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The Minneapolis journal. (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, May 13, 1905, Image 19

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1905-05-13/ed-1/seq-19/

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EXPLORERS THOUGHT
TONKA DAY'S JOURNEY
It Was Not Until 1869 That the First Summer Lake
Home Was Built by S. C. GaleThe Lake First
Explored by Soldiers From Fort Snelling in 1822.
An important part of the charm of
Lake Minnetonka lies in the fortuitous
combination of waters and the beauti
ful primeval forest growth that has
been largely retained. The lake lies
just in the edge of the "Big Woods,"
a term that used to mean a very defi
Snite thing to Minnesota people, but
which, with the general passing of the
forest, requires explanation. The "Big
"Woods'' was a large tract of luxurious,
deciduous forest, sweeping in a broad
belt from the Mississippi river, at
about the mouth of the Minnesota,
southwest thru the state.
This fine body of hardwood timber,
valuable for the uses of civilization
and indicating rich soil, was the prime
attraction for the first settlers, and
also drew the first pleasure seekers.
As soon as Minneapolis began to emerge
from the wilderness itself, its people
especially those accustomed to eastern
forests turned their thoughts to Min
netonka when on pleasure bent. At first
only a picnic or camping ground, the
first permanent summer residence was
built by S. C. Gale at Maplewood in
1869. So far as records and recollec
tion go the next cottager was Harlow
Gale, who built his house on Bright
wood island, that has become the most
familiar landmark on the lake. Neigh
bors joined them each summer in
steadily increasing numbers, but the.
first decade of Minnetonka's history as
a summer resort does not record a large
number of residents.
Going farther back than the first
cottager, the written history of Minne
tonka begins with the record of the visit
to the lake in 1822 of Joseph E. Brown,
a drummer boy from Fort Snelling
John Snelling, son of the commandant at
the fort, and perhaps two companions.
The}*- reached the lake by following the
windings of Minnehaha creek, whose
first name was Brown's creek, from the
fact that this soldier made a claim at
the mouth of the creek. The party car
ried its exploration as far as the upper
lake, making camp on one of the islands.
They gave no name to the beautiful
sheet of water, and there is no other
recorded visit to the lake until in 1851,
when George Davis and two compan
ions in an exploring trip passed around
the entire lake.
A Thoro Exploration.
With 1852 came the period of set
tlement, for in that year, April 12,
Simon Stevens, brother of Colonel John
II. Stevens, the pioneer of Minneapolis,
and Calvin Tuttle set out with a week's
provisions to reconnoiter for land. They
received their information from Philan
der Prescott, the Indian trader at the
fort, who gleaned his information from
the Indians, who told of "big water"
to the west, confirming the tradition
of the whites. The explorers supposed
the lake to
b,e
or three dajr
MINNETONK A
Train Service
VIA THE
Great Northern
Trains Leave Union Depot, Minneapolis, as Follows:
Beginning Saturday, May 13th
9:15 a. m. daily except Sunday.
9:35 a. nu Sundays only.
2:00 p. m. daily.
5:05 p. m. daily.
6:10 p. m. daily except Suftday.
8:10 p. m. daily except Saturday.
10:40 p. m. Saturdays only.
BOAT CONNECTIONS
Regular trip tours of the lake will begin Sunday, May 14. Steamer will
lonnect at Wayzata with the regular morning lake train and make tour of
loth upper and lower lakes, arriving at Spring Park about 12:15 noon. The
iteamer will again connect at M^ayzata with the 2:00 p.m. train from Minne-
!polis and make a tour of both lakes, lending passengers at Spring Park for
he early afternoon train to Minneapolis, or at Minnetonka Beach, where a
ater train may be taken to the city.
REGULAR SUMMER SERVICE.
