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The Minneapolis journal. (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, November 11, 1906, Part III, Classified Section, Image 26

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1906-11-11/ed-1/seq-26/

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^SyfiK GERTRUDE ATHERTON
J(Copyright 1906 by Gertrude Atherton." All Rights Reserved.)
XXVL-^-Continued.
The hills were very high and very
steep, the roads but a name i sum
mer. Had not the snow been soft
and thin th horses -could not have
made the ascent at all and as it was,
the riders were forced to walk the
greater part of the way and drag their
unwilling steeds behind them. They
were twelve hours covering the thirty
versts, and at Katschuk Bezanov suc
cumbed for two days, while Jon
scoured the country in search of a te
lega as sometimes happened there was
a long stretch of country without
snow, and sledges, by far the most
comfortable method of travel in Si
beria, could not be used. The rest of
the journey, but 196 versts, must be
made by land. Bezanov admitted that
he was too weary to ride, and refused
to travel in the post carriage. On
i the third day the servant managed to
hire a telega from a superior farmer
snd they started immediately, the
heavy luggage having been consigned
to a merchant vessel at Yakutsk.
Bezanov stood the telega exactly
a day. Little larger than an arm
ehair and far lighter, it was drawn by
horses that galloped up and down hill
and across the intervening valleys with
no change of gait, and over a road so
rough that the little vehicle seemed to
be propelled by a succession of earth
quakes. Bezanov, a fever which
fie attributed to rage, dismissed the
telega at a village and awaited the com
ing of Jon, who followed on horseback
With the personal luggage.
It was a village of wooden houses
built in the Bussian fashion, and in
habited by a dignified tribe wearing
long white garments bordered with fur.
They spoke Bussian, a language little
i heard farther north and east in Sibe
ria, and when Bezanov declined their
hospitality they dispatched a courier
at once to the governor general of Irk
I utsk, acquainting him with the condi
tion of the chamberlain and of his im
minent arrival. In consequence, when
Bezanov drew rein two days later and
looked down upon the city of Irkutsk
with its pleasant squares and great stone
I buildings beside the shining river, the
gilded aomes and crosses of its thirty
churches and convents glittering in the
sun, the whole picture beckoning to
the delirious brain of the traveler like
I gome mirage of the desert, his appear
ance was the signal for a salute from
the fort and the governor general,
privy counsellor and senator de Pestel,
accompanied by the civil governor, the
commandant, and the archbishop, and
1 with a military escort, sallied forth and
I led the guest, with the formality of
Officials and the compassionate tender
!ess of men, into the capital,
For three weeks longer Bezanov lay
in the palace of the governor. Between
fever ana lassitude his iron will seemed
alternately to melt the fiery furnace
of his body, then, a cooling but still
viscous and formless mass, sink to the
Utmost depths of his being. But here
he had the best of nursing and attend
ance, rallied finally and insisted upon
continuing his -journey. His doctor made
the less demur as the traveling was far
smoother now, in the early days of
March, than it would be a month hence,
when the snow was thinner and the
sleages were no longer possible. Never
theless, he announced his intention to
accompanv him as far as Krasnoiarfk,
where the chamberlain could lodge in
the house of the principal magistrate of
the place, Counsellor Keller, and be able
to command fair nursing and medical
STOMACH
DAT. Young's BEPTOPADS and FEPTOLKTS
We where medicines alone fail. They regulate
the bowels, relieve soreness, and strengthen
th* nerves and muscles of the stomach in ei
ther sex. You can soon eat what yon want
Without fear of distress The cures effected
are marvelous. If you have Dyspepsia, Indi
rostion, Sour Stomach, Distress after Eating,
STervousnen, Dizziness, Heart Fluttering, Sick
Headache,' etc., send lOo to cover cost of pack
ing and mailing, and I will send you a $1.00
reatment absolutely free. It will relieve you
mediately. Address, DE. G. 0. YOUNG,
National Bank Bldg., Jackson, Michigan.
^attendance and to this Bezanov indif
ferently assented.
The prospect of continuing his jour
ney and the bustle of preparation raised
the spirit of the invalid and gave him a
fictitious energy. He had fought depres
sion and despair in all his conscious mo
ments, never admitted that the devasta
tion in his body was mortal. With but
a remnant of his former superb strength
and emaciated beyond recognition, he
attended a banquet on the night preced
ing his departure, and on the following
morning stood up in his sledge and ac
knowledged the God-speed of the pop
ulation of Irkutsk assembled in the
square before the palace of the gover
nor. All his life he had excited interest
wherever he^went, but never to such a
degree as on that last iourney when he
made his desperate fight for life and
happiness.
XXVII.
The snow rarely falls in Krasnoiarsk.
It is a little oasis in the great winter
desert of Siberia. Bezanov, his face
turned to the window, could see the
red banks on the opposite side of the
river. The sun transformed the gilded
cupolas and crosses into dazzling points
of light, and the sky above the spires
and towers,, the stately square and nar
row dirty streets of the bustling little
capital, was as blue and unflecked as
that which arched so high above a land
where Castihan roses grew, and one
woman among a gay and thoughtless
people dreamed, with all the passion
of her splendid youth, of the man to
whom she had pledged an eternal troth.
Bezanov's mind..was clear in those last
moments, but something of the serenity
and the selfishness of death had al
ready descended upon him. He heard
with indifference the sobs of Jon,
crouched at the foot of his bed. Tears
and regrets were a part of the general
futility of life, insignificant enough at
the grand threshold of death.
