFFS—No changes of importance
are reported to-day in the general market.
The market is quiet but steady. Bran In
bulk is quoted $12@12.25; shorts, $11.75@12;
flour middlings. $12.60213; red dog in 140-lb
sacks, $15; in 200-lb sacks, $1 per ton addi
tional; in 100-lb sacks, $1.50 per ton addi
tional. Shipments, 1,681 tons.
FEED AND MEAL—The market Is very
firm. Coarse corn meal and cracked corn
are quoted $16; No. 1 feed, $16.50: No. 2 feed,
$17; No. 3 feed, $17.50: granulated corn meal #
In cotton sacks at the rate of $1.96 per brl.
CORN—The market Is firm and steady. No.
8 yellow is quoted 42%e; No. 3 corn, 42@42%c.
Receipts, 24 oars; shipments, 1 car.
OATS—There was demand for oats and
firm prices were paid for good lots. No. 3
white is quoted 27%@28c: No. 3 oats, 27@
27% c. Receipts, 22 cars; shipments, 11 cars.
BARLEY— Feed grades are quoted nomi
nally 37c to 41c: malting grades, 41g53c. Re
ceipts, 1 car; shipments, 2 cars.
RYE—The market is stronger; No. 2 rye la
quoted &OV*c; one car no grade rye cold at
47^. Shipments. 1 car.
HAY—Choice timothy is quoted $14; Min
nesota upland, $11.5O@12; lowa upland, $11.50
©12; choice mixed, $10^10.50; rye straw, $6.50
©T. Receipts, 99 tons; shipments, 10 tons.
Cash Sales Reported To-day.
No. 1 northern, 26 cars „...$0.74
No. 1 northern, 14 cars 73%
No. 1 northern, 12 cirs 74*4
No. 1 northern, 10 cars 741
No. 2 northern, 22 cars „ .71%
No. 2 northern, 12 cars f .71%
No.. 2 northern, 2 cars 71
No. 2 northern, 7 cars 72
No. 2 northern, 5 cars 70%
No. 2 northern, 1 car .70
No. 2 northern, 3 cars 71%
No. 2 northern, 4 cars 17%
'3fa.'3 wheat, 2 cars .68%
No. 3 wheat. 2 cars 67%
No. 3 wheat, 1 car 67
No. 3 wheat, 3 cars 65 1-!
No. 3 wheat, 4 cars 66%
No. 3 wheat, 1 car..". _ .63
Rejected wheat, 5 cars _ 67
Rejected wheat, 2 cars _ .69
Rejected wheat. 3 cars. ....^ 63%
No grade wheat, 3 cars „ 60
No grade wheat, 2 cars _ 63%
No. 3 corn, 5 cars _ 4115.
No. 3 yellow corn, 6 cars _ 42
No. 3 white oats, 1 car _ 28V"
No. 3 oats, 2 cars.dirty „. 25%
No. 3 oats, 2 cars „ 26%
No. 3 oats., 3 cars _ .26%
No. 3 oats, 4 cars _ 27
No. 3 oars, 1 car _ .26%
No grade barley, 1 car _ 38'
Rejected flax, 6 cars „ \ 1.59
Rejected flax, 2 cars _ 1.53
No. 1 flax, 1 car _ 171
No. 1 flax, 600 bu, to ar _ 1.71
No grade flax, 30 sacks 1.40
State Grain Inspection.
May 3.
Inspected In—Wheat—Cars—Great North
ern—No. 1 northern, 33; No 2 "nortlfem, 21;
No. 3. 5, rejected, I'; no grade, S.
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul—No. 1
northern. 13; No. 2 northern, 27; No. 3, 4:
rejected, 2.
Minneapolis & St. Louis—No. 1 northern, 19;
No. 2 northern, 7; no grade, 6.
Soo Line—No. 1 northern. 1; No. 2 north
ern. 7: No. 3. 1; rejected, .'.
Northern Pacific—No. 3, 2; rejected, 1; no
grade, 1.
Chicago. St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha-
No. 1 northern, 11; No. 2 northern, 22; No. 3,
i: no grade, 1.
Totals—No. 1 northern, 77; No. 2 northern,
84; No. 3, 21: rejected. 7; no grade, 16.
Other Grains—No. 2 winter wheat, 4 cars;
No. 3 winter wheat. 3; No. 3 yellow corn, 7;
No. 3 white corn, 1; No. 3 corn, 11; No. 4
corn. 1; no grade corn, 3; No. 3 White oats,
1: No. 3 oats, 6: no grade oats, 1; No. 4 bar
ley, 1; No. 5 barley, 2; No. 1 flax, 1; rejected
flax. 9; no grade flax, 6.
Cars Inspected Out—No. 1 northern wheat,
31: No. 2 northern wheat, 20; No. 3 wheat,
19; rejected wheat, 1; no grade wheat, 1; No!
2 winter wheat. 7; No. 3 yellow corn, 5;
No. 3 white corn. 4; No. 3 corn, 1; No. 3
white oats. 4; No. 3 oats, a; No. 1 flax, 4;
rejected flax, 1; no grade flax, 1.
'Wheat Movement. •
The following are the receipts and ship
ments at the principal primary wheat mar
kets:
Receipts, Shipments,
Bushels. Bushels.
New York 133,000 1,000
Philadelphia -... 31.231 None
Baltimore 78,834 132,000
Toledo 1.515 840
Detroit 3,000 3,987
St. Louiß 19,000 24,000
Boston 78,092 None
Chicago 47,025 190.707
Milwaukee 15,000 6,000
Duluth 18,504 None
Minneapolis 161.020 6,010
Kansas City 64,000 68,200
Receipt* and Shipment*.
May 3.
Received —Wheat, 194 cars, 161,020 bu; corn,
21,120 bu; oats, 29,700 bu; barley, 680 bu;
flax. 4,080 bu; flour, 546 brte; hay. 98 tons;
fuel oil, 90.000 gals; fruit. 526,199 lbs; mer
chandise, 2,510,760 lbs; lumber. 21 cars; posts
and piling, 1 car; barrel stock 2 cars; machin
ery, 550,250 lbs; wood, 81 cords; coal, 481
tons; brick, 10,000; lime, 1 car; cement. 500
brls; ties, 5 cars; stone and marble, 3 cars;
live stock, 2 cars; salt, 1 car; dressed meats.
64.21K) lbs: hides, pelts, etc., 20,000 lbs; rail
road materials, 11 cars; sundries, 19 cars;
car lots, 582.
Shipped—Wit eat, 7 cars, 6,020 bu; corn, 840
r RANGE OF WHEAT PRICE IN MINNEAPOLIS /
Ope£ \ ■ Hit-&. Low. To-day. Yesterday. Year Ago.
May..* .73% $ .73* * .7*% * .73%^73% % .73% * .65^4@65%
July.. .74 .74% t .74 .74 @74% .74* .65%
Sept.. .70% :. .70% .70% .70%' -'1,. n^;V"""
On Track—No. 1 hard, 75% c; No. 1 northern, 73% c; No. 2 northern, 70@71c.
* THE DAY'S RESULT
July Wheat. Minneapolis. Chicago. Duluth. St. Louis. New York.
Close to-day .74 @74% * .72%@72% % .75 . % .70%@70% % .78%.
Close yesterday.... .74% .73%@73%, .76% -71 • ©71% .79%
bu; oats, 15,070 bu: rye. 1.860 bu; flax,- 2.610
bu; flour, 44,681 brii; millstuffs, 1,618 tons;
fruit, 26,000 lbs; merchandise, 2,231,538 lbs;
lumber, 123 cars; machinery. 178,070 lbs; coal,
26 tons; cement, 100 brls; household goods,
24,000 lbs; stone and marble, 1 car; linseed oil,
574.000 brls, hides, pelts, etc., 60,000 lbs; rail
road materials, 3 cars; sundries, 23 cars; car
lots, 775.
