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The Minneapolis journal. (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, March 30, 1903, Image 14

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1903-03-30/ed-1/seq-14/

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STRENGTH 1ND ^AGTIYITY^COIE SlNTOcWHEAT.
^
%
May Gains Over a Cent From Low
^f|- Point and Closes Very Firm ,
|- at 73y8 Cents. \
JThe Visible Snpply Decrease of
2,375,000 Bu. Was a Strength
ening Feature.
rood Export Inquiry Reported
* - News and Gossip of
the Trade.
Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce. March 30.
Wheat was just a shade off in price this mor
ning. May opening at 72%@72i
firmer almost immediately and held up well, sell-
* ing to 73-i after a time. There was consider
H able doubt as to what the visible would show,
and some disposition to buy a little on the fore
vast of a big decrease. Stocks at Fort Wil-
' liacus were reported to have fallen off consider
ably, and this, It M-as thought, might affect the
visible showing. An early message brought the
leport of fair export inquiry at New Yoik and
the indications of good business to come. Senti
ment has changed considerably and the week
opens with the situation, ^vbile bearish enough,
, yet free from the pessimism of last week. A
big Chicago house that has been rather inclined
to put out the bear side of the situation had
out a more favorable summary to-day, saying
that they have noticed that foreigners appear to
be willing to take a little cash wheat whenever
the price Is acceptable. .TSxpcrt orders were
reached at about the same level on two succes
sive dips last week. This rather Indicates that
we are near a working basis despite tbe heavy
competition from Argentina and other countries.
'Liquidation has been rather Iree during the long
ntlnue decline, and much of the pressure is,
therefore, removed. This leaves the market in
good working condition and In a position to re-
, apond to any important development either way.
Just now the situation appears to favor the bear,
ibut In speculation it is often the unexpected that
'happens. The Modern Miller predicts that the
condition of winter wheat April 1 will be as
high as In 1901, when its average was 97. The
area this year Is so much larger that an enor
mous crop is to be expected, barring Important
[accidents. The recent fears of manipulation
appear to have faded away. Spring wheat con
'tlnues relatively stronger than winter, but fears
~are not now as general that there will not be
enough to go around. Current clearances are
"" moderate, but we will be fortunate to maintain
even this level for the remaining three months
of the crop year. The showing for the nine
months of the erop year to date is certainly
gratifying. We have exported 174,000,000 bu
to date, as compared with 194,000.000 bu for the
corresponding period of the previous year. The
Try high prices prevailing for meats of all sorts
the world over have undoubtedly greatly in
creased the world's consumption of wheat.
World's shipments were 8.172,000 bu, against
fr,082,000 bu last year, and 6,632,000 bu a year
ego. America shipped 2,904,000 bu Russia,
2,082,000 bu (Danube. 1.248,000 bn Argentine,
\ 2.424,000 bu, and India, 104,000 bu. The quan
tity on passage, at 29.848,000 bu, shows a big de
of 1,176,000 DU. The visible shows a big de
crease, or 2,764 000 bu.
On the big decrease the markets strengthened
all around. Primary points received 646.00 bu,
against 575,000 bu, and shipped 144.000 bu.
against 177,000 bu. Wheat and flour clearances
equaled 506.000 bu. Minneapolis had 460 cars,
against 348 last year, and Duluth had 27,
against 26.
New lork reported 17 loads wheat and 15 of
corn for export.
The market was firm near the close. May
touching 73}'73%r on sales. May closed at
7S%c. July 73%c, September, 67^c.
There was excellent demand for caSh wheat.
THE FLOUR MARKET
FAIR DEMAND TO START THE WEEK
PRICES HOLD STEADY.
There was fair general demand reported this
morning, and millers said the outlook was favor
able for continued business during the week.
Domestic buyers are taking larger lots and are
apparently gaining a little confidence In the
market The foreign tone remains rather hesi
tant, but there Is foreign Inquiry from time to
time and a fair business for export.
Shipments. 65.6S4 brls.
First patents are quoted $3 70@3.80: second
patnts. $S 60@8.70, first clears, $2.70 second
clears, $2@2 Oo.
THE~CASH~TRADE
TLAX EASIERI" AIR GENERAL DEMAND
kOR COARSE GRAINS.
TIJAXl(ea\ler receipts than had been looked
for and a weaker tone at the head of the lakes
made the local market soft this morning and a
lower price range tesulted. The difference be
tween Minneapolis crsh and the Duluth option
Midoned a trifle. Local oil men and shippers
\ ere buyers and there was good demand for the
choice lots.
Minneapolis received 10S ears against 31 last
J ear and shipped 8. Pulutb. had 70 cars
, Closing prices: MinneapolisCash, $1.09 to
arrive, $1.09, March, $1.09 May, $1.09 July,
$11 1.
CORNCorn receipts picked up materially and
the market was considerably more active. No.
3 yellow closed at 42%c. Receipts, 23 cars
shipments, 1 car.
OATS--Good general demand for oats contin
lies inrt the matket was pietty well cleaned up
to-'lay of the desirable lots. Some of the off
grades moved slow, but the market on the
vhole was satisfactory to selleis. No. 3
white closed at 32V4c. Receipts, 28 cars ship
ments, 22 'ore.
PKED AND MEAIDeman is lepoited good.
Coarse corn meal and cracked corn, $1." No. 1
ground feed. 2-3 com and 1-3 oats, $15 50 No.
2 ground fpd, \'t coin and ^ oats, $16 No. 3
ground feed, 1-3 corn and 2-3 oats, $16 50.
MILLSTUFFStrices remain firm and steady.
Demand is a little better all around. The de
cline, the millers say, has about run its course.
Prices were advanced and are now quoted firm
at the higher range. Bran in bulk, $11.75(gJ12:
shorts, $U.75g)12 flour middlings, $13.50(&514.
red dog, $15.50 fob feed In 100-lb sacks, $1.50
per ton additional: In 200-Ib sacks, $1 per ton ad
ditional. Shipments, 1,214 tons.
BYENo 2 closed at 475ic. Receipts, 2 cars
shipments, 1 car.
PARLEYNot much business was done, re
ceipts being light. Fed grades are quoted 40
46c malting giades, 46@52c. Receipts, 12
cars: 3 cat a.
r@12shipments,.
[AYThe market Is quiet. Upland, choice,
upland No. 3, $10.50(811 upland. No.
2. $ 5OC310. midland. 7 75@8.50. medium*
$7.25g7.75 off color. $6i?7 timothy, choice.
SU.7512.25 timothy. No. 1, $11 25@11.73,
Timothv. No 2. $100tl0.50 rye straw, choice,
$5@5.50. Receipts. 85 tons shipments, 12 tons.
'/" PUTS AND CALLS.
/1- Two o'clock report :
1
TutsMay wheat ,
- n ' CallsMay wheat. 71^ r.
v CurbMay wheat, 73^c.
' ^ CASH SALES REPORTED TO-DAY.
No. 1 hard wheat, 1 cais $0.75%
No. 1 hard wheat, 2 cars 76
No. 1 bard v,heat, 1 var, o
No. 1 northern. 12 cans i5
. 1 northern. 8 carp choice : .75 "M
JCo. 1 northern, 4 cars 74?*
No. 3 noithern, 1 cai 751,
'#' No. 1 northern, to anivo, 5,000 bu 10V3
J** Ho. 2 northern. 18 cars 74
"* No. 2 northern, 1 car. choice
fixfiio. 2 northern. 3 cars
t* No. 3 wheat. 2 cars,
& !No. 3 wheat, 2 cars
-fC No. 3 wheat. 1 car ~ .
I* Rejected wheat, 1 car. stnnttv
'' .Rejected wheat, 2 cais, sinuttj
M , Rejected wheat, 4 cars, smutty 72Vi
- E*| Rejected wheat, 1 car 73^
^Rejecte wheat, 1 car 6Mi Rejected d
5* Rejected wheat, 2 cars
m Rejected wheat. 1 car 71
m- Rejected wheat, 1 car 70
| f i Rejected wheat, 2 cais fift
Si'tJ^ejected wheat, 2 cars .
fWJltejected wheat, 1 car. .
i Rejected wheat, 2 cars .
No grade wheat, 1 car, .
No grade wheat, 1 car, .
No grade wheat, 1 car. .
- Ko grade whsat. 2 cars .
No grade wheat, 1 car, .
* No grade wheat, 1 car, .
