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The Minneapolis journal. (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, May 13, 1905, Image 13

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1905-05-13/ed-1/seq-13/

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TW
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iVeae i Varied Thrills
To Be on Tap in
I N CITY WONDERLAND, the
big amusement park at Lake
street and Thirty-first avenue
S, is destined to furnish pleas
ure-lovers of the northwest
with a set of new and variegated
thrills. While the gravity railway has
been in use here in modified forms to
some extent, such devices as shooting
the chutes, the cvcle swing, "the
bumps," and the old mill will be novel
ties.
The fascination which a spiee of dan
ger has for even the most timid is a
singular pha se of human nature, and
the success of these amusement devices
which simulate danger is due laigely
to a shre wd knowledge of this weak
ness. Al are safeguarded, so that the
risk is reduced to almost an impossi
bility*. A the same time the risk
seems to be there. I is the delight in
the delusion of having experienced dan
ger that will make a middle aged
woman, who has ridd en on the scenic
railway in a car that suddenly shoots
downward as if droppi ng in to a bottom
less pit," or turns sharp and unexpected
angles to declare, Well, I am glad it's
over, but would not ha ve missed it
for anything."
Those who first vi ew the toboggan
like slide of the chutes with a sinking
famtness about the heart will be won
by familiarity to enioy the steep
plunge do wn to the lake, the splash of
the water and the emoyment that
comes from th exhilaration of the sud
den rush thru the air.
Wonderland will abound in the unex
pecte d. A mvth city, for instance, sup
plies a labvrinth in which a visitor
will encounter haunted chambers,
SHOOTING THE CHUT ES AT WONDERLAND.
magic mirrors, rocking floors, endless
tunnels and other "horrors." A.house
of nonsense will furnish a series of
practical jokes. A crystal maze affords
the opportunity of losing oneself. I
a laughing gallery one can enioy the
grotesque distortio ns caused reflec
tions in concave and convex mirrors.
A fairy theater owes its popularity to
the optical illusions caused lenses
and lights. Looking thiu a lens one
sees a performance in which some ac
tors appear of gigantic size, while
others are dwarfs.
The Chilkoot pass, popularly named
bump-the-bumps, stus up the physical
sv ste ms of those who \enture upon it
and is productive of unending laughter.
You mount a stairway to a platform
front of which is a wide, smooth, slip
pery chute, accentuated at intervals by
low protuberances. Th adventurer
simply sits down at the top of the
slide and lets himself go. Th rest
TRIUMPHED IN PARIS
Norwegian,Student Chorus Is a Renowned
Institution.
Thursday evening. May 25, Minneapolis
will ha\e an opportunity for the first time
to hear the renowned student chorus from
the "University of Christlania, or, as it
might appropriately be called, the Uni
versity of Norway, being a government
institution and the only one in the coun
try.
This school of science was founded in
1811 by King Frederik of Denmark and
Norway It started out with six profes
sors and eighteen students, and now has
flftv-three of the former and twelve hun
dred of the latter The courses of study
are considerable* longer than in America,
medicine requiring from seven to eight
years and law about five, hence the stu
dents stay longer together and their bonds
of friendship are probably on this account
correspondingly stronger.
The regular university chorus is an in
stitution recruited exclusively from the stitutlo recruited exclusively from the
Why Endure Pain
the excruciating misery of blind, bleeding,
itching piles, when there is an absolute cure
Dr. Percin's Pile Specific is an internal
remedy that painlessly produces a positive
and lasting cure. Pleasant to the taste, it
is absolutely free from opium, cocaine or
other injurious drugs. Simply take a
spoonful three times daily before each meal.
Dr. Perrin's Pile Specific
The Internal Remedy
For dyspepsia* indigestion, constipation,
biliousness, catarrh of the stomach and
kindred ailments it is the greatest remedy
that has ever yet benefited mankind.
Think what a relief it would be to you to
be rid of these troubles and to avoid the
i almost certain consequence of Files.
f\ Dr. Perrin Medical Go* Helena, Mont.
BUMPING THE BUMPS A WONDERLAND.
(Wonderland}
may be imagined. encounters bumps
that will send him sprawli ng in every
conceivable way. A the bottom soft
cushions prevent disaster.