■: Put* and Call!.:,
PuU-July wheat, 73%®73%c, sellers. • ••
Calls—July wheat, 74ftc bid.
Curb —July wheat, 74% c.
Grain in Regular Local Elevator*.
—Week Ending-
Wheat— ■ . May 4. April 27.
No. 1 hard 95,479 95,479
No. 1 northern 7,595,995 7,668,574
No. 2 northern 1,042.451 1,111,450
No. 3 , 344.662 367,531
Rejected 45,425 45,425
Special bin 4,948,390 6,343,632
No grade 38,397 36,397
Total* 14,108,799 14,658,488
Decrease 649,689 ....
Corn 235,461 262,134
Oats .........;.... 1,675,437 1,834,051
Barley 28.582 27,889
Rye 14,117 6,972
Flax 164,474 286,060
Wheat Movement by Roads.
Received—Milwaukee, 35 cars; Omaha, 34;
St. Louis, 26> Great Northern, 92; Great
Western, 1; Burlington, 2; Soo, 5.
Shipped—Milwaukee, 5 can; Great North
ern, 1; Great. Western, 1.
RANGE OF J<*LY WHEAT
CJ3O tofn jlctn ls2o ll£
'
OTHER GRAIN MARKETS
CHICAGO GRAIN
Heavy Selling; of Corn Causes a
Break Near the Opening.
Chicago, May 4.—Wheat prices sank to a
lower level during the first hours of trading
to-day. The ready response of the Liverpool
market to the decline here yesterday started
liberal selling all along the line. Bearishness
was j further encouraged by a prediction of
showers and the Missouri crop report show
ing a rise of 1 point over the AprH condi
tion of 98. July opened %@%c to %@
%c lower, at 72% cto 72% c, sold to 72%®72%c,
and then • dropped back to 72% c, where the
market steadied. The decline was checked
by light northwest receipts and mail ad
vices confirming reports •'that ■ 90 - per cent
of the German crop .of - winter wheat had
been ruined. Local receipts were 32 cars,
none of contract grade, while Minneapolis
and Duluth reported 201 cars, against 253
last week and 315 a year ago.
July later touched 72%@72%c, but rallied
on covering to 72% c and closed steady and
%c lower, at 72%@72%c.
Cash Wheat—No. 2 red, 73%@75c; No. 3 red,
72@74c; No. 2 hard winter, 73%@74c; No. 3
hard winter, 72%@74c; No. I'northern spring,
73%@74%c; No. 2 northern spring, 73%@74%c;
No. 3 spring, 70@73%c.
- July corn opened i%c to %c lower, at 46% c
to 46% con lower cables and in sympathy
with wheat. Heavy selling led by the man
who has the May delivery cornered caused a
sharp break to 46c during. the first hour.
At 46c the pressure was reduced aud a rally
to 46% c followed. May corn was governed by
expediency alone. Profit-taking by scattered
longs caused a weak opening, 2@2%e under
yesterday's close, at 52% c to 53% c. A sale;
was made at 54a 2 c and following this another
at 53Vie. Receipts were 272 cars, with only
20 of contract grade.
The close was easy, July %c down, at 46% c,
and May 2%c lower, at 63c.
Cash Oats—No. 2. 52%@53c; No. 3, 44%@
45% c.
Oats sold lower in sympathy with wheat
and corn and met '■vith a fair demand at
the reduction. July opened %@%c lower at
26% cto 26% c, and sold to 26% c, where prices
steadied. May opened %c down at 28% c
and sold to 28% c. Receipts were 229 cars.
Cash Oats— No. 2, 28%@28%c; No. 3, 29@30c.
The following was the range of prices:
Wheat— May. July.
Opening 72% 72%<g%
Highest 72% 72%
Lowest 72% 72%
Close-
To-day 72%@% 72 37s
Yesterday 72%@73 73 1 B g1i
Year ago 65%©% 67%
Corn—
Opening 62*4653 46%<@%
Highest 54 46%
Lowest 52% 46
Close- • /
To-day 53 46%
Yesterday 65% 47%
Year ago 39% . 40®40Vg
Oats-
Opening 28% 26%@%
Highest 28% 26%
Lowest 28% 26%
Close-
To-day 28% 26%
Yesterday 29 26%
Year ago 23@23% 23%@%
Duluth Grain. '"
Duluth. Minn., May 4.—Wheat was weaker.
It opened %c off at 73% c for May and 75c for
July. May went to 74c and July to 75% cla
a featureless session. There was small trad
ing and no Interest. Receipts—Wheat, 7 cars;
corn, 1; oats, 1; flax, 14; total, 23. Close:
Oats, 27% c; rye, May, 52% c; corn, cash, 44c;
May, 44% c; flax, cash, $1.70; May, $1.70; Sep
tember, $1.28; September northwest, $1.30;
October, $1.25: No. 1 hard, cash and May,
75% c; September, 72% c; No. 1 northern, cash
and May, 73% c; September, 71% c; July, 75c;
to arrive, 73% c; No. 2 northern, 70c; No. 3.
66c. •. . — .
Kansas City Grain.
Kansas City, May 4.—Close—Wheat— May,
69»4c: July, 67% c; cash No. 2 hard, 70%@
72% c; No. 2 red, 71c. Corn— 42%@42%c;
July. 41%@41%c; cash No. 2 mixed, 42% c;
No. 2 white. 43%@44c. Oats—No. 2 white,
29%®30c. Hay—Choice timothy, $10@10.50;
choice prairie, $9.50@10. Butter—Creamery,
15®17c; dairies, fancy, 13@14c. Eggs—
10@10%c. Receipts wheat, 130 cars. -
, St. Louis Grain.
St. Louis, May 4.—Wheat closed lower; No.
2 red cash, 73% c; May, 73% c; July 70%@70%c;
September, 70% c; No. 2 hard, 73c. Corn—
Lower; No. 2 cash, 45c; May, 44% c; July,
44% c. Strong; No. 2 cash, 29% c; May,
29% c: July, 26% c; No.~ 2 white, 31c. Lead-
Steads; $4.22%. Spelter—Steady, $3.87%.
Milwaukee Grain.
Milwaukee, May Flour—Dull. Wheat-
Easier; No. 1 northern, 75@75%c; No. 2 north
ern. 72%@73c. Rye—Firm: No. 1, 54%@55c.
Barley—Quiet; No. 2. 57@57%c;. sample, 50©
54c. Oats— Steady; No. 2 white, 29%@30c.
Chicago Seed and Coarse Grain.
Chicago. May 4.—Flas, rash, northwest,
$1.64%; No. 1, $1.64%; May, $1.65; September,
$1.2501.30; October. • $1.20. Rye, May, • 52%@
5314 c; July. 51%@52c. Barley, cash,. &3@56c.
Timothy, per -100 lbs, $3.45. Clover, per 100
lbs, cash, $10.25. " - - -?:'.." ■
Liverpool Grain.
Liverpool, May 4.—Close: Wheat, quiet, %@ j
l%d lower; May, 5s 10% d; July, 5s 10% d; Sep
tember, 5s 10% d. Corn, quiet; %@%d lower;
July, 4s Id; September, 4s %d.
'*.i- Chicago Produce.
Chicago, May Butter, easy; creameries,
14&18 c; dairies, ll@l6c. Cheese, dull; twins,
»%@10c; Young Americas, 10%@llc; Ched
dars, 9%@10c; daisies, 10%@llc. Eggs, weak;
cases returned, ll%c. Iced poultry, steady;
chickens, ' B%@9c; turkeys, 9©loc.
PROVISIONS
Chicago Provisions.
Chicago, May 4.—Provisions were dull and
easier, in sympathy . with a decline at the
yards. July pork opened 10c lower, at $14.95,
touched $15 and then eased to $14.90. July
lard and ribs opened 2%c down, at $7.92%
and $7.90. , .