I No grade wheat, 1 car, 62
! No. 4 corn, 1 car 40
i j, No grade corn, 1 ear 39
i N o grade corn, 1 car 37
i No. 3 white oats, 3 cars 32%
N No. 3 .white oats. Scars 32%
! No. 3 white oats, 3 cars, seed 33%
No. 4 white oats. 2 cars 32
No. 4 white oats, 2 cars 31
i No. 3 oats, 2 cars 29%
L No. 3 oats, 2 cars 31
No. 3 oats, 1 car 30%
t No. 3 oats, 7 cars 30%
No. 3 oats. 1 car 30%
No grade oats, 1 car 29
No grade oats, 1 car 39%
No. grade oats, 1 car * .80%
No grade rye, 1 car 46%
No. 4 barley, 1 car 46
C. C. WYMA N MO.
Qraii Commission, 505-506 Chamber of Commerce.
"We have been in the Commission Bu5ines^here twenty years this
4 c, but it turned
MONDAY, JJTENINO,
Minneapolis $ .73%
Chicago 73%
Duluth 73%
St. Louis 68%
Kansas City 64%
New York 77%
RANGE OF WHEAT PRICE IN MINNEAPOLIS
' , " - # Close
Open. High. ' Low. To-day.
May.$ .72&@72!4 $ .73i4@73% $ .72%@72& $ .73%
July. .73%@73% .73%@73ft .TS%@73% .13%
Sept
O n TrackNo. 1 hard, 76%cNo . 1 northern, 75%c No. 2 northern, 74%c.
No. 1 flax, $1.09 No. 3 yellow cor n, 42%e.
No. 3 white oats, 32%cNo . 2 rye, 47%c.
Barley, 40c to 52c.
No. 1 flax, 4 cars ..
No. 1 flax, 2 cars . .
No. 1 flax. 1 car ..,
Rejected flax, 1 car
Rejected flax, 1 car
Range of May Wheat.
n3o )oA */&>*,/*&> fit
7^
s Z?
7^
STATE GRAIN INSPECTION, MARCH 28.
Inspected InWheatCarsGreat Northern
No. ] hard, 2. No. 1 northern, 16: No. 2 north
ern, 16. No. 3. 3 rejected, 2.
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. PaulNo. 1 north
ern, 6 No. 2 northern, 18 No. 3, 8 rejected, 10
no grade, 2.
Minneapolis & St. LouisNo. 2 northern, 4
rejected. 1.
Soo LineNo. 1 northern. 6 No. 2 northern,
6 No. 8, 2 lejected. 1.
Northern PacificNo. 1 northern, 1 No. 2
northern, 1 rejected, 5.
Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & OmahaNo. 2
northern, 2: rejected, 4 no grade, 1.
TotalNo 1 hard. 2, No. 1 northern, 29 No
2 northern. 47 No. 8, 8, rejected, 23: no grade, 8.
Other GrainsCarsNo. 8 winter wheat, 31
rejected winter wheat, 1 No. 4 corn, 3" no
grade corn, 2 No. 3 white oats, 3 No. 4 white
oats, 1 No. 3 oats 1 no grade oats. 1 No. 2
lye, 1 No. 4 barley, 1 No. 5 barley, 1 no
grade barley, 1, No. 1 flax, 35 rejected flax,
14: no grade flax. 3.
Cars inspected OutNo. 1 hard wheat, 2* No.
1 northern v. heat, 28 No. J2 northern wheat. 72:
No. 3 wheat, 16 rejected wheat. 2: no grade
wheat, 1: No. 3 winter wheat, 17 no grade corn,
4, No. 2 white oats, 2- No. 3 white oats, 12
No. 4 white oats. 12 No. 3 oats, 4 No. 2 rye,
2 No. 1 flax 15. \
RECEIPTS AND SHIPMENTS, MARCH 28.
ReceivedWheat. 460 cars, 418,600 bu corn,
20,930 bu oats. 40,880 bu: barley. 10,200 bu,
rye. 4,620 bu, flax, 07,200 bu flour, 020 brls,
millstuffs. 151 tons, hay. 85 tons, fuel oil, 100,000
gals fruit, 218,378 lbs merchandise. 2,942,475
lbs, lumbet, 57 cars posts and piling, 1 car
barrel stock, 10 cars machinery, J,211,SOO lbs
coal, J.334 tons: wood, 330 coids. brick, 105,000,
lime. 2 cais, cement 2.790 brls, household goods,
8,600 Jbs railroad iron, 3 cars, stone and marble.
4 cars, live stock, 3 cars salt, 1 car dressed
meats, 250.230 lbs railroad matenals, 17 cars:
sundries, 67 cars, car lots, 1,261.
ShipmentsWheat, 67 cars, 57.000 bn: corn,
780 bu oats, 33.000 bu barley. 3,270 bu rre,J
87(i bu: flax, 6,960 tu flour, 65,864 brls mill
stuffs. 1,214 tons, h.iv, 12 tons fruit, 69.200 lbs
merchandise, 2 701460 lbs lumber, 145 cars,
mnchinerj. 1.178.630 lbs brick. 8.000. cement,
500 brls, household goods. 24.000 lbs linseed oil,
210 brls. oil cake, 209.010 lbs, butter, 21.500 lbs
hides, pelts, etc., 53,400 lbs railroad materials,
13 cars sundries. 23 cars, ear lots, 917.
THE C0MPARTIVE VISIBLE.
Wheat
Present total
Last week
Last year
Two years ago 54,749,000
Three jeais ago 54.204,000
Corn
Present total 10 202,000
T.nst week
Iis 3 car
TSvo years ago
Three years ago
Oats-
Present total . .
Last week
Last year
Two years ago
Three years ago
DAILY WHEAT MOVEMENT.
The following are the receipts and shipments
s t the principal primary wheat maikets:
Receipts. Shipments
New York
Philadelphia ....
Baltimore
Toledo Detroit St. Louis
Chicago Milwaukee ......
WORLD'S
America Russia
The Danube ...
Argentine India
WHEAT SHIPMENTS.
Last Previous
Week. Week.
2,904,000 2,396,000
2,032,000 1,640,000
1,248,000 1,608,000
2,424,000 3,352,000
. 104,000 32.000
None None
WHEAT MOVEMENT BY ROADS.
ReceivedCarsMilwaukee, 66 Omaha, 103
St. Louis, 23 Great Northern, 154 Burlington,
4i Soo, 39 Northern Pacific, 27 Chicago Great
Western. 1, Rock Island. 4
ShipmentsCarsMilwaukee, 10 Omaha, 1
St Louis. 17 Wisconsin Central, 2 Great North
ern, 14 Chicago G-ea Western, 23.
THE VISIBLE SUPPLY.
Increase. Decrease. Total.
2,784,000 43,291,000
4.J5.000 10,202,00)
173,000 7,307,000
Wheat
Cc rn .
Oats .
CHICAGO GRAIN t f*'
MODERATE WHEAC BUYING ON A VISIBLE
DECREASE STATEMENT.
Chicago, March 30.The May wheat opened
ye to ^(a^c lowe- at 72V4@72%c to-day on
improved weather. Compaiatively steady cables
and prospects of a liberal visible decrease re
sulted in a rally to 72%c. St. Louis leading a
modeiate buying movement. World's shipments
last week were 8,712,000 bu, and the week's
on passage statement shows a decrease of 1,176,-
000 bu. Local receipts were 11 cais, none of
contract grad*. Minneapolis and Duluth reported
4^7 cars, making a total for the three points
of 498 cars, against 419 last week and 470 a
year ago.
Later May advanced to 73%(^!73%c on the
visible decrease of 2.764,000 bu, the large clear
ances, and influential buying. T he close was
strong with May JJ^'^c higher at 73%c.
Close Wheat, May, 73'.ic July, 69ic Septem
ber, 68%@68%e cash wheat. No. 2 red. 73c
No. 3 red, 67fe71c: No. 2 hard winter, 70@71c
No, 3 hard winter, 67g!70c No. 1 northern
spring, 67c No 2 noithern spring, 75VS576%c
2o. o spring, 6S?$7fi
Corn was dull, Maj opened a shade to %@i4c
down at 43%c to 43
71J
%
.73-
73% 72 Vi
72V, 73 "t
3
.65
.68 .66 .66%
.64 .65 .68
63
which were changing to July. The strength de
veloped iu wheat later led to a reaction to
43%@433'ic,
THE DAY'S RESULTS
r CLOSING CASH PRICES
i/ILruyl
nr ^V
a 8 c, on selling by houses
Receipts were 91 cars.
