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The Minneapolis journal. (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, December 03, 1905, News Section, Image 6

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1905-12-03/ed-1/seq-6/

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-I-,
1
CITY NEWS
4
THE WEATHER
Forecast.
For Minnesota and WisconsinFair,
continued cold, Sunday Monday, fair,
With rising temperature fresh to brisk
northwest to north winds.
For MontanaFair, warmer in south
east: snow and warmer in northwest
portion Sunday Monday, snow, colder
west and north portions.
For North and South DakotaFair
and not so cold Sunday Monday, snow.
For MichiganFair in south, snow in
north portion Sunday much colder,
with a cold wave Monday, fair, not
so cold in west portion brisk west
winds Sunday.
For Iowa and MissouriFair Sunday
Monday, fair, warmer.
AROUND THE TOWN
"Mohair' in City.M. O. Hall, for
whom Mohall, N. D., is named, and
tounder of that bustling burg, is at the
Hotel Nicollet, with Mrs. Hall. They
will start today for a European tour
to last thru the winter.
Civil War Panorama.A panorama of
the civil war will be given at the uni
versity armory Tuesday, Dec. 5, at 8
p.m., under the auspices of the depart
ment of physical culture. Military music
will be furnished by the university
band.
Jessamine Club's Location.The Jes
samine club, raided Friday night by
the police as a gambling-resort, is lo
cated in the alley in the rear of 245
Nicollet avenue, not at 245 Hennepin
avenue. The building at 245 Hennepin
is owned and rented by A. M. Smith
and has no such tenants.
NECROLOGIC
BENJAMIN F. HANSCOM.Funeral
at 2 p.m. todav from the Richfield
Methodist church. Mr. Hanscom was
one of the early settlers in Richfield
and died at the age of 56. The funeral
was postponed until the arrival of chil
dren who live at a distance.
FELIX A. NEWMAN.Funeral from
residence, 2536 Tenth avenue S, Monday
at 2 p.m. Interment at Lakewood ceme
tery.
MRS. HANNAH WEIL.Funeral at
2 p.m. today from residence, 1312 Ste
vens avenue. No flowers.
YENTDRESOME YOUTHS
SKATING ON THIN IGE
Altho no accidents have been re
ported to date, the youth of Minne
apolis are taking serious chances on
the ice. Owing to the long continued
fall weather the skating season has
been delayed and the "kids" have
been waxing impatient to try a few
Dutch rolls and figure eights. Most of
the lakes and ponds have frozen and
some of the smaller ones are strong
enough to stand a light weight, but
hardly strong enough to be safe for
more than a few skaters.
Lake of the Isles, which is well
sheltered and quiet, is as smooth as
glass and many of the youngsters in
the neighborhood have been out. The
north arm is stronger than the open
part of the lake, but at that is hardly
safe. The police department is dis*
couraging the sport as much as pos
sible, fearing that a few venturesome
ones may try the open lake or that
too many will collect at some one spot,
and that there will be a fatal accident.
If the snow stays to prevent dust
from settling on the ice the lake
should offer rare sport in a few days.
The lake was open when the snow fell
and as a result froze as smooth as
glass, with no scaly or choppy places.
The larger lakes are freezing about
the edges and if the cold weather con
tinues will close up rapidly. The pond
in Lormg park is frozen, but no skat
ing is allowed yet. The park board is
allowing skating on only one of its
ponds, that in Van Cleve park, and
is doing everything in its power to
i prevent skating on the other lakes,
altho the lakes are so large that it
it is impossible to cover them.
There has been some ice-boating on
Lake of the Isles and Calhoun, but
it is considered dangerous.
MAIL ORDER HOUSES
IN SHOES OF SALOONS
May mail-order liquor houses solicit
tmsmess in prohibition districts?
This is the question which has been
put up to Governor John A. Johnson
by W. T. Maynard, a resident of Twin
Valley. Mr. Maynard says that Twin
iValley at the last election voted "no-
I license,'' that as a result all the sa
i loons have been closed and the sale of
liquor in stores of the town is a thing
of the past. But since, the village has
been flooded with circulars from a big
mail-order liquor house of St. Cloud.