Close-Pork, May. $14.80: July, $14.90; Sep
tember, $14.80. Lard. May, $8: July, $7.92%®
67.35; September, $7.92%@7.95. Ribs, May,
$3.05; July, $7.90; September, $7.8507.87%.
London Codioli.
London, May 4.—Consuls for money, 94%;
tor the account, 94%.
THE MINNEAPOLIS JOURNAL.
BIGWEEKON'CHANGE
Speculation Due to Rumors of More
Railway Consolidations.
BUT WHOLE LIST IS AFFECTED
Hardening Tendency of Money Had
Little Effect Until Late In
the Week.
New York, May 4—Speculation has reached
unprecedented volume during the week and
apparently < all ; available : sources, are being
| diverted Into Wall .- street -to} take advantage
of ' the boom. . The confidence that other
transcontinental. railway . consolidations were
in process of formation to ; meet i conditions
made by the Burlington" deal ha« furnished
the main spring of speculation. :. Railroads
Immediately available for such consolidations
have led the market • conspicuously, but the
sympathetic influence has V been broad and
comprehensive through the whole list.
The hardening tendency of the money mar
ket received little attention until late in the
week, when there was: some calling.of loans
and liquidation of profits, which, checked the
rush to buy to some extent.
WALL STREET
Closing Active and Buoyant at the
Top Level— Changes Divided.
New York May 4.—The nervous sentiment
caused by yesterday* sharp break in prices
here was reflected in some wide declines for
Americans in the London market *"• :morn
ing At 2 o'clock (London time) Illinois Cen
tral showed a loss of -4% there, Union Pa
cific. Atchison, Denver & Rio Grande Read
ing. Baltimore & Ohio and New York Central
from 2 to 2%, and other leading internation
als from 1 to 2 points. St. Paul alone showed
any evidence of support. The selling in Lon
don was attributed to cabled orders from
New York and the opening here was feverish
and excited in response. Some violent de
clines were shown, but St. Paul and Missouri
Pacific were strongly supported, the former
running up 1% and the latter 2 points. Atch
ison. Union Pacific and Baltimore & Ohio
showed the most acute weakness. Pour thou
sand shares of Atchison cold at 80% to 81%,
compared with 82% last night, and 5,000
Union Pacific sold at 120% to 118%. compared
with 122% last night. Baltimore & Ohio de
clined 2%. Among other notable losses were
General Electric 2% points, Metropolitan
Street Railway 2% and Chicago Terminal
transfer preferred 3%. Losses of Ito 2 points
were general throughout the list, but the
internationals generally were not down to
the London parity. Union Pacific met sup
port at the opening dip and rallied in a few
minutes to 121%. The dealings were very
heavy, and the movement of prices continued
very irregular and the market excited after
the opening.
There was an abrupt rally on buying by the
shorts and by supporting orders. Prices rose
rapidly, causing the cancellation of the open- I
ing losses in many stocks, particularly the
Atchisons, New York Central, Manhattan,
Brooklyn Transit, Northern Pacific and the
United States Steel issues. Conspicuous buy
ing of Sugar, Western Union, Amalgamated
Copper and the Tobaccos lifted them a point
over yesterday's close, and Rock Island
Jumped to 164, when St. Paul was lifted to
180. Southwestern stocks were better in
sympathy with Missouri Pacific improvement
of 2%. Large amounts of stock were unload
ed again before 11 o'clock and the market
yielded again. St. Paul was most affected,
losing 2%. Union Pacific fell back to 119,
Atchison and Rock Island 2% and some other
stocks in the neighborhood of a point. North
western dropped 4 points.
St. Paul led a fresh rally with a rise to
182%, and Union Pacific rose to 121%. Atch
ison got back to within a shade of last night
and there were recoveries at a number of the
weak points of 1% to 2%. ■ The weak bank
return drove St. Paul and Atchison down 2%
and 1% respectively, but they were supported
again. The undertone continued feverish but
the fluctuations in the general list were not
wide. Northwestern fell 6 in all and rallied
3, and the preferred lost 6% from the last
sale. Adams Express sold lift higher than
the last sale, and Lackawanna rose 3. Very
heavy buying of St. Paul carried it up to
185, and the United States Steel stocks rose
vigorously over last night. The market hard
ened ■in sympathy and gained- increasing
strength in the closing dealings.
The closing was active and quite buoyant
at the top level of the day, ' and with net
changes divided between gains and losses. I
Stock quotations reported for The journal
ty Watson & Co., Chamber of Commerce,
Minneapolis.
Closing prices are bid. .
i • ~ ~1 I —Close—
Sales) Stocks— J HI- | Lo- | Bid. | Bid.
I | est. | est. ; May 4 May 3
. I Adams Exp ...| |......| 175 I 180
I Am. Express .j 200 j 198 I 198 1......
400|Am. Cot. 0i1... ; j 27%!......
6001 Am. Car | 25% 25 | 25%] 25%
1.2001 do pr . i 79% 77 | 79% | 78%
I Am. D. T. Co.. 40 | 38 1 40 | 35
|Am. Ice i 33%" 38 | 33%| 38
I do pr |..;..?T | 72 | 71
1,1001 Am. Linseed .-1 12%1 12 | 12%| 12%
I do pr | | .| 38 | 38
6,800; Am. Sugar „.. 147%! 146ft| 146% | 146%
| do •pr ! | | 121 121
I Am. Smelting .| 59%| 58 | 59 | 58
I do pr | 97 | 96ft| 96%! 96%
16.100 Am. Tobacco „ 123%| 127%| 128%; 127%
I do pr i 147%| 147 .| 145 j 145
B.9oo|Amal. Cop | 121%j 120 1 121%| 120
1.6001 Anacon. Cop ..| 50 \ 49 |......| 49%
71,700 At., Top. & S.F., 82% 80%| 82%| 82%
19.1001 do pr I 104%| 102 ft! 103%; 104%
8.000!Balt. & Ohio 109 ■ 107% 109 j 110%
1.1001 do pr | 93 I 92% 92% | 93%
9,200: Brook. Rap. Tr.i ......| | 83%| 84
IBrunswick Co | j 11% lift
3001 Can. Southern .] ' 73% | 72 | 72 | 72 .
1.9001 Canadian Pac .| 100%! 100% 100% | 100
10.300 Ches. & Ohio . 49%| 48% 49% 49%
|C. & E. 11l 1 ! 1 130 | 130
! do pr 1. ......|...... I 130 | ..;...
2,600 Chi.: & Alton... | 45.% 44% 45% 45%
1,000 do pr 180 79% 79% 80
3 100 Chi., Bur. &Q. 198 197% I 197%; 197%
1,000 Chi. Gr. West. 23% 23 | 23% 23%
; do pr A : 82 82
I do pr B 51 51
do deb ...... ...... ...... 92% 93.
Chi., Ind. & L. 36% 36% 36% 36%
. do pr ...... 70 | .71%
C.C.C. & St.L. 83% 83 83 , 83
do pr ..:•• 117% 117%
Cle.,Lor. & W 35 35
I do 'pr •• 74 74
Chi. Term ..... 22% 22 22% 22 .
I do pr ......:. I 45% 43 45% 46
3,000 Col. Fuel & I. 103 100% 101% 102%
[ do pr j 137 | 138
Col. Southern .-. 15 14% 15 | 15 r
i do Ist pr ... 53 52% 52% | 53
I do 2d pr .... 25- 24% 24% 24%
Consol. Gas ... 225% 223 225% 224%
30,000 Con. Tobacco 49%| 46
800 do- pr....... ! 104% 104% 104% | 104 ;
2,100 Del. & Hudson. | 177 175 : 175 j 175%
2,800 Del., Lack. & W 223 j 219 | 222% 217 :
5,000 Den. & Rio Gr. 51% 50 | 51% ; 50 .
20* do pr j 97% 96% 97% 96%
Dcs M. & Ft.D. 31% 30 31% 30
do pr 133 183 .
