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The Minneapolis journal. (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, August 31, 1905, Commerical and Financial Publicity Section, Image 15

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1905-08-31/ed-1/seq-15/

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The Door of Opportun
ity Stands Wide Open
Today in the Central
Northwest.
N
By James E. Neville, Commercial Editor of
The Journal.,
O MOKE DIFFICULT TASK could be put be
fore the crop statistician than that o figur
ing out in advance the money value of a gen
eral harvest. So many and diverse are the
elements that enter into such a calculation, and so
changeable and shifting the ratio of production to
farm value, that a basis absolutely tenable and insured
against later modification is almost impossible until
late in the year, or early in the year following that of
production. The government does not pretend to have
gathered the data that enables it to approximate total
farm values until late in the fall, and not until De
cember does the department of agriculture issue a re
port in any way final.
Yet to an observer of conditions in the northwest,
there is always possible on Sept. 1, or just prior to that
date, such an approximation as will stand all ordinary
analysis, and, with allowance for later corrections of
the minor sort, will remain unchanged, and afford re
liable basis for all to figure upon, whose interests de
pend upon the growth of the country and the produc
tion of new wealth.
Were it only a matter of estimating the quantity
produced of a particular crop, and setting after it an
arbitrary figure representative of farm value, the mat
ter would resolve itself into a question of ability close
ly to determine the production. But, while production
is in itself no easy thing to arrive at, until the actual
movement of the crop to market establishes a gage,
the farm value of a particular crop is even more diffi
cult to reach.
VALUE OF LARGE PRODUCTION.
Economically, the country always profits by a large
production, even i prices somewhat lower ensue, for
the money return to the farmer, altho the most impor
tant, is by no means the only factor in determining
prosperity. Given a small crop, and high prices result
ant, the money coming into a particular producing sec
tion may readily measure up to the total of a year
of larger production, but it is false economics to figure
this as commensurate, for true prosperity lies in the
employment in full of all industry dependent upon crop
production, and the railroad tonnages, the transactions
of the banks, and the activity or inactivity of the
many whose business consists of handling and market
ing the produce of the farms, must not be passed over.
The most remarkable illustration of the mainten
ance of a stable return against change in the produc
tion is afforded by the two barley crops of 1903 and
1904. In the former year the state of Minnesota pro
duced the total of 27,783,170 bushels of barley, for
which the money return was $10,279,773. The follow
ing year the production increased to 32,123,041 bushels,
a gam of 4,339,871 bushels, yet the farm value, at $10,-
279,373, showed practically no change, a difference of
only $400 appearing. This is explained by an average
farm valuation in 1903 of 37 cents, and an average in
1904 of 32 cents. Not only the quantity produced birl^
the quality of Hu&JTarnp, the- proportion tha^r^na-t^
low gractef'makes a material difference in *he value.
ANOTHER PROOF OFFERED.
Even a more striking illustration, and one showing
a surprising inverse ratio in the moving of the farm
value relative to production is shown in the potato crop
comparisons for the two years. In 1904 the states of
Minnesota, North and South Dakota produced 19,938,-
972 bushels of potatoes, and the farm value was $5,897,-
069. The year previous the production was only 13,-
880,653 bushels, yet the farm v,alue was $8,000,853, or
$2,103,783 greater.
This is accounted for by a difference in the value
per bushel for the two years, it being 29 cents in 1904
against 61 cents in 1903 in Minnesota, 32 cents against
48 cents in North Dakota, and 30 cents against 54 cents
in South Dakota.
FLAX
Flax is one of the great crops of the northwest,
North Dakota leading the entire country in its pro
duction. I is the crop about which the least reliable
statistical information is available, if one goes back
more than a few years, for its relative importance was
not then considered such as to draw the attention of
the government or the more reliable private statis
ticians.
This year the northwest lines up with a flax crop
Bo good that comparisons would be of little use in any
case, save to magnify the difference, for never before in
northwest history was there a crop like that of 1905.
