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The Minneapolis journal. (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, July 15, 1901, Image 10

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1901-07-15/ed-1/seq-10/

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10
DOWNWARD RANGE OF 2Mc IN SEPT. WHEAT
The Market Opened Higher at 66c,
but Broke to 63 3-4 C, and Was
Without Support.
SOUTH DAKOTA DAMAGE LIGHT
Some Relief From the Hot Spell-
Corn Weather—General
... : . New*.
Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce, July 15.
—Wheat had another up and down turn much
the same as on Saturday, the market open
ing higher but going to pieces*on the first
heavy offering. September started In this
morning nearly l%c higher at 66c, and then
made a straight drop to 64% c. Here -it
held a while, but dipped again later, selling
to 64@64%c.
Over Sunday there was practically no rain
in the corn belt. The high temperatures ex
tended northward into South Dakota, the
•weather report showing a maximum of 102
degrees touched at Huron. Late last night
and early this morning some slight relief
■was felt, with a sprinkle of rain. ■ Huron
had a trace, and .14 at Winnipeg was the
heaviest noted in the first report. The early
business was of a mixed character and after
the break the markets showed a nervous and
Quickly responsive tendency, but hesitation
ruled the trading. It was expected South Da
kota would have some bad reports to send
out, but nothing worth noting came at first,
and the fact that there were scarcely any
country buying orders In the pit made it
look as If there had been no material harm
done. Later on, some news of Injury to
■wheat began coming, but up to noon it was
difficult to determine how extensive the dam
age had been, or whether this South Da
kota hot weather was to help the market or
not. For one thing the wheat in South Da
kota is very well matured for this date and
in places is ready for the harvester, which
■was a point of consideration in speculating
as to the probable effect of the hot spell.
Before noon it was reported cooler generally
and indicating rain. Redfield had a fair
shower and Williston, Minn., reported a ma
terial drop in the temperature.
Liverpool was off %d at the opening, but
on second cables came %@%d higher.
World's shipments were 7,064,000 bushels
for the week, against 7,288,000 bushels last
•week, and 5,470,000 bushels a year ago.
America shipped 5,016,000 bushels, Russia 840,
--000 bushels and the Danube 136,000 bushels.
India shipped 248,000 bushels and Australia j
440,000 bushels. Wheat on passage decreased
2,072,000 bushels. Liverpool stocks are lighter
by 72,000 bushels. t
Primary receipts were 1,370,000 bushels,
against 952.000 busheU last year, and ship
ments 584,000, against 490,000 bushels. Kan
sas City had 500 cars, against 701 last year,
and St. Louis 372,000 bushels, against 246,000
bushels. Wheat and flour clearances showed
796,000 bushels, corn 208,000 bushels. Minne
apolis received 449 cars and Duluth 25,
against 253 and 34 last year. The visible sup
ply made a decrease of 1,709,000 bushels,
•which makes the total now 27,959,000 bushels.
The corn market was weaker towards the
close and wheat showed further weakness
in sympathy. September sold to 63% c foi»
low and December to 65% c. At the close
there was little support and closing figures
■were near the low points, September at 63% c;
December, 65%@65%c; July wheat, 63% c;
Chicago closed September at 66%@66%c.
The cash market showed a satisfactory de
mand, although the heavier receipts had ef
fect to hold the market quiet on the poorur
lots. No. 1 northern sold at l@l*4c over
September. No. 2 brought 64*4@65*4c No.
3 was salable at 60@63c. Rejected wheat
ranged from 56 to 60c and no grade from 52
to 57c.
THE FLOUR MARKET
Sales Are Satisfactory and Grinding
la Heavy.
Millers report the flour market in satisfac
tory shape, although the unsettled wheat
market has effect to lessen demand on the
■whole. Foreigners continue bidding under
the market and will not come in freely at the !
advance. A break of 2c In wheat, it is
thought, would stimulate flour trade greatly, I
as it Is believed buyers would take hold j
freely on a slightly lower basis. The mills i
are grinding heavily.
Shipments for the day were 44,452 brls. .
First patents are quoted $3.75@3.85; second
patents, $3.55@3.65; first clears, $2.65@2.75;
second clears, $2.05.
theTash trade
Millstuffs Strong: and Hishter—
Firm—Corn and Oats Active.
FLAX—The market held strong and active
at prices about even with Saturday's range.
Although 24 cars wer posted w many of them
•were only part lots and only 10 full cars j
■were represented. Rejected sold at $1.85 I
for a straight car, and small sack lots |
brought $1.80, poorer stuff selling at $1.70.
Minneapolis received 24 cars, against 2 last
year, and Duluth had 2 cars.
Closing prices were: Minneapolis cash,
$1.87%; September, $1.51; October, $1.46*».
Duluth cash, $1.85; September, $1.54; Octo
ber, $1.48%. ■..-,,: - ":,>
CORN—Th^ market was a little easier on
the whole, although an occasional lot sold
at Saturday's price. No. 3of fair quality
brought 46%e. No grade sold on wide range,
according to quality, hot lots going at 43c
and 40c, and very poor no grade selling Mown
to 36c No. 3 yellow is quoted 46®46%c;
No. 3, 45%@48c. Receipts, 37 cars; ship
ments, 2 cars.
OATSThe market was active at firm
prices and an average a shade higher all
around. No. 3 white sold at 33c. No. 3
oats brought 51%@33%p. Receipts were 30
cars, and shipments, 15 cars. There is good
demand for oats, especially for choice lots.
No. 3 white Is quoted 33@33%c; No. i, 31%©
FEED AND MEAL— market is active,
•with an especially active demand for Zeed.
Prices are maintained on the higher level and
quotations are firm. Coarse corn
meal and cracked corn, $17; No. 1 feed, $17.50;
No. 2 feed, $18; No. 3 feed, $18.50; granulated
com meal in cotton sacks, at the rate of $2
per barrel.
MILLSTUFFS—The market Is again higher
all around. Millers report a very active
demand from all quarters and sharp inquiry
from points through Kansas and Nebraska,
■where the drought has brought fear of a
scarcity of feed, and where the high corn
and oats prices are helping demand for mill
fe«d. Prices ara now 50c@$l per ton above
the Saturday figures. Bran r in bulk is
quoted 12.50; bulk shorts, $12@12.50; flour
middlings, J13.50® 14; red dog in 140-lb sacks,
$15@16; feed In 200-lb sacks, $1 per ton addi
tional; in 100-lb sacks, $1.50 per ton addi
tional. Shipments, 1,482 tons.
BARLEY—There was a little trade in No.
6 around 39% c. The general market is quiet,
■without Important change. Feed grades are
quoted 83@S5c, and malting grades, 36@42c.
Receipts, 2 cars, no shipments.
RYE—The market is quiet. There was
no rye in the receipts and none shipped. No.
2 is quoted at 47c.
HAY— market is stronger and quota
tions are a little higher. The demand is
good. Upland fancy.' $11; upland choice,
$9©10; upland, No. 1, $9@9.50; midland, $8
@9.50; medium, $7@B; timothy, choice, $11@
11.50; timothy, No. 1, $10.50@ll; rye straw,
choice, $5.75@7.25; wheat and oat straw, $4©5.
Receipts, 181 tons.
Puts and Calls.
2 o'clock report:
Puts, September wheat, 63@65%c.'
Calls, September wheat, 64%@64*4c.
Curb, September wheat, 639i@63%c.
, Cash Sales Reported To-day.
No. 1 northern, 12 car 5.....,.;.. $0.66*4
No. 1 northern, 11 car 5...... 66%
No. 1 northern, 4 cars . .66%
No. 1 northern, 9 cars 66*4
No. 1 northern, 2 cars " .65%
No. 1 northern, 3 cars .66%
; No. 2 northern, 25 cars '.65%
No. 2 northern, 24 cars ......'.....■.....• 65
No. 2 northern, 1 car..................... .(55%
No. 2 northern, 12 cars 64V4,
No. 2 northern, 8 cars . .65%
No. 2 northern, 3 cars .................. ' .64%-
No. 2 northern, 2 cars .64%
No. 3 wheat, 2 cars ... .60*
..No. 3 wheat, 10 cars ..."........:.. .63
No. 3 wheat, 5 cars ;............. .62%
No. 8 wheat, 2 cars ..:.;.'.....'.'...... .61%
No. 3 wheat, 1 car. smutty .......... .61
No. 3 wheat, 2 cars ...'.'........... 63%
No. 3 wheat, 2 curs ;. [62*4
No. 3 wheat, 4 cars ..,'..„.".............;.. *.62'
Rejected wheat, 2 cars 60
Rejected wheat, part car .58
Rejected wheat, 1 car ........«.........j. 58
No grade wheat, 6 cars ,!.!.!".!!! .52
No grade wheat. 4 cars ...........I. 54
No grade wheat, 1 car ......_:.......... 53
No grade wheat, 1 car .... _ ........: 54%
No grade-wheat, 5 cars ( _ . ;.; . * 57, .