The scenic railway affords an ex
hilaration enioyed by all. Th descent
is made with great swiftness down a
deebvitv, then up again to a height
equal to that from which the start was
made, fifty feet from the ground. Next,
a plunge into a dark tunnel, then a
sudden turn into the light, passing a
landscape of Oriental splendor then a
whirl around the loop and a trip along
the bank of a river past the ruins of an
old church, another tunn el and a dip
into the Devil's cave. Then into the
open air and another descent, a steep
plunge downward down a tobogga n,
v-
which sends you kiting up hill again
a nd around a sharp curve in to a deep
mountain ia\ine, where you see a vol
cano in eruption, and then glide smooth
ly nlong the shore, with a vi ew of
ocean expanse,-and the journev is end
ed. Th trip has taken only a few
minutes, but it has seemed mu ch
longer.
The cars fit in to grooved tracks,
which thev cannot leave. A block
signal system prevents collisions with
as much certainty as on a railroad. The
cars are in chaige of men who can stop
them at any point, no matter what the
speed. I has past seemed dangerous,
a nd the sensation has been delightful.
The chutes invented by Paul Boyn
ton, the great swimmer, some years ago
have prov ed a perennial source of de
light. Passengers are pulled by cable
cars to the top of a steep incline. There
they embark in boats, which shoot down
the slide and strike a cushion of water
in the lake below. The fiat-bottomed
boat bounds clear and then comes a
series of plunges, which gradual ly di
mmish until the boat glides smoothly
on the surface to the other end of the
lake.
The Old Mill gives a diverting boat
ride. A picturesque front represents
an old mill, with its water wheels play
ing in a racing current. The. passen
gers embark in^boats that glide in to
a narrow canal, which follows a tor
tuous course along kaleidoscopic vis
ta s. Th journey takes them thru sub
terranean caverns and along panoramic
scenery that represents every clime,
from pole to equator. Occasionally the
boat shoots downward as if passing
Tapids, turns sharply around unexpect
ed coiners, and finally makes a com
plete loop, which leads to the return
journey.
Milder thrills are found in a score of
other contrivances.
ranks of the students and has existed for
more than fifty years. During the sum
mer of 1900 they visited upon invitation
the great exposition at Paris and sang
at the Trocadero palace to an audience of
4,000, including several Minneapolis
people On the occasion the program had
been selectpd from the compositions of
living Norwegian composers, and each
number was conducted by its own com
poser, a feature which created great en
thusiasm ii Pans
No attempt at personal gain is made by
thf students on these trips and the profit
of the present tour will be distributed
to some American charities by the chorus.
T'ckets for the auditorium concerts will
be placed on sale at the Metropolitan
Music company on Monday morning,
May 22
TO SING DELPHIC HYMNS
Classical Chorus Will Be a Senior Class
Play Feature.
The ancient "Delphic Hymn to Apol
lo" v,ill be rendered for the first time
America by a chorus at the performance
of the university senior class play, Sat
urday afternoon, May 27.
A chorus of youths and maidens attired
in the costume of ancient Greece, singing
in Greek, will render this ancient hymn
in the "Masque of the Old Mam," which
follows the class play proper Heretofore,
so far as can be learned, the beautiful
Greek music has been produced in 'Paris
and Athens and nowhere else. I has
been arranged for the orchestra by,Mr.
Kelsey expressly for the university pro
duction and its rendition is awaited with
interest by students of the ancients
Two pieces of music have been im
ported direct from Germany for the .class
play. These have never been rendered in
public here and the theme of one of them
is of especial beauty and dominates a
large part of the musical performance.
There is also an old English song that
has been secured and will have its ini
tial rendition by a senior chorus.
South Carolina is making a methodical and
hopeful effort to divert the stream of tmmigra
tion 10 ner iei,riior- me mme una OUUUL ii,w,- W
MUSIC
The graduation recital of Misses
Emma Eusberg, Kate Pettijohn and Nel
lie Sabelowitz, pupils of Gustavns John
son, will be given Thursday eveni ng in
Johnson hall. Miss Margaret Bailey
will assist in the program with two
recitations. Mi ss Ellsbery will play se
lections from Beethoven, Grieg, Mosz
kowski, Liszt Miss Pettijohn's numbers
will be from Schubert, Paganini-Schu
mann, Henselt and Nicode, and Miss
Sabelowitz will contribute a Beethoven
svmphony, a Bochermi-Joseffy number
and a Liszt Polonaise with Mr. Johns on
at a second piano.
Mi ss Frances Durnam, a pupil of Her
mann Zoch, will give a piano recital
Tuesday evening in the First Unitarian
church. Her numbers will be from
Hummel, Chopin and Mendelssohn.