The regular summer service will go into effect on Saturday, June 3rd, ap-
proximately as follows:
Week Day TrainsLeave Minneapolis 6:30 a.m., 9:15 a.m., 2 p.m., 3:30
p.m., 5:07 p.m., 5:42 p.m., 6:10 p.m., 8:25 p.m. (except Saturday), 10:40 p.m.
Saturday only.
Leave Mound 7 a.m., 7:30 a.m., 7:59 a.m., 1:30 p.m., 3:30 p.m.. 4:40 p.m.,
7:15 p.m.. 9 p.m. (except Friday and Saturday), 10:15 p.m. (Friday and Sat-
urday only.
Sunday TrainsLeave Minneapolis 6:30 a.m., 9:35 a,m., 9.45 a.m., 2 p.m.,
8:80 p.m., 5:07 p.m.. 5:42 p.m., 8:25 p.m.
Leave Mound 7 a.m., 7:30 a.m., 11:10 a.m., 1:30 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 6 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 9 p.m.
For Lake Minnetonka time card apply to
V. D. JONES, City Passenger and Ticket Agent,
Third Street and Nicollet Avenue, Minneapolis, Minn.
&4f*s*~*& OUR SERVICE
distant journey of tw
and wera much surpriseo
to reach a large body of water, since
called Gray's Bay, before eating their
noonday meal at 1 'clock. They pushed
on across the ice to Wayzata Bay, past
Breezy Point to Big Island, where they
camped. They explored the North Arm
and crossed from that to the upper lake.
They returned thru the natural channel
between the lakes, the old Narrows,
where they discussed the feasibility and
possibility of navigation thru it.
They selected the site of the Minne-
"A Littla Bettor than Seems
Necessary."
OUR SPECIALTIES
Spectacles, Eyeglasses, Lorgnettes, Opera, Field, Marine Glasses,
Aneroid and Mercurial Barometers, Telescopes and Microscopes,
Window and House Thermometers,
Sun Dials, Photographic Cameras and Supplies.
OUR PRICES
*'Reasonably Consistent With Our Service."
604 Nicollet Av. (near 6th St. S.) Minneapolis.
BRANCHES:
NEW YORK. ST. PAUL. PARIS.
ENTERPRISE MACHINE CO.
WESTMAN
Marine and Stationary gasoline
Engines are no experiment.
Strictly high grade in every
respect. Launches complete.
Write for
tonka Mills dam as the best point of
settlement on the lake on account of
4ts nearness to St. Anthony, its power
and the accessibility of timber. They
marked out their claim at the Mills
and, returning to it the following week,
cleared a path and prepared to build
their cabin. In June, Stevens and Hor
ace Webster poled two batteaux of pro
visions from jjust above Minnehaha
falls to the claim, and near the end of
the month a distinguished party made a
trip to Minnetonka. The party included
Governor Ramsey, Colonel Stevens,
George P. Brott, sheriff of Ramsey
county Dr. Alfred B. Ames, Edgar
Folsom. Jack Haney, Simon Garvey and
John C. Gairns. The two batteaux
were poled up the creek to the. outlet
and used for making a trip around the
lake. On this occasion Governor Ram
sey christened the lake, confirming
the Indian name, which means big
water.
Work was begun on the dam in Sep
tember, and the mill commenced saw
ing logs the next summer. One of the
early jobs was sawing the sauare oak
timber's used in the construction of the
first suspension bridge for Minneapolis.
The First Settlers.
There was a goodly group of settlers
near the outlet and at Chowen's Cor-
I
N
E
S
I
A
E
1114-20 South Third Street
Minneapolis, Minn.
THE MINNEAPOLIS
ff -*v
A BIT OF SHORE A TONKA BAY.
ner in 1852, but the rush of settlers
came in the following year, when claims
were taken all about the lake. The
first settler on the south shore of the
lake was Stephen Hull, on whose land
at Lake Park was included the old nar
rows and West Point. He was followed
almost immediately by William Lith
gow, whose claim included part of the
old state experimental fruit farm in
Wildhurst. His cabin was on Locke's
point, then called Lithgow Point, after
him.