,No.grad« wheat, 1 car, bb .J.........a.- 52*4
No grade wheat, part car •;„■.".......... ,ao
No grade wheat, 1 car....;........ . [ 62%
■Ko grade corn, 1 car, hot ............... '.&
' •'*' t- -■*„ -- ■ ■ ■ .■ ■-■.-» • - rT iirWi iMjiirn ■_■■.--»-— - t <
RANGE OF WHEAT PRICE IN MINNEAPOLIS
Open. High. Low. To-day. Saturday. Year Ago.
July..s $ % $.63% $.64% $.77
Sept.. .66 .66 .63% .63% .64%@64% .76V4
Dec. .67 .17 .65% .65*&@65% .66*4 .77%
On Track—No. 1 hard, 66% c; No. 1 northern, 64% c; No. 2 northern, 63% c.
THE DAY'S RESULT
Sept. Wheat Minneapolis. Chicago. Duluth. St. Louis. New York.
Close to-day $ .63% $ .66*4@66% $ .65% $ .64%@64*fc $ .72
Close Saturday 64%@64% .67%@67*4 .66% .64% .72%
Xo grade corn, 1 car, hot 36
No grade corn, 1 car, hot 40
No grade corn, 1 car, hot 40*4
No. 3 corn, 1 car 46*4
No. 3 oats, 3 cars 32
No. 3 oats, 2 cars 32*4
No. 3 oats, 2 cars 31*4
No. 3 oats, 1 car 33*4
No. 3 white oats, 3 cars 33
No. 5 barley, 1 car 39*4
No. 5 barley, part car 37
Rejected flax, 1 car 1.85
Rejected flax, 10 sacks 1.78
Rejected flax, part car 1.80
Rejected flax, part car 1.85
Rejected flax, 10 sacks 1.70
State Grain Inspection.
July 13.
Inspected in—Wheat—Cars—Great Northern
—No. 1 northern. 11; No. 2 northern, 23; No.
3, 8; no grade, 4.
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul — No. 1
northern, 5; No.' 2 northern, 17; No. 3. 20;
Minneapolis & St. Louis—No grade, 1.
Minneapolis &St Louis—No grade, 1.
Soo Line—No. 2 northern, 5; rejected, 1;
no grade, 1.
Northern Pacific—No. 2 northern, 2; No.
3, 10; no grade, 4.
Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha-
No. 1 northern, 6; No. 2 northern, 17; No. 3,
7; no grade, 4.
Minnesota Transfer—No. 2 northern 1; No.
3, l.
Totals—No. 1 northern, 22; No. 2 northern,
65; No. 3, 46; rejected, 5; no grade, 2G.
Other Grains—Cars—No. 8 yellow corn 8;
No. 3 corn, 13; No. 4 porn. I; no grade corn,
1; No. 3 white oats, 3; No. 3 oats, 11: no grade
oats, 6; No. 5 barley, 1; No. 1 flax, 2; rejected
flax, 16; no grade flax. 3.
Cars Inspected Out—No. 1 northern wh"at,
193; Xo. 2 northern wheat. 33; No 3 wheat
17; no grade wheat, 7; No. 2 winter wheat,
1<: No. 3 yellow corn, 1; No. 3 corn, 10- no
grade corn, 2; No. 3 oats, 14; rejected flax, 1.
Receipts and Shipments.
July 13.
Receipts—Wheat, 449 cars, 359,200 bu; corn,
-8 930 bu; oats, 47,800 bu; barley, 940 bu; flax,
.',840 bu; flour, 440 brls; millstuffs, 38 tons-
Hay, 131 tons; fuel oil, 30,000 gals; fruit, 230,
--108 lbs; merchandise, 2,826,390 lbs; lumber 41
cars; barrel stock, 7 cars; machinery 1,068U10
lbs, coal. 1,063 tons; wood, 72 cords; brick,
181,000; lime, 1 car; cement, 1,595 brls; house
hold goods, 20,000 lbs; pig iron, 48 cars; stone
and marble, 5 cars; live stock, 3 cars; linseed
oil, 42,300 lbs; salt, 1 lb; dressed meats 261 -
622 lbs; butter, 50,040 lbs; wool, 15,700 lbs
railroad materials, 9 cars; eundries 57 cars
car lots, 1,132.
Shipped^Wheat, 49 cars, 42,630 bu- corn
1,560 bu; oats, 17,700 bu; flour. 44,462 brls
millstuffs, 1,482 tons; fruit, 66,000 lbs; mer
chandise, 2,356,225 lbs; lumber, 136 cars- ma
chinery, 634,800 lh*s; wood. 12 cords; cement,
700 brls; household goods, 20,000 lbs; live
stock, 3 cars; linseed oil, 26,000 lbs; oil cake,
»4,000 lbs; butter, 21,000 Jbs; hides, pelts, 110,
--300 lbs; wool, 36,600 lbs; railroad materials 4
cars; sundries, 36 cars; car lots, 858.
Grain in Regular Local Elevators.
_, Week Ending Week Ending
Wheat— July 13. July 6.
No. l hard 1,743 1,743
No. 1 northern 5,893,455 6,536, tiflj
No. 2 northern 464,940 504,898
No. 3 339,465 338,616
Rejected 28,631 35,865
Special bin 2,180,184 2,416,861
No grade 36,397 36,397
Totals 8,944,815 9,871,045
Decrease 926,230 ,
Corn 29,789 29,727
Oats 864,235 909,200
Barley 3,761 3,277
Rye 7,222 9,846
Flax 8,724 12,114
\ ';'.. The Visible Supply.
Inc. Dec. Total. .'
Wheat ............. ..;... 1,709,000 27,959,000
Corn 405,000 14,067,000
Oats ;.... 1,777,000 7,421,000
Barley 395,000
Rye ....... 209,000
Wheat Movement.
The following are the receipts and ship
ments at the principal primary wheat mar
kets: ■:;';",'-:". i*:: •-■;:*: . .
Receipts, Shipments,
Bushels. Bushels.
New York 281,200 415,780
Philadelphia 15,825 17,310
Baltimore 102,371 ......
Toledo 18,281 3,800
Detroit 676
St. Louis 372,000 31,000
Boston 65,267 90,310
Chicago .."... 159,112 ' 330,621
Milwaukee .; 13,500 8/930
Duluth 43,498 , 75,618 j
Minneapolis 359,200 42,630
Kansas City 400,000 80,800
Wheat Movement by Roads.
Received—Cars—Milwaukee, 83; Omaha, 92;
St. Louis, 67; Great Northern, 169; Northern
Pacific, 23; Great Western, 1; Soo, 14.
Shipped—<^ars—Omaha, 22; St. . Louis, £;
Wisconsin Central, 9; Northern Pacific, 3;
Great Western, 3; Burlington, 3.
RANGE OF SEPTEMBER WHEAT
fso /ns~ liar. /Ssu US'
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i+\ — '. :
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tps.^ ztzz
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4 U 4—l^
OTHER GRAIN MARKETS
CHICAGO GKAIX
Strong? Start in Wheat, bat a De-
cline Soon Comes.
Chicago, July —Wheat started strong to
day, September opening %@%c to 1%@1%c
higher, at 68^68%c. There was an active de
mand, chiefly from local shorts, on bullish
world's statistics and hot weather in the
northwest. Outside selling checked the
rise and September declined steadily .to 67c.
Local receipts -ware 170 cars, 110 of contract
grade. Minneapolis and Duluth reported 474
cars, against 453 last week and 287 a year
ago. -World's - shipments, according to a
: board cable, were „ 7,064,000 bu, i while the
quantity on ocean passage showed a decrease
-of 2,072,000 bu. - . . -.■■•.. ■
j In sympathy with a break in northwest
markets on, reports of better weather, Sep
tember later ' declined to * 66% c and closed
Wieak, %c lower, at 66%@66%c.
| Close— 65^4c; August, 66c; September,
66%@66%c; October, 67% c. Cash—No. 2 red,
67c; No. 3 red,. 64@66c; No. 2 hard winter,
65Hc;-No.'; 3 hard'winter,* 64c; No. 1 north
ern spring, 1 67c; No. 2 northern spring, 66c;
No. 3 spring, 61@65c.
