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The Minneapolis journal. (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, February 08, 1904, Image 1

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1904-02-08/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE I
PEICE TWO CENTS.
idb&M&jM $ik
Having Destroyed the Best of the
Business District, It Now Devas
tates the Harbor Front.
Estimates of the Loss Range as
High as Two or Perhaps Three
Hundred Millions.
Firemen and Apparatus from Many
Neighboring Cities Hasten to the
Stricken City's Aid.
BOILED DOWN FIRE FACTS
Fire started yesterday morning in John E. Hurst company's
cellar at Liberty and German streets.
This was in a nest of big buildings and this, wit hnarrow
streets, preventedfiremenfrom stopping it.
Flames have burned best part of business district, and. are
now raging on the harbor front.
Fire departments of seven cities have come to the aid of the
exhausted local firemen.
Impossible to estimate loss, but thought to run from $200,000,-
000 to $300,000,000.
Big insurance companies will lose from $500,000 to $2,000,000
each.
Business districts wiped outwholesale houses, railroad of-
fices, financial buildings, lumber and shipping districts.
As yesterday was Sunday, casualties were few. One man was
killed, 35 injured.
A hundred government engineers sent from Washington to
aid infirefighting.
Martial law declared in Baltimore and a special session of the
legislature called.
The fire burned 27 hours before it was checked.
Number of persons thrown out of employment, 20,000.
District burned over is fully two miles square.
Baltimore, Feb. 8.1:15 p. m.Sweeping along furiously, but now ap-
parently checked by the united efforts of firemen from a number of cities,
the greatest conflagration in the history of Baltimore is raging in the harbor
section, and bids fail to roll up a property loss far i nexcess of all previous
estimates.
The estimates vary, ranging as high as $200,000,000 to $300,000,000.
With the fierce wind blowing, nothing could stem the tide of the flames till
all property in that section was burned to the water's edge.
From the myriads of lumber yards on the western sides of Jones Falls,
the little rrmdy stream that flows thru the business section of the Oriole city,
the flames leaped over to the other side of the stream and were rapidly eating
Into the mass of oyster and fruit packing establishments, which fast crumbled
into ruins.
The clanging of hospital ambulances bore evidence of minor casualties.
Up to this hour approximately thirty-five persons have been injured, includ-
ing one fireman.
THE FI RE IS CHECKED.
2:40 p. m.The progress of the fire has now been checked and it Is
burning itself out. The last place to go was the ice house and coal yard of
the American Ice company. The coal yard, which spread out about 200 yartts
south of the ice house, was the means of staying the march of the flames on
the south and Jonese Falls on the east.
The Norfolk wharf of the Baltimore Steam Packet company, which was
stocked with barrels of resin and other miscellaneous merchandise, was de-
stroyed before the fire had attacked the merchandise company's property.
It took twenty-seven hours to stop the progress of the great fire.
MILITARY CONTROL. OF CITY.
The city government has been entirely suspended and the city is under
complete military control. The city officials are adopting the most heroic
measures to check the flames, and Governor Warfleld has telegraphed to the
secretary of state ordering a special session of the legislature this evening.
SMOULDERING ACRES IN HEART OF CITY
Conflagration Rivals in Property Destruction the Great Chicago
Fire of 1871Was Still Beyond Control at Noon.
Baltimore, Feb. 8.Acres of buildings, covering territory more than half
a mile in length, and from three to six block in width, were destroyed in
Baltimore's great fire, which started yesterday morning.
No one can tell today the extent of the disaster, which now has reached
proportions that rival the Chicago fire of 1871, hitherto the greatest fire
In the United States, and to estimate the total loss is the merest folly.
The wholesale dry goods, produce, lumber, shipping, railroad and finan-
cial interests have been destroyed, nothwithstanding heroic efforts on the part
of the fire department, reinforced by almost numberless firemen from Wash-
ington, Philadelphia, Wilmington, Newark, N. J., Harrisburg and New York
city.
THE FIRE'S DEVASTATING COURSE.
Starting 4n the wholesale district the fire burned out every wholesale
house of note in the city, swept along thru the Baltimore and Fayette street
retail sections, destroyed all the prominent office buildings leveled banks
and brokerage offices, as well as the Chamber of Commerce and Stock
Exchange in the financial section then sped on thru the wholesale and export
trade sections centering about Exchange place.
It finally brought up at the Falls, where it invaded the lumber district.
This morning the fire was burning fiercely along Pratt street. It had
gutted the old and new buildings along that thorofare, and on the wharves,
which house hundreds of firms doing business all over the world. It had
swept away the bridges over Jones Falls and had burned Into the great
freight terminals of the Pennsylvania and Baltimore & Ohio railroads on
President street. Millions of feet of lumber have gone up in smoke.