Mr. Lithgow" was an interesting and
rather unusual figure in a pioneer set
tlement, being an educated gentleman
of means, whose cabin was well sup
plied with books and other evidence of
culture and travel. He was the first
white victim of the cruel waters of
Minnetonka. He was drowned in 1854,
being caught in a gale with his sail
unreefed.
He was fascinated with the wild life
of the forest and had written suoh
glowing accounts of it to his friends
that he had induced his mother and
aunt to come out to spend the winter
with him. The same day his body was
recovered on the beach of Northome
they arrived in St. Paul from Boston.
In spite of the fact that the lake
shores were early well settled for a
rural community and now have a large
summer population, Excelsior has been
Have HI
The WORLD'S BEST in a
New Era Paints .w,
Russell & Erwin's Builders' Hardware
Our Lawn Mowers, Rakes, Garden ||ensils,
Ice Gream Freezers, Water Wolerl, Oil
and Gasoline Stoves cannot be beat at prices
quoted. Have a fine line of Fishing Taekle, etc.
Don't fail to get our prices on above goods
they will surprise you.
The BUILDERS HARDWARE GO.
505"507 Washington Avenue South
PHONESN. W. Main 580-J.1
Cedar Row Boats, $22.50 up
Steel Row Boats, $38.00 up
Canvas Covered Canoes, $31 up
Open Paddling Canoes, $28 up
We have a few Pearson
Row Boats and Canoes
big snaps nnmaMus
T. C. 580.
8 Beautiful Building Sites
ON GIBSON TRACT
Overlooking the Main Lake,
BETWEEN NORTHOME
AND BAY ST. LOUIS.
New Minneapolis-Excelsior electric
line will run in rear of these lots,
Giving Frequent CAR SERVICE
For plats, prices and information, call at our offict.
David P. Jones & Co.^*"i*
Pictures for the Lake V.
We have a special line of Picture Novelties and Inexpen$ive Frames, very
attractive for summer cottages. Come and see them. Prices extremely
low. Framing Pictures our specialty. 1
KOSINGMFG. CO.
Successors to the Ohio Picture Frame Co.
314-316 Worth First St.
MINNETONKA PROPERTY
$ 1SOOLake Shore Front. 74x210 on S Albans Bar. has 49 beautifol *Jpl trees, S minutes
walk from train. f,
$1609)lake Shore. 160x125, 2 blocks of Tonka Bay hotel, north
THE SEELEY AGENCY ^USSS*^0*".lakenenlocatiotbesfront
JOURNAL./wmMBS,-
I
N E
S
I
A
E
111 Washington
K:
Ave. AL
BOAT
BARGAINS!
Write today for bur
Pleasure Insurance Policy
of interest to lake residents,
pleasure resorts or boat
liveries. ^.5
Our spcialty-Launhes
STEEL BOAT GO. 'jhif
PhonesN.W. M. 1660. T.C. 2829. _*
mfts'
-Copyright Photo by Sweet.
and still is the only village of much
size and business on the lake.
How Excelsior Started.
The village was projected in New
York, being a colony known as the Ex
celsior Pioneer association, 'organized
in .1852. George M. Bertram, president
of the association, visited Minnesota
in that year and selected the site, and
while in the west met and interested
R. B. McGrath, then living in Dubuque.
Mr. McGrath was the first actual set
tler, for he went to lake early in May
to build a house on the village site for
Mr. Bertram. The first of the colonists
to arrive was Rev. Charles Galpin,
whose village property, long held by his
widow, is oeing parceled out this
spring, according to the provisions of
her will. The village was platted that
year and was formally named the fol
lowing winter by a vote of its citizens.
The names of a good many of the
early settlers about the lake are pre
served in the names of points, islauds
and bays, altho a number of these are
rapidly passing into disuse and being
forgotten. Among these settlers thus
kept in mind are M. S. Cook, Frank W.