The close was firm, May %@%c up. at 43^0.
Close: CornMay, 43%c July, 43%c Sep
tember, 43@43%c.
Cash CornNo. 2, 43%c No. 3, 40@40%c.
May oats opened a shade depressed at 32%c,
in sympathy with wheat. A rally to 33%c fol
lowed on wet weather complaints from Iowa and
Illinois and in sympathy with that better tone
developed In wheat. Receipts were 80 cars.
Close: OatsMarch, 34%c May, 33%c July,
30%@31c September. 28c. *
Cash OatsNo. -2, 32%c No. 3. 32c.
The following was the range of prices:
Wheat May. July. Sept.
Opening 72%@% 69@69% 67% @%
v- v. av" U'^ai ngaaasaaa)i*a"
May. Wheat.-,- ~
Close
To-day.
49,615,000
10.637,000
... 8.799,000
... 32 2ST.OOO
... 21,588,000
... 7.807,000
... 7,132,000
... 3.146,000
... 11.156,000
... 7,536,000
Bushels.
65 550
10.045
2.66H 8,000 3.800
60.00(1
20.423 20,9i0
8,712,000 9,028,000
67%
Close
Saturday. ' To-day.
$ .72%)72 % .7 3%
.73 @72% .69% _,
72% -
.67% .64%@64%
'7 7%
1.09%
1,09 1.10 1.06
1.05%
Highest 73%@% 69% -*-
Lowest 72% 69
Close
To-day 73% 69%
Saturday 72% @% 69% @%
Year ago 71% @% 7272%
Corn
OP^S 43%@% 43%@% 42%@%
Highest 43% 44 43%
Lowest , 43% 43% 42%
Close To-da y ...
Saturday . .
Year ago .
Oats
Opening ....
EUgliest Lowest ......... 32%
Cloge
*o-day 33%
Saturday 32%
Year ago 42
a
OTHER GRAIN MARKETS
DULTJTH GRAIN, March 30.Wheat was quite
active and strong, advancing %c for May from
Saturday's ckSSe. No. 1 hard has advanced to a
2c premium over No. 1 northern. Little ship
ping demand has shown itself
Flax lost %c, to $1.10% for May, and then ad
vanced to a close at $110. It was dull.
Chances in stocks for week: Wheat in store,
6,415,833 bu, increase 49,505 flax, 4.196,119, in
crease 185 159 oats, 1,511,794, Increase 34,179
barley, 641,808. increase 13,182 rye, 83,163, in
crease 1,687.
To-day's receiptsWheat, 27 cars flax. 67
oats, 6. ShipmentsWheat, 4,909 bu oats, 8,200
barley. 2,173.
Close No. 1 northern, to arrive, 73%c No. 1
hard, 73% c No. 2 northern. 72% c: May No. 1
northern, 73%c, July. 73%c: flax, cash, $1.08%
to arrive, $1.09% Mny. $1.10 July, $1.11%
September, $1 13 October, $1.12, November,
$1.10 oats, cash, 32%c May, 33%c rye, cash,
49c May, 50c.
NEW YORK GRAIN AND FLOUR, March 30.
FlourReceipts, 27,025 brls: sales. 4.100 pkgs
steady and quiet. WheatReceipts, 65,500 bu
sales, 1,200,000 bn quiet but generally weak,
sustained all the forenoon on covering and talk
of visible supply decrease March, 81 1-16c:
May, 77 3-16@77 9-16c July, 74%@75c Sep
tember, 73%@73 5-16c. RyeDull state, 56@
60c c.i.f. New York, No. 2 western, 60c f.o.b.
afloat CornReceipts. 113,000 bu sales, 60.000
bu, dull but steadier on small receipts and with
wheat May, 50%@51%c July, 49%c. Oats
Receipts, 123,000 bu inactive, showing some ad
vance track white, 41@46c.
Close: WheatMay, 77%c July, 75%@75%c.
CornMay, 54%@54%c July, 49%c.
LIVERPOOL GRAIN, March 30.Wheat-
Spot dull. No. 2 red western winter, 6s %d
No. 1 northern spring, 6s 6d, No. 1 California,
Cs 3d futures steady May, 6s l%d July, 6s
%d.
CornSpot American mixed, new, quiet, 4s
6%d American mited, old, steady, 5s 4%d fu
tures quiet May, 4s 2%d June, 4s l%d July,
4s l%d.
The imports of wheat into Liverpool last week
were 40,500 quarters from Atlantic ports, 7,000
from Pacific and 99.000 from other ports.
The imports of corn from Atlantic ports last
week were 85,700 quarters.
. MILWAUKEE GRAIN, March 30.Flour-
Five cents up. WheatFirm No. 3 northern.
77Mic No. 2 northern, 75@76%c May 73Vic
asked RyeFirm No. 1. 51V,@52e. Barley
Steady No. 2, 60c sample, 44@53c. Oats^
Firm standard, 34%@35%c CornMay, 43%c
bid
WheatPuts, 72%c asked calls, 73%c asked.
CornPuts, 43%c asked calls, 44%@44%c
asked.
42,291.000 45,053,000
TOLEDO GRAIN AND SEED, March 30.
WheatDull, Aim, cash, 73%c: May, 74%c
July, 71%c. CornDull, firm March and May.
43c: July, 43%c. OatsDull, firm March, 35c
May, 33%c July. 31c. RveNo. 2, 53c. Clover-
seedDull. eas.\ , cash, $7.12% March, $7.12%
April, $6.75. October, $5 35. TimothyPrime,
$1.60. AlsikePrime, $7.50.
KANSAS CITY GRAIN, March 30.Close:
WheatMay 64@R4%c July. 61@61%c cash
Iso 2 nard, OSMsC, No 2 red. 69@TO%c. Corn
April. 35%@35%c: May, 35-y4c: July. 35%@
35%e cash No. 2 mixed, 3^%@37%c: No. 2
white, 38%c. OatsNo. 2 white, 34%@35%c.
CHICAGO SEED AND COARSE GRAIN, March
30.Rye, May, 49%@3oc. Flax, cash northwest,
$109- southwest. $1.06 May. $1.09(3)1.10. Timo
thy, March, $3.35. Clover, March, $12.25. Bar
ley, cash, 42@54c.
Bushels.
0.585 4,800
57.000
8,800
GRAIN TRADE GOSSIP
San Francisco to Stephens: Wheat declined
on rainy weather in this state Saturday, which
has gieatly benefited giowing crops. Dealers
who latelv bought the December option for an
upward turn were liberal sellers. Iu the cash
market there is little inquiry from exporters,
but millers are now using considerable shipping
wheat, which can be obtained much cheaper than
high priced milling grades, and their operations
keep the maiket in a steady position.
Logan to Stephens: Traoe in the May option
shows a falling off and the buying or selling of
a comnaratively small amount moves the market
quicklv. The pi Ice will depend largely on the
esport business. So far as we can see there Is
nothing to indicate concentrated holdings and it
is too late now for any Individual to absorb an
amount sufficiently large to manipulate the
market with the end of. the option but five weeks
away. The July Is influenced mainly by crop
conditions. The May premium is a good one and
there is, we think, a scattered long interest in
it, which in the abseice of an urgent foreign
demand is likely to liquidate.
C. Lewis, from I ake, Chicago: The price
of wLeat to many represents Its consumptive
merit even with "brilliant crop prospects, but
the situation does not Lave sufficient attiactive
ne: to bring in general big trade. Shorts are
inclined to nervousness in the Mav option now.
Cash demand keeps fair and clearances good,
with stocks on the decrease lr all positions. The
important factors now are cash demand and crop
prospects. Developments in either will quietly
affect values. Tne onening of navigation may
cause a stir among the shorts In the May kind.
Clearances. Wheat and flour, 506,000 bu corn,
714.000 oats. 14,000.
Liverpool close: Wheat uncbanitd to %d high
er* corn unchanged to %d lower.
Paris close: Wheat 5 centimes higher tio 40
centimes lower flour unchanged to 5 centimes
blgoer.
Harris Gates has been a good buyer of May
corn.
WinnipegCloudy *nd calm. 20 above.
Grand PorksClar, southwest wind, 35 above
rained some yesterdaj.
FargoCloudy and mild 42 above light rain
''asseltonCloudy, celm, mild.
HillsboroClear, fine.