Du., S. S. & At. 6%......
! do pr .'. 14%
26,400 Erie : 40% 40%
2,400 do Ist pr ... 70% 69 70 j 70%.
I do 2d pr .... 57% 56% , 57,'
Evans. & T. H. 63 62% 62% 60
do pr .. ...... 90 90
800 Gen. Electric ..I 227% 225% 227 i 227%
4,4oo|Glucose I 60 ; | "58% 59 | 60
Ido pr ]...... L I 104 | 100
Great Nor., pr..| 188 | 186% i 188 | 186 -
l.Duo Hocking Valley.! 55% 55 , 56%| 55%
300 do pr ! 78% TSV* i 78%! 13%
3,4oo|lllinols Central. | 144 142 , 143%| 144
llowa Centra1....!......|......| .30 |......
| do pr....,:..|..:...j......| 59, |......
100 Inter. Paper...., |...\..|-23 | 23
j do pr........| 75%r 73 | 75 | 75%
,K. C. & South..|....\.|. | 22%| 22&
I do - pr......:.| 46 I 45% 46 ! 46%
La Clede Ga5...|...... [ ......| 84 | 84
I do pr .|...... i .-..;..1 M | 98
100 Lake E. & \V... .'..'..'.|:..'.'.'. [- 62 | It
I do .pr .....'.. : ."..:.". j....... i 120 I 121 .
Long Island .'.....".:*./. | 71 , 71
10.700 Louis. & Nash. lo7ft; 106 ft, 107% 108
;M.,St.'P. & Soo :/..:{;.■..... is% 19
I do v-pr.v.:-.:;-.v:|.-.-r;:-.f:':-..";.|/.52y | 52
4,900 Manhattan -~:.: .I) i:t>V ,125 -V| ■ 126%| 125%
12.000 Met St. Ry..v:-.|-17<J'- | 168%, i 169y 4 171
•200 Minn, & St. L..j '87 | • 56% 86% | 86"
• '■■:■. .* | do ■-pr.....:.. i .':.. v;:.'.... 112 .112;
53,500 Missouri Pac...| 114% 110% 112% 110
3,700 M.VK. &,T..:..| 30% 29% 30% 31%
10,600" do pr...-.:-.•.. I- 63 '63% -64% 64V;
; Mobile & Ohio.-.|:.-..V.|......|: 81% :81%
-'■■" Mexican Cent... 28% 28 I 27% 28*
• Mexican Nat.... 11% 11% 11% '-11%
1,100! Nat. 'Biscuit.... | -'42 40% 42% .43%'
| do pr..".................. 98 971,
500 Nat. Lead 18% 17% 17% 17%
100 do pr '. 82% 82%
/Nat. Salt ..... .43% 43%
do pr -76% 76%
. -N. J. Central ...... 156 156
1,600 Norfolk & West 55 54
I do pr 88 89
i North Am. Co 86% 86%
28,900 Northern Pac .. 110 108% 110 109%
1,200 do pr 100 99% 98% 100%
4,400 Northwestern .. 207% 203 | 206 j 208
--100' N. Y. Air Brake 154% 153% 154 [ ......
. 9,400, N.Y. Central..! 162 159%! 161% 161%
NY., C. & St.L. ...... .../. I 32 I 35
d<* Ist pr .: 105 108 .
do 2d pr .. 69 70
N.Y..N.H. & H ........ 214 .:....
Omaha 140 140
10,100 Ontario & W... 36% 35% 35% 36%
■<-..- Paper Bag ....... 13 13
- do pr 70 69 69 69
100 Pressed Steel ..': 44% I 44%
! do pr ..'. 83% 84%
Pacific Coast : 59 60
do Ist pr 93 93
do 2d pr .... ...;• 68 68 :
Pacific Mail ..;.. ' 38% ..:...
--20,300 Perm. R. R .... 152 150% 151% 151%
P..C.C. & St.L. 68 66% ' 66% 65
do pr ...... 98 97
8,600 People's Qa* .. 116 114% 115% 115%
Pullman 209 208
10,500 Reading ........ 43% 41% 41% 42%
4,400 do Ist pr ... 77% 77%
».?*i <lo K 2d pr .... 55% 53% 55% 55%
1,500 Repub. Steel ..20 19 19% 19%
90U, do .pr 76 74% 75 75%
10,100, Rock Island ... 164 161% 163 162%
St. L. & San F 48% 47% 48
do Ist pr.. J.: 84% 85
rnno.d°T 2d pr.... 70 68% 69% ' «9%
500 St. L. & S. W ..... 36% 36%
2.000 do pr ...... 65% 64% 65% 65%
ll!1900:St. Paul 185 177% 184% 177%
2,9001 do pr ...198 194 \
29,100 Sou/them Pac .. 54 53% 53% 64%
14,100 Southern Ry.. 30% 30% ' 32% 31%
3,7001 do .pr ...... 85% I 54% 85% 85%
800|Tenn. Coal & I 64 62% 63 64
7,600 Texas & Pac. 50 48% 49% 49%
Tol, St. L. & W 18% IS% 18% 18%
do pr 36% 36% 36% 36%
HC2oo]Unlon Pacific. 122% 118% 122% | 122%
4,500f 'do pr 96% 65 96 96%
5,000 U. S. Leather.. 14% 14 14% 14%
800 do pr 77% 76% 77% 77%
U. S. Rubber.. 22% 22% 21% 21%
200, do pr 62 62%
U. S. Express 89 88%
51,500 U. S. Steel.... 52% 50% 52% 51%
22,500 ;do pr 100 98% 98% 99
2,200 Wabash 1% 2l' 21% 21%
6,000 do pr ...... 41 39% 40% 40%
10,000 Western Union. 97% 95 97 95%
200 Wheel. & L.E............ 18% 18%
do Ist pr... 55 55
do 2d pr.... 35% 34% 34% 34
1,500 Wisconsin Cent 21% 20% 21% 20%
; Ido pr ; ..... 45 145
Total sales, 939,500. "
' Minneapolis Money.
MINNEAPOLIS — Bank clearings, $2,293,
--864.90; New York exchange, selling rate 60c
premium, buying rate par; Chicago exchange,
selling j rate 50c premium, buying rate par;
London 60-day sight documentary, $4.84%.
ST. PAUL—Clearings to-day, $763,216; for
the week, $5,677,937.45; corresponding week
last year, 15,459,140.55.
The Bank Statement.
New York, Mayf 4.—The statement of the
associated banks for the week ending to-day
shows:
Loans, $890,4,-0,000, increase $6,005,500; de
posits, $973,111,600, increase $2,321,100; cir
culation, $31,132,900, decrease $182,000; legal
tenders, $71,955,300, decrease $344,300; speqie,
$182,302,700, decrease $4,855,100; reserves, $254,
--258,000, decrease J5,199,400; reserve required,
$243,277,900, Increase ! $580,275; surplus, $10,
--980,100, decrease $5,799,675.
GENERAL PRODUCE
The Minneapolis Market.
Saturday, May 4.
For the past week the butter market lias
barely held a steady basis. - The tendency
has been weaker all through and it has been
difficult to get the outside quotations except
lor especially choice lots. The.demand was
active on small lots and retailers have taken
their full share, but on jobbing account.there
was a light inquiry and not much business in
the aggregate. Storage buyers showed dis
position to hold off to a large extent until
grass goods begin coming in, not caring to
load up heavily with the present run of
stock, which is not all of the most desirable
grades. Eastern marKets, while fairly steady,
at present, are without any snap and
rule quiet on all grades. "Well posted deal
ers are figuring on a continued quiet market
; for the present, and no advance is thought to
be likely until the new butter begins to come
and speculative buyers pay more attention to
the market. • .:K ■'•• - r •
Warmer weather and heavier recipts had
a weakening effect on the egg market. Prices
have been sagging continuously, and to-day
strictly fresh are quoted around lO^jc. Can
dled stock brings lie to ll%c, but the cur
rent 1 quotation is l<H£c. ■ ■•■ ■ :
- Veal suffered a decline and even at the
present low prices the market' is without
good support and very weak. The warm
weather caused some shipments to arrive
here soon, and this, in connection with a
lessened demand for fresh meats, has made
the market heavy under pressure of accumu
lations. To-day there is more than enough
veal in sight to meet all requirements; de
mand is moderate and some good lots will
undoubtedly be carried over.