Corn traders kept a dose eye on the
weather map arid scattered showers, brought
them rapidly to a selling side. September
opened ie to l%c higher, at ol^c to 52c, de
clined to 60% c, rallied to 51c and then fell
to 49% c. Receipts were 459 cars.
September declined to 49*4 c and closed
weak, %c lower,-at. 49% c.
Close: July, 47% c; September, i'j%c; cash
No. 2, 48@49c; No. 3, 47@47%c. >•
' Oats were fairly active ■ and acted largely
in sympathy with corn. September opened
%@?ic to l@l%c higher/at 31% cto 3ic, and
fell to 31c. Receipts wer 104 cars.
Close: July; 29%@29%c; September, 30?i®
30% c; i cash ; No. 2, ' 3i@32M;c; No. 3, 32c.
The following was the range of prices: '
Wheat— • July. Sept.
Opening 67 '68«j68%
Highest 67 • 6S& '
Lowest ...................... 65% 66%. ■
Close— . .
To-day ..................... 65% 66&@%
Saturday 65% 67H@Vi
Year ago .................. 76 77H©14
Corn — . ■ ■ •
Opening 49 51^@52
Highest ..-...-...•...'..;...:... 49 52 |
L0we5t............ 1..... 47V6 "43U ]
Close- ■ ;' . ■....":.,■■"■ •_-.■ •- Vi
To-day;......*...... "... 47% ;45?4 -
THE MINNEAPOLIS JOURNAL.
Saturday 48*4 50*4
Year ago 40% 40?i@41
Oats-
Opening 30*4 31Ts@32
Highest 30*4 32
Lowest Z9%@% 30%
Close-
To-day 29%@»4 30%@%
Saturday 30*4 70%@31
Year ago 23*4 24
Duluth, Minn., July 15.—Wheat opened with
considerable ginger, but weather maps were
reassuring and it fell rapidly. The September
opening was %c up, at 67*4 c, and it sold at
once to 67% c. This was top. A break took
it to 66% c, when it rallied a trifle and again
broke to 65% c, almost 2c from top. The oth
er options followed. Cash wheat sold largely,
75 cars Nos. 1 and 2 northern at from 6SV£c
to 67*4 c for the better grade. September flax
boomed up to $1.55 without sales, and October
advanced to sales at $1.50. This was 4c high
er for September. Changes in stocks: Wheat
in store, 2,399,703, decrease 523,005; corn,
2,227,228. decrease 183,345; oats, 1,097,307, in
crease 863; rye, 82,758, decrease 58,785; flax,
6,032, decrease 68,655; barley, 41,470, un
changed. Receipts—Wheat, 25 cars; corn, 6;
rye, 5; flax, 2; total, 38.
Shipments—Wheat, 75,608 bu; corn, 93,714;
flax, 106,602.
Close—Oats, 30% c; rye, to arrive and future,
48% c; flax, cash $1.85, September $1.54, Sep
tember northwestern $1.57, October $1.48*4;
Xo. 1 hard, cash, 68% c; September, 68% c; No.
1 northern, cash, 67*4 c; to arrive, 67*4 c; Sep
tember, 65% c; October, 6&*4 c; December,
66% c; August, 66*ic
.New York Grain.
New York, July 15.—Flour, receipts, 24,925
brls; sales, 9,600 pkgs; state and western,
quiet and barely steady. Wheat, receipts,
281,200 bu; sales, 3,145,000 bu. Opened strong
on cables and small world's shipments but
turned very weak under realizing and tiie
drop in corn. July, 73@74c; September, 72^4®
73% c; October, 73M:@73%c; December, 74©
75% c. Rye, steady. Corn, receipts, 37,000 bu;
sales, 240,000. After a very firm opening
weakened decidedly owing to prospects for
rain in the corn belt. September, 53%@55c;
October, 53%@54%c; December, 53%@54%c.
Oats, receipts 67,200 bu. Sold off with corn
and on weather prospects. Track white, 37%
@42c.
Liverpool (<raln.
Liverpool, July 15.—Wheat—Spot dull; No.
2 red western winter, 5s 6%d; No. 1 northern,
spring, 5s 6M>d; No. 1 California, 5s 9d; fu
tures quiet; September, 6s 6%d; December,
5s 7%d. Corn, spot, steady; American mixed,
new, 4s 2%d; American mixed, old, 4s 3&d;
futures quiet; July, nominal; September, 4s
2%d; October, 4s 3%d.
Imports of wheat into Liverpool last week:
From Atlantic ports, 71,900 quarters; from
Pacific ports, none; other ports, 11,000 tfuar
ters. Imports o; corn from Atlantic ports
last week, 33,000 quarters.
Kansas City Grain.
Kansas City, Mo., July 15.—Close: Wheat-
September, 61%@61%c; December, ,63%@64c;
cash No. 2 hard, 61& c; No. 2 red, 67MsC Com
—July, 52c; September, 51^,e; December,
51»4c; cash No. 2 mixed, 52M>@53V4c; No 2
white, 53@54%c. Oats—No. 2 white, 41c.
Milwaukee Grain.
Milwaukee, July 15.—Flour—Steady. Wheat
—Steadier; close, No. 1 northern, 68@68^4c;
No. 2 northern, 66@67c; September, 66% c.
Corn—September, 52e. Rye—Higher; No. 1,
51@520. Barley—Steady; No. 2, 54@54^c;
sample, 35@5ac. Oats—Firm; No. 2, 34%@35c.
Chicago Seed and Caame Grain.
Chicago, July 15.—Flax, cash, northwest,
$1.88; No. 1, $1.38; September, $1.55; October,
$1.55. Rye, September, 50c; July, 51c. Timo
thy, September, $4.95; October, $4.82. Clover,
cash, $9.50. Barley, cash, 40@53c.
St. Louis Grain.
St. Louis, July 15.—Close: Wheat, lower-
No. 2, cash, 63% c; July, 64c; September, 64%
@64Vic; December, 67^c; No. 2 hard 64%®
65% c. Corn, lower; No. 2, cash 51c- July
60c; September, 50% c. Oats, firm; 'No 2
cash, 34c; July, 33M>c; September, 34% c; May'
30% c; No. 2 white, 39% c. Lead, quiet; $4.27%
@4.40. Spleter, quiet; $3.82*4.
GENERAL PRODUCE
The Minneapolis Market. ; '•
BUTTER—Extra creameries, . lb. IB@lß%c
--firsts, per lb, l6V4c; seconds, per lb, 14©
14% c; imitations, firsts, per lb, 14c; seconds
per lb, 12c; dairies, extras, per lb, 16c; firsts'
14c; seconds per lb, 12c; packing stock
fresh lb, 12@12%c; stale packing stock per
lb, 6V4e; grease, lb, 3@sc; tested butter fat
in separator cream, 17c.
EGGS— fresh, loss off, ll^@l2c
dirties, fresh, 7c; checks, fresh, 6^@7c
* CHEESE—Twins or fiats, fancy, new, 9%(S
10c; twins or flats, choice, new, 7@Bc; brick
No. 1, per lb, lie; brick, No. 2, per lb, 9@loc :
brick, No. 3, lb, 6c; limburger. No 1 per lb
lie, limburger No. 2, lb, 8%@9%c; primost!
No. l, per lb, 8c; No. 2, per lb, 6c; t Young
America, fancy, per lb, 10% c; choice, per lb.
9@9V2c; pultost, per lb, 9@loc; Swiss, No. 1
M@l3M>c; block Swiss, No. 1. ll@l2c- block
Swiss, No. 2, SV£@9c {
-,L^Y E JfOULTRY-Turkeys, mixed coops,
<^@8c; chickens, hens, lb, 9c; roosters lb sc:
broilers, 12@13c; ducks, white, 7; colored'
6c; spring ducks, 10@llc; geese, sc. "'
# DRESSED MEATS-Veal, fancy, lb, 7&@Bc
fair to good, 7V2C; mutton, 7c; lambs 8c !
milk lambs, pelts off, 10@llc. ' '
FlSH—Pike, per lb. 6e; crappies, lb • 4%<fi
6c; pickerel, drawn, per lb, 4@sc; pickerel
round, 4c; sunfish, perch, etc., 2@3c; bull
heads, skinned, 3@sc; buffalo, 2@3c '
POTATOES— per bu, 90c, according
to size. ~- •. . .
k BEANS—Fancy navy, bu- $2.35; choice - per
bu, $2.10; medium, hand-picked, per bu $2
brown, fair to good, $2. ' '
DRIED PEAS-Fancy : yellow, ?l@l.lo per
bu; medium, 90c@$l; green, fancy, $1.25@l 35
--green, medium, 90c@$l; marrowfat, per bu[
APRICOTS—Four-basket crates $140
CHERRIES-24-qt case, $1.75; California
cherries. 10-lb box, $1.50@1.75; Illinois sour
cherries, $1. .