All estimators agree that the acreage was larger by
far than last year, while the condition of the plant was
such that, when the crop has all moved to market, and
receipts and shipments are available for purposes of
comparison, the total will be found to exceed by several
millions of bushels anything ever before produced.
Government figures for the acreage will not be
available until December next. Meanwhile there are
competent men in the Minneapolis oil trade who figure
the total at approximately 2,500,000, which would be
an increase of 500,000 acres over that of last year.
There is the big acreage, and the promise of an average
production of twelve bushels an acre for the three
states.
The flax production for 1905 and the two years
preceding was as follows:
1903
Yield
per
Acre.
9.9 7.3
10.5
Acres
Harvested.
Minn.. 607,425
N. Dak. 1,814,400
S.Dak. 371,925
2,793,750
1904
Minn.. 557,356
N. Dak. 1,233,792
B. Dak. 207,256
-"sffe-"^ fl=?rgw-p^ggt?^
ffl^
and Minneapolis, which
last year ran to 23,839,-
043 bushels for both
markets, shows discrep
ancy, and suggests
that, as has often been
commented upon in the
trade, the government
reports of northwestern
flax yields have been too
low. Allowance must be
made for duplication, as
for instance the ship
ment of a car to Minne
apolis and from here to
Duluth, which would
make it appear in re
ceipts at both markets
but, after figuring this
out, there still remains a
total indicating that the
government has not
overestimated the pro
duction, and that the
northwest, in the past
few years, has probably
raised some millions of
bushels more flax than
the government reports
show. THE LINSEED OIL
INDUSTRY.
Total Value
at Farm.
$4,991,212
10,728,547
3,124,170
Bushels. Value.
6,013,508 $0.83
13,245,120 .81
3,905,212 .80
23,163,840
10.8 10.6
10.0
$18,843,929
5,803,445
13,078,195
2,072,560
2,098,404
The 1905 Estimate
Minn.. 580,000 11.7
N. Dak. 1,520,000 11.4
S.Dak. 325,000 11.5
$1.01 $5,861,479
.99 12,947,413
.98 2,031,109
20,954,200
2,425,000 27,851,000 $25,096,835
Minneapolis is the great northwest consuming
point, and Duluth the market thru which passes the
bulk of the crop not crushed here. Eastern crushers
$re always active in Duluth, and'as a market for flax
futures it is most important. Many cargoes go out by
lake during the season. Duluth received 16,132,317
bushels of flax in 1902, 18,456,675 bushels in 1903 and
15,327,003 bushels last year. From the present crop
Dttluttt's receipts should run above the big figures of
1903.
A glance atthe figures for the receipts at Duluth
$20,840,001
6,786,000
17,328,000
3,737,500
$0.91 $6,175,260
.90 15,595,200
.89 3,326,375
Dependent upon the
flax-growing farmers is
the linseed oil business,
now one of the great
manufacturing in
dustries in the north
west and centered at
Minneapolis 'No indus
try in the entire north
west shows so rapid a
growth as this. "Within
five years it has twice
doubled capacity and
capital invested. Six
mills make up the group
and they do about one
third of all the business
of the kind in the
United States. There
are 158 presses here, of
which 142 are active and
16 are dormant at pres
ent, these latter the
Archer mill of the
American Linseed Oil
company, which is out
of commission, but will*
-likely be"rebuBfcMater.
With deference to
size, the linseed oil mills
rank as follows:
Total
THETttDOWJicMllS
1903-
WHEAT
Wheat, the king of northwest crops, has served the
farmers royally this year, and in the grand final show
ing is conservatively estimated at a total of 182,296,800
bushels, which in money value means $139,939,538.
Practically all this is spring wheat, there being
11,000,000 to 12,000,000 bushels of macaroni wheat in
the total. The quality of the crop is on the average
much higher than last year, which is a consideration of
importance, both in determining farm value and in pro
viding ample supplies of raw material for the flour
mills of Minneapolis, that make and sustain the great
grain market into which the bulk of the farmers'
wheat moves.