St. CloudyCloudy and mild, calm.
Fergus FallsCloudv, calm.
Berlin close: Wheat, %c higher.
Budapest^c lower.
London close: Wheat %d higher to %d lower
corn %d lower. ^
Broomhall cabled:. Total world's shipments of
breadstuffs during the week. 9.760,000. Of the
above quantity the United Kinkdom took this
week 3,328,000 n^ainst 3,448,000 Inst week and
3,560,000 a year ago.
Southwest weather: Kansas city, clear, 41
above Atcrison, cloudj, 35 above St. Louis,
cloudy, 50 above: Omaha, clear, 40 above.
On nissoge Wheat 29.848.000 bu, decrease
l,17,00O bu, corn Xa,7S7,000 bu. Increase 567,-
000 bu.
Broomhall cabled. The light shipments of
wheat to Liverpool last week partially offset
the declines in America Saturday, opening prices
being unchanged to %d lower. Later both deliv
eries eased off %d on the larger Russian ship
ments and increasing stocks at this port. Corn
opened %d and %d lower, the principal factor
being the lower Ameiican cables of Saturday.
During the morning May advanced %d in sym
pathy with the squeeze ni March.
Weather map shows higher temperatures north
west, mild west and southwest rains In Ohio
valley, Pacific coast and In far south. Raining
at 1 a. m. at Huron, S. D., Columbus, Ohio,
Louisville and Nashville.
New York reports 17 loads of wheat and 15
loads of corn taken- for export.
5.690
41.000
18.433
3,520
Last
Year.
2,904,000
1,072,000
840,000
1,224,000
None
592,000
6,632,000
Spring."CogfpjtW
MIDWAY HORSE MARKET, Minnesota. Trans
fer. St. Paul, Minn., March 30.Barrett & Zim
merman report that the retail trade made up the
largest item in the opening market of the week.
Good heavy draft horses' were scarce farm mares
plentiful. Prices held at about last week's
quotations. Values: - Drafters, extra, $180
225 drafters, choice, $155@180 drafters, com
mon to good. $125@155 farm horses, extra, $120
@150 farm horses, choice. $110@120 farm
horses, common to good, $85@110.
PEORIA WHISKY, March JO.Whisky on the
basis of $1.30 for finished goods.
NE YORK COPPER AND LEAD, March 30.
- ^ and lead quiet and unchanged.*
Close Close
Saturday. ' Year Ago.
$ .72k@72% $ .69%
.7 3% .71
66%
r * Close
.7 3%
.66% -
.61 61
.75%@75%
43% - 43%@44 43@43%
48%@% 48?
60% 60%
32%
THE MINNEAPOLIS JOURNlli:
-July Wheat.
BEAR LEADERS OUT
They Attack tjie List Because It
$"e Does Not Respond to Bull/ $*}
Argument.
T he First Hour's Selling Attriouted:
*
Close
'Saturday.
$, ^72%
.69%@69%
.73 .65%@655B'
'.60%@60%
.75
r to Calls for Additional
V
New York, March 30.The opening movement
of prices was hesitating and irregular, but the
leading speculative stocks were lower. United
States Steel preferred opened 1% down and
Southern Pacific ran off 1% on a few transac
tions. New York Central fell % and Pennsyl
vania and United States Steel lost 1%. On the
other hand, Manhattan rose. 1%, St. Louis & San
Francisco 1% and Canada Southern 1%. There
was a generally yielding tendency after the
opening.
Bear leaders attacked the list vigorously on
the failure of the market to reflect the rise in
London or to lespond to the good bank statement
on Saturday. Southern Pacific was raided down
2% to 58, the lowest of the movement St. Paul,
New York Central, Pennsylvania, Reading,
Union Pacific. Amalgamated and Tennessee Coal
declined l@Hs below Saturday's close, and
Manhattan and St. Louis & Sau Francisco lost
their opening gains. Ian other less prominent
stocks also made substantial declines. Support
ing orders checked the decline and rallies from
the lowest extended to anoint or more In Amal
gamated, New York Central, St. Paul and Cana
dian Pacific and two points in Southern Pacific.
Speculation then became very dull and hesitating
and prices were inclined to go off again at 11
o'clock.
The desultory rally continued when the recov
ery was pretty complete, some small fractional
gains being established. Metropolitan Street
Railway gained a point. Southern Pacific, after
touching 60, fell back again a point, with a
slightly unsettled effect, but the tone became
firm again. The trading became intensely dull
at tlie rally. The first hour's selling -was at
tributed to calls for additional margins. Bonds
68% 7!*i
42%@ %
59
30% 30%
27% _.
27%
30%@31 28
80% 27%
34% 29%@%
were easier at noon.
Buying was encouraged by the absence of fresh
selling at the higher level of prices. The in
quiry, while small, carried St. Paul, Pennsyl
vania, Union Pacific, Amalgamated and a few
others, a fraction above last week's close.
Southern Pacific rallied to 60%. Bull leaders
were rather more disposed to hold Hie list steady
than to force an advance. Southern Pacific fell
back to near 59 later and the market eased off.
In the first hour to-day a special set move
ment was made against Union Pacific and
Southern Pacific, the latter exhibiting consider
able weakness. Practically all the international
list was lower and there was further evidence
of forced liquidation.
The continued absence of public interest, the
increasing intensity of the Southern Pacific con
troversy, and various adverse rumors ranging
from threatened labor troubles to fears of a
money stringency, wer the chief causes for the
unbettled state of the list.
While definite information is lacking,, there
is little doubt that some of the banks have
called loans, as preliminary to the adjustment
of present settlements.
Prices reacted slowly but the decline did not
become precipitate until New York Cential broke
to 130%. Other stocks fell off rapidlj then. St.
Paul and others to-iclimg the lowest. Declines
from the high level lan well over a point in
many instances, including Missouri Bfrcific, Noi
folk & Western, Reading, Pennsylvania. South
ern Pacific and Amalgr.mated. Selling slackened
somewhat toward 2 o'clock bat the market
showed no disposition to haiden much.
The apathy of the demand on rallies offered
no encouragement to the bulls, and active selling
was resumed, carrying pi Ices to the lowest of
the day. New York Central touched 130, St.
Paul lost 1% and manv active stocks extended
their previous fractional losses to April or more.
General Electric lost 2%. Sloss-Sheffield Steel
3%, and Anaconda 8 points. The tightening of
the call money market aggravated the weakness.
Covering by room shorts caused a rally of a
point in Southern Pacific, and of fractions in
other stocks. The rally was not well held and
Ahe closing was active at irregular.
Stock quotations reported for The Journal by
Watson &. Co., brokeis. Chamber of Commerce,
Minneapolis. Closing figures are bid.
Sales.
' Margins. ^ v
Stocks
300
300 100
Am. Cot,
Am. Car
do pr
Am. Locomot
do pr
Am Ice
do pr
1,900
200 600
8,00|Am. Sugar ....
do pr j^...
do pr .'....
Amal. Cop '..
At.,Top. & S.F
do pra ...
Bait. A- Oho.
do pr
Brook Rap Tr
Canadian Pac.
Ches. & Ohio
Chi. & Alton.
do nr
Corn ^Products
6,300
56.600
38,100
1^300
26,800
6,600
14,300
3,600 1,600
400 300 300
2.500 1,000
do pr . ...
Chi. Gr. W..
do pr B..
Chi. Term ...
do pr .
1,000 Ool , Fuel &. Ir
800|Col. Southern..
do 1st pr.
do 2d pr
Col.. H. C. & I
Consol Gas . .
Con. Tob , pr
Del. & Hudson
DU..S.S. & At
do pr ....
Erie
do Istpr..
do 2d pr.
Evans. & T. H
do pr
Gen. Electric.
Great Nor., pr
Illinois Central
Iowa Central .
do pr
K. C. & South.
do pr ... .
Lake S. & W.
Louis. & Nash.
M.,St.P. & Soo
do pr
Manhattan ...
Met. St. By..
Missouri Pac.
M., K. & T...
do pi-
Mexican Cent.
MPX. Nat ....
do pr
Nat. Lead . .
Norfolk & W..
do pr . -..
North Am. Co.
Nor Secur ...
400 N.-Western ...
40.000IN. Y. Central.
IN.Y..C.& St.L.
5,400 Ontario & W ..
(Pressed Steel..
I do pr
02,4001 Penn. R. R...
4001 People's Gas.
16,S00l Reading 1
700| do 1st pr..
l,800lRepub. Steel. |
6001 do pr . . .