Poultry has suffered along with veal, but
not to the same extent. Prices are easier.
There is a fairly satisfactory demand, but re
ceipts run much heavier.
: Strawberries are active and in sharp de
mand. Oranges and lemons hold steady. All
new fruits and early vegetaoles are selling
well. ■ ■ -
BUTTER—Extra creameries, per lb, 18c;
firsts, per lb, 16% c; seconds, per lb, 14c; imi
tations, firsts, "'lie; seconds, lb, 12V6c; dai
ries, extras, lb, 16% c; firsts 14@14V4c; seconds,
lb, 12c; roll, fancy, 13©14 c; choice, lb, 12c;
ladles, firsts, per lb, 16c; seconds, lb, 12c;
packing stock, fresh. ll@ll&c; tested butter
tat in separator cream, 16^c, delivered Min
neapolis. , ' ■ .
EGGS—Strictly fresh, cases included, low
off, 10V4c; dirty, fresh, 8c; checks, Be. -..-
CHEk'SE—Twins or flats, fancy, lb. 12c:
twins or flats, choice, lb, 9&@lOV4c; twins or
flats, fair to good, C@7c; brick, No. 1, lb,
12V4c; brick, No. 2, 10@llc; brick, No. 3,
6@7c; limburger, No. 1, 13% c; limburger. No.
2, 8%@9%c; primost. No. 1, 8c; -primost. No.'
2 per lb, tic; Young America, fancy, lb,
12Vic; choice, lb, 10<&10kc; pultost, »@loo,
Swiss, No. 1, 13V4@14c; block Swiss, No. 1,
14c; block Swiss, No. 2, 9@loc.
LIVE POULTRY —Turkeys, hens. fat. per
coops, - 9c; chickens, hens, B@9%c; young
roosters, 7V4@Bc; old roosters, sc; ducks,
white, B@BV*c; colored 7@7^c; geese, 6@7c.
DRESSED MEATS—VeaI, . fancy, 100 to 125
lbs, 7c; fair to good, s%@'6c; thin or
overweight, 4@sc; mutton, fancy, country
dressed, 7c, thin or overweight, 6c; lambs,
fancy, 8c; thin or overweight, tic; milk lambs,
fancy, 13@14c; choice, 9@loc; hogs, according
to weight, 6@7c. - „■ „, .'**
PIGEONS—Live, per dozen, $1.35; dead, per
dozen, 60c; squabs, dozen, $1.
FISH— lb, 7@Bc; crappies, large, per
lb, 6c; crappies, small, small, 4@sc; pick
erel, drawn, 4%c;. pickerel, round, 4c; sun
fish perch, etc., 2@4c; buffalo, 2@3c;- bull
heads, skinned, 3@6c; turtles, lb, 2@3c. - r "*-■•?■
POTATOES—Burbanks, car. lots, .42c; Ru
rals, SB@4oc; Ohios, 43@45c; mixed white, 37
@39c; mixed red, 35@3ic; small lots sell at
s@loc per bushel higher than these figures.
BEANS—Fancy navy, bu, $2.30@2.35; choice,
bu, $2@2.10; medium hand-picked, bu,. $2,
brown, fair to good, $1.50@2. .
1 ONIONS—Red Globee. car lots, per bu,
|2- Red Wethersfield, bu, $2; Yellow Globes,
car lots, per bu, ?2; white, per bu, $2. .:,
DRIED PEAS— yellow, $l@l.lo per
bu; medium, 90c@$l; green fancy, - $l.i;o<B>
1.35; green, medium, 90c<tf$l; marrowfat, • per
bu %'i.
APPLES— brl, $4: Ben Davis, brl,
$4 2504.50; Baldwins, $4.25@4.50; - Winesapß,
brl. fr».6U@o; western box apglea, Dv, $1.5u
©1.75. .
CRANBERRIES— Jerseys, $7; ' bu • crate,
$2 ■ — ' - ■
. CHERRlES—California, in 10-lb boxes,
$2<§2 25. "
ORANGES—California navels, 80s, $2.50®
2 75- California navels. 965, $2.50@2.75; . Cali
fornia navels, 1265, ?3@3.25; California. navels,
150s, $3; California navels, 1.65 ; $3;
California seedlings, all sizes, »Z. 75; Califor
nia tangerines, half box, $2; Mediterranean
sweets, |3; grape fruit, 80s to 965, $2.25. '
LEMONS—Messinas, 30Os or 36Us, fancy,
$3.50@3.75; choice, $3.25; California, fancy, as
to size, $X 25; choice. $3.
STRAWBERRIES—Cases, 24 qts, $4.25@4.75;
cases, 24 pint*. $2.
PINEAPPLES—Per doz., as to size, range
$3 to $3.50.
BANANAS— large bunches, $2.25©
2.50; medium bunches, $I."is<&>2; small bunches,
$1.50. *• • :■''■■ - '" T ■
THONEY— fancy white, 1-lb Sections,
•>oc- choice white. lC@l7c; amber,; 13@14c;
golden rod, ll@12c; extracted white,.lOiffllc;
buckwheat, 10@12c; extracted amber, S@9c.
STRAWBERRIES— 24 qts, $4.50;
Der doe $1; Muscatine, box, $3(&3.25; carrots,
per bu 55®60c; California, white, :- boxes,
$3 25®3 50; cauliflower, • per dozen, $1.25;
cucumbers, per doz, $16>1.60; egg plant, doz,
$ISI 50; green onions,.. per : doz. bunches,
20040; lettuce, per doz, 30c; head lettuce, I
per doz. 30c; parsley, 30c; parsnips; per
bu 50060 c; watercress, per doz, 30c; wax j
beans- ,bu r $3 5004; string brans.' per , bu.
$3 506-4' mint, per doz, 40c;:turnips, new.-per
bu* 40@50c; new Bermuda potatoes, bu, $2.50;
new home-grown potatoes, per bu;52@2.25;
rutabagas; per bu, 35@40c; California celery,
doz 70e; horseradish, per lb, 7^c; tomatoes,
Florida stock, 6-basket crates, $2.25@2.50;
home grown/ 5-lb baskets,' $1.40@1.50; spin
ach per bu, 75(g85c; radishes, dot bunch
spiriach, per bu,'76@Ssc; radishes, doz bunch
es ;lS@2oc; new carrots, doz bunches,' 50c;
new beets, per doz bunches, 45Q53c; pie plant,
aU-lb box, $2@2.25; •'.'" i;'' ; 1 *' '
LIVE STOCK TRADE
Volume of Business Was Larger,
but on an Easier Basis.
RECEIPTS OF HOGS INCREASED
Good Cattle Herd Vv Well—Sheep In
Demand—Review of the
Week.
South St. Paul, Minn., May 4.-«-HOGS—The
general marketing of hogs this week was the
heaviest since .the last week in February. At
the five leading market points receipts ag
gregated about 373,000, against 341,200 for the
previous week, 266,400 for the corresponding
week a month ago and 326,200 for the corre
sponding week a year ago. Since Jan. 1,
receipts at these five markets aggregate 6,142,
--700, against 5,867,600 for the corresponding
period last year, or a gain of 275,100. Local
receipts were about 13,400, against 12,070 for
the week before, 9,380 for the same week a
month ago and 10,617 for the same week
a year ago. With supplies at all points
showing an increase, the market has ruled
very uneven. Early In the week the decline
in values was very sharp, leaving the close
still about 5c under the close last week, and
about 30c under the. high point of three
weeks ago. The local demand, however,
was very strong, especially for good to
choice medium and heavy weights. While the
total for the week shows a fair increase over
the previous week, yet the quality was gen
erally common, with the big end running
well to light and mixed grades that sold
from 7%c to 12% c under the better and more
desirable medium and heavy weights. At the
close the bulk sold from $5.65 to $5.70. A
week ago the bulk sold from $5.70 to $5.72%
and $5.95 to $5.97% the high point three
weeks ago.