Struck by the black rust last year, at a time when
very susceptible to injury, the wheat crop was cut
materially. The winter wheat fields of the southwest
had already suffered a loss from floods and excessive
rains at harvest time, and with a crop of not much over
552,000,000 bushels for the entire United States the
price of wheat rose to above the dollar level at the
principal markets, and remained high for about seven
months. The bulk of the northwest crop was marketed
at these very remunerative prices, with the result that
while the crop was spotted, some farmers had good
yields and others had little, and the money distribution
was uneven, the total return to the farmers, so far from
falling under the year preceding, actually ran over by
almost $16,000,000, notwithstanding the wheat meas
ured almost 20,000,000 bushels less.
THIS YEAB'S CONDITIONS.
Bushels.
173,146,171
117,921,374
84,512,339
20,163,840
50,907,992
2,820,344
Wheat....
Barley Rye
Total..
*Hay
Potatoes..
1904
Total.
Barley
Rye
Total.
Western mill (American) 40
Midland mill 40
Daniels' mill 40
Archer mill (American) 16
Minnesota mill 12
Northern mill 10
The Midland Linseed Oil .company built its big mill
here a few years ago and has operated almost con
stantly since. The Daniels Linseed Oil company fol
lowed. The American Linseed Oil company's mills
were already here. The largest capitalization repre
sented is that of the Midland, which is capitalized at
$2,250,000 and has paid 7% per cent regularly on its
common stock, besides 6 per cent on the preferred.
The Daniels mill is the newest of the properties and
has recently been enlarged. The comparative showing
in presses for the Minnesota mill does not give an ade-
quate idea of the size of that company, the Minnesota
Linseed Oil and Paint company, which does an enor
mous business in the manufacture of paints aside from
the crushing of flaxseed.
These mills represent consuming capacity for 25,-
000 bushels of flax a day, or 7,500,000 bushels for a
300-day operating year. The business runs to 575,000
barrels or about 18,750,000 gallons a year, which, for
linseed oil, is an enormous production. The money
equivalent of the oil output varies from $8,000,000 to
$11,000,000 a year, according to market values during
the period.
Incidental to this there is an important export
business in oilcake, running to 150,000 tons a year.
This averages about $3,500,000 in value, and the mills
of Minneapolis sell it to Antwerp, Liverpool, Rotter
dam, Amsterdam, Hamburg, Belfast, Glasgow, and
other United Kingdom and continental points.
About 600 men are directly employed in the mills,
and in all over 1,000 obtain employment directly or
indirectly from the industry.
527,082,931
2,314,490
21,058,400
*Hay
Potatoes
Tons.
3F
Defective Page
-m "Lmi^j j^p^y.M.jJiu i UJI^JJU^WW*yni
Farm Value.
$112,848,713
35,322,190
30,952,843
18,843,929 18,285,016
1,226,588
449,472,060
2,032,879
13,880,653
$217,479,279
12,541,859
8,000 852
$238,021,990
Bushels.
153,793,233 144,014,115
87,578,665 20,954,200
59,428,739
2,621,851
Wheat
Flax Barley
Rye
Farm alue.
$128,032,968
36,545,210
31,604,901 20,840,001
18,2US,474
1,622,317
468,390,803
2,044,339
19,938,972
Hay
Potatoes
1905-
Wheat
$236,861,871
10,576,828
5,897,069
$253,335,768
Bushels.
182,296,800 154,492,000
95,863,500 27,851,000 63,634,000
2,945,631
Farm Value.
$139,939,538
37,946,100
34,631,302 25,096,835 23,429,854
1,206,118
$262,249,747
13,432,366
7,241,798
$282,923,911
Presses.
158
COMMERCIAL AND FINANCIAL PUBLICITY SECTION.
THURSDAY EVENING,, AUGUST 31, 1905.
But That Is the Amount of Money It Takes to Measure the Farmers' Harvest from Fields and Dairies and Herds and Gardens in the Central Northwest This Year
GRAND SUMMARY
Showing the Production and Farm Value of the Principal Field Crop? of the Three
States, Minnesota, North Dakota and South Dakota,
for the Past Three Years,
The following table shows the yield and the esti
mated yield and the value of the wheat crop of Min
nesota and the Dakotas for 1903, 1904 and the present
year:
1903
Yield
per
Acre.