I Rubber Goods..
do pr . ...
Rock Island ..
do pr
St.L. & San F.
do 2d pr...
st. z.. &. s. ~w?
do pr
St, Paul ....
Southern Pac
Southern Ry .
do pr
Tenn.Goal & I.
Te\as & Pac.
ToL.St.L & W.
do pr . . ..
Twin City R.T
Union Pacific.
do pr
U. S. Leather.
do pr . ...
U. S. Rubber.
do pr . ...
U. S. Steel...
do pr
Wabash
do pr
Western Union
Wheel & L. E|
do 1st pr.
do 2d pr..
Wis Central .
do pr
2,200
400
2,700
200 200
19,700
4,200 8,100
200 200
1,200 2,600
100 200
4,SfO 1 100
200
3,200
11,700
26,600
2,200
900
9,200
500
3,400
L00
24.500
1,000 3,600
900
1,000
200
42,400 25.500
5,600
200
3,600 3,900 3.600
61.100
200
1,400
400 100
100
14.600 13.300
1,200 8,200
300 200
700
'200
500
Total sales, 671,600.
*
High-
est.
Oil.
.|7%
91%
| Close
Low- | Bid. | Bid.
est. |Mr. 30|Mr. 28
43 39% 91%
27% 95%
7%
32
42% 39% 91
27% 94%
7
31
81% 63%
42% 39% 91 27% 94V,
7 "
31
123% 121
93% 65% 80%
97 89% 91%
93 63% 79%
97 89%
328V&
45% 3114
68%
33% 82 24 40
17
64%
126%
44 30% 68%
33% 81%
23%! 39% 1
10 I
2!%|
5% 26% b/i
3%
20
204V" 112%
167
m%
59% 19% I
77%
25% 78%
44% 33% 81% 24 39%
36 20%
si
23% 04%
38%
39%
64% I
38%
19%
112
163
8b Yt
103% 112
16514
14%, 22%
34% (i68 52% 64
85
ISS 100
136%
36% 63%
29% 53%
40
116%
68
324% 138% 135%
100%
24% 54% 26%
34% 66 52% 64
85
53% 64% 85%
190%
337*"
36% 64 "
30%
53%
1S8
"l36%
36% 63% 29% 53%
iis% iie%
69
139% 185%
107%
23% 55 26%
138
134% 105%
24%
94 26
35
25% 69%
90%
34%
25 68%
90%
102 103% 182 132%
"30% "29%
138% 101%
383,038 balances, $2,135,850. Money, 5@5%
per cent. ... ,-
PARTS, Mawh 30.4 p. m.Three per cent
renteh,.99 franbs 2% centimes for,theCaccoflnt
change on London, 25 francs 17 centimes for
checks* *
LONDON, March 30Gold premium at Lis
bon, 25 Madrid, 35.15.
BOSTON, March 30.Exchanges, $14,207,452
balances, $1,026,953.
LONDON, March 30.The amount of bullion
taken into the Bank of England on balance to
day was 14,000.
LONDON CLOSING STOCKS, March 30.Con-
sols for money, 90 3-16 consols for the account,
OO 3-16, Anaconda. 54 Atchison, 83%, Atchieon
v.aukee & St. Paul, 170 De Beers, 21% Den
ver & Rio Grande, 36% Denver & Rio Grande
preferred, 89 Erie, 35% Erie first preferred,
0S% Erie second preferred, 64% Illinois Cen
tral, 140% Louisville & Nashville, 120% Mis
souri, Kansas & /Texas, 25% New York Central,
137^, Norfolk & Western, 71 Norfolk & West
ern preferred, 31 Pennsylvania, 70% Rand
Mines, 11% Reading, 30 Reading first pre
ferred, 43 Reading second prefeired, 36, South
ern Railway, 32%. Southern Railway preferred,
86 Southern Pacific, 61 yt Union Pacific, 92%
Union Pacific preferred, 93 United States Steel,
36% United States Steel preferred, 87% Wa
bash, 28% Wabash preferred, 51 bar silver,
221-16d per ounce money, 3%g( per cent
the rate of discount iu the open market for.
short bills, 3%@% per cent the rate of dis
count in the open market for three mouths"
bills, 311-16@4 per cent.
FINANCIAL GOSSIP
Whallon, Case & Co , from New York: Lon
don comes steady, but fcends few if any or
ders The New York Journal hss a page about
United States Steel men going to .strike, but ends
up by sajing that J. P. Morgan can likely stop
it. It Is not taken seriously, but It may affect
the market, and it raaj be a scheme to cover
shorts. The rumor was out a week ago and then
suppressed.
C. E. Lewis from C. G. Gates. New York: I
yould not advise selling anything at the moment.
I think the market is due for a rally of from 1
to 3 points. If they get them up, however, I
would sell such stocks as St. Paul, Pennsylvania
and Steel stocks.
American Bridge strike extending. Other labor
conditions unchanged. Rumors that Union Pa
cific February statement will show net decrease
of $600,000. Hocking Valley earnings 6 per cent
on both stocks. Better prospects of peace among
conflicting Conner interests Rush of settlers
to Canadian northwest greater than in any
previous ear
New York to Watson: The stock market Is
hardening and, while the buying has not been
general, it has been of a good class, and the
short Interest seems to have found very few
good stocks coming out on the dips. This Is
causing a steadier feeling and a further improve
ment is possible.
The Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway
company reports for February show gross In
crease In earnings of $299,814 and net increase
of $89,687.
New York to Charles B. Lewis: While the
market shows stubboruess and Keene is quoted as
predicting a rally, the floor traders think there
will be a raid made on the market before the
close. The market gets very dull on all the
rallies, which, apparently, get more and more
feeble. At the same time, the buying is cer
tainly better than the selling.
Monday, March 80.Extra creamery but
ter, firm packing stock, steady. Strictly
fresh eggs, active. Fancy country dressed
veal, steady. Poultry, firm. Green fruits,
steady. Apples, steady. Potatoes, weafe.
BUTTERExtra creameries, per lb, 27c: firsts,
25c seconds, 18c dairies, extra, 22c nrsts, 15%
@16c seconds, 12c roll and print, 13@35c
packing stock, 8@12c.
EGGSStrictly fresh, cases included, loss off.
per doz, ll%c stiictly fresh, case count, He
checks and seconds, be.
CHEESETwins or flats, fancy, 14%c twins
or flats, choice. 13%c twins or flats, fair to
good, 13c daisies, fancy, 15c Young Americans,
fancy, 15c brick, No. 1, 15c brick, No. 2, lie
brick, No. 3, 7@8e primost No. 1, 8c pultost.
9c, Swiss, No. 1 round. 14fj,14%c Swiss, No. 2
round, 12c Swiss, No. 1 block, 14(g)14%c Swiss,
No. 2 block, 32c.
DRESSED POULTRYTurkevs, fancy, un
drawn. 18c, choice, 16@17c culls, 6@7c chick
ens, spring, fancy 15^16c fair to good, 12@
13c hens, fancy, 14c fair to good, 12@13c:
ducks, fancy, heads off, 10c geese, fancy, heads
off, 12%c fair to good. s@9c
LIVE POULTRYTurkeys, mixed coops, 13r
turkeys, thin, small, 9@10c chickens, hens, 33c,
chickens, roosters, old, 6e: ebicKenp, springs,
13@14c ducks, young, white, 12c ducks, young,
colored, lie geese, fat, heavy, 10@llc geese,
thin, no sale.
DRESSED MEATSVeal, fancy, per lb. 8@
8%c fair to good, 7c small or overweight, 5%@
6c: mutton, fancy, 8c lambs, pelts off, fancy,
lie: hogs, 8%c medium, 8%e: hea\j, 8c.
TOMATOESCalifornia, per crate, $4.50.
CABBAGEJHome grown, fancy, per 100 lbs,
$1.00.
POTATOESPer bu, small lots, 45@50c car
lots. No. 1, sacks extia, 35c medium, sacks ex
tra, 25c.
SWEET POTATOESCobdens, per brl. $4.