PEACHES—Missouri stock, 6-basket crate
}1.40@1.50;. Alexanders, box, 70c. '
PLUMS—Clyman, 4-basket crate $1 2501 40
--4-bu crate, $1.75. . . ■ ', '
ORANGESCalifornia navels 80s, $4-
California novels, 965, $4; California navels'
1265, $3.76; California navels, 150s $3@3 25*
California navels, 1765, $3@3.50; California
seedlings, all sizes, $3.25; California tanger- '
ines, half box, $2; Mediterranean sweets
!6s°:s2a2 Michaels, $4.25; grape fruit, iOs to
90s, $2(&2.50.
LEMONS— Messinas, 320s or 360s fancy
$5.50@6; choice, $5.50; California, fancy as to
size, $5@5.50; choice, $5. /,»».«»
■ PINEAPPLES—Dozen, as to size. $1.25©'
GOOSEBERRIES—Per 24-qt case $176
BLLEBERRIE3— case $1 50* v ' '.
BLACKBERRIES— case, $2@2 25 ■
RASPBERRIES—Red, 24-pt case $202 25
--16-ut case, $1.25@1.75. ■ ♦*«*•».
■ CURRANTS—24-qt -case, $1.50@2.
WATERMELON—FIorida stock, per 100,
f«.sQ'us. ' ■ ' ■ ■ ■■. , ■■■■'■■";;■ ■■'•i»'<'--■' ' ■■ ■ ■
PEARSCalifornia, per box, $2 50
CANTALOUP—FIorida stoc*. per crate
$1.50@2.26. . '
BANANAS—Fancy, large bunches,' $2.30;
Medium bunches, $2@2.25; small bunches
$1.50(51.75. £ •• . ..; . ■ .'
HONEY—New, fancy, white, 1-lb sections
19c; choice white, 16@17c; amber, 13@14 C :
golden rod, ll@12c; extracted white." lo@llc :
buckwheat, 10@12c; extracted amber. B@3c '
VEGETABLES—Asparagus, per doi 70e
beans, wax, bu crate, $1.75; beans, strinc'
i 2-3-bu crate, $1.75; beets, bu, 45c; beets, new'
j doz bunches, 30@35c;; cabbage, southeri/
about 150 lbs, $l@1.50; carrots, doz bunches'
30c; cauliflower, per doz, 75@85c; cel
ery, California, per doz, -25@50c; cucum
bers, home grown, doz, 30@45c; egg plant
per doz, „ $1.75; green • corn, per do*'
i2%c; lettuce, per dozen, 15c; lettuce'
; head, per doz, 20c; mint, doz, 30@40c; onions'
doz bunches, 15c; onions, southern • per bu'
box, $1.50; Bermuda onions, crate, $125- par
' sley, per doz, 30c; parsnips, per bu, 50c- peas
green, per -bu, > $1; radishes. ) round' doz
bunches, 15@20c; rutabages, bu, 30c- < salsify
(oyster plant), per doz, 35c; spinach 'bu 30c
turnips, new, doz bunches, 40@45c- tomatoes'
home-grown, 5-lb basket, 60@75c; watercress'
per doz. 30c. ,; -, „• . ■ .'
Jiew York Produce.
New York, July 15.— Butter—Receipta 11 897
pkgs; steady; state dairy, 14@14%c; creamery
15<&.18c; factory, 15% c. - Cheese— Receipts 8 671
pkgs; steady; fancy large colored, 9c; 'faii.-y
large- white, 9c; fancy small colored S%&9\ic
fancy small white, 9Hc. Eggs—Receipts 11,
--767 pkg»; strong; state and Pennsylvania 14®
15c; western candled, 13@15c- western' un
candled, 9@l2&c. Beef—Dull. Pork—Easy
Lard—Easy; prime western steam ?S.BO
STOCK PRICE SMASH
Wall Street Mart Demoralized at
the Opening.
THEN COMPETITIVE BUYING HELPS
It Serves to Elevate Prices, but
Some Heavy Declines Are
Recorded.
New York, July 15.—Heavy declines in
Americans In London before the opening here
foreshadowed the effect here of the strike of
steel workers. United States Steel in Lon
don was 4% lower at 2 o'clock and the pre
ferred 6, and iv the railroad list losses ran to
2 points or over in Erie first preferred, Lou
isville and Southern Pacific.
The market here opened demoralized and
prices were smashed all around. First sales
of United States Steel were of 20,000 shares
on a running scale downwards from 38 to
37%, an extreme decline of 4 from Satur
day. Of the preferred the first sales were of
8,000 shades on a scale downwards from
87% to BG%, an extreme loss of 5. The fluc
tuations in these stocks were wild and er
ratic over a range of several points above
the lowest, but the recoveries constantly
yielded. Meantime other stocks were drop
ping by Intervals of 1 and 2 points. Union
Pacific was forced down 5 points within the
first few minutes. Texas & Pacific and
Atchlaon 4%, St. Paul 4%, Erie 3, Amalga
mated Copper 3%, Southern Pacific 3% and
Missouri Pacific 4%. Pretty much every
thing on the list was down from 1 to 3
points. Trading was nervous and' excited
and enormous blocks were unloaded upon
the market without apparent regard to the
prices they brought.
Shorts commenced to cover and support
ing orders were executed for various pools
and substantial interests. This competitive
buying sent prices up from 1 to 2%, the
latter in United . States Steel . preferred.
Among the railways - St. Paul, Atchison and
Pacifies made the least recoveries. The
rapidity 1 of the rally invited realizing and
there were frequent setbacks of a point here
and there. A sharp break In the corn market
on reports of rains in the corn belt accen
tuated the rally. _... .. ' :*
Liquidation was resumed in spots in the
market, especially for . the Coalers j during
| the second hour. Delaware & Hudson fell
j 2%, Jersey Central 5 and Lackawanna '. 8%.
Colorado Fuel also slumped 6% and Northern
American j6. Elsewhere prices ruled gen
| erally above the lowest, but the tone was
feverish. The leaders fluctuated a point i
either way frequently, but : met good buying j
i on every relapse which canceled temporary '
recessions. The rally reached 3% in Atchi
son, 3 in Union Pacific and 2% in St. Paul.
Stock quotations reported for The Journal
by Watson & Co., brokers. Chamber of Com
merce, Minneapolis, Minn. vftif-rt
Closing prices are bid: "• ;■ ■•
j ~~~ i I —Close—" 7
Sales Stocks— Hi- Lo-| Bid. ) Bid.
| . | est. jest. |Jlyls|Jlyl3
| Am. Cot. Oil .. 27%| 27%| 27%| 27%
I do pr .......:....,...... I 89 1. .
3,900 Am. Car ....... 28%) 27 | . 27%| 28%
400 do pr .. - 82% | 82 | 82%| 82%
: Am. Ice ....... 32% ; 82%; 32%| 33
do pr ....... | .'. | . . | 66 r6B .
Am. , Linseed ..j .....' 24 | 25%
j do pr .:.-.;:. j ...... j ...... -60 I• 62 •
Am. Malting 6 j 6
1 do pr ...... 27%| 28
6,600 Am. Sugar 135% 136%
do pr ..1.... :...:. ...... 120 | 120%
. . Am. Smelting.. 53% 51%, 53%| 52%
: I do pr ..'....: 102 99% 102 I 100 »
900 Am. Tobacco 1* :..;.. ...... | 130 | 129
| do pr ...'.... ...... ...... 140 | r.....
22,100 Amal. Cop ..... | 111% | 109 111 | 113%
l,7oojAnacon. Cop .| 43%| 42 j 43%| 44
49,300, At. Top. &S. Pi 72% 68% 71%1 73%
15,400 do pr ....... I -94% | .90% | 94 | 94%
2,800 Bait. & Ohio.. 94% 92 | 94 | 95
--900 do pr ....... 91 | 90%! 91 i 91
12,700 Brook. Rap. Tr 75% | 74% 75 j 76%
Brook. Un. Gas 1 .:... 208 j 211 ,
■■ 200 Can. Southern . 66% 66 65% 67 .