Catalogs have made the acquisition of
bottles of "tanglefoot" of just the
brand desired, a very easy thing. The
^nail-order house has done a great busi
ness at Twin Valley, and as a result
drunks are just as numerous as when
the town had open saloons, asserts
the governor's correspondent.
Mr. Maynard says as the people of
the place have voted for prohibition,
that prohibition should be the rule,. He
asked the governor to take action in
i the matter, and da what he can to
prevent further sale of liquor by the
*|1 St. Cloud mail-order liquor house.
_f
g
vern
fr
r will probable refer
futile matter to the attorney general to
see what legal steps can be taken to
,]&,
causesTwi
nValley
toybecome 5voter want it, a "dr" town.what
*w
Minneapolis Deputy Collector of Cus
toms Not Liable to Arrest.
^fyi* A special dispatch to The Jour
nal from Washington, D. C, states
that C. R. Coolev, deputy collector of
customs at Minneapolis^ is not in any
danger of arrest for selling without a
license two bottles of brandy at the
custom house sale of unclaimed goods
Jxhere is a clause in the customs law
^providing for the sal of seized liquor*
subject to the pavment of the internal
'revenue tax by the purchaser.
T. N. Nichols, deputy collector of
internal revenue, has standing orders
to proceed against any person selling
liquor without a federal licensp and
has been wondering if he has been
.derelict in duty in failing to arrest
^pooley.
its
COQLEY IS SAFE
Thieves entered Albert Rowleff's
room at 2307 Nineteenth avenue S last
evening and, after breaking into his
trunk, departed with a gold watch and
about $5 in small change. There was
no one in the house at the time and
the thieves entered the rear door with
fte ,_$ _H-s 4?_
sfti
TO SHDT COUNTRY?
iSALOONS SUNDAY
_____________________
MOVEMENT IS ON FOOT IK HEN
NEPIN1
COUNTY.
Respectable Property Holders and Resi
dents Object to Their Towns Becom
ing Regular Sunday Battle Grounds
for City Toughs and "Booze-Fight
ers"Sheriff Will Be Asked to Act.
Residents of the country districts of
Hennepin county are said to be quietly
lining up their anti-Sunday saloon
friends and neighbors preparatory to
starting a saloon crusade in the coun
try. At present the saloons in Rob
binsdale, Golden Valley, Keegan 's Lake,
Medicine Lake and a few scattered
roadhouses are open on Sunday, being
out of reach of the Minneapolis Sun
day closing rule, and reap a rich re
ward for the trouble and extra work of
passing out intoxicants of all sorts to
thirsty Minneapolitans and country
yokels.
An organization, it is said, is form
ing nuietly and will soon be ready to
begin an active campaign against these
outside resorts. The membership is
composed of property holders and resi
dents who object to their districts be
coming regular Sunday battle grounds
for "booze-fighters" from the city.
While they are willing to have the sa
loons in the neighborhood, the results
of four closed Sundays in Minneapolis
have shown that the country Sunday
saloon will have to follow the city sa
loon.
As the first step in the movement the
sheriff will be asked to exercise his
authority and order the country resorts
closed. If the sheriff refuses to act
the cases will be laid before the county
attorney, who will be furnished with
evidence and asked to proceed against
the resort keepers. In the organized
villages the same plan will be followed,
but the offenders will be taken before
the local authorities. In Robbinsdale
there is a citizens' committee that will
handle the situation there and will seek
to close the four saloons of the town.
If the regular arrest and fines every
Monday morning will not produce re
suits, more drastic measures will be re
sorted to.
While the ~overnor has the authority
to order these places closed and to order
the sheriff to see that they are kept
closed under the state law, it is thought
that he could hardly single out Henne
pin county alone for such a movement.
The leaders in the movement are in
earnest, however, and say that they will
keep at it until they win. If the mat
ter is not settled this winter for good
and all it is feared that lige in these
country districts will be unbearable
next summer.