13.1 12.7 13 8
Acres
Harvested.
Minn... 5,393,328
N.Dak. 4,349,652
S. Dak 3,424,130
13,167,110
1904
Minn... 5,339,395
N.Dak. 4,567,135
S.Dak.. 3,287,165
13,193,695
1905
Minn... 5,554,000
N.Dak. 4,817,000
S.Dak.. 3,290,000
13,661,000
This year the rust was found again in many fields, Reached figures big enough. to make it highly impor-
and it did damage in places, in the cutting down of tant with, reference %Vm V=Hole Today it is spread-
Increase of 1905 over 1904, in grain 58,692,128 bushels
Increase of 1905 over 1904, in value $25,387,876
Increase of 1905 over 1903, in grain 77,610,871 bushels
Increase of 1905 over 1903, in value $44,770,468
Increase of 1905 over 1904, in wheat 25,503,567 bushels
Increase of 1905 over 1904, in value $11,906,570
Increase of 1905 over 1903, in wheat 9,150,629 bushels
Increase of 1905 over 1903, in value $27,090,825
Increase of 1905 over 1904, in oats 10,477,8S5 bushels
Increase of 1905 over 1904, in value $ 1,400,890
Increase of 1905 over 1903, in oats 36,570,626 bushels
Increase of 1905 over 1903, in value $ 2,623,910
Increase of 1905 ovsr 1904, inn corn 8,284,835 bushels
Increase of 1905 over 1904, in value $ 3,026,401
Increase of 1905 over 1903, in corn 11,351,161 bushels
Increase of 1905 over 1903, in value $ 3,678,459
Increase of 1905 over 1904, in flax 6,896,800 bushels
Increase of 1905 over 1904, in value $ 4,256,834
Increase of 1905 over 1903, in flax 7,687,160 bushels
Increase of 1905 over 1903, in value $ 6,252,906
Increase of 1905 over 1904, in barley 4,205,261 bushels
Increase of 1905 over 1904, in value $ 5,213,380
Increase of 1905 over 1903, in barley 12,726,008 bushels
Increase of 1905 over 1903, in value $ 5,144,838
Increase of 1905 over 1904, in rye
Decrease o 1905 under 1904, in value...
Increase of 1905 over 1903, in rye
Decrease of 1905 under 1903, in value
Increase of 1905 over 1904, in hay
Increase of 1905 over 1904, in value $ 2,855,538
IncreasI of 1905 over 1903, value.
Increase in money value of all principal field crdps for 1905 compared with 1904 $29,588,143
Increase in money value of all principal field crdsps for 1905 compared with 1903 44,901,921
IncreasI of 1905 over 1904, in potatoes 1,119,428 bushels
Increasf, of 1905 over 1904, in value $ 1,344,729
IncreasI O&1905 over 1903, in potatoes 6,058,319 bushels
Decreasf of 1905-under 1903, in- value $ 759,052
In addition to the value of the annual! production of $eld crops given above, it is safe
to say that the value of the annual production of the dairy farms, the truck farms, the
marketable increase in cattle and sheep and hogs and, horses, will bring the farm production
of the current year for the three states of Majftjlsota and North and South Dakota up to
$340,000,000.
yields and lowering of the quality. But the crop on
the whole stood against it well, and while there were
times when with weather favorable to the spread of
the rust, the partial destruction of the crop seemed im
minent, no sv-h calamity followed.
The rust visitation of 1904 and the remarkable de
velopments following it, gave birth to many theories
not fundamentally sound with reference to the wheat
producing northwest. I the rise of No. 1 northern to
the high point of $1.27, the extreme top, the excite
ment in the grain markets,' the importation of about
3,000,000 bushels wheat from the Canadian northwest,
the bringing back to America of wheat cargoes shipped
from the Pacific coast to Europe, and the decision by
the treasury department permitting the milling of im
ported wheat in America in bond, all operated to
strengthen the argument that America had ceased to
be a wheat exporting country. Many viewed the con
ditions as representing a permanent turn, but the truth
is that they were but temporary. t is entirely clear
that if the population of the United States increases
at the present rate, and the wheat area increases no
faster than the present ratio, the time must come when
the country will produce only enough wheat for her
home needs, but this condition will not be reached for
many years yet.