2,800 Can. Pacific ;..; 99%| 100%
•3,400 Chea. & Ohio.. 42% •41 . 42%| 43%
c. & E. iir.::.... 122 1123%
| do : pr4j'..,.'. ...... •-••• I 127 I 128
2,800 Chi. 1 & Alton..| 36% 35 j 36%| 37 •■■•
500 do! Pr ........ -75 74% - 75% 175 -f
i 900 Chi., Bur. &Q. 194 198% 194 | 194%
3,600 Chi. > Gr,-West. 21% 20% ■ 21% 22 ■-,:■
100 do pr A ... 81% 81
200 do pr B .... 45% 45 45 45%
; | do deb-'. 1 ...... 90 90
Chi:, Ind. ft L. 32% ,30% 32% 33% i
I do pr j 68 68 ;
. > 900 C.C.C. ft ■ St.L. 90 . 88% . 88% 87% ;
| do pr | 118 118
•■-.-. Chi. Term ..... 19% 18% 19 19
," do pr .....:. .. :...;. 37' 37
C01.,H.C. & In ...... ...Z. 18 18%
Col. Fuel & lr. 94% 92% ' 93% 99%
. ' do pt,^:. ................ 130 | 130
1,800 Col. Southern ..I 12% 12 12% 13
| do Ist pr ...:..;........- 48 48%
| do, 2d pr .... 21 20% 20% 20%
2.400 Consol. Gas ... 213 210% 212% 212%
. 200 Con. Tobacco .. 64% 64 j 64% 65
I do pr ............. ."...;. 115 | 116%
200 Del. & Hudson. .. r. & ...:.. 155 ' | 156%
Del., Lack. & W 220 218 218 | 223
200 Den. & Rio Gr ....:. | ...... 40% 42 -
. 2,300 do pr 89- 87% 88% 90%
33,3001 Erie .... ....... 37 34 36%| 36%
i do Ist pr ... 66%| 64% 65% 66
, . I do 2d pr .... 61% 49 51 51%
I Evans. & T. H. * 54% 62 52 54 "
| do pr 85 85
: 800 Gen. Electric .. 248 1 245 2451 248
Glucose ........ ;.. 54 54
do pr 100 101
Great Nor. pr.* 174 176%
Hocking Valley 48 49%
200! . do pr 73 73
3,200] Illinois Central. | 148 146 147% 148%
lowa Central...! 35 33% 34% 35 -
do pr .. 73 70 73 V7$?A
200 Inter Paper ... 20% 20 20% 21 ■
do pr'...... 76 75 '76 '75 *
K. C. & South 18 19
do pr ...... .....; 37% 40 '
Lake Shore ....:........... 235 ..*...
100 Lake E. & W. ...:;. ;..'.;. 55 54
do pr ..:... ...... ;..... 118 118
7,500 Louis." & Nash.. 103% 101% 102% 103%
600 M., St. P. & Soo 22% 21% 22% 22% '
-:. 'do pr .. .69 63% 63 69
7,400 Manhattan 118% 113% 116% 116%
8,000 Met. St. Ry.... 167 164 167 165%
300 Minn. * St. L . :... '.. ...... 106 102
12,300 Missouri Pac .. 103% 100% 102% 104%
2,700 M...X. &T 25% 24% 25 26
1,100 • d0pr«...... 53 51 52% 53%
; Mobile & Ohio ;:;......... 82% .'
Mexican Cent... 22% 21 22% 2274 i
' - Mex. Nat ....... ...... ...... 9 914
. Nat. : Biscuit „ 41 42
500N^Le^:::::;"i9%"i 9 - 100% 100%
500 Nat. Lead 19% 19 19 01
- 100 Nat. 5tee1...... ..;J! ...... 43 .....
do pr ;.-.r.; ........ 76
Nat.-Salt ...... 43% 43% 43 '43%
do pr ;......... -76 >-(•
, 300 N.J..Central.. ..::...... 155 156
3,300 Norfolk & West 48% 45% 47% 47%
, d pr ;.. 88 »
' nnn North Am. Co.. 99 " 92 98 96 ■
200 Nor. Pac. pr... ...;...;...-. 93. 96
. 100 Northwestern .. 193 190 192 189 :
8-SW-c cT^i'mm 150% ssi%
200 NT, C. & St, L.... ..... 35% :35 y
" do If pr ...' ••••'• •••••• 105 105
, . do 2d pr .... 1 ....;. ... , 7414 nxt,'
• 200 N.Y..N.H. &H. 215 214 214 ' ... %
10,900 Ontario & W...| 31% 30 30% 31%
Paper Bag .... ...... .....; 141? ......
I do pr j ... 70 """"
200 Pressed Steel ..| 41% 40 40 "41"
L do pr ............. :... 81 83 '
. Pacific Coast ...../...„... 64 64
do Ist pr ...j ....:. ...;.. '9$ j ..v...
do 2d pr .... .'....-. ...... 69 '■■"■'
-200 Pacific Mallv... 37% "36"
29,0001 Perm. R. R j 142 % 1431/
4f^D eople>s Gas " 11S^ m 113%) "3%
1n Pullman i 206% 206 206% 205
2,000 do list pr ... 74% 73 74% 74%
3,000: "do 2d pr .... :48% | 47% 48% : 49%
2,100/Repub. Steel .\.\...... 17% 18%
: 900 .do pr ....... 72 69% 72- 72%
3,000 Rock Island ...I 140% 135% 140 133
; -Vi St. L.- & San F. 41% 41% 41% 42%
. do Ist pr;.. 1. ...... ...... 75 '- 73.
200 St. L. 2( & S. W. ............ g*l 5*
M^c do pr •"•••• I 58% I 53 -58% 60 .
32,700 St. Paul ........ ...v.- ...... 156% 155%
e*d'V Pl A'' •••'•••■■'•"• 181% 182,
f St. Joe & Gr. Is ... v . ...... 10% tv ,•
* "'do , Ist pr 67 69
do 2d pr v.. ...r.. ....;. 27 - 31 >
- Stand. R. &Tw 6% C% 6% 6%
36,000 Southern Pac. 50% 48 59% 61%,
19,600 Southern Ry.... 28% 27% 28% 29%
3,400 do pr ....V. 184 ! 81% 83 83%
2,600 Term. Coal &Ir 59 55% 57% 58%
9,600 Texas ft Pac. .38 34 37% 37%
- Tol.. St. L. &W ........... 20 20%
- '-' do •pr •••••"• •■■••• •••••• 31% 33
_. DnA Twin City R. T .92 90% 91 . 90%'
(4,800 Union Pac .... 94% 93»> 94% 94%
LOOO^do^pr,.:.... S8 87 * 871 87%
.t■V. .S. Express .'. ...; /. ...... 85 85
U. S. Leather.. 12% 12 .12% 12%
TT do n . Pr ...... 76% 76 76% 76%
- ? U«. S. Rubber ..:V.: | ...... 19% 19%
,: -. I do >pr :...:.-....:..'. ...:.. 58 58
129000 U.S. Steel .... 39 37 ; 38% 41%
TSfcU'.::::;:;! S»- 86% 88% ,91%
ViSR wf bash • • •••••• 19 • 18y * iB% w%
1>:00lw d?, ST 5•.;...-. 38 33% ,: 35% 36%
r. Wells-Far. Exp ...;.. ...... 140 140 •
. 6,600 Western ■ Union. ............ I 89 ' - 90%
.; 1,300 Whe«i; ft :L. E. 18 .16 17% l' 17 - ■
;; ,.;. Jj do Ist pr „.| ..:.;*. j j 50 *j..51V.
i do 2d pr\... .....; .'..•;.; 25 I 29%
1,000 Wisconsin Cent 20 19% 19% .20%
300 do pr ....... 40 89% 39% 41%
Total sales, 971,000. ■"' -■ ••----• ■■•■■ .-. ■..- -•-.-..
l*Kx-dl vldend, 1% per cent. -'
. 2*Ex-divldend, 1% per cent. ■ }>;":^
MONEY REPORTS
.: New York Money.
: New York, July 15.—Closi^-Molney on call
steady, 3@4 per cent; last loan, 3% per cent;
ruling ■; rate, . 1 per cent; prime mercantile
paper, 4@4% per cent; .sterling exchange
steady, with actual business in bankers' bills
ath54.87%@4.87%: for demand and $4.84%®
4.84 % = for 60 days; posted rates, $4.85% and
$4.88; commercial bills, $4.83%@4.84 l / 4; bar
silver, 58% c; Mexican dollars, 46%c;.govern-:
ment bonds, weak; state bonds inactive; rail-'
road bonds, Irregular.
:■•-• Minneapolis Money. .