Miss Florence Peterson, a pupil of
Victor Bergquist, will give a recital,
assisted by Walter Stenvi g, violinist,
Monday eveni ng in the Minneapolis Mu
sic company's parlors. Miss Peterson's
selections will be from Beethoven, Cho
pin, Grieg, Bergquist, Schubert and
Moszkowski.
The choir of the Hennepin avenue
M. E chmch will give selections from
Mendelssohn's "Elijah" at a special
musical service tomorrow evening. Th
quartet includes Mrs. William Gordon
Brackett, Miss Edith Pearce, Alv in
Davies and Harry E Phillips.
Ortin Kell er will take Ernest Her
man's place in the Wesley church choir
until he graduates from the university
in June, when he will go to Butte,
Mont., to accept a position. Mr. Hedman
has gone to Duluth.
The cantata, "From Sepulchre to
Throne," by Shepard, which was given
in the Fifth Avenue Congregational
church Easter Sunday, will be repeated
tomorrow evening. Th choir, Mrs E
ii. Cooley, Miss Ethel Matson, George
O. Brown and Allan Jone s, will be as
sisted by a chorus of twenty voices.
The choir and chorus will also sing,
"Worthy is the Lamb," from "Mes
siah.
The spri ng program by the junior
class of the Northwestern Conservatory
of Music will be given Friday eveni ng
in Conservatory hall. Those who will
take part are Julia Eandall, Margaret
Eichardso n, Kenneth Briggs, Eonald
Carter, Esther McCrossan, Neal Weber,
Marie Carter, Katherine Hodgdon, Ruth
Van Tuyl, Beulah McCrossan, Bachael
Van Nes t, Gladys Friend, Grace Leek,
Edna Hills, Marie Cheney, JeanWaehter
and Louise Frary.
The Mandolin and Glee clubs of the
Central high school will give their an
nu al concert Friday evening in the East
high school auditoriu m. The clubs are
made up of scholars from all classes.
In addition to the musical numbers by
the student s, Miss Frances Woodard
will read several entertaining selections
a nd Austin Willia ms will sing.
The pupils of Miss Lillian Dyer
gave a class recit al this afternoon in
the Northwestern Conservatory of
Music hall.
Miss Helen Elizabeth Preston, a pupil
of Miss Margaret Drew, gave' a pia no
recital at Graham hall last evening.
Miss Preston ga ve her numbers a
most admirable manner and showed sym
pathy and intelligence. Of special in
terest were the Moskowski numbers
and the Liszt Rhapsod ie Hongroise No.
6 Th program opened with the Bee
thoven Sonata op. 14, No. 1, which was
well played. Miss Katherine Wat
kin s, a pupil of Louise Shawe of
Paul sang Beethoven's "Adelaide"'
and a group of Schumann songs in a
charming manner. Miss Drew played
her accompaniments.
But one important event remains of
the musical season, the concert of the
Pittsburg orchestra at the Auditorium,
Wednesday evening, May 17. This will
equal in interest and importance any
thing which has preceded it I is
indeed an epoch-marki ng engagement,
for it brings to the city for his first
visit Emil Paur, director of the or
chestra, which is conceded to be the
greatest orchestra in America and one
of the greatest in the world. I the
Pittsburg orchestra he has an instru
ment worthy of his skill, for he found
in it splendid material and he has
round ed it into form that enables it
to challenge comparison with any or
chestra in America.
The operatic idol of the last few
seasons. Mme. Gadski, is the soloist,
and this combination! exceeds in inter
est anything Minneapolis has be en of
fered for many seasons. I is quite
unusual for traveling orchestras to em
ploy soloists of first rank, but Mr Paur
is a believer in presenting the best,
and it will be the policy of the Pitts
burg orchestra under his directorship
to make an annual tour, so he is taking
especial pains that the initial appear
ance shall present it in the best pos
sible form and circumstances.
The program arranged for the Min
neapolis concert opens with one of
Paur's greatest Beethoven readings
and closes with an arrangement of
Weingartner, which is one of the mosr
attractive lig ht numbers written for
the orchestra. Th full program fol
lows:
Beethoven, gymphonte. No. 5, minor.
Wagner, scene and ballad from "The Flying
Dutchman", Mme Gadski -with orchestra.