Value.
Cents.
69
63 62
13. 13. 13
Total Value
at Farm.
$48,750,292
34,801,565 29,296,856
Bushels
70,652,597
55,240,580 47,252,994
173,146,171 $112,848,713
12.8
11.8
9.6
68,344,256
53,892,193 31,556,784
87
81 79
$59,450,503
43,652,606 24,929,859
153,793,233 $128,032,968
74,979,000 64,547,800
42,770,000
79 76 74
$59,233,410
49,056,328 31,649,800
182,296,800
BARLEY
No important crop in the United States has shifted
its center of production so far as barley. I 1850 its
center lay in New York state. Today it is on the line
between Iowa and South Dakota and is now about
stationary, moving only slightly north and west from
year to year. California produces 23 per cent of the
barley of the country, and Minnesota, Iowa, Wiscon
sin, the Dakotas and California, together produce 75.7
per cent of it. The shj$i$ng^f, the center to the west
and northwest could be shown, if other statistical evi
dence were lacking, by the movement into Minneapo
lis, -which in 1893 received only 2,358,290 bushels, and
last year 11,600,360. The effect upon the northwest,
of the tendency on the part of farmers to go in more
for coarse grains has been very marked as has also
been the effect upon the Minneapolis grain market,
which reflects every change in northwest conditions.
A RAPIDLY INCREASING CROP.
About five years ago barley production -first
MILLIONS OF
GOOD, GOLD DOLLARS IS A LOT OF MO?TEYJ
270,151 tons
281,611 tons
890,507
RUSSIAN-JAP WAR
During the period of
Yield
per
Acre.
25.3 21.6 31.4
Acres
Harvested.
1,098,149
577,240 339,377
Minn N. Dak
S. Dak
2,014,766
1904
Minn.. 1,131,093
623,419
349,558
$139,939,538 S. Dak
28.4 28.1
28
N.Dak
2,104,070 59,428,739
Estimate for 1905
Minn., 1,175,000 28.5 33,487,000
N.Dak S. Dak
685,000
390,000
27.5
29
ing very rapidly, and
the acreage promises to
increase from year to
year. The business of
trading in barley has
grown to large propor
tions in Minneapolis,
and firms interested on
the buying side of the
market, that in former
years paid little atten
tion to tne northwest,
now. keep in closest
touch. A number of men
prominent in the trade
have moved here from
the east the better to be
in close to the primary
offerings.
From being a relative
ly unimportant point
Minneapolis has grown
to be a market where
buyers for the largest
maltsters are always ac
tive. The local malting
capacity has been in
creased by the erection
sof
323,780 bushels
416,199 125,287 bushels
20,470
the North Star Malt
ing company's large
plant in Northeast Min
neapolis and the enlarge
ment of the plants of the
breweries. As a malting
point the city does not
compare with Milwau
kee, Buffalo and. other
centers, but the business
here is in its infancy
and judges of conditions
in the malting trade
have predicted a great
increase ultimately.
More recently the
eastern exporters, who
handle barley, have been
getting into the Minne
apolis field, and promi
nent men in the Atlantic
seaboard trade who make
Minneapolis their head
quarters during the sea
son, predict that the
northwest, having taken
the lead in new interest
for barley buyers and
exporters, new develop
ments affecting the
trade or the production
are sure to occur here,
and that Minneapolis is
destined to become the
greatest barley market
of the country
CREATES DEMAND.
the Russian-Japanese war
just preceding the last land campaign, Minneapolis
sent out round lots of feed barley to the orient. Local
grain firms handled the business safely and expedi
tiously and brought about commercial relationship be
tween the American northwest and the merchants of
Japan and the Philippines, likely to result in further
expansion of trade at times when conditions favor.