■ MINNEAPOLIS — Bank clearings, $1,688,
--355.35; New York exchange, selling fate, 75c
premium; buying rate, 25c premium; Chicago
exchange, selling rate, 60c premium; buying
rate, par; London 60-day sight documentary,
♦'•84%. ■
ST. PAUL—Bank clearings, $726,772.85.
.'■' Chicago Money.
Chicago, July Clearings, $25,412,172;
balances, $1,369,413; posted rates, exchange,
$4 86@4.88%; New York exchange, 50c pre
mium. . •
■ : • /.. Berlin Money.
Berlin, July 15.—Exchange on London, 20
marks 40 pfennigs for checks. Discount rates:
Short bills, 2% per cent; three-months' bills,
3 per cent.
Paris Prices.
Paris, July 15, 4 p. m.—Three per cent
rentes, 100f 57% c for the account. Spanish 4s,
71.45. •-. t,X:-"^*,"' a;-•'■"'• ■ '■
:' PROVISIONS .:•;■
;.l ■ Chicago Provisions.
Chicago, July 15.— heavy run of hogs
caused a sharp break in provisions. Septem
ber, pork opened 30@37%c lower, at $14.05®
14.12%; September lard 10@15c down, at $8.55®
8.60, and September ribs depressed, at $7.95@
7.97%. Close: Pork—July, $13.95; September,
$14.17%; January. $14.25. Lard—July, $8.57%;
September, $8.60; October, $8.60; November,
?8.47%; December, $8-37%; January, $8.32%.
Ribs— $7.87%; September, $7.95; October,
$7.95; January, $7.62%.
Coffee and Sugar.
New-York, July 15.—Coffee futures opened
unchanged to five points higher on room
covering, following an improvement in Ham
burg cable. During the forenoon, the mar
ket ruled quiet and featureless. Sales to
noon were 500 bags of December at 5.25 c.
The undertone of the market was tolerably
steady on light covering up to midday, . prices
varying but little from the opening level.
There was a poor demand for spot coffee
locally and prices showed no quotable
changes. No. 7 Rio was quoted at 5 13-16 c
and Santos, No. 4, 6%c, invoice lots. :
Sugar—Steady; fair refining, 3 9-16 c; cen-
I trifugal 96-test, 4 3-16 c; molasses sugar,
1 3 15-16 c; refined, steady; crushed, 6c; pow
dered, 5.60 c; granulated, 5.50 c.
: Molasses—Steady; New Orleans, 35@42. .
MISCELLANEOUS
New York: Cotton.
New York, July 15.—Cotton opened steady,
I@9 points lower, principally on weak Eng
lish cables and rain reports from central
Texas. After the call there was a further
sharp decline under a flurry of pit selling,
but by 11:20 o'clock prices had stiffened again
to nearly Saturday's close on outside buy-
Ing. August displayed decided strength and
July held up well. The market later dis
played pronounced strength on moderate gen
eral buying and absence of selling pressure
from any quarter. August worked up to
$7.90, or 3 points above Saturday's closing.
Noon bids showed a net loss of 1 point to an
advance of 2 points. Spot closed quiet; mid
dling uplands, B%c; middling gulf, B%c. Sales,
5,700 bales.
Futures closed steady; July, 8.30e; August,
7.80 c; September, 7.67 c; October, 7.71 c; No
vember, 7.69 c; December, 7.70 c; January,
7.72 c; February, 7.72 c; March, 7.75 c; April,
7.75 c.
Peoria Whiikj-.
Peorla, 111., July 15.—Whisky, $1.27.
Chicago Produce.
Chicago, July 15.—Butter, steady; creamer
lea, 14@19c; dairies, 12@16c. Cheese, steady;
twins, 9@9%e; Young Americas, 9%@10c;
Cheddars, 9@9%c; daisies, 9%c. Eggs, steady;
loss of, cases returned, 12% c. Iced poultry,
steady; turkeys, 8c; chickens, B@9c.
Hides, Pelts, Tallow and Wool.
N0.1.N0.2.
Green salted heavy steer hides 9% 8%
Gieen salted heavy cow hides 8 7
Green salted light hides 7% 6%
Green salted heavy cow and steer
hides, branded 7% 6%
Green salted bull and oxen 7% 6%
Green salted veal calf, 8 to 15 1b5...10% 3
Green salted veay kip, 15 to 25 lbs.. 8% 7
Green salted long-haired or runner
l!ip 7% 6%
Green 3alted deacons, each 50 40
Green cattle hides and skins, l@l%c per
pound less than above quotations.
Green salted horse or mule hldvs.
large »i.OO 2.25
Grten salted horse or mule hides,
medium 2.50 1.75
G;eec salted horse or mule hides,
small 1.50 1.00
Dry flint Montana butcher hide5...12%@14%
Dry flln* Minnesota, Dakota and
Wisconsin hides 11 9
Dry fliut (fit skins 16 12
Dry fiuat kip skins 11 11
Green salted pelts, large, each $0.7531.00
Green salted pelts, medium, each.. .50@ .70
Green united pelts, small, each 2of? 45
Dry flint territorial pelts, butcher..lo ii-'.Oli,
Dry flint territorial pelts, murrain... B%'i/) 9%
Dry flint territorial shearlings li (a s
Tallow, in cakes 4'i 4
Tallow, in barrels 4*« 3%
Grease, white 4 3/3
Grease, dark 3% 2%
Wool, medium, unwashed 12%@14
Wool, fine medium, unwashed 11 fyl'-',k
Wool, coarse, unwashed 11 @l-%
Wool, flue, unwashed 9 ®iO
Woool, broken fleeces, unwashed 11 @12
Wool. seed}, burry, unwasacJ 11l dfll
Pngiit H -scousiu and similar gradas i&2c
higher thin above quotations.
SPECULATIVE! GOSSIP
L. T. Sowle & Sons from Verdon, S. D.:
We are having our usual hot summer weather
and wheat is maturing fast and is now in
better condition than for years.
Clearances: Wheat and flour, 796,000 bu;
corn, 208,000; oats, 115,000.
A Broomhall cable said: Reports from our
agents in Roumania state that the quality of
the new wheat is unsatisfactory.
Predictions: lowa and Nebraska generally
fair to-night and Tuesday with possibly local
thunder storms.
Official weather reports sent from Wash
ington give predicted possible thunder storms
and rain in south Kansas, Missouri, Arkansas
and Oklahoma. Only rain reported yesterday
was slight shower at Palestine, Texas, and
little in Canadian northwest. Higher tem
perature prevailed all through corn belt; 102
at Omaha, Kansas City, Oklahoma Huron
S. D.; 104 at Fort Smith, Ark.; 100 at Dcs
Moines; 98 at Dodge City, Kan.
Dcs Moines wired 11 a. m.: Clouds are
banking in the south, getting darker and a'
good deal cooler.
INVESTMENT GOSSIP
New York to Watson: There is a general
feverish sentiment this morning over the
outcome of to-day's market. It looks as if
weak accounts will be liquidated and this
will place the market in good shape for bar
gain hunters.
New York to Lewie: Reported rain In
southwe&t. Stocks have been thrown over
this morning without regard to prices. I
therefore think this morning will show about
the lowest and good stocks can be safely
bought now. '
AVOIDING FATALITIES.
Philadelphia Record.
Wi«g—Out in Chicago I understand they
don't throw old shoes after the bride.
Wagg—Certainly not. Suppose one of
them should hit her!
HAD HER THERE.
Judge.
Mrs. Chri«tian Science—Henry, you are
in a state of beastly intoxication.
Henry—lmposh'ble, m' dear; mental de
lusion. Only think I'm (hlc) drunk.
M.; BORAN & CO.,
The Oldest Firm of
Bankers and Brokers
IK THE SOUTHWEST.
H»t« removed from their old quartan _:
( on Jackson Street to th«
tiermaala l4Te Uuil&l*, Oer. 4th
•»* MiwMaota »*4 3 •*. Paul. Minn.
MONDAY EVENING, JULY 15, 1901.
LIVE STOCK
South St. Paul Live Stock.
Cows-
No. Ay. Price. No. A?. Price.
2. 1,110 $3.26 3 1,173 $350
3 1,073 2.75 2 575 2.60
1 950 2.00 i 582 2.30
1 980 2.25 4 875 2.00
1 420 2.25 3 857 2.15
1 900 2.35 2 1,045 2.15
3 953 2.15
Stockers and Feeders-
No. Ay. Price. | No. Ay. Price.
10 800 $3.00 I 3 770 $3.00
9 354 2.95 2 750 2.85
4 562 2.80 1 700 2.30
2 455 2.00 3 823 2.40
Stock Heifers-
No. Ay. Price. No. Ay. Price.