To describe in detail the fire of Feb. 7, which will go down in the history
of the world as one of its greatest disasters, is simply an impossibility, just
as it is impossible, at this time, to give an adequate idea of the amount of
loss, the number of buildings destroyed or the firms which have gone out of
business. These are facts which will not develop for days to come.
HELP FROM NEW YORK CITY.
In the face of the fire fiend's fury Baltimore's equipment of twenty-five
engines was almost useless. Aided by four companies from Washington, as
many more from Philadelphia, two more from Wilmington and another from
Chester, Pa., it was still unable to check, last night, the" progress of the
flame*. This morning a half dozen of New York city's most powerful steam-
AContinued on Second Page.}
BALTIMORE'S GREAT FIRE
NOW APPARENTLY CHECKED
4-^ 1A- x" *K/i'i*ito^l!^^4'^raw
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8
MONDAY EVENING,
GOVERNMENT MGMBRS WII^ JP&P
Washington, Feb. 8 President Roosevelt has comedo the
assitance of the city of Baltimore. Upon the appeal of the local
authorities he has ordered Unitted States engineers to that city
to assist in checking the spreadofflamesthere
At 2:30 o'clock the first of the soldiers boarded a train at the
Pennsylvania station, only an hour after the order had come.
The force is under command of Major Burr and the engineers,
100 strong, were drawn from the Washington barracks.. .They
carried with them 1,600 pounds of gun cotton with fuses and
electrical detonators.. At Baltimore they will meet another
store of ammunition, comprising 5,000 pounds of guncottou
from the Advance supply at Dover, Del.
The engineers go equipped with tents and ten days* ra-*
tions, so that they may take care of themselves.
.MHtlllimiMtnmtlHHMMtmMIMHmMMMMtM.HMMmmM.
MAP OF THE CITY OF BALTIMORE
The burned portion of the business district is "shown by the shaded blocks. Since the map was
made theflameshave swept on to the harbor front, where they are now devastating the warehouses,
lumberyards, wharves and shipping.
WMIWWmtMHlWWtHMWMHHMMHMmWMWMmiMWmiHWMjMWtMWWlWmWMtMIMlMlMIMWMI M.-MM.I
^^5'W*'rf'^*,^"w/^^^ig
FEKRUAKY
&"'
AWAITING THE REPORT
i--
8. 1904.
JAPAN STRIKES AT LAST
HAN N i DOINf WILL
The Senator Passed a Comforta
ble NightMorning Consul
tation Is Delayed.
Washington, Feb. 8.:At the Arling
ton hotel this morning it was reported
that Senator Hanna had passed a com
fortable night. The doctors will not
hold a consultation until about noon.
-This bulletin was issued at 11
o'clock by Senator Hanna's physi
cians:.
Mr. Hanna's temperature is a little high
er. 103 pulse 84,.regular respiration 24.
A little irritability of stomach mind quite
clear. General condition good.
Doctors Rixey, Osier, Carter.
TROOPS TO DISEMBARK
Japanese Minister Says 'Twill Be Done
in Three Days.
London, Feb. 8. Baron Hayashi,
the Japanese minister, states that the
military steps contemplated by Japan
for the preservation of its interests in
the far east already have commenced.
The minister was careful to point
out, however, that this does not mean
actual hostilities, but strategic action
thru pouring Japanese troops into
'Korea and Manchuria. This, he
states, is now in progress.
Baron Hayashi calculates that
forces adequate to meet any emergen
cy will have Jjeen fully disembarked
within two or three days. He regards
the breaking off of negotiations as
tantamount to war and does not look
for any formal declaration. The min
ister reiterates the statement that the
Russian reply was not delivered and
declares his belief to be that it never
was sent.
MEDIATION ATTEMPTED
Declarations of Neutrality Expected
from Friendly Powers.
Paris,, Feb. 8.A person of high of
ficial standing is quoted as saying:
French diplomacy will be equal to the
task of striving to effect a conciliation
and sparing Japan the crushing defeat
which threatens her. The final crushing
of Japan is certain and under conditions
France considers to the interest of Great
Britain, Japan's ally, to exercise decisive
pressure in order to avert war.
There is no doubt that France is ready,
if the Japanese government is willing, to
offer her mediation to Japan and Russia,
if it is not too late. Lord Lansdowne has
offered Japan Great Britain's good offices
and King Edward has sent a long tele
gram to the mikado, begging him to re
flect.
At the present time China is remaining
neutral. The intervention of a third power
being unlikely, a general conflict in the
far east is not to be fearod.
At the first decisive defeat sustained by
Japan, France and Great Britain will re
new the offer of their good offices should
I these have been declined the first tune.
FAIR AND CONTINUED COLD TO-NIGHT AND TUESDAY
16 PAGES-FLVE O'CLOCK/
RUSSIA'S DELAYS FUTILE
Troops of the Mikado Loaded on 40
Ships Are Making for the Main
land of Korea.