If the country resorts keep open dur
ing summer while the city is shut tight
there is reason to believe that there
will be a general exodus to the rural
joints each Sunday. Men and women
from the lowest classes of society will
simply transfer their orgies to the green
fields and open air and make the coun
try Sunday a general nuisance. Even
with the city saloons open, as they have
been in the past, there is generally
enough disorder and debauchery to
sicken those who wish for a decently
quiet Sunday. It is therefore feared
that with the additional crowds of
toughs, sports and questionable women
who would be attracted now that the
city is closed, orgies and jousts of the
worst description would be an every
Sunday occurrence.
"Giving Away" 25,000 (15c) Collars.
One 15c collar free with every $1
worth Laundry you bring us. "Save
Slips." Collars lc, Cuffs 1c, Shirts 10c.
Underwear work hand finished.
Shirts all finished by hand.
Ladies' skirts specialty, hand work.
Hoffman's (3) Stores and Laundry.
DISTINGUISHED ELKS HERE
PERKY A. CLAY, OF DENVER/AND
CHAMPE S. ANDREWS, OF NEW
YORK, WELCOMED.
Two distinguished Elks were last
night welcomed to MinneapolisPer
ry A. Clay, the Denver editor to whose
eloquence before the grand lodge at
Buffalo last summer is attributed the
selection of that city for the nex1
Elks' national convention, and djampe
S. Andrews, a noted attorney and Tam
many orator, of New York. Mr. Clay
this afternoon, is to deliver the me
morial address at the Elks' lodge of
sorrow at the" Auditorium and Mr. An
drews is to perform similar service at
St. Paul.
A dinner was given in their honor
last night at the Elks' club, which was
attended by the officerB of both lodges
and other prominent members of the
order, thirty-five being present. The
rooms were tastefully decorated and
Xavier's orchestra furnished music.
Exalted Ruler W. M. Regan presided as
toastmasler and responses were made
by Mr. Clay, Louis Nash, exalted ruler
of St. Paul lodge, and M. Oudinot of
Hudson, Wis.
Mr. Andrews did not arrive, owing to
a railroad delay, until 11 o'clock, but
was met at the depot and escorted to
the lodgeroom, when an impromptu le
ception was held, some 200 Elks being
present. In the couise of a witty ad
dress he told a new story on Minne
apolis. He was in Spain, he said, when
the cruiser Minneapolis arrived with
some government astronomers to view
the eclipse of the moon. Illustrating
th? ignorance of the Spaniards con
cerning the United States, he related
this incident:
A negro sailor, left in charge of the
astronomical instiuments, was inter
viewed by the editor of the local paper.
Realizing that he was regarded as a
personage of importance, the darkey
answered inquiries as to his official
title by declaring that he was mayor of
Minneapolis, se_t by the people of his
town aS their head man to take charge
of the expedition, and the next day his
portrait, labeled "the mayor of Mni
neapolis," appeared in the local paper.
Mr. Clay, in his address, utilized his
opportunity to work up enthusiasm for
the Denver convention. That city, he
said, would spen'd $60,000 in entertain
ing the Elks next June and was pre
paring some novel features for the oc
casion, which would include- among
others the presence of 1,000 Ute Indians
from the frontier and a mammoth
bronco busting contest.
4
Basing his prognostications on the
habits of the mole, an old molekiller in
Olten, Switzerland, announces that the
coming winter will be the longest and
severest for the las Hfteen years.
LETTERS COMINft
**0B SANTA GLAUS
CHILDREN ALREADY APPEAL TO
GIFTMAKER. *V
Little Believers in Christmas Saint Sly
ly Drop Letters into Mail Boxes from
Whence, Unknown to Their Writers,
They Are Taken to the Dead Letter
Office. Letters for the elusive Santa Olaus
are beginning to make their appearance
at the local postoffice.