Grain producers who have gone into barley culti
vation have had experiences not always pleasant, some
times thru ignorance of the importance of protecting
the yield from deterioration, by change of color or
otherwise, after it is harvested. Growing the crop and
gathering it in does not in itself assure a remunerative
price for the product. I is sometimes possible, thru
very adverse weather conditions, and always possible
thru carelessness or neglect, to bring down the qual
ity of the grain materially. Minneapolis firms have
recently employed some of the most expert men in the
barley trade of the country, who have moved here.
They have also iven the farmers the benefits of any
thing gained by their experience, and circulars about
the care of barley at harvest time have been sent out
very widely.
When barley yields well and holds a high grade, it
is a very satisfactory crop to raise, and while the farm
value is always comparatively low, yields an acre run
high enough to counterbalance.
In 1899 the northwest production of barley was as
follows:
Acres.
Minnesota 877,845
North Dakota 287,092
South Dakota 299,510
MINNbSUIA
HlQTOniOAL
SOOIETY.
Bushels.
24,314,240
6,752,060 7,031,760
Totals 1,464,447 38,098,060
The crops of the past three years,
equivalent figured out, are as follows:
1903
Value
per
Bu
$.37
.36 .33
Bushels
27,783,170 12,468,384
10,656,438
50,907,992
$18,285,016 $10,279,373
4,905,061 3,132,040
32,123,041
17,518,074
9,787,624
$.32
.28
.32
$18,216,474
$32 2 $1,782,814
18,837,000
11,310,000
2,250,000
.32
.32
OATS
Next after wheat in size, the oats crop is one of
the big money producers of the northwest. Nothing
raised here, unless it be barley, has played so impor
tant a part in the progress of the three states in the
past year or two. Time -was when the center of oats
production lay far in the east. Today it has shifted
into Dlinois and is rapidly moving farther northward
and westward. The states of Minnesota, North and
South Dakota always produced oats, since first their
soil was tilled, but the great expansion occurred about
two years ago, when buyers from all parts of the coun
try began to turn towards Minneapolis, and this, cre
ating a good market, and materially advancing the
average price to the northwest farmer, turned the mind
of the country districts more to oats production. Thus
6,027,840
6,619,200
63,634,000 $23,429,854
If You Would Be Pros
perous Yourself Cast
Your Lot Where Others
Are Prosperous. --&
^Minnesota last year produced the great total of 85,178,-
503 bushels, which, in money value, meant $22,146,411
for her farmers.
Up to about two years ago tne big buyers, the
cereal companies and others, drew *,he bulk of their
supplies from western Illinois and eastern Iowa. The
running down of the crop in important sections of
-this area, and the production in the same season of a
crop of oats of high quality the northwest, changed
affairs. ^Buyers found it advantageous and often nec
essary to come to the northwest for their supplies, and
naturally they came to Minneapolis. The result of all
this was that while in 1902 Minneapolis received the
total, then the record figures, of 12,066,490 bushels of
oats, the movement jumped to 22,384,050 the year fol
lowing, and again to 25,848,000 last year.
MINNEAPOLIS A GREAT OATS MARKET.
Todajj^ all buyers, including the American Cereal
company and the Great Western, the two largest con
sumers, are represented here. The elevators last year
carried at one time the heaviest stock of contract oata
in ths country, and stocks of all grades ran much larger
than ever before.
The stimulus to expansion of the oats acreage last
year came from both directions, for while the Minne
apolis market felt the benefits of the eastern demand,
and the increase in export shipments from the Atlantic
seaboard that originated here, the west coast was also
an active buyer. Many lots of oats for the govern
ment were taken here and sent to the Philippines,
and other sales were made for private account to the
orient.
This business, it is believed, will be seen again, a
little later. The eastern demand should begin to show
up here this year about Nov. 1. Everything indicates
that the Minneapolis market will receive more oata
this year than ever before, and that the outside de
mand will increase materially.
The acreage and production of oats in the north
west made a material advance this season. The esti
mate for 1905 and the two seasons preceding, follows:
1903
Yield
per
Acre.