4 807 $3.00 2 430 2.80
4 267 2.65 | 8 446 2.50
1 970 2.00 4 470 2.35
Bulls—
No. Ay. Price.
1 1,010 $2.05
Milkers and Springers—
Two springers at $70.
One springer at $28.
Veal Calves-
No. Ay. Price. i| No. Ay. Price.
1 140 $6.00 | 2 120 $5.70
1 240 • 4.50 |
Hogs-
No. Ay. Price. I No. Ay. Price.
20 200 $6.10 158 276 $6.00
58 263 5.97^144 185 5.95
63 221 5.90 !34 260 5.90
50 255 5.90 49 233 5.90
65 237 5.90 J6B 236 5.90
50 251 5.87V 2 65 269 5.85
65 254 5.82% 28 282 5.75
Pigs and Culls-
No. Ay. Price. No. Ay. Price.
5 314 $5.55 2 310 $5.55
3 403 5.55 4 297 5.C0
1 400 5.35 |1 510 5.25
Sheep—
No. Ay. Price.
10 ewes 84 $3.25
Sioux City Live Stock.
Sioux City, lowa, July 15.—Receipts, 1,800
hogs, 1,200 cattle.
Hogs—s@loc lower. Sales:
No. Ay. Price.
29 236 $5.70
i 65 236 5.72%
[62 260 5.75
; 53 284 5.80
Cattle—lo@lsc lower. Stockers, 25^40c
lower. Sales:
No. Ay. Price.
39 beeves 1,158 $4.85
17 beeves 1,350 5.25
2 cahners 910 2.25
2 cows 1,060 3.50
5 stock heifers 416 2.40
7 stock heifers 467 3.40
2 bulls 910 2.50
2 bulls 1,010 2.75
2 bulls 1,100 325
24 stockers 854 3.55
44 stockers 597 3.60
36 yearlings 624 2.50
6 yearlings ClO 3.75
6 calves 330 3.75
6 calves 370 4.00
Sheep—ln demand; $2.50@4.60.
Chicago Live Stock.
Chicago, July 15.—Cattle, receipts, 29,000,
including 550 Texans; best steady, generally
10c to 25c lower; good to prime steerß, $5@
6.15; poor to medium, $3.85@4.90; stockers and
feeders, $2@4.40; cows, $2.35@4.40; heifers,
$2.40@4.75; canners, $1.65@2.40; bulls, $2.2T>@
4.35; calves, $4@6.20; Texas fed steers, $3.20
@4.50.
Hogs, receipts, to-day, 38,000; to-morrow,
25,000; left over, 2,656; averaging 10c lower;
mixed and butchers, $5.85@6.17H; good to
choice heavy, $6.05@6.25; rough heavy, $5.85
@6; light, $5.85@6.10; bulk of sales, $5.95@6.10.
Sheep, receipts, 25,000; steady; top range
sheep and lambs, 15c to 25c lower; good to
choice wethers, $3.90@4.65; fair to choice
mixed, $3.40@4; western sheep, $3.80@4; year
lings, $4.25@4.80; native lambs, $3.50@6; wes
tern lambs, $4@5.35.
Official Saturday: Receipts—Cattle, 805;
hogs, 14,141; sheep, 1,795. Shipments—Cattle,
882; hogs, 2,995; sheep, 641.
St. Louis Live Stock.
St. Louis, July 15.—Cattle— Receipts, 8,000;
lower; native steers, $4@5.80; stockers aud
feeders, $2.56@4.30: cows and heifers, $2@4.80;
Texans, $3.30@4.40.
Hogs—Receipts, 5,500; market s@loc lower;
pigs, $5.85(35.95; packers, $5.80<g6; butchers,
$6©6.30.
Sheep—Receipts, 7,000; steady; native mut
tons, $3.25@3.75; lambs, $4@5.75.
Kansas City Li*» Stock.
Kansas City, July 15.—Cattle—Receipts, 10,
--000; strong to shade lower; native steers, $4.50
(&5.50; Texans, $3.50@4.40; cows and heifers,
$3@4.85; stockers and feeders, $3.25@4.25;
bulls, $2.50(0■»;' calves, $3@4.50.
Hogs—Receipts, 10,000; market s@loc lower;
bulk of sales, $5.60@5.95; heavy, $5.75@6;
packers, $5.65@5.95; mixed, $5.60@5.90; york
•rs, $5.70#5.90; pigs, $5@6.40.
Sheep—Receipts. 2,000; strong to steady;
lambs, $4.25@5.25; muttons, $3@4.25.
METHOD IN ADVICE
How the Commuter Who Liked Soli-
tude Attained His Purpose.
Life.
I have lately been giving advice to my
friends, and find it Days. The first one I
toet was Typerly. He came up to me in
the station. He is a successful novelist.
"I've read your book, old man," I said,
"and understand how you came to write
it. A man must live. But it seems a
pity that you couldn't have paid more at
tention to the style and literary finish.
After all, there's something else in the
world besides money."
Typerly gazed at me witheringly and
passed on.
My next friend was Pendragon, an ex
pert accountant.
"Let me give you a few pointers," I re
marked, earnestly, "on the simple lawa
of health. You are under weight. You
look pale. You have undoubtedly some
thing the matter with your lungs. You
ought to give up work at once. Even now
it may be too late."
Pendragon murmured something Inaud
ible and hurried into the smoking car.
No. 3 was Smith. Smith wats the father
of a three-weeks-old baby. Here was a
golden chance
"Nothing could be more fortunate," I
remarked, "than that we should be oc
cupying the same seat Now about that
baby. Does he cry much at night? How
is his digestion? Have you examined
his heart with a stethoscope? If not,
do so, and don't rely on the doctor. It is
better to know the worst at once. Have
you read Whimper on 'Children's Dis
eases'? Get it at once. Do you know
what rickets are? They are caused by a
lack of nutrition. You are a father, and
it is your duty to study every biological,
anthropomorphical, dietic, hygienic, lac
teal, phychologlcal and physiological as
pect of your offspring."
Smith murmured something about a
business engagement and went away
abruptly.
The next on my list was Gullton, a man
of piety.
"I understand," I said with a cynical
smile, "that you attend church regularly.
Of course, sir, blind faith is a common
human attribute, but as an intelligent in
quirer have you investigated the claims
of orthodoxy? Have you read Briggs on
the scriptures? Are you familiar with the
process of natural selection and that
biogenesis effectually answers the prob
lem as to the nature of the so-called soul?
Do you know that the doctrine of the sub
jectivity of the senses, while not neces
sarily antagonistic to teleology, utterly
precludes the postulate of an orthodox
God? It is your duty, my dear sir, to
look these matters up."
Gullton's voice shook with anger and
his face turned all colors of the rainbow
as he remarked, in paring, that he would
hereafter be careful of his company.
But these few examples serve to show
my method. I advise every thoughtful,
self-contained man, like myself to do the
same. I might remark, in conclusion,
that I live in a suburban town, one hour
from the office, and like to spend the time
on the train all alone by myself.
A GENERAL SCARE.
Shelbyville, Ind., Jeffersonian.
Ad editor in Columbus printed an item
that the man who was hugging the hired
girl had better stop or his name would
be published. In a few days about twenty
five citizens paid up their subscription
and told the editor to pay no attention
to foolish stories going around.
= BSTASXtISSm 1879 '
WOODWARD & CO.
»~~», GRAIN COMMISSION «*•«
I •SAXCHXS— <%l6tun> and MUwwike*. ' Order* ffaf tutor* deUTeti executed la all anTtfH
Bhas E. Lewis Ms
7 &Co- Bub,
1, 2 and 3 Chamber of
Commerce/Minneapolis, f![)tfflT}
GRAIN, PROVISIONS.
New York Correspondents,
Clark, Dodga A Co. •
Chicago i Bertlett. Frazter A Cm.
Correspondent*. (.J. P. Harris.
Dally Price Current mailed free on ap
plication. -■J&l&BßgßSß&s£*.
L T. SOWLE & SONS
STOCKS, BONDS, GRAIN
AND PROVISIONS.
I Chamber of Commerce, Minneapolis.
Members i Chicago Board of Trade and
{ M pl 8 Chamber of Coiiunerca.
Phones: N. W. 634 M., T. C. 634.
Write for our dally market letter, free.
SHIPPING NEWS
OF THE LAKES.
Buffalo—The excursion steamer Puritan of
the Crystal Beach line was burned at' her
dock at 4 o'clock this morning. The entire
upper works were destroyed, aid it will not
be possible to repair her. lor this season's
business. The damage is estimated by her
owners at $10,000.