Tschaikowsky, symphonie No. 6. Patnetlque
Goldmark, entr acta from the opera Cricket
on the Hearth
Selections, Mme. Gadski
Weber-Weingartifer, Invitation to the Dance
SUPREME COURT
Belle McKenzie, respondent, vs. Sarah
Banks, appellant Order affirmed.
Hyman Fegelson, respondent, vs, Ni
aga ra Fire Insurance company et al, de
fendants Niagara Fire Insurance com
pany et al, appellants. Order affirmed.
Clarence M. Rawitzer, as administrator
of the estate of Harry Jacobs, deceased,
respondent, vs St. Paul City Railway
company, appellant. Order affirmed.
M. H. Furseth, respondent, vs. Great
Northern Railway company, appellant.
Judgme nt aftirmed.
David Tozer, respondent, vs. the'Ocean
Accident & Guarantee corporation (lim
ited) of London, Eng., appellant. Order
affirmed.
Mary Schaefer. appellant, vs. Luch
Schoertborn, respondent. Order reversed.
William H. Mason, respondent, vs. Ed
ward Thompson company, a corporation,
appellant. Judgment reversed.
Elwin A. Pope, as administrator of
Floras C. Mackay, deceased, appellant,
vs Waugh, the Waugh Safe & Lock
company, and /Pnscilla C. "Waugh, re
spondents. Judgment reversed.
E. O. Halvorsen, respondent, vs. Chi
cago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway com
pany, appellant. Per curiam order af
firmed.
State rel J. Keltgen, appellant, vs
William McMahon, respondent. Per cu
riam order affirmed.
Robert M. Stitt and Nellie Armstrong,
copartners as Stitt & Howe, respondents,
vs. Rat Portage Lumber company, appel
land. Per curiam order .affirmed.
A
ogo acres of unoccupied land and desire new ment Of $1. Ask at the Ticket office.
1
Soo Line to Toronto^
22.20 for round trip via the Iltkes.
Dates of sale, June 16 and 19. All rail
$23.75 on sale June 18, 19, 21 and 22.
Beturn limit June 30th, but limit -will
be extended to Aug^ath Tarpon -Pac-
4.1,- mj-1-,.,1. teiZ.
ST. OLAF'S SECON
FESTIVA O SON
CHORAL UNION WILL SING THE
"MESSIAH."
Chorus of 1 10 Wi ll Reinforced by
Choirs of the United Chur ch of Du
luth, Eau Claire and Decorah-Two
Concerts by the College BandDirec-
tor Christiansen 's Success.
F. MELIUS CHRISTIANSEN,
Director of Music in St. Olaf College,
Northfield.
Special to The Journal.
Northfield, Minn., May 13.The sec
ond annual music festival under the
auspices of St. Olaf college will be giv
en June 12 and 13, in connection with
the commencement festivities. Th first
of these festivals was given May 17
and 18 last year, and aTtho it was in
the nature i an' experiment it proved
a success beyond nil expectations. Th
presentation of the "Creation" by the
Choral Union showed that there was
talent and that it was being well de
veloped.
The festival of last year prov ed to be
a splendid advertisement for the music
department of St. Olaf, and this year
the attendance has been' not only larger,
but made up of a large number of well
advanced student s. This has giv en a
great impetus to the chorus and band
work of the institution and the public
will have the opportunity of judging
of the improvement at the coming festi
val.
The Choral Union began' the study
of Handel's ''Messiah" early last fall,
a nd at the end of the fall semester
gave a concert made up of choruses of
the "Messiah" and secular composi
tions. Th union proposes to present
the "Messiah" in June in full, giving
18 choruses with the usual solo work
and orchestral accompanimen t.
Reinforc ed by Church Choirs.
The membership of the chorus is now
140 and this number will be augmented
by three of the largest church choirs
of the United church, those #*om De
corah, Eau Claire and DuTuth. All
these are under the le&4$s$4p of well
trained musicians, and^ps^j^had pre
vious experience in ortgS^m^wbJik.
The soloists this vear wilKb'j^Mrs.
Elizabeth Brown-Hawkins, jrfbpiiafeto
Mr s. Jane Huntingdon Yale, alto Owfyn,
T. Morris, tenor, aid Clarence A Mr
shall, bass.
The accompaniment will be playecT
again Danz's Symphony ofehestra.