Reported that Jap Warships Have
Already Seized Russian Trading
Ships and War Is On.
Russia Shows a Bit of the White
FeatherWarns Alexieff to
Be Careful.
WAR NEWS IN A NUTSHELL
Japan broke off diplomatic relations with Russia on Saturday
afternoon.
Russia immediately directed her minister to withdraw.
Japanese minister in London states breaking off the negotia-
tions was tantamount to a declaration of war.
Russian troops leave Mukden, in Manchuria, for Korea,
Japanese squadron reported off Wei-Hai-Wei.
Russian trading ships seized by Japanese warshipsthe first
overt act of war,
Japan cuts cable communicating with Korea and dispatches
troops.
Russia asks France to mediate and instructs Viceroy Alexieff
not to provoke hostilities.
Great Britain and Italy send ships to protect their interests.
France, Great Britain, Germany and the United States ex
pected to declare neutrality.
ALEXIEFF WARNED TO E CAKKFUL
St. Petersburg, Feb, 8.At a nimportant council, held at the palace to-
day uf|der the presidency of the czar, it was decided to telegraph to Viceroy
Alexieff scrupulously to avoid any step which might provoke hostilities.
THIS IS FIRST OVERT ACT.
Berlin, Feb. 8.A. strong fleet of Japanese warships, reported to be on
its way to Chemulpho, Korea, has seized several Russian trading steamers.
JAPANESE SHIPS ARE OFF MASAMPHO.
Washington, Feb. 8.-The state department has received a cablegram
from the American legation at Seoul to the effect that it is reported Japanese
warships have arrived off. Masampho, but that telegraphic communication
has been cut off and it is impossible to confirm the report.
FIGHTING EXPECTED HOURLY.
Berlin, Feb. 8.A dispatch to the Cologne Gazette from Vienna says Ad-
miral Von Spaun, commander-in-chief of the Austrian navy, has received a
dispatch from the commander of the Austrian legation guard at Peking ta
the effect that Japan has embarked her regiment of guards and two army
divisions on forty steamers.
The dispatch added that the Russian cruiser division had sailed from
Port Arthur and that fighting was hourly expected.
JAPAN-KOREAN CABLE CUT.
Paris, Feb. 8.The French foreign office was advised this afternoon
that the Japanese have cut the cable connecting Japan and Korea. The ob-
ject of this action is believed to be to prevent news of the operations of tine
Japanese reaching the Russians, which was possible, no matter how closely
censored the dispatches sent. Following the breaking off of relations between
Russia and Japan, the cutting of the cable is regarded here as significant of
the purpose of the Japanese to begin hostilities.
COSSACKS PROTECT PORT ARTHUR RAILROAD.
It is learned that among the troops sent by Russia to the vicinity of the
Yalu river are 15,000 Cossacks, whose province it is to destroy the communi-
cations of any Japanese army landing along the coast or trying to strike the
Port Arthur railroad. The French military experts consider this a good tac-
tical move, for the reason that the Japanese have only a small cavalry foroe,
insufficient to cope with that of the Russians.
*J^^^r^-^fc-:
Vv?
"-*,:r--
It is probable that a collective note
signed by the British, French and Ger
man chancellors and it is hoped by the
American secretary of state will short
ly be addressed to Japan, notifying her
of the neutrality of these four power*
in whatever may happen.
JAPANESE PREPARATIONS
Civilians Departing"-Troops Sailing
Chinese Greatly Excited.
Port Arthur, Feb. 8.The Japanese
consul at Che-Foo has sent a telegram
to a Japanese elder here urging the
departure of all Japanese from Port
Arthur and Port Dalney. A number
sailed for Nagasaki to-day.
The greatest excitement prevails
here. No steamers are available, and
the Japanese are trying to charter a
sailing vessel. They are hastily sell
ing off their property and winding up
their affairs. Japan has been tel
egraphically cut off from this port for
three days.
A detachment of Japanese troops
stationed on the island of Zuzima,
forty miles from Masampho, Korea,
has been ordered to be in readiness
to land on Kqrea in the event of a
rupture.
The Chinese in Manchuria are
greatly excited and' numbers of them
are preparing to leave for Chee-Foo.
GERMANY IS NEUTRAL
Rusisa Has Therefore withdrawn
Troops from' Western Garrisons.
Berlin, Feb. 8^Germany's attitude
is described as one of strict neu-'
trality. She has conveyed the most
binding assurance of this to S Peters
burg and by so doing has conferred a
great favor on thte Russian govern
ment, which has been enabled in con
sequence to increase her forces In
Manchuria at the expense of her west
ern garrisons.
The popular German feeling is di
vided between a certain admiration for
the little people of Japan and the
necessarily greater community of in-
Continued on Second Page*
A
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