Buffalo—The steamer Avon, which was re
cently badly burned near Sault Ste. Marie
arrived to-day in tow of the Portage. She
has been libeled for $25,000 by the owners of
the steamer Victory, which- helped subdue the
nre. Bonds must be furnished for this
Duluth-Superior—Arrived: Alva, Lake
H«° rV casCle Rhodes. Mecosta. Ralph,
™ro. ld;. Scranton, Nimick, Iroquois, John;.
Mitchell, Nyanza, Thomas Palmer, Street and
consorts, Mahoning. Departed;. Roumania,
Spencer, Senator, Caledonia, America, Ty
rone, Emory Owen, Albright, Lake Erie, ore;
Tom Adams, Buffalo, grain; Interlakeu Mad
den, Two Harbors, l.ght; Stafford, Maine.
Bralnard, Strong, Commodore, Lake Erie
lumber; Mohawk, Buffalo, flour
Toledo, Ohio—Departed: Coal-Belman,
Duluth. Light—Hundred Thirty-four, Du
lutbr. ' . .) „ .. *
Ashland, Wis.—Arrived: Craig, Aztec Miz
tec. Cleared: Choctaw, Whitney, Iron
Cliff, Iron Age, Cleveland . .
Detroit, Mich.— Bango^ 9:40 last night;
Alaska (wood), Auburn, 11; Gilbert, 11-10-
Harvey Brown, 11:30; Wyoming (large), mid
night; Watt Holley, Montana, 1 a. m. Grif
fin Rust, 2; Pease, Planet, 2:30; Manistique
and consorts, 2:40; Tower, Northern Queen
3; Hutchmson, Black, 5; Harvard and whale
back, Fiske. 5:40; Folsom and consort, Rose
dale, 6; Olympia, Sauber,'McVitti©, 6:20- V
I H. Ketchum, 7:40;- Selwyn Eddy, 9- Italia
I Amazon. 9:20; Mitchell. Chickamauga, 9-50*
Mo°re« 0V 30; Mlnch ' -10:40; Prick, 11; Gates)
11:30; Bielman, 11:50; Mariposa, Marcla
noon; Robert Packer, 12:10 p. m. ■ Paris'
1-%' Emerald, Elflnmere, Alfred Mitchell!
2:20; Merrimac, Merida, Magnetic. 2:40-
Helena, Nipigon and consorts, 3; Northwest
McDougall and whaleback, 5; Eddy, Penning
ton 5:20; ■ Linn, . Nasmyth and. whalebacks
6; Northwestern. 8; Bulgaria, 9. Down: Hoyt
b.C. HalJ and barges, Baldwin and barges,
9:oO last night; Rugee, 10; Grecian end whale!
back, 10:30; Hiawatha, 11; Forest City 11-20-
Amazonas, 11:40; Scott and barge, 1:20 a. m •
Fin a*?- I" Green ' 2:2: s- M. Stephenson,
2.40; Masaba and whaleback, 4; Chemuns
4:30; Corsica, Maida, Samoa, 6: Quito Page
?i? 0; R1J?i lle ' 8:40: ' Ablna ' 9:4°; Lafayette!
10; Buffalo, 10:40; Rees. Norton. Sevona 11
?i--n PanV,^ tka ' 11:10; Ntagara- Angeline,
11:50; Cadillac, 1:40 a. m.; Nicholas, 1:50-
Livingstone. 2; Adventure, Montana 2-30-
Venus, 3; Seattle, 4; Business, 6; Lagonda'
Iron King, Iron Quean, 8:30.
Amherstburg, Ont.—The schooner Myron
Butman, in tow of the steamer Baldwin was
struck by an unknown steamer at Bar
Point, and sank shortly afterward in twenty
feet of water. The Butman was bound down
with a cargo of lumber. The steamer struck
her forward, inflicting serious damage. The
lumber held the boat up sc that she sank
slowly, and the crew were able to escape in
safety. . . *. v . ;.,.---:.
Sault Ste. Marie. Mich.—Up: Schuck
Rensselaer, 11:10 last night; tug Connoran
and barge Clerk, 11:40;. Penobscot. 1:20 a. m ;
£l! a n ne'., 1:0;^ lrcknead ' Burton. Our Son
5:?S: sar"ett«5 ar"ett« Ollver" 7; Cofflnberry.' Bloom
™0; Marlcopa. 10:30; Centurion. 11; Wright
11:40; Trevor, noon; Manitoba, 1:20 p. m.:
P. - Sawyer, Cumberland. Aurania, 2-40-
Mather and whaleback, Bchuylkill. 3:30; Mc-
Williams, Cartagena, Paisley. 6; Havana
6:30; Republic, 7:30; Wllhelm, Nirvana, Gala
tea. Ranney, Quayle, 9. Down: Peavey
Crescent City, : 10:30 last night; Mariska. mid
night; Emily, Gebhart, Hattie, 12:30 a m •
Kalyuga China, Mars« 4; Rockefeller,' Jen
ney, 5i Elphicke, 5:40; Bermuda, 6:40: Nep
£B?' 30-: * Carn, e? le ' Neshoto, Lackawanna,
8.40, Meriden. Victory, Constitution. 9:40:
Miami (steel), 10; Westcott. 11:30; George
Gould, noon; Maruba, Liberty. l p m •
Grover, Cobb, Glidden, Frye, 2:40- Vega'
Andaste, Wilson and whaleback 4-10- Cor
morant, Norris, 4:30; Ed Smith," Iron City
Warmlngton. 7:40; Edenborn, Malta 8-30
t Fi 1?' Pa—Cleared: Coal—Mineh. 'superior.
Light—Case, Duluth.
Sault Ste. Marie—Up: Charles Eddy,. Yu
kon, 1 a. m. Warner, Thompson, Bangor
Gilbert. 1:30; Algonquin, 2; Harvey Brown,'
3:0; Hesper, Glasgow, Abyssinia, 4:10; Ven
ezuela, Pretoria, Berlin, 6; Miami, Mosher
6; Continental, Holland, 7: Clyde, Amboy'
7:30; Hutchinson. Japan, 9; Watt. Hollev'
iking, Vinland, 10:30; Nlcol, Northern. 11-40
Down: Northern Light, 10 last night-
King, Gawn. Teutonic, Sparta. 11:20- Mar
shall, Tilden, Ellwood, 12:30 a. m.; Adams.
Kendall, Troy, 2; Mohawk, 2:30: Roumania
4; Gilchrist, Georger, Presque 151e,5; Marl
tana,. Krupp, Black and whalebacks, Roby 7;
City of Cleveland, Cumberland, Senator'
Fleetwood, Moravia, 8; Corona, Spencer 10-
Monarch. Cornell, Marsala, Lansing, 11-80 •
Chicago—Grain freight rates were again
dull, with little stuff offering for shipment
Rates were nominally unchanged, at lHc foi
wheat. ":•:-.- -■ - • ••. <■ ■
Detroit—Up: Boston, 9:40 last night •
Sachem and consorts, 12:10 a. m.; Reginald
and oil barges, 2; Turner and barees 2 20-
Reynolds, 5:30.
RECOGNIZED
Cleveland Plalndealer.
St. Peter—Well, sir. ■what have you te
say about yourself?
The Newcomer—l regret to report
St. Peter—Why, it's Kitchener! Came
right in, general.
HDR OWN PAUL/T.
Fliegende Blaetter.
"The pike that I bought of you yester
day wasn't fresh:"
"Then why didn't you buy it sooner? I
offered it to you last week."
HOW IT WILL SOON BE.
Puck.
'Mr. Subbubs (pleadingly)— Can't you
help me out for a few day* until I make
other arrangements?
Miss O'Rourke (the cook) —Not on yer
lolfe! Me toime is booked solid fer eigh
teen months ahead, all one-wake stands.
THOMAS & Co
Grain Commission and Stock Brokers. I
Write for our dally market latter, which we H
mall FREE on application. ' ' D
Members Minneapolis • Chamber of Com- II
merce. Telephone—Main 1897-J. 11
5 CHAMBER OF ;i GOUHERSE. jj
Watson & Co
Brokers In Grain, Provision*,
Stocks and, Bonds,
Members N. V. Stock Exchange
Chicago Correspondetifc-aaavrarte, Dape«&Oo.
Private wire Chicago «TOew York. Tel. 906 Mala
35 Oh ambar of GcrurnGroo.
■- '- : ' " J" ' " "'' —
\BBS|!Bfeaa»^iS\
: \nEHBEBS(gBSBB QFTkADE CH CAfiO- \
\ MEMBERS tEHAIffiEROF COERCE MPLS. \

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