The first concert of the festival will
be given by the college battel. Th
membership is now 55 and consistent
improvement has been noted all the
time since Professor Christiansen took
charge. Th concert tour of the band
after the Christmas holidays was a de
cided musical success. The band will
give an open air concert on' the even
ing of June 10, and the festival con
cert in the Ware Auditorium, Monday
evening, June 12.
Festival Program.
The program of the festival and com
menceme nt will be as follows:
Saturday, June 10, 7 p.m.Open air
coWcert.
Sunda y, June 11, 8 p.m.Baccalaur
eate sermon. President Kildahl.
Monday, June 12, 10 a.m.Academy
graduation8 p.m., band concert.
Tuesday, June 13, 10 a.m.College
commencement 8 p.m., the "Messiah."
Eeduced rates will be furnished on
all the railroads of the northwes t. A
special bulletin, which will be sent free
to any address, is being issued" to ad
verti se the festival.
THE VALUE OF CHARCOAL
Few People Know How Useful I I in
Preserving Health and Beauty.
Nearly eveiybody knows that char
coal is the safest and most efficient
disinfectant and purifier in nature, but
few realize its val ue when taken into
the human system for the same cleans
ins purpose.
Charcoal is a remedy that the more
you take of it the betteri is not a
drug at all, but simply absorbs the
gases and impurities always prese nt in
the stomach and intestines, and carries
them out of the system.
Charcoal sweetens the breath^ after
smoking, drinking or after eating
onions and other odorous vegetables.
Charcoal effectually clears and im
proves the complexion, it whitens the
teeth and further acts as a natural and
eminently safe cathartic.
I absorbs the injurious gases which
collect in the stomach and bowels it
disinfects the mouthy and throat from
the poison of catarrh."
All druggists sell charcoal in one
form or anothe r, but probably the best
charcoal and the most for the money is
in Stuart's Charcoal Lozengesthe
are composed of the finest powdered
Willow charcoal, and other harmless
antiseptics in tablet form, or rather
in the form of large, pleasant tasting
lozenges, the charcoal being mix ed with
honey.
The daily use of these lozenges will
soon tell in a much-improved condition
of the general health, better complex
ion, sweeter breath and purer blood,
and the beauty of it is, that no possible
harm can result from their continued
use, but on the contrary, great benefit.
A Buffalo physician in speaking of
the benefits of charcoal says: I ad
vise Stuart's Charcoal Lozenges to all
patients suffering from gas in stomach
and bowels, and to clear the complexion
and puri fv the breath, mouth and
throatI also believe the liver is great
ly benefited by the daily use of them
they cost but twenty-five cents a box
at drug stores, and although in some
sense a patent preparation, yet I be
lieve I get more and better charcoal
in Stuart's Charcoal Lozenges than in
any of the ordinary charcoal tablets."
WhatlCanDo*
I
joor appearance prevents your social
or batiaeas adtancooent .1 can remove
the Meaatoh or correct 4he irregularity ot
By my home treatment mluMes,
btaefcheada and aU i Mm-
rendered, write for
ubea
'**sew&*-
3ttS
A House, Parly|
Deucedly pleasant, of
course
Butyou're always on the go
A score of people to meas
ure wits against
A hundred things to do
Wearing on the nerves
Stomach sympathizes
You wake up feeling
razzle-dazzled
A bottle of
Red Raven
will clear the liver,
sweeten the. stomach, and
take the strain off the nerves
For sale everywhere
Deaf People Now
HearWhispers
Listening Machines Invented
by a Kentuckian.
Invisible, When Worn, but
Like Eye-Glasses.
Ever see a pair of Listening Machines?
They make the Deaf hear distinctly.
They are BO soft In the ears one can't tell the)
are wearing them.
And) no one else can tell either, because they
are out of sight when worn. Wilson's Bar Drams are
to weak hearing what spectacles are to weak sight.
Because, they are sound-magnifiers, just as
glasses are sight-magnifiers.
They rest the Ear Nerves by taking the strain off
themthe strain of trying to hear dim sounds. They
can be put into the ears, or taken out, In a minute,
lust as comfortably as spectacles can be put on and off.
And, they can be worn for weeks at a time, bo*
cause they are ventilated, and so soft
In the ear holes they are not
felt oven when the bead rests
on the pillow. They also pro
tect any raw inner parts of
the ear from wind, or cold,
dust, or sudden and piercing
sounds.