In spite of the fact that none of the
thousands of messages sent by mail to
the merry, white-whiskered old man
who spends all his time at a workshop
at the north pole making toys for dis
tribution Dec. 25, is answered, every
year +h letters increase in number. Few
children seem to be aware that the right
way to get the contents of a letter di
rect to Santa ClauB is to burn it in an
open fireplace, anfd let the never-to-be
seen brownies carry the message in
smoke from the chimney, direct to the
owner of the historic flying reindeer.
The mails are the source thru which the
letters of parents are carried in safety,
and tne youngsters seem to prefer to
slyly post their letters to Santa Claus
than to send them by the smoke route.
Influx Only Begun.
Letters to Santa Claus will continue
to increase in their daily number at the
postoffce till Christmas. If Santa
Claus does not appear at the general de
livery window and claim his communica
tions within two weeks after they are
respectively received at the postoffice,
then they will be forwarded to the dead
letter office at Washington. There the
cold letter of the law says they must
remain for several weeks more in hopes
that the addressee will put in an appear
ance. At the end of that time they
are opened to see if they contain any
valuables, and if not are destroyed.
Santa Claus letters are most frequent
ly addressed with lead pencil, and in*
many cases the writers fail to put
stamps on the envelopes, evidently hav
ing no fear that Santa Claus will take
offense at being asked for postage at
the north pole end of the line.
Dear Santa Claus.
Most of
lettersor 1'
McLEOD'S BODY UNCLAIMED.
No one has appeared at the county
morgue to claim the remains of William
McLeod, who died at the Grand Central
hotel Thursday morning, and Coroner
Kistler has iven up hope of finding the
man's relatives. He died after a brief
attack of pneumonia and had iust come
from the harvest fields. The body will
probably be turned over to one of the
medical colleges.
Free Free
Jewel
Dr. J. T. Carpenter, formerly with Rexford
& McGirk's, is now associated with
these offices.
Telephones
T. C. 10040 N. W. Main 1606
THE-MINMEAR
are addressed
Dea Santthe a Claus,' simply San't a
Claus," while not a few of them, writ
ten by better posted authors, add
North Pole.'' There seems to be im
plicit trust that the postal authorities
will see that these communications are
properly delivered.
It may be timely to suggest, for fear
the letters are not delivered, that in or
der to have the desires expressed in the
communications carried out, it is well
for the writers to show the letters to
their parents before mailing, that
"mama" an'd "papa" may tell^Santa
Claus in person i_' case they should hap
pen to meet him at some of the big
stores, as is often the case.
SERVING OLEO
and
Northwestern Railroad Camps
Stores Violating State Law.
State Dairy and Food Commissioner
E. K. Slater," has sent an agent to the
northwestern part? of the state to look
after violations of the oleomargarin
law. Several railroad camps as well
as stores are serving out the colored
oleomargarin instead of the pure ex
tract of cream. The departmetn offi
cials find that as the price of butter
goes up in the fall there is more of the
oleo sold. Mr. Slater says that there
is scarcely any oleomargin palmed
off for butter in the biig cities and else
where in the southern part of the state.
At the close of the dairy course at
the state farm school the department
will send out the whole force of cream
ery experts and dairy inspectors to
look into the milk and cream supply
in the twin cities and other large cities
of the state. The creamery inspectors
will help the regular milk inspectors
in this as they finish the work of the
creamery inspection during the summer.
MUSICAL REIAL f!
SOON 1 ILIfBE O N
0%
DISTRICTS ABB FORMED FOB THE
'*''-&* CAMPAIGN-
Books Open for Enrollment of Pupils
and Struggle to Uplift Music and
%Taste for Musfc WW Be Under Way
in Short TimeMr. Patten Fires
First Shot at University Wednesday.
Willard Patten, originator of the
project to improve music and instill a
taste for only good music, will fire the
first gun of the revival campaign in
chapel at the university Wednesday
morning. Wednesday evening Mr. Pat
ten will meet musicians, educators, min
isters and patrons of music at Arcade
hall, there to complete plans for the re
vival and arrange a date for its formal
beginning.