BUTCHER CATTLE—Receipts of cattle at
the five big markets totaled about 123,200,
against 115,600 for the previous week, 114,010
for the corresponding week a month ago ana
106,400 for the "corresponding week a year
ago. The supply for the week here totaled
about 4,000, against 3,973 for the week before,
4,180 for the same week a month ago and
4,525 for the same week a year ago. Con
ditions at nearly every market point has
been more or less unfavorable to the sellers'
interests, owing to the unusually heavy sup
plies on the Chicago market. In many in
stances gales of beef cattle east were quoted
15c to 25c oft early in the week, while the
prices here held firm all week. There were j
a good many bunches of corn-fed beef steers
offered to the local trade and they were soon
picked up at the prevailing strong prices.
Early In the week one hundred head of only
fairly choice, corn-fed beef steers, averag-.
ing 1,316 pounds, sold to Swift & Co. at $5.10.
Buyers maintain that choice beeves will com
mand prices from $5.35 to $5.50 and are will
ing to pay these figures if they can get the
quality. Butcher cows and heifers sold to
advantage and are quoted fully steady. Veal
calves are in strong demand again at prices
ranging from $5 to $5.25 for choice ones.
STOCKERS AND FEEDERS—The trade in
stock and feeding cattle was practically a
repetition of the week before. The move
ment was very uneven, and was character
ized by an unusuallf keen demand for
strictly good quality steers and heifers of all
weights, while sellers who had strings of
the extreme common tail-enders found prac
tically no outlet during the early part of
the week and only succeeded in disposing of
a iew head later in the week. There were
a good many outside buyers In the yards
looking for supplies, but In nearly every in
stance their wants were confined to good to
strictly good stock and feeding steers and
stock heifers. Both regular dealers and
order buyers had large orders, but their
inquiry, too, was confined almost entirely to
the strictly good quality kinds. The supply
was not so large as during the week before
and offerings, as a rule, ran to light weights.
The keen demand for the strictly good qual
ity stuff had a tendency to strengthen prices,
but aside from a few sales that were pos
sibly 10c to 15c higher, the general market
on these kinds was only strong with the
close of the week before. Good to choice lit
tle stocks steers sold from $3.85 to $4.20,
while the few good to choice feeding steers,
averaging better than 700 pounds, sold from
$4 to $4 35 Good to choice little stock heifers
sold from $3.15 to $3.35, but mostly around
$3 25 although strictly good ones sold up to
$3 50 Both common little stock steers and
heifers sold largely on the same basis from
$2.50 to $2.75.
SHEEP—The supplies in the sheep division
were more tban double the receipts of the
previous week, but still the number on sale
was not large enough to meet the require
ments of the local trade. Receipts east were
quite liberal and prices were generally
bearish. While the bulk of the supply here
arrived early in tne week and the demand
then was sufficient to have taken care of a
good many more carloads, yet buyers were
very bearish in their views and were not
willing to pay prices as high as at the close
of the week before. As a result the weak
ness finally developed into a 15c to 2uc de
cline In values, with fat ewes showing the
full decline. The big end of the receipts
consisted of pretty choice, fat. shorn lambs
of which the bulk arrived Tuesday, and sold
at $4 50, or fully 15c under the close of the
week before. There was a comparatively
small supply of choice, fat, shorn ewes or
wethers included in the offerings. They met
with good demand from the trade, but
conditions generally warranted lower prices
and while ewes declined 25c from the close
of the previous week, wethers were only
auoted about 15c off. There was a fair per
centage of stock ewes included In Tuesday's
bis run but they were very thin and did not
meet the local demand. Good, desirable stock
ewes would have. sold readily at prices rang
ing from $3 to $3.50.
Receipts to-day -were 50 cattle, 75 calves
aTTh» following table shows the receipts from
Jan. 1. 1901, to date, as compared with the
same Pecattle.CaivesHogß.Sheep.Horses.Cara.
Year. Cattle.Calves.Hogs Sheep Horses.Cars
l»01.... 45,111 16,070 206.047 71,457 682 4,804
1900.." 34J339 16.992 175,322 98;« i 7,633 4,6,0
r\^o 1,194, 15,951 ....
Inc..:'." 10,772 78 30,725 .. MJ
The following table shows the receipts for
the month of .May to date, as compared with
the same period a year ago:
Year. Cattle.Calves.Hogs.Sheep Horses.Cara.
1901.... 978 770 6.670 54 .... 122
1900 . 2,219 2,089 7,698 846 1 217
Dec..!. 1.261 1,319 1,028 .792 18=
Receipts: H(>gg c&
April 27.... 14 36 1,406 114 22
Anrll 2^:::: 521 195 1,721 113 41
April 30 .... 739 586 3,480 1,086 88
May 1 515 349 3,16« ..- 39 61
May 2 .... 228 . 131 1,532 . 1 »
May .3 .... 209 268 1,928 79 33
Estimated receipts by cars to-day of the
railroads centering at these yards: Chicago
Great Western, 3; Chicago, Milwaukee & Si.
Paul. 6; Chicago, St. Paul Minneapolis &
Omaha. 10; Great Northern, 1. Total, 20.
Disposition of stock May. 3:
pi r m— Cattle. Hogs. Sheep.
Swift &Co 100 1.749 ....
North Pack'g Co., 805t0n.... iso. •■••
Estate of I. Staples •••• . b3
Slimmer & Thomas j •••• ••••
J. E. 801t0n... 1* •
Hankey Bros } • :i
Leo Gottfried 1 ••••• «
Country buyers 203 .... i
Total 321 1,934 78
CATTLE — The supply here consisted of
only a few head. There was practically no
receipts at other market*. The few here in
cluded some beef ftteers that sold early at
$4 50@4.86, and butcher cows and heifers
that sold at $3.75@4. The week closes fully
steady with a week ago.
There was very little done in the stocker
and feeder division. The supply was very
short Anything good would have sold read
ily at full steady prices. Common little tail
end stock steers and heifers sold from $2 to
$2.75. Sales:
Butcher Cows and Heifers-
No Ay. Price. II No. Ay. Price.
V 1.154 M.» 3 1.133 $4.00
i 1,190 3.50 II
Beef and Butcher Steers-
No Ay. Price. No. Ay. Price.
2 ' 1,340 $4.85 5 1,016 $4.50
1 1,210 4.85 I!
Milken) and Springers-
One cow for $37.
One ow for $25.
Stockers and Feeders-
No. Ay. Price. , No. Ay. Price.
23 356 $3.85| 10 291 $3.80
M. DORAN & CO.,
The Oldest Firm of
. . Bankers and Brokers .
; I\ THE NORTHWEST.
Har* removed from their old quarters
•. '■ on Jackson Street to the ■
Uermania Life Building. Qor. 4th
and Minnesota St.. fit. Paul, Minn.
.SATIM&Y EVENING, MAY 4 1901.
62 -263 3.75 41 400 3.00
52 430 3.50 5 606 3.70
1 490 3.25 28 464 3.50
2 355 3.00 7 357 3.00
12 371 3.00 1 240 2.00
a 376 2.50!
Feeding Cows and Heifers —
Xo. Ay. Price. No. Ay. Price.
34 506 ?3.25 68 292 $3.25
17 351 3.15 2 605 3.10
8 577 3.00 A 350 3.00
6 236 2.75 a 620 2.50
2 270 2.25
Feeding Bulls—
Xo. Ay. Price.