POPCORNOld rice, per lb, 4@3c new rice,
per lb, 2Z83c
NEW HONEYWhite, fancy, 1-lb sections,
17c
43 39% 91
27%
94 31%
124 121
93 67 80
97 9] 92% 65
127%
45 30% 68 33% 82 24 39% 16% 30
117%
69
324% 138%
135 107
23 54%
26% 17% 35 26% 69%
90%
102 102% 182 132%
87
30% 60%
92%
337 101% '58%
84% 19% 77% 23% 78 42% 75% 78%
17% 34% 25% 68 &
00%
100% 103 180% 130
100% 103 182
130%
37
29% 60 93
136% 101
58%
83%
136% 101
57%
19%l
76%
24 %
77%
42% 76 77% 69%
'53%
MONEY REPORTS
NEW YORK, March 30.Money on call steady
at 5% per cent prime mercantile paper, "5%@6
per cent sterling exchange steady, with ac
tual business in bankers' bills at $4.87 for de
mand and at $4.83% for 60-day bills posted
rates. $4.84%@4.87Tr4.88 commercial bills,
$4.83fi! 83%. Bar sliver, 49%c. Mexican dol
lars, 38%c. Government bonds steady 2s, reg
istered 106, coupon 106% 8s, registered 107%,
coupon 108 new 4s, registered 136, coupon 137
old 4s, regl'rtered 110\ cOupon 111 5s, registered
103%, coupon 103^.
NEW YORK, March 30.Exchanges, $120,-
987,343: balances, $8,024,680.
MINNEAPOLIS. March 30.Bank clearings to
day, $2,180,738.18. New York exchange, sell
ing rate, 50c premium buying rate, par. Chi
cago exchange, selling rate, 25c premium buy
ing rate, 25c discount. London sixty-day sight
documentary exchange, $4.83%.
ST PAUL. March 30.Clearings, $1,018,701.13.
BALTIMORE. March 80. Clearings, $2,726,-
042 balarces, $547,281. Money. per cent.
CHICAGO, March 30Clearings. $28,690-,122
balances, $8,133,TOO: New York exchange, 23c
premium foreign exchange unchanged sterling
posted at $4.84% for 60 days and at $4.87% for
dom art(k
PHILADELPHIA, March 30,-^Clearings, $12,-
19% '-
76%
25 78
42%
76 77% 69% 23v= 55%
161%
58% 31% 90% 63%
35% 23
42% 1
108%
89% 80 12
00 15 50%
35% 85% 27%
76%
79%
^0
at 55%
162%
60% 31%
55%
160%
58 31
63
37% 25%
63%
33%
108?
89{
00 12%
90%
12
90
35% 85% 28 50 87%
35% 84% 27%
48%
87%
"5 2"
47%
NEW YORK COTTON, March 30.The cotton
market opened weak at a decline of 3g, points.
Later business Increased the decline to 8@lo
points on the old ciop months and about 5
points on the new crop positions. The latter
were comparatively neglected. The local weak
ness had its origin in depressing cable news
public and private. Receipts were another
factor against the market here. These proved
to l e larger than expected, with estimates
pointing to 6.000 bales at the ports, against
11,704 last year. The Houston estimate, on the
other hand, was smaller than expected and
this with somewhat unfavorable weather condi
tions in parts of the south arrested the downward
movement after which there was a partial rally
on covering. The local market was not active.
At noon the market was feverish and at about
the low level df the morning, a net decline of
3a1 points. Spot cotton quiet middling up
lands, 9.35c: middling gulf. 10.20c.
Estimated receipts at the ports to-day. 16.000
bales, against 14,394 last week and 11,704 last
vear. For the week. 100.000 bales, against 80,540
last week and 66,646 last year. To-day's re
ceipts at New Orleans were 8(485, bales, against
3,680 last year, and at Houston 2,553 bales,
against 3.034 last year.
Spot closed quiet. 15 points lower: middling
uplands. 9.90c middling gulf, 10.15c. Sales.
1,211 bales.
00%
161%
31%
91 64%
37 12%
90 15 52
35% 85% 27 RL
87%
22% 52
33%
2414 47 I
48 % 49% 87% 23 52
33%
GENERAL PRODUCE
OFFICIAL QUOTATIONS OF THE MINNEAPO-
LIS PRODUCE EXCHANGE. -
choice, 1-lb sections. 15@16c. -
DKirD PEASFancy yeUow, per bu, $1.75,
medium. $1.50, green, fancy, $1.75 medium,
$1.25 marrowfat, $2.50.
DRIUD BEANSFancy navy, per bu, $2.75
choice navy, $2.50: medium, hand picked, $2 25,
medium, fair, $1.75 brown, $2.50 fair to good,
$1.20@t 25.
APPLESJonathans, per brl, $4 Ben Davis,
$3@3.25. Kings, $3 50 Spies. $3 25: Russets,
S? "JO Wlnebaps, $3 50, Missouri Pippins, $3 25
WillOW- Twigs, $4 Baldwins, $2.75@3 Green
ings. $3@3.2* Roman Beauty, $8 50.
PINEAPPLESPer crate, $5.50@6.
ORANGESCalifornia navels, as to size, fan
cv, $2.25, choice, as to size, $2.75@3 Califor
nia budded seedlings, $2.25.
LEMONS California, fancy, $3.50@3.75
Choice. $3.25@3.50.
TANGERINESPer half box, $2.50.
GRAPE FRUITPer box, $4.25.
STRAWBERRIESFloridas, per qt, 50c,
BANANASFancy, large bunches, $2.75 me
dium bunches, $2.25@2.50 small hunches, $2@
2.15.
VEGETABLESWax beans, per bu, $6 egg
plant, per do, $1.50@1.75 radishes, per doz,
bunches, 75fr80c letti.ee, per doz, 45c lettuce,
heads, per doz, 75@85c mint, per doz, 25@30c
encumbers, per doz, $1.6$@1.75 celery, per doz,
85c@$l turnips, per bu. 40c carrots, per bu,
25@30c pie plant, per lb, 7c.
NEW YORK PRODUCE, March 80.Buttei1.
receipts, 52,214 pkgs market firm state dairy,
17@25c extra creamery, 29c held creamery, l o
@24c creamery, common to choice, ie(is28%c
factory, 13@16e renovated, 12@12%c. Cheese
receipts, 1,080 pkgs market firm state full
cream fancy small colored fall made. 15c small
white fall made. 14% c large colored fall made.
14%@14%c large white fall made. 14%@14%c.
Eggs, receipts, 37,754 pkgs firm state and
Pennsylvania. 1513%c western, 14%c south
ern, 14%c Kentucky, 14@14%c.
25% 64
38% 19%
105% 313
166%
15 23
34% 66% S"*
64%
85
191 300
337
36% 64
30% 54
CHICAGO PRODUCE, March 30.Butter-
Firm creameries, 18(Et.28c dairies, 14@24c. Eggs
Firm at mark, cases included, 13c. Cheese
Steady twins, 13@13%c daisies, 13%@13%c
Young Americas, 13%c. Drested Poultry
Steady turkeys, 15@17c, chickens, 10@13c.
47%
MISCELLANEOUS
CHICAGO PROVISIONS, March 30.Provis-
ions opened easv on a. leav run of hogs, but
steadied at the opening decline. May pork,
opened 12%gl5 lower at $17.92% and reacted
to $18: May lard opened unchanged to 2%c
down at $10 05 to $10.07%, selling to $9.95 and
May ribs 2%c depresesd at $9.82%.
Close: Pork. May, $18.12%: July. $17.32%:
September. $17. Lard. May, $10.07%: July,
eptember,
9.85. Ribs. May, $9.85,- July, $9^67%@9.70,
$9.57%9.W.
NEW YORK PROVISIONS, March 30.Beef-
Dull. PorkSteady. LardQuiet prime west
ern steam, $10.40.
LIVERPOOL PROVISIONS, March 30.Pork,
prime mess western steady, 81s hams short cat.
steady. 54s bacon, Cumberland cut, quiet, 31s,
short ribs, steady, 53s loug clear middles light,
steadv, 52s long clear middles heavy, steady,
52s 6d shoulders, square, quiet, 43s, lard. Ameri
can refined, quiet, ols. - _,,
PROVISIONS
NO WAGON-CARRIAGE STRIKE.^,.,
Chicago, March 30.After an all-night session
representatives of the carriage and wagon mak
ers' association and the striking union workmen
practically settled their differences early to-day.
I t was decided by the strikers to seek a settle
ment through arbitration on Hie question of
wages and hours and the time limit of the agree
ment with the unioii, Recognition of the union,
? walking delegate and other minor demands of
he workmen were granted at the conference.