Already the interest manifested in
the project has insured its success. Miss
Blanchard, secretary of the movement,
is receiving many applications from per
sons who wish to take advantage of the
very reasonable and exceedingly fine
opportunities offered to secure the best
musical instruction.. Miss Blanchard
is quartered at the Weber Music com
pany offices, Nicollet and Eighth streets
and anyone who desires to enter one of
the classes will be enrolled by her.
Inasmuch as the fees are almost noth
ing, co make the revival financially pos
sible it will be necessary that hundreds
enroll. They will receive the best at-
Winner of Fourth Prize,
JANET ROSS,
1700 Como Avenue, S. E.
Both Phones.
Dental Parlors
To adrertise their
work will give on*
sold filling: and ex
tract your teeth Free
with all plates or
dered before Christ-
mas. Come and see
samples before going
elsewhere.Gasor anti
pam for painless ex
tractions.
Plates $5, $6 and $8. 22k cold crown, $5
Uold fillings, $1 up. Silver fillings, 50c up.
OFFICE HOURS
8:30 A. M. to 6.00 P. M.
Sundays10:00 A. M. to 1:00 P. M.
Corner 6th and Hennepin Ave.
4
Holtzermann's
STORE OPEN EVEIUMS
C. M. AMSDEN
W. S. AMSDEN
C. S. HULBERT
C. J. JOHNSON
Defective Page 1
417-425 CEDAR AVENUE
Minneapolis
Daily deliveries to all parts of Minneapolis and St. Paul.
The SWEDISH AMERICAN
SAVINGS BANK
Now open for business at 52-54 South
Fourth Street.
TRUSTEES:
,J. A. LATTA
JOHN LIND
.E. L. MATTSON
B. F. NELSON
C. C. WYMAN
Deposits made on or before Dec. 4th, will be entitled to interest fox*
December if left the length of time required by the rules.
THE PHOTOGRAVURE
The latest, rarest, and most txquisite production in
photographic portraiture, possessing the effect attained
in portraiture by old masters. Sitting by appointment,
THE SWEET STUDIOS
News
teution and instruction and are certain
to profit by the training offered.
Tho subject to change when the. en
rollment is completed, the districts as
now planned are as follows:
CentralAround Wesley M. E. or
Central Baptist churches.
SouthNear Riverside mission near
Elliot park between Cedar and River
side near Oliver Presbyterian church
between Powderhorn park and Port
land avenue near Whittier school
near Lyndale and Lake street near
Lowry hill.
NorthNear Oak lake near Fourth
Baptist church.
NortheastCentral avenue to the
river New Boston.
SoutheastNear Andrew Presbyter
ian church near Minneapolis academy.
Final plans will be made at the meet
ing of Mr. Patten and other musicians
and interested persons Wednesday
evening. The invitation to the meet
ing is signed by Gustavus Johnson,
Clarance A. Marshall, Gordon Graham,
E. C. Lawton, J. L. Hjort, A. B. Bass,
W. S. Marshall, C. C. Heintzeman, Wal
lace McWhinney, William H. Dale, O. T.
Morris, H. A. Rudolph, Sidney Moore,
Robert Griggs Gale and Willard Patten'.
BANK CLERKS MEET
Professor McVey Will Continue Lec
tures on "Corporation Finance."
Minneapolis bank clerks will meet
Wednesday night on the second floor
of the Eastman block 414 Nicollet ave
nue. Professor F. H. McVey of the
University of Minnesota will deliver
his fourth lecture on "Corporation
Finance.'" Following the talk the
members will be come the guests of the
Northwestern National bank clerks. It
is expected to increase the membership
to 200 by Jan. 1. At the beginning of
the season the membership was 157,
since which it has been increased 20
per cent.
Scranlon
Coal
i
FOURTH PBIZB.
The chilling winds of winter
Strike no terror to my soul,
For we use exclusively
The best of Scranton Coal.
Our furnace hums serenely,
Jack Frost is put to flight,
The merits of the Scranton Coal
Ae clearly brought to light.