32.3 27.4 38.6
Acres
Harvested
Minn... 2,130,315
N. Dak. 797,263
S.Dak.. 706,404
3,633,982
1904
Minn... 2,172,921
N.Dak. 829,154
S. Dak. 713,468
3,715,543
1905
Minn... 2,225,000
N.Dak. 930,000
S.Dak.. 840,000
Value.
Yield
per
Acre.
28.3 25.2 27.2
Acres
Harvested.
Minn... 1,439,112
N.Dak. 86,008
S.Dak.. 1,530,076
with money
1904
Total Value
at Farm.
$10,279,773
4,488,618 3,516,625
Total Value
at Farm.
$20,642,752
6,771,952 7,907,486
Bushels. Cents.
68,809,174 30
21,845,006 31
27,267,194 29
117,921,374
39.2
37.4 39.0
$35,322,190
85,178,503
31,010,360 27,825,252
26
24 25
$22,146,411
7,442,486 6,956,313
144,014,115
39.5 36.5
39.5
$36,545,210
87,887,000 33,845,000
32,760,000
3,995,000
25 23 25
$21,971,750
7,784,350
8,190,000
154,492,000
CORN
Altho outside the corn belt, and producing a total
that by comparison with corn-growing states appears
small, Minnesota and the Dakotas find the yellow
cereal a source of great wealth. Of late the produc
tion of corn has increased materially, and the increase
la likely to continue. In 1904 an important part o
the area of southern Minnesota and South Dakota,
where corn was planted, suffered from too much
moisture, and yields per acre were disappointing. This
operated to prevent such an increased acreage as
would otherwise have followed, yet the three states
this year ran well above last year in production, with,
a total of 95,000,000 bushels.
As in the more important corn producing states,
so also in Minnesota and the Dakotas, a large propor
tion of the crop never sees the open market. Much of
it is consumed on the farm where it is produced, more
nver gets beyond the county line, and still more
does not leave the state. I is turned into wealth in
different form. The cattle raising interests and dairy
ing industry of the three states stimulate the produc
tion of corn which promises to increase steadily.
North Dakota, naturally, raises very little. South
Dakota beats out Minnesota in any ordinary year, and
in a favorable season that state is capable of producing
50,000,000 bushels, while Minnesota should come into
line with 40,000,000 to 45,000,000 in any good year.
The acreage and production for 1905 and the pre
ceding two years were as follows:
1903
$37,946,100
Value.
Cents.
38 42 35
Minn... 1,554,241 26.9 41,809,083 36
N.Dak. 90,308 21.2 1,914,530 40
S.Dak.. 1,560,678 28.1 43,855,052 36
3,105,227
1905
Minn... 1,575,000 28.5 44,887,000 36
N.Dak. 101,000 26.5 2,676,5i/0 40.5
S. Dak.. 1,725,000 28 48,300,000 36
3,401,000 95,863,500
HAY
Hay is a crop that from its nature comes upon the
open market in quantity very small relative to total
production. Much of it necessarily never leaves the
farm. Its value appears ways too numerous to ol-
Total Value
at Farm.
$15,476,211
910,309
14,566,323
Bushels
40,726,870
2,167,402
41,618,067 84,512,339
3,055,196 $30,952,843 $15,051,270
765,812
15,787,819
87,578,665
$31,604,901
$16,159,320
1,083,982
17,388,000
$34,631,302
low. Like corn it creates wealth in form other than,*j
its own.
The crop is not often figured upon as important in
wealth production, yet in Minnesota it is so big-this
year that it stands the farmers a money equivalent of
$10,784,812. The Dakotas do not raise much hay, as is
natural. With the growth of diversified farming, and
the cutting up of the larger holdings of land into
smaller farms, hay raising will increase. The bulk of
the northwest crop now comes off Minnesota land, the
total for the three states in value this year showing
$13,432,366, with North Dakota and South Dakota re
ceiving only the smaller part of it. Yet North Dakota
increased its acreage by 228.8 per cent in the ten years
prior to the census of 1900, and has gained steadily
since then.
An important new hay produeting district *an|
from Winnipeg Junctiton north to Crookston, Minnf
"i

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