The deciiion of the aibitration committee must
be made by April 30
MARCH ,30, 1903. 4
QUIET- AND STEADY
Cattle, Hogs and Sheep Show Mod-
* ^ , erate Receipts at Souths/ '
- . - -. . St. Paul,
Prices Not Materially ChangedDe-
" mand Fair for the Good
-- - Lots.
sSouth St. Paul, Minn.. March 30.Estimated
receipts at the union stockyards todav Cattle,
475 calves, 150 hogs, 1,450 sheep, 825 ears,
41.
The following table shows the receipts from
Jan. 1, 1903, to date, as compaied with the
same period in 1902.
Year, Cattle. Calves. Hogs. Sheep Cars.
1903 37,974 8.027 200,140 152,312 1,830
1902 41,478 7,637 119,044 135,891 4,433
Inc 370 30,096 16,321 40-1
Dec 3,504
The following table shows the teceipts thuh
far in March, as compared with the same period
in 1002:
Year. Cattle. Calves. Hogs
1903 15,671 4 162 51,860
1902 16.524 4,002 48.3^2
Inc 100 3.17S
Dec 853
Official receipts for the past week are as fol
lows:
Date. Cattle. Calves. Hogs. Sheep.Cars.
Match 21 33 6 828 252 11
March 23 767 170 991 5*3 4S
March 24 1,030
March 25 732
March 26 'i&i
March 27 280
March 28 33
Railroads entering the yards reported receipts
for the day by loads as follows Chicago Great
Western, 7 Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul, Gi
Minneapolis & St. Louis, 4, Chicago, St. Paul,
Minneapolis & Omaha. 5 Great Northern. 11
Northern Pacific. 4 Soo, 2 Chicago, Rock Island
& Pacific. 2 total, 41.
Disposition of stock Satin day, March 28:
Firm Cattle. Hogs. Sheep.
Swift & Co 11 1.732 196
W. E. McCormick ...... l .... 6
W. G. Bronson 8
Slimmer & 31 2
City butcherThomas s .
Country buyers
Hogs
Date Av
March 21
Receipts moderate, quality largely poor not
as good as on Saturday price range, $6.70@7.15
bulk. $7@7.05 light and inferior grades sell
ing at $6.80(^6.95 mixed. $7@7.05 butcher and
heavy, $7.10@7.15- nothing good ou sale.
Hogs62. 250 lbs, $7.15 63, 240 lbs, $7.13.
35, 220 lbs, $7.10 33, 222 lbs, $7.05 22. 234
lbs, $7.05, 66, 210 lbs, $7, 82, 212 lbs. $7 75.
190 lbs, $7 52. 189 lbs, S6.93: 20, 206 lbs. $6.83,
60, 175 lbs, $6.80, 40, 153 lbs, $6.80, 30, 153
lbs, $6.70.
Odds and Ends8, 170 lbs, $6 95 7, 230 lbs.
$6.95 14, 383 lbs, $6.95 4, *300 lbs, $6.80 0,
166 lbs, $6.65.
Pigs and Underweightsi, 130 lbs. $6.50: 2,
325 lbs, $6.35 9, 126 lbs, $6.25 7, 101 lbs,
$6 25.
Stags and Boars1, 680 lbs, $5.25 1, 410
lbs, $5 1, 530 lbs, $4.50, 2, 155 lbs, $4 1, 360
lbs, $3.
CATTLEReceipts of all kinds rather light.
Butcher cattle steady. Stuff on sale included a
few pretty good steers which sold at $4.35, but
aside from these theie was \ery little better
than common to fair in qualltv. Bulls dull.
Veals steady. Milch cows steady. In the
stocker and feeder division prices ruled steady.
Good kinds moied readily others quiet. Sales:
Butcher Steers17, 1.212 lbs, $4.35: 1, 1,300
lbs, $4 1. 1,200 lbs, $3 75 2. 1.320 lbs, $4.13
7, 1,117 lbs, $3.90. 1, 1.090 lbs, $3.65.
Butcher Cows and Heifers11, 3,056 lbs. $3.75
2. 1,020 lbs, $3.50 3. 1.120 lbs. $3: 2. 1,175 lbs.
$2.75 1, 3,150 lbs, $3.60: 1. 1.260 lbs, $3.40 1.
1,180 lbs $2.85 2 970 lbs, $2.60.
Cutters and Canners1, 810 lbs. $2 30 1, 960
lbs. $2 25 1, 830 lbs, $1.30 2, 1,105 lbs, $2.85
1, 760 lbs. $2. ' V '
Buteher Bulls1, 1.600 lbs. $3.13 1, 3,330 lbs,
$2.75: 1, 1,270 lbs, $2.85 1. 1.470 lbs, $2.75.
Veal Calves3. 100 lbs. $5, 1 120 lbs, $4.50
20. 103 lbs, $5.10: 1, 110 lbs. $3.
Stock and 'Feeding Steers7. 658 lbs, $4 25,
988 lbs. $3.75 17, 1.764 lbs. $3.60, 6, 516 lbs,
$3 50: 4, 863 lbs, $3, 0. 962 lbs. $3.80 8, 765
lbs, $3 70 27. 492 lbs. $3 53 10, 301 lbs, $3.15.
Stock Cows and Heifers2, 1,035 lbs. $2.90 7.
574 lbs. $2.60: 5, 270 lbs. $2.50: 5..626 lbs, $2.63
2, 910 lbs. $2.60 1, 850 lbs, $2.23^
Stock and Feeding Bulls1, 970 lbs, $2.75 1,
930 lbs, $2.50 1, 610 lbs, $2.75.
Milch Cows and Springers4 cows, $105 1
cow, $33: 1 cow. $26 1 cow and 1 calf, $20.
SHEEPSheep and lambs quoted steady. De
mand very good for good kinds, others a little
low. Receipts consisted almost entirely of Shorn
wethers, which told at $6.
Sales: 37 lambs, 63 lbs, $5 767 shorn weth
ers, 101 lbs, $0
Among the shippers on the market were: Nel
son & Grothe, Hanska, C. F. Berg, Northfield
S. H. Pettis, St. Teter, T. Reinsky, C. Benson,
Langford Rusell & S , Britton Ward & Har
rington, Brjant C. Tree, Wheatland: J. Rue
sink, Cogswell A. B. Larson. Madison E. ('.
Nelson, Walnut Grove. J. Anderson, Evansville
Thelsen & B.. J. D. Auer, Albany J . Schmidt,
Melrose A. Wester. Rothsay: A. F. Renner, Pel
ican Rapids: Stevens Brothers. Osakis H. L.
Holvike. Iiovalton. C Black, Cannon Falls: C.
\ , McOonnell, Belle I'liine.
CHICAGO LIVE STOCK, March SO.-Cattle
Receipts, 25,000 market steady good to prime
steers. $5@5.50 poor to medium, $3.75@4 75.
stockers and feeders, $2.75@4.73, cows, $1.50
(4 50 heifers, $2.50fe4 75 canners, $1.50@2 75-
bulls. $2 25?44.30 calves, $3@6.75 Texas fed
steers, $4(g4.50.
HogsReceipts to-day, 34,000 to-morrow, 25,-
000, left over, 2,580: market 5@10c lower
mixed and butchers, $7.15@7.35 good to choice
heavy, $7.35@7.55 rough heavy, $7.10@7.33
light, $6.90(^7.20, bulk of sales. $7.20
SheepReceipts, 20,000 sheep steady: lambs
steady good to choice wethers, $5.5026.73 fair
to choice mixed. $4.5C@5.50: western sheep,
$5.50@6.75 native lambs, $5.50@7.50 western
lambs, $5.50@7.50.
SIOUX CITY LIVE STOCK, March 30.Re-
ceiptsCattle, 4,500 hogs, 3,800.
Hogs5@10c lower. Sales 68, 189 lbs,
$6.90, 04, 248 lbs, $7.15 48. 287 lbs. $7.25.
CattleStockers lower killers steady. Sales:
11 beeves, 1,040 lbs, $4 19 beeves. 1,430 lbs,
$4.60 8 cows, 890 lbs. $2.50 14 cows, 1.020 lbs.
$3.75 9 cows, 1,300 lbs, $4 10 stockers, 740
lbs, $3.75 48 stockers, 890 lbs. $3.75 28 stock
ers, 980 lbs, $4.23. 18 yearlings. 466 lbs. $3.75
49 yearlings, 040 lbs, $4, 58, 647 lbs, $4.40.