Jingle Contest
North Western Fuel Co.
34 Third Street Sout SiMK
cfer
OUR ANNUAL
OPENING
Monday, December 4th
Brings forth multitudes of original and ex
clusive Xmas and Holiday goods and wares.
Mr. L. J. Holtzermann, who spent a number
of months abroad in company with our for
eign connections, secured a very exceptional
selection of "Deutsche Spielwaaren,'' Gal
lanterie Waaren, European novelties and a
very interesting collection of rare antiques.
We beg to announce the display will be ready
for inspection Monday, Dec. 4th.
CHAS. S. PILLSBURY
C. A. SMITH
A. UELAND
N. O. WERNER
nfiN'T DPI AY
fvij
Thousands of beautiful gifts, moderate in price.
Ladies' Diamond rings $ 5.50
Ladies' Diamond Solitaire, a beautiful stone, 25 de
signs ^11.50
Diamond and Opal cluster ring, 12 Diamonds.
14-Carat Ladies' Tiffany Diamond ring
100 Silver 3-piece Toilet Sets, a beautiful gift for a
lady
}_-Carat Diamond, a beautiful gem
$250.00 Diamond Brooch, 17 large Diamonds of extra
quality, special Monday
Our ladies' size, 25-year gold filled ladies' watch is the
best value in the city at
Mak
II 327 Nicollet Ave.
The most exacting care^ to the smallest detail has
made us the laundry for particular people.
Fine woolens and flannels especially need the care
received at our plant, to prevent shrinking.
We make our own soap, and by fifteen years' daily
use know that it is harmless to the most delicate fabric.
Every piece is thoroughly inspected for defects
before it is delivered. This reduces the chances for
unsatisfactory work to a minimum.
For a trial next Monday, call
T. C, 120. or N. W., Main 621-J.
Hennepin Laundry Company
120-122 First Ave. No.
PETEE SCHLAMPP. ADOLPH Ch REINECKE.
A WOED ABOUT OUR
We positively save you 10 per cent on every Gar
ment, Neck Piece or Muff or any work done by us.
OUR LOW RENT DOES IT
Furs from here carry with them a distinct importance. In every
branch of the Fur business we excel, from our splendid display of
up-to-date coats and neckwear made in all Furs to the perfectly de-
signed and faultless fitting garments made by us.
A BIG STOCK TO SELECT FROM
To avoid the Holiday rush your order should be placed at oncewith
Schlampp & Reinecke,
14 years with Plymouth Clothing House.
911 TWENTIETH AVENUE NORTH.
Take Cedar and Emerson car, or 1st Ave. and 20th Ave. N. car,
going north, to Bryant Ave.
Telephone, N. W., 3901-J.
38.00 23.00
6.50
55.00
165.00
the article aside until called for.
1 R. G. WINTER JEWELRY CO.
CHOIC E FURS
i FOR GIFTS.
_r A splendid variety of all the most effective styles is one of the
many advantages offered at this store. Every fur absolutely
I reliable at prices the lowest obtainable in well selected furs.
PrettyScarfs and Neckpieces
A In Ermine, Mink. Sable, Beaver, Black Marten, Squirrel make
most desirable gifts and do not run too high in expense. A A
__ large line of nobby muffs to match.
We carry in stock a complete line of sealskin and every fash- A
ionable fur, which we make into garments after the very
latest patterns.
SELECT YOHR CHRISTMAS FURS NOW
2 AND SELECT THEM FROM
C.IC.BENNET
620 Nicollet Avenue
When You Think of Laundry, Think
Hennepin
Are You Going
to Wear a Plate?
If so, come in and let me try in a set.
You don't have to take them if you
don't like them.
Plates $3 to $15
Double suction plates a specialty.
Call and see our samples.
i_t* DAV^9 NICOLLET AV.
JLPI\. a rl. O a IV-HL I Corner MINNEAPOLIS
4th St.
k~
12.75
your selection early. We will put
I
IT,
i
i
f"*T
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