2 930 $2.80
HOGS—The visible supply at the leading
markets to-day was only fairly moderate.
Conditions, however, were not very favorable
and right from the early opening prices
ruled lower. Bids here opened 5c to 10c off
and the bulk of sales were made on that
basis. The best on sale sold from $5.62% to
$5.07^, with fairly choice mediums topping
the market at $5.70. Mixed sold from $5.55
to $5.60, and roughs at $5.30. As compared
with the high potnt in prices three weeks
ago, prices to-day are about 40c per 100 lbs
lower.
Hogs—
Xo. Ay. Price. No. Ay. Price.
77 222 $5.70 fi6 254 $5.67%
70 213 5.65 66 237 5.65
64 241 5.65 |80 216 5.65
63 .-. 204 5.65 M .... 262 5.62V 3
62 215 5.62% JES 24G 5.60
47 . . 225 5.60 127 242 5.60
68 213 5.60 J74 215 &.60
44 222 5.60 |||72 191 5.57%
19 154 5.55 ||
Pigs and Culls-
No. Ay. Price .JINo. Ay. Price.
3 370 $5.30 2 £60 $5.30
2 455 5.25 || 1 420 5.00
5 90 4.50 ||
SHEEP—Nothing was received in the sheep
division. Local buyers were ready to pick
ud both choice fat shorn lambs and' sheep
at prices fully steady with the 15@20c decline
early in the week.
On the market: E. Dennis, Hutchinson;
M. Uhlman, Roberts, Wis.; Laughlin &
Thompson, Bixby; J. W. Jones, Durand, Wis.;
M. C. Black. Cannon Falls; J. S. Green,
Goodhue; Johnson, Peterson & Co., Hector;
F. White. Chaska; Behrensfleld Brothers,
Heron LaJse; W. Jentz, Henderson; A. Pettis,
A. Berg, St. Peter; D. Blaiichard, Vesta;
Burg & Anderson, Nicollet; A. D. Sackett,
Janesville.
Sioux City Live Stock.
Sioux City, lowa, May 4.—The cattle run
the past week comprised 12,500 head, indi
cating the largest supply for any week of the
year, a gain of 3,200 over last week, and an
increase of 2,100 over the corresponding pe
riod a year ago. About 2,000 head of the
arrivals were fat cattle, and the balance were
offerings in the stocker grades. Although re
ceipts of the latter were liberal, everything
was taken care of in good shape. There was*
an enlarged outside demand and, while there
was an easier tone to the trade after Wednes
day, there was a good.clearance. On Mon
day and Tuesday, with a strong demand from
the yard dealers, prices ruled a. dime higher,
and all grades of stockers sold at the high
I ooint of the year. Te quality of offerings
showed much improvement, and this was the
cause of bringing out some pretty high
figures and making the market appear higher
than it was quoted. The be#t of the steer
calves and well bred yearlings ranged in
price from $4.65 to $5, while the bulk of the
desirable offerings sold from $4.25 to $5.60.
The fair to good sold from $3.75 to $4.25, and
the common steer stuff down to $3. In the
heavier grades, some choice medium weight
stockers reached $4.90, but the bulk sold at
$4.25 to $4.60.
! There was a strong demand for heifers
! weighing from 400 to TOO lbs, caused by the
presence of an extensive buying order. Every
thing in this line was cleaned up quickly
every day. The bulk of the sales ranged
from $3.25 to $3.60, while the common to fair
sold from $2.75 to $3.25. Feeding cows sold
from $2.25 to $3. There was good inquiry for
bulls of all kinds at fully steady prices.
Canning animals sold from $2.25 to $3.50 and
well bred and breeding and stock bulls from
$3.50 to $6.50. The supplies of fat cattle were
quite plentiful, but an active demand from
the local packers made short work of the of
ferings. The market declined a dime on
Tuesday, but during the balance of the week
the market ruled firm at the decline. Good
aft steers which had been fairly well finished
ranged from $4.75 to $5.15, and the bulk of
! the short-fed offerings, which Included quite
! a few that were rough, sold from $4.25 to
j $4.65. Canners and medium cows sold from
1 $2.50 to $3.50, fat cows and heifers from $3.50
! ©4.15.
Hogs—Receipts for the week comprised
! 20,000 and were about on a par with the heavy
i run last week. The local packers were free
buyers and they got most of the offerings.
Heavy receipts at all points in the west
caused some weakness early in the week, but
later some of the loas was regained and on
Friday the -sales averaged just a shade lower
than the same day in the week before.
Receipts, 4,500 hogs. 200 cattle.
Hogs—s@loc lower. Sales:
No. Ay. Price.
(67 210 $5.55
! 62 230 5.57%
166 240 5.60
65 285 5.G5
Cattle—Steady. Sales:
No. Ay. Price.
16 beeves 1,060 $4.75
20 beeves 1,150 4.95
2 canners 900 2.25
6 cows 1,010 3.50
2 bulls 070 2.50
4 bulls ~ 900 2.75
. 2 bulls ~ ... 910 3.00
6 stockers *..... 790 3.50
10 stockers 900 4.40
6 yearlings 660 3.75
8 yearlings 500 4.45
3 calves 330 . 4.25
4 calves 300 4.50
Sheep—ln demand: $3.50@4.90.
Chicago Live Stock.
Chicago, May 4.—Cattle, receipts, 200;
steady; good to prime steers, $5@5.9D; poor
to medium, $3.95@4.90; stockers and feeders,
!s3@s; cows and heifers, $2.70@4.75; canners, $2
@2.60; calves, $3.50@5.12Vj; Texa3 steers, $2.50
@5.40.
Hogs, receipts, to-day, 16,000; Monday,
30,000; left over 3,650; weak; mixed and butch
ers, $5.55@5.85; good to choice heavy, $5.70@
!5.87Vi; rough heavy, $5.56<8>5.65; light, $5.50@
5.80; bulk of sales. $5.70@5.80.
Sheep, receipts. 500; steady; sheep, $4@4.50;
lambs, $4.20@5.25.
Official yesterday: Receipts—Cattle, 1,913;
hogs, 13,734; sheep, 3,736. Shipments—Cattle,
2,450; hogs, 5,033; sheep, 1,169.
Kansas City Live Stoc!%
Kansas City, May 4.—Cattle— Receipts, 200;
unchanged.
Hors—Receipts, 7,000; s@loc lower; bulk of
sales, $5.60@5.75; heavy, $5.75@5.80; mixed,
$5.60@5.75; light, $5.25@5.65.
Sheep—Receipts, none.
Omaha Live Stock.
South Omaha, May 4.—Cattle—Receipts,
100: unchanged.
Hors—Receipts, 9,900; 7H@loc lower; heavy,
$5.65®5.75; mixed, $5.62*4@5.65; light, $5.60®
5.65: bulk of sales, $5.62V 5 @5.65.
Sheep—Receipts, none.
St. Louis Live Stock.
St. Louis, May 4.—Cattle, receipts, 100;
unchanged.
Hogs, receipts, 2,000; 5c lower; lights, $5.65®
5.75; packers, $a.65@5.75; butchers, $5 75®
5.95.
Sheep, receipts, 800; strong: muttons, $3.75
@4.50; lambs, $4.60@8.
.MISCELLANEOUS
Jfew York Cotton.
Xew York, May 4.—Cotton opened 'easy and
4 to 10 points lower in sympathy with fur
ther losses abroad. July In the local pit
broke to 7.70 c, under the first wave of selling,
which came from all directions, and theu
rallied slowly on profit taking by timid shorts,
who feared to risk over Sunday develop
ments. Liquidation in Liverpool from all
parts of Europe was the chief factor of de
pression there, though tehind this pressure
was a demoralized cotton goods market.
Spot closed quiet and l-16c lower; middling
uplands. 8 3-16 c; middling gulf, 8 9-16 c. Sales,
802 bales.