ST. LOUIS LIVE STOCK, March 30.Cattle
receipts, 2,000 market steady beef steers, $3.50
@3.25 stockers and feeders. $2 30@4.G3 cows
and heifers. $2.25(g4.40 fancy heifers up to $5
Texans, $2.50@4.3O.
Hogs, receipts. 5,500: market 5c to 10c lower
pigs, $6.9u*77.l5- packers, $7.10@7.30 butch
ers. $7.20((j/7.43.
Sheep, receipts. 1,500 market firm sheep,
$4.50@6 lambs, $5.70(0(7.40.
KANSAS CITY LIVE STOCK. March 30.Cat-
tle receipts. 5.000: market steady to weik, beef
steers. $3.15@5.25: Texans. $1.90tf?4.20: cows
and heifers, $1.75(t4.50 stockers and feedeis,
$3.75(^4.65.
Hogs, receipts. 3.000 market weak to 3c
lower, heavy, $7.25@7 40 packers. $7.10f?7.30
yorkers. $7.10@7.15. pigs. $6 30@6 95.
Sheep, receipts, i.OOO. market steady sheep,
$3.80@6.50 lambs, $5.75@7.45.
OMAHA LIVE STOCK, March 30.Cattle, re
ceipts 3,200 market steady beef steers, $4(c"
5 25, cows and heifers, $3ft 70 Hogs, re
ceipts 4,000. market 5 cents lower, beavj, $..2r
@7.35, pigs. $6 50@7. Sheep, receipts 8,Oi)0:
market steady sheep, $3.75tfj,G'.3j lambs, $0&.
7.35.
' HE DIDN'T GO TO CHURCH.
Marine City, Mich., March 30.Arthur Wcll
housen. a 15 year-old lad, went to his room to
dress yesterday morning, after a heated argument
with his parents as to whether he should go to
church. A shot was beard soon after he w'ent
upstairs and the boy was found dead on his bed,
with a bullet through his brain. The parents
insist that the shooting was accidental, but the
lad's friends who knew his temper declare he
committed suicide.
house and Mr. BruBell pare his services, with
those of all the cast. The entertainment Satur
day evening at the Auditorium will conclude the
work of the committee.
t
$1,000 FOR SWEDEN.
Chicago, March 30.The Swedish central re
lief committee began a drama in the Grand
opera-house last evening which netted $1,000.
The play was In Swedish, under the direction of
Christ Brusell. It wis illustrative of peasant
life in Sweden. Mr. Hamlin donated the opera-
GRAIN COMMISSION.
New Chamber Commerce . * -
Minneapolis, Minnesota.
Offices: Chicago, iUlwaukee, and Dnlutli
Send us your { ^bSftVi**.
WOODWAR8 D & CO.
I,*,* GRA/N COMMISSION^
BRANCHESCbioeco and-Milwaukee, Orders for future delivery executed in all marketav f *
W
Sheep. Cars.
29,431 1,430
28,736 1,364
655 66
410 392
88 37 39
2.672 2,746 1,630 1,866 1,733
2,467
891
2,296
47
80 1
Weight.
..213
32 413
Av. Cost.
$7.13 7.33 '
7.30 7.15 7 12
7.11 7.12
.219 .207 .213
211 -
.200 .224 '
Price range
7.00Si7.4 7.00@7.65 7.00 6.95@7.40 6.85(^7.30
7.00@7.3O 6.90(^7.30
CHAS. E. LEWIS
~-1%
STOCKS, BONDS,
GRAIN, PROVISIONS
V,*
412-415 Chaitibir of Commtroa, '
JUembersAR Kxehanze*.
EDWARDS,
WOOD
68 77 74 il
42 26
XSTABX.XSKS117 9
MINNEAPOLIS. ^ ^
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Bartlctt, Prazier A Co* _ , ^~
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Grains, Stocks, Provisions I
Bought and aoM in all markets for cash or oa I
reasonable -margin*. \ |
flembcrs of All Principal Exchanges^.
Private Wires.
Write tor oar dally market letter and private
telegraph ciphermafled free. % ,
Ship Your Grain lo Us. (
Beat Vacuities. Liberal Advance**
B Chamber of Commeroe.
312 Guaranty Loan Baildlaa
MINNEAPOLIS.
Finley Barrell & Co
Brokers In Grain, Provisions,
Stocks and Bonds.
Members New York Stock Exchange
Denman F. Johnson, Wgr.
# 08 New Chamber Gommeroe Building.
TelephoneMain. IMS. T.C.,2732.
NEW YORK COFFEE AND SUGAR, March 30.
Coffee futures opened steady at unchanged
prices to dn advance of 5 points under braalled
primary receipts and better European cables.
Trading was quiet, however, and while the mar
ket continued steady under a little demand of
shorts, mlddaj prices were dull on the opining
basis. Sales to that time were reported of
9,000 bags, including March, 4.20c: Maj, 4.20c,
June, 4.30c: July, 4.35c October, 4 6TC Decem
ber, 4 85(^4 90c January, 4.90S4.95c
RioSteady No. 7 ltio, 4, $3 exchanges 12
3-3?d. Receipts. 6 00o bags: cleared for the
United States, 4.000. stock. 497.000.
SugarRaw, ste-'dy. fair refining, 3 3-16c:
centrifugal. 96 test. 3%c, molasses sugar. 2
15-16c refined, steady crushed, 6 40c powdered,
4.90c- granulated, 4.80c.
CoffeeQuiet, No. 7 Rio. o^c.
MolassesFirm New Orleans, 31@40c. i
DRrPLOWER PLEADS
He Thinks, for the Present, That He
Is Not Guilty.
New York, March 30.Dr. Richaid C.
Flower to-day pleaded not guilty to the
indictments charging' him with grand lar-'
ceny, but reserved the privilege of with
drawing that plea on April 7 and making
any motion he saw fit.
TO RATIFY CUBAN TREATY.
Washington. March 30.Ratifications of th
Cuban reciprocity treaty will be exchanged at
the state department to-morrow morning. To
day Senor Quesada, the Cuban minister, called
upon Secretary Hay and officially notified him
of the ratification of the treaty by the Cuban
senate as reported in the news dispatches. As
there is only one copy of the treaty in Washing
ton, the other being en route from Havana, the
exchange of ratifications will be constructive
rather than actual. Secretary Hay accepting as
sufficient the assurance that the Cuban copy
has been dispatched to Washington. No date
has been set for the assembling of congress to
take action on the treaty.
&co:
Prompt Retamf.
EMINENT PIANIST DEAD.
Denver. March 30.Frederick Roscovltz. tbff
eminent Hungarian pianist, is dead from general
debility. He was 67 years of age. Mr. Bosco
rltz was the last living pupils of Chopin. He
was born in Budapest, Hungary, and lias been
in America twenty-three years. Mr. Boscovits
came to Denver last September and opened a
school here. Illness overtook him and he was
placed in St. Joseph hospital, where he died.
His only living relative in this country was his
wife, who resides in Cleveland, Ohio.
JAPANESE DROWNED.
Special to The Journal.
Welser, Idaho, March 30 A Japanese in the
employ of the Pacific & Idaho Northern railroad
was drowned in the Welser river Saturday night,
about fifty miles north of here. The river Is
very high and he was keeping driftwood from
settling around the railroad bridge that crosses
the Weiser. He was in a boat which capsized.
He was unable to swim and the river being very
swift at that point he was carried out into the
stream.
A FINE SPORTING EVENT.
London. March 30.The Globe to-day says a
Harvard-Yale-Oxford-Cambridge field meeting has
been arranged for this summer.
J. F. WHALLON,
GEO. F. CASE,
Whallon,cas e & Co.
STOCKS, GRAIN, PROVISIONS.
MEMBERS'Chicago Board of Trader
( Mpls. ChamberCommeroe
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68 CHAMBER
OF COMMERCE.
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( New York Stock Exchange
Stoottwt and 0OIMIS.
Members N. Y. Stock Exchange
Chicago CorrespondentsJ. H. Wrenn & Co.
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JOSEPH H. MARTIN,
'-(Formerly of * Martin & Wyman).- vj
109 Chamber of Commerce. ' -
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Careful attention given to shipment* anof
execution of orde rs for future delivery*
We Oet Highest Market PrloM.
FITCH & CO.
LiveStockyarda,
Stock
traio n South Paul, Xtaa*
Established in lSSff. *
GEO. C. BAGI.EY,
CHAS. M. CASE.
Up-Town Office.
GLOBE BUILDING.
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