These little telephones
make It as easy for a Deaf
person to hear
weak sounds as
spectacles make
it easy to read
fine print. And,
the longer one
wears them the
better his hear-
ing grows, be-
cause they rest
up, and strength* & -O
en, the ear nerves. To rest a $ I
weak ear from straining Is A.
like resting a strained wrist
from working.
Wilson's Ear Drums rest the Ear
Kerres by making the sounds louder,
so it is easy to understand without
trying and straining. They make
Deaf people cheerful and comfortable, because
such people can talk with their friends without the
friends having to shout back at them. They can bear
without straining. It Is the straining that puts such,
a queer, anzlons look on the face of a deaf person.
7th at, Hear
Hennepin.
Act
i
Wilson's Sat Drams make all the sound strike
hard on the center of the human ear drum, Instead
of spreading it weakly all over the surface. It
thus makes the center of the human ear drum
vibrate ten times as much as If the same sound struck
the whole drum head. It is this vibration of the ear I
drum that carries sound to the hearing Nerves. I
When we make the drum vibrate ten times as much i
we make the sound ten times as loud and ten times
as easy to understand. I
This is why people who had not in years heard a
clock strike can now hear that same clock tick any
where in the room, while wearing Wilson's Ear
Drums.
Deafness, from any cause, ear-ache, buzzing
noises In the head, raw and running ears, broken
ear-drums, and other ear troubles, are relieved and
cured (even after Ear Doctors have given up the
cases), by the use of these comfortable little ear
resters and sound-magnifiers.
A sensible book, about Deafness, tells how they
are made, and has printed in it letters front hun
dreds of people who are using them.
Clergymen, Lawyers, Physicians, Telegraph
Operators, Trainmen, Workers in Boiler Shops and
foundriesfour hundred people of all ranks who
were Deaf, tell their experience In this free book.
They tell bow their hearing was brought back to
them almost instantly, by the proper use of Wilson*
Ear Drums.
Some of these very people may live near yon,
and be well known to you. What they have to say is
mighty strong pr,oof.
This book has been the means of making 326,001
Deaf people hear again. It will be mailed free to yoa
if you merely write a post card for It today. Don't
put off getting back your hearing. Write now, while
you think of it. Get the free book of proof.
Write for it today to the Wilson Ear Drum Co.,
829 Todd bldg, Louisville, Ky.
BEAUTY
Tcomplexionl.
O lopk wel take care
ofwyour not allo un
sightly pimples, blackheads, tan,
or freckles to blemish your skin.
Derma-Royale
will remove these like magic.
Cures Eczema and Tetter.
Used with DEWA-ROYALB
SOAP, a perfect skin is1
Insured. Derma-Royole $1.00'
DermaoRoyale Soap, .25
Portraits and testimonials sent on request
THE DERMA-ROVALE CO., Cincinnati, 0.
Solely recommended by Voegeli Bros., cor, Hen
nepin end Washington cor. 7tb and Nicollet.
AMTJSEJH*NTS.
DEWEY THEATRE
All Weak, Commonalng Mai. Tomorrow
Prices
lOo
20c 30c
Best Showif the Season
Fulton Jolly
Grass Widows
Ladies' Day Friday
Last Time Tonight
Miss New York, Jr.
FAMILY THEATER. Continuous vaudeville
four performances dally, at 2 and 8:30 and at
8 and 8.80 p.m.
"8elng nlinncapolls"
"Seeing The Twin Cities"
KHTMEAPOLIS JOURNAL TOURS.
Under direction Twin City Motor Liyery Co.
20-JHLE TOURCars leave Journal office at
-\.m., it a.m., 2 p.m., psa. Seatrft.
50-MILE TO0RCaw leaw Tfce Toaratl of
fice at 1 pu. FlTe-hour tito. fifeats 92.60.
JSone..).u* to***1
Tickets on *le et 1t Journal tflear
erraUona b flde by" p&0|fcB.
mam^^mm ft*
Defective Page
AMUSEMENTS AMUSEMENTS
METROPOLITAN
N SCOTT, Manager.
4 NIGHTS, WEDNESDAY MAT-
INEE, STARTING
SUNDAY, MAT 14
Jules Murry Presents His Com
pany, including
MR. MA FIGMAN
I the Roaring, Screaming Farcical
COMEDY SUCCESS, THE
MARRIAGE
O KITTY
BARGAIN MATINEE 25c and 50c.
Evening Prices, 25c, 50c, 75c, $1.00.
"Kitty is as witty, dainty and
pretty as her Cousin Kate."Den-
ver New s, March 20.