Halsted, Oliver Locke, William H. Fer
guson, John Carina, James and Francis
Maxwell, James Holmes. James B.
Brown, Robert Maxwell, Stubbs, Peter
Gideon, Carson, Robinson, Harrington,
Smith and others.
LOT AT^
LYNNHURST
The Suburban Residential Section of
the near future, and watch your in
vestment increase in value!
J,%
FACTS ABOUT
LYNNHURST
Large lots on easy terms..,
Bryant av car service every 15
minutes.
Delightfully located near Lake
Harriet.
Reasonable building restrictions...
Park trees, stone walks, city
water, Gas.
City Privileges, I.
Country Surroundings.
Tour city and lake home in one.
SEE LYNNHURST
Get plat and price list at our of
fice or No. 4306 Fremont av S.
D. C. BELL INVST. Co.
Ill So 4th St.
MAK E OFFERS
We want offers on the following
lots. They must be sold.
Corner"*of Lyndale &r S and 36th st, also two
adjoining inside lots.
Corner of Garfield ay S and 36th st. also two
adjoining inside lots.
Fremont ay S. between 24th st and Hennepin ay,
east front. 63x129.
Pleasant av, near 36th st, west front, 40x147.
43d ay near 32d st, west front, 50x135."
st, near Division st NB, east front,.38x128.
25th av S, near 83d st, east front. 50x127.
Forest ay, between Groveland and Dell place,
50x106.
Corner Washburn ay and 40th at, east and sonth
front.
5th ay S. between 26th and 27th sts, east front,
48x126.
Corner 21st ay S and 35th at, east and north
front. 40^x125.
Corner Russell and 83d ay N, east and vouth
front, 40x128.
Fremont, ay 8. near Lake st, west front. 45x128.
Girard ay N, near 32d st, east front, 45x127.
14th ay S, near 45th st, two lots, 43x127 each.
Logan ay N.'near 35th st, east front, 40x126.
Morgan av N, near 35th st, east front, 40x126.
James ay N, near Crystal Lake. 41%rl25.
Colfax ay S. corner 38th st, four lots, east front.
42x129 each.
Garfield av, near 22d st, west front, 40x120.
Pillsbury ay, between Lake and 31st et, east
front, 47x165.
im
ii
FARMS TURNED TO FRUIT
MINNETONKA FARMERS MAKE
GOOD PROFIT BY JOINT MAR-
KETING OF BERRY CROP.
sponsible for the growth and success
of the berry business on the north shore.
This association, formed four years
ago thru its manager, William Hursh,
markets the entire berry crop pf mem-
receives a receipt for the amount de
hvered. and once a month receives a
cheek from the manager for his berries.
000 wortu of berries'wa,s marketed'
by the association and the proceeds di
vided among the members.
Strawberries, raspberries, blackber
ries and a few currants are the only
fruits handled by the association. The
besi
marke
is the
iws-mwiiB -'Wmmm
sixty and eighty-acre farms are giving %enl
away to the small ten and fifteen-acre
patches, and the farmers are going infyj
berries.
The Minnetonka Fruit Growers' as
sociation is, in a measure, largely re-|
LOWRY
IT
19
(1 It tO
b'.- ?'j?
Oakland ay. near 4tst st. 41x116. /i fc f~:
Girard av S, near 3Sd st. west front. 40x128.
Bryant av S. between :J3d Rnd 34th sts, west
front. 40x128 each.
We will submit any offers made on any of the
above lots."?j", sitEs.-?"
gnera
ru
an
a
a
ct
loca western
mar- Dest markett is locall western mar vi *-u i~or. if
^SSSTetwi^^Ss
6
Sliw^Sfci J%* t
fruit erally flooded with outsidS and
prices are generally not so good as can,
be secured where the fruit does not
come in competition with southern and
eastern berries.
More and more the large farms are
being cut down to small patches, and
new growers come in to cultivate them.