Futures closed barely steady; May, 7.72 c;
June, 7.71 c; July, 7.73 c; August, 7.45 c; Sep
tember. 7.22 c: October. 7.13 c; November, 7.09 c;
December, 7.09 c; January, 7.10 c.
Peorla Whisky.
Peorla. May 4—Whisky on the basis of
$1.28 for finished goods.
MONEY MARKET
>ew York Money.
New York, May 4.—Close: Money on call
firm at 4 per cent; prime mercantile paper,
4@4 1 * ! per. cent. Sterling exchange nominal
with actual business in bankers' bills at $4.88
for demand and at $4.54%@4.84% for 60 days;
posted rates, $4.86%@4.86 and $4.89. Commer
cial bills, $4.84@4.84%. Silver certificates,
nominally 60c; bar silver, 59% c; Mexican dol
lars, 4S&c. State bonds weak. Railroad
bonds irregular. Government bonds firmer;
refunding 2s, registered and coupon, 106; 3s,
registered and coupon, 109%; ■ new 4s, regis
tered and coupon. 138>4; old 4s, registered and
coupon, ♦113&; - ss, registered and coupon,
109%. . ":r-. r / ; ' . >:.: ;■. ;. >>;•:-■■ ■■
New York Produce.
New York, May 4.—Butter—Receipts. 3,172
pkgs; firm; creamery, 16@19c; factory, 11@
I2c. Cheeie—Receipts, 1.688 pkgs; quiet; fan-
•;: - ~ ' = ESTABLISHED 1878 rzz _ ■; v
WOODWARD & CO.
«»«» QRAIN COMMISSION : "<*"«
* BENCHES— aid Milwaukee. Orders for future delivery executed la all market a.
Ghas E. Lewis stoclS|
& Co- Bonus,
I, 2 and 3 Chamber of
Commerce, Minneapolis. [Jj|||(JJ|
GRAIN, PROVISIONS.
New York Correspondents,
CUrk, Dodge & Co.
Chicago j Bartfctt, Pnutor * Co.
Correspondents, ( J. P. HarrU.
Dally Price Current mailed free oa ap
plication. ___________^___^^_^
Wall Street's Boom
"Probable Duration
of the
Bull Marker
Is the title of a special letter issued by us
Monday (April 22d). The demand for copies
was so great that temporarily we could not
supply the demand. We can now accommo
date every interested person. Writ* for It.
OUR DAILY MARKET LETTERS
will also be mailed free upon request.
HAIGHT & FREESE CO.,
Stocks, Bonds, Grain, Cotton.
53 Broadway, New York.
Six Branches—All connected by private
wires.
Commission orders solicited for large or
small accounts, for cash or moderate margin.
OFPICIAL OIL REPORTS
The California State Investment Company,
with eastern offices at 88 Tremont st, Boston,
Mass.. offers investors an opportunity to ob
tain reliable information direct from the offi-
cial state government reports regarding the
oil industry of California, and all etters of
inquiry, inclosing stamp for reply, about any
oil company, will be cheerfully answered free
of charge.
cy large, colored, lO'/fcc; fancy large, white,
10@10%c; fancy small, colored, ll%c; fancy
small, white, ll%c. Eggs— Receipts, 9,885
pkgs; firmer; western regular, packed. 12 1.,
©13^,; storage western, 14c; southern, 11&
12^c. Sugar—Raw firm; fair refining, 3%c;
centrifugal, 96 test, 4^4@4 5-16 c; molasses
sugar, Vfac; refined firm; crushed, 6.05 c; pow
dered, 5.65 c; granulated, 5.55 c. Coffee dull;
No. 7 Rio, 6*4 c
Boston Miiiiiiu Stocks.
. Boston, May 4.—Adventure, 1'QllM; Arca
dian, 19^@20%; Ailouez, 34@34%; Arnold, 3%
@4; Baltic, 47^@48; Montana, 440@441; Cal-i
--met, 825®828; Centennial, 30%@31%; Franklin,
18^@19^: Isle Royale, 51; Osceola, S7@SS;
Quinoy, 175@18O; Mohawk, 40%@41J*; Rhode
Island, s®s^i; Tamarack, 335@340; Tecuniseh,
1)602; Wolverine, 58@60.
New York Grain.
New York, May 4.—Close—Wheat— May,
80fto; July, 78% c. Corn—May, 52% c; July, 51c.
speculative: gossip
St. Louis receipts: Wheat, 19,000 bu; corn,
112.000 bu; oats, 43,1)00 bu; last year, holiday.
Logan, Chicago, to Jolley: "The wheat
market is depressed by fine crop reports.
Snow estimated the winter wheat crop at
450,000,000 bu. Reports of crop damage from
the southwest seem rather decreasing. Cash
demand is less encouraging. Corn is wholly
controlled by manipulation. Would take
profits on long corn, and think. If the condi
tions remain favorable for the new crop, it
will be difficult to maintain the July price.
Moderate shipping demand at a large dis
count."
Ohio state crop report: Columbus, Ohio-
Condition winter wheat has increased four
DOints since April 1 and is now 82 per cent of
a full average. Oats area, compared with
1900. is 87 per cent. Wheat damage by fly,
10 per cent. The fly damage was done last
fall.
INVESTMENT GOSSIP
Npw York stock gossip: From sources of
the most reliable kind comes conflramtion of
the views expressed last night—namely, that
the banks and banking interests, having be
come alarmed at the wild speculation,
have determined to check it by the rise of
their power in the money market, and the
most reliable people are strongly urging their
friends to lighten their lines as much as
possible, giving their opinions that before
long considerably lower prices will be seen
all along the line.
Chicago Money.
Chicago, May 4.—Clearings. $24,828,811: bal
ances, $2,501,129; posted exchange, $4.85&@
4.89; New York exchange, 5c premium.
Get fly Estimates on Elevator Building,
W. 8. CLEVELAND,
ELEVATOR BUILDER
530 GUARANTY LOAN BLDQ,
TEL. 1560. MINNEAPOLIS.
Dulutb, , Chicago,
E A. BROWN & CO.
Grain Commission.
WHOLESALE COAL.
Consignments Solicited,: Prompt .Returns
.••..'...-. , Guaranteed. -v ft-
Minneapolis,-,-:-*.--- • fllnnesota.
.1 " iiiiiHiiiiiiMMnrnwißnift
I SENT FREE "JSjS. I
Northwestern Mining Journal I
containing full account of the recent phenomenal ■
discoTertes of Pet rale and Natural Cm in ■
Eastern Washington, by which hundreds of for- ■
tune* tare" been made la a day. Alto describe! ■
the wonderful Mialnr, Agricultural and other ■
resources of the Crest Paella Nortkwut. and ■
fires latest ITlningNewi and Mioinjr»»dOU Stock ■
quotations. D*a*t l>T«at la alilif »r «U ■
•took* anywhere withont thla »a»er. M
Write today. Bex «M, Bf«k«*t, Wuti^tn. I
THOMAS A Co
Qraii Commission and Stock Brute
Write for our «tily market letter, whlob we
mail FREK on application. - -
Members Minneapolis Chamber of Com
merce. Telephone— Main 1887-J,
5 CHAMBER OF COMBIERSE.
■ ■ t >• *
EST4JJLIBHED 1881. ,
LT.SOWLE&SONS
Rrnlf>r< is ''Grains, Provisions,
Brokers IE Btook y and Bonds.
Chicago and New York Correspondents.
Long Distance Telephone, 684 Main.
21 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.
Watson A Co
Brokers In Grain,Provision^
, Stocks and Bonds,
members N. V. Stock Exchange
Chicago Correspond eht»-aßs>w»rtz,Dttpee*Cp.
PriTate wire Chicago & New York. . Tel. 906 Main
35 - Ohambar of Gommoi*oo*
\JMig^»gftisS&\
1 |_ M J— PHIVATE WIRE aC <i %
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\MEMBERS iEHAMBEROF COMMERCE MPLS. \

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