O. Raymond, Ees. Mar.
Both phones. 3697,
MODERNVAUDEVILLE
This Afternoon and Evening.
JOHN C. RICE
& SALLY COHEN
PESCHKOFF TROUPE
LEW SULLY
NICHOLS SISTERS
GRACE ULMER
KARTELLI
COUNT DEBUTZ
KINODROME.
RUOU
Julia May Gifford
Week of
May
21
THE NATURAL ACTOR
MR. ROBERT FITZSIMMONS
-AND THE DAINTY SINGER-
In the Great
Comedy-Drama
Success,
CMa* E SNIH^*7 (In a Sensational Three-Round Glove contest.
^W*~W*^ I I M^\ In Marvelous
Bag-PunchingwExhibition. Mak a Horseaho a in FnU Vie of tb Audience.
Thursday, Friday, Saturday
and Saturday Matinee
METROPOLITAN OPERA HOUSE
FREE FOR LADIES ONLY
T&uMay Afternoon, May 1811, at 2:30 O'-Clw*
A Scientific Lecture on
BEAUTY CULTURE & FACIAL BLEMISHES
By OR. CRISTIOM, AT. O., A. t*.
Late of Paris Academy of Sciences.
BEAUTY DOCTOR TO MMES. BERNHARDT.
CALVE. PATTI AND LANGTRY.
Assisted by one of the most beautiful
women of Her Age,
MME. MAY, 0 0
Thursday Afternoon Lecture is Free.
Friday Afternoon's Admission 50c
YOU ARE
INVITED.
NO,
ADMISSION CHARGED.
Tonight Last Time *~3
Miiwaukte German Co.*
William Tell
4 NIGHTS, SATURDAY MATINEE
STARTING
THURSO A Y, May IS
W Cullen Presents the Music al
Comedy Triumph
THE
BURGO-
MASTER
Big Cast, Headed by
OSCAR L. FIGMAN
AND RUTH WHITE
24 Great Song Hltm
SEATS O N SALE MONDAY.
IIEYT lAfEEHHCOMMENCING
RCA I I ECU I Tomorrow Matinee
MARGUERITA
25c
EVENINGS
15c-25c-50c
STARTING MATINEE TOMORROW AT 2:15
Last Time Tonight
I
&fr3 'is
4f$
t/&
SYLVA
The Famous Operatic- Star.
BONIFACE & WALTZIN8ER
George C, Jr. Bertha.
Matinee
DAILY
GEORGE W. DAY
"In Cork."
HURD
Digital Manipulator and Magician.
SULLIVAN & PASQUELENA
Presenting "A Newsboy's Appeal.'*
Hennings,Ltwis & Hennings
In a Condensed Musical Comedy.
OKABE JAPANESE TROUPE
KINODROME
CHARLEY'S AUNT
THE FERRIS
STOCK CO.
with
Eva Taylor
present
Branden Thomas'
Farcial Comedy
The Brightest and iff est Laugh
Provoking Comedy Written.
Matinee* Sunday. Tuesday
Thursday. Saturday, 10c & 25c
Every Evening, 10c, 25c & 50c
"A ROYAL SLAVE.'*
TONIGHT LAST TIME
UNCLE TOM'S GABIN
TOMORROW MATINEE
AND ALL NEXT WEEK.
A Fight for Love
THE BIB MELODRAMATIC FEAST
"James Boys in Missouri
AUDITORIUM
TWIN CITY WONDERLAND
AMUSEMENT PARK
Lake Street anil Thirty-First Aveaue South,
OPEN TOMORROW, SUNDAY, MAY 14
For Public Inspection2 to 5
Take Minnehaha or Riverside Cars.
AUDITORIUM Wednesday,x
Great Closing Event of the Season
PITTSBURGH ORCHESTRA
mmnm.EaVS^VSSn^^SSS^mm-
TicfegtaN^wOnSa^atMatrpyolttatnMMfeStWe. *L40.SLSO. $*.*.:H
99
J. F. CONKLIN
Manager
May 18-19-20
MRS. FISKE
and THE MANHATTAN COMPANY, Presenting
LEAH KLESCH N A
C. S. McLELLAN.
SEATS O N SALE MONDAY at the Metropolitan Music Store, Minneapo-
olis, and Dyer's Music Store, St. Paul. Prices50c, 75c, $1, $1.50, $2.
'4
May 17.
^^^7T

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