In the territory now covered by the
association, which embraces the district
between Wayzata, Crystal Bay, the
West arm and Maple Plain, there are
5G3
LINCOLN AVENUE.
Corner 75x135 Feet, Colfax Avenue and Lincoln,
THE CHEAPEST LOT TODAY ON LOWRY MILL
Only $50 a Foot
The Edmund G. Walton Agency
it I
It
19
but the work, while particular, is not
hard.
SECLUDED COTTAGES
Estates on Lake Shore Hidden From
Land Travel.
The most beautiful property on the
lower lake is, generally speaking, un
known to the public, because necessarily
unseen.
There are many large and important
estates clustered together around the
Minnetonka clubhouse that are perfect
Berries and small fruits are becoming
the mainstay of the north-shore Minne
tonka farmers. Moreover, general
farming and the raising of all sorts of
vegetables and field products are be- i ^TtheouAvw^ being awaV"Trom"&e
coming less each year. The large forty,
trafl
And
fro
th
conta
promontor
^en
ater
Of these, thw most beautiful is cer
tainly Crest Haven, now owned by Mrs.
William Donaldson. This magnificent
property is approached from Cottage
0 Ja
ins eleven acres of
tha
i
commands the whole
er
broa direction. It faces the
watc
on
sid
tere
an
a
the^shel-- Carsoen the other, af
f0Tdinfib, double valuoen and an
bers. of the association. In this way sheltereda water Acros the bay
the individual farmer and grower loses ver
no time marketing his products. Burton, a house that was conceived
merely takes his fruit to the station,
always-ethsi
handsome house of Commodore H.
tist and designed by an arebi
jr
too
a nds
wh i
i
+_ manager to his berries
During the seasonof 1904 over $100, too tha tennis courtsaned land
K^,^.w^.
beautifully-keptn true
nntiitm and alwavs wildgrounds,down,hillhehigalona,o
uboathouses, re and always wild, slop down
th
nor
ithe Ho and further nortthh
and luxurious estates of Mrs.gPassmore,siu?Ltlelbeautifuytver
R. M* Bennett and others,
None of these beautiful places can
ever be seen by the tourist, they are .j
$*%?& xi^anYef/n e*weU
TO versed in Minnetonka topography would
hegitat
befor committing themselves
as to what road to take to drive there.
We are known as the highest priced
tailors in the city. Our goods and qual
ity of work justify it. Thos. Pease.
still many small places waiting to be! safety. I has become necessary to use
taken up, and at prices and terms high explosives more and more fre
up
which are not excessive. Land for
berry growing which is well located and
good can be bought for from $100 to
$200 an acre.
With care and attention berries will
WantedA Safe Explosive.
Under this heading a writer in the
Scientific American laments the lack of
an explosive which can be handled with
quently and these alone of the great
sources of energy under our control
cannot be safeguarded. To create en
ergy there is nothing known to modern
science like golden grain belt beer, for
pay for the land in a short time and it works on the nerves and digestion in
return a good profit to the growen such a way as to build up strong con-
The plants require attention in the stitutions and level heads. We all need
fall to protect them against the cold., such a tonic and there's no time like the
Beds need renewing from time to time, i present to begin.
O
..<p>
300 Hennepin Avenue. :%"Y
Pillsbury's 2nd Addition
A muiirsDAi I at ./C
TO MINNEAPOLIS.
2*
ii"tt'
JZ. *m
5 "Tf-r
SCREEN
DOORS
OAK PINE BIRCH
All Stock Sizes at Our Display Room
Fourth Street, opposite Court House
CITY SASH & DOOR CO.
Both Phones96.
Sanderson Boat and Engine Go.
315 3rd Street South.
-ar
tr
ti
*ssr
r*\
4*
.E
For full information about these beautiful lots, located in one
of the best parts of the city, see
LEWIS CAMPBELL
PILLSBURY BUILDING

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