No doubt that his great schemes
would die with him, and were he re
membered at all it would be as a
dreamer or as a failure, because he
had died before accomplishing what his
brain and energy and enthusiasm alone
could force to fruition. None realized
better than he the paucity of initia
tive and executive among the charac
teristics of the Slav. What mattered
it? He had had glimpses more than
once of the apparently illogical se-
?ort,
uence of life, the vanity of human ef
the wanton cruelty of Nature.
He had known men struck down be
fore in the maturity of their useful
ness, cities destroyed, by earthquake or
hurricane in the fairest and most prom
ising of their days: public men, priests,
pareats, children, wantons, criminals,
blotted out with equal impartiality by
a brutal force that would seem to have
but a casual use for the life she flung
broadcast on her planets. Man was
the helpless victim of Nature, a calf
in a tiger's paws. If she overlooked
him, or swept him contemptuously into
the class of her favorites, well and
good otherwise he was her sport, the
plaything of her idler moments. Those
that cried "But why?" "What rea-
son?" "What use?" were those that
had never looked over the walls of their
ego at the great dramatic moments
the career of Nature, when she made
immortal fame for herself at the ex
pense of millions of pigmies.
And if his energies, his talents, his
usefulness, were held of no account, at
least he could look back upon a past
when he would have seemed to be one
of the few supreme favorites of the
forces that shaped man's life and des-
to
Take Your Choicea Drug or a Food
Physicians of the highest setentlflo attainments unite In declaring that coffee is a term of slow poisona pernicious drag. They point
oat that it darkens the blood, clogs the llTr, colors the skin, weakens the heart's action and ruins the digestion of all who drink It. On
the other hand, dootors declare that a pore bottled beer,properly brewed from Halt and Hops, fully aged, like
Guild's Peerlessand Beer
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JOHN GUND BREWING CO La Crosse, \Vls.
C. BDECE, Hgr. Minneapolis Branch,
a nxa
i ,&>
us
fir*L
Classified Section. THE MINNEAPOLIS JOURNAL
tiny. Until he had started from Kron
stadt four years before on a vo\age
that had humiliated his proud spirit
more than once, and undermined as
splendid a physique as ever was grant
ed to even a Bussian, he had rolled
the world under hiB foot. With an ap
pearance and personal magnetism, gifts
of mind and manner aid character that
would have commanded attention
amidst the general flaccidity of his
race and conquered life without the
great social advantages he inherited,
he had enjoyed power and pleasure to
a degree that would have spoiled a
coarser nature long since. True, the
time had come when he had cared little
for any of his endowments save as a
means to great ends, when all his ener
ie8 had concentrated in the determina
ion to live a life of the highest possi
ble usefulnesswithout which man's
span was but existencehis ambitions
cohered and been driven steadily to
ward a permanent niche in historv
then paled and dissolved for an hour
in the glorious vision of human happi
ness.
And finally as he might realize
man's insignificance among the blind
forces of nature, he could accept it
philosophically and die with his soul
uncorroded by misanthropy, that final
and uncompromising admission of fail
ure. The misanthrope was the su
preme failure of life because he had
not the intelligence to realize, or could
not reconcile himself to, the incom
plete condition of human nature. Man
was made up of little qualities, and as
pirations for great ones. Many yielded
in the struggle and sank into impotent
discontent among the small material
things of life, instead of uplifting
themselves with the picture of the in
evitable future when development had
run its course, and indulgently pity
ing the children of his own period who
so often made life hateful with their
greed, selfishness, snobberymost po
tent obstacle to human endeavorand
injustice. The bad judgment of the
mass I How many careers it had
balked, if not ruined, with its poor
ideals, its mean heroes, its instinctive
avoidance of superior qualities foreign
to itself, its contemptible desire to be
identified with a fashion. "It was this
low standard of the crowd that in
duced misanthropy in many otherwise
brave spirits who lacked the insight
to discern the divine spark underneath,
the persistence, sure of reward, to fight
their way to this spark and reveal it
to the gaze of astonished and flattered
humanity. Bezanov's very arrogance
had led him to regard the mass of
mankind as but one degree removed
from the nurseryj his good nature and
philosophical spirit to treat them with
an indulgence that kept sourness out
of his cynicism and inevitably recur
ring weariness and disgust his ardent
imagination had consoled itself with
the vision of a future when man
should live in a world made reasonable
by the triumph of ideals that now
lurked half ashamed in the high spaces
of the human mind.
He looked back in wonder at the mo
ment of wild regret and protestthe
bitterer in its silencewhen they had
told him he must die when in the last
rally of the vital forces he had believed
his will was still strong enough to com
mand his ravaged body, to propel his
Main, still teeming with a vast and
complicated future, his heart, still
warm and insistent with the image it
cherished, on to the ultimates of ambi
tion and love. How brief it had been,
that last cry of mortality, with its ac
companiment of furious wonder at his
unseemly and senseless cutting off. In
the adjustment and readjustment of
political and natural forces the world
ambled on philosophically, fulfilling its
inevitable destiny. If he had not been
beyond humor he would have smiled at
the idea that in the face of all eternity
it mattered what nation on one little
planet eventually possessed a fragment
called California. To him that fair
land was empty and purposeless save
for one figure, and even of her he
jPlLfrjftfrCweT
8., Minneapolis,
Phones 723.
Buyi a Case of 12 Fall Quart Bottles
Metzge Rye
Transportation charges all paid by us when money is sent
with older.
Thims fine whiskey is known as the best of the best whiskies for medicinal
to worth SO PER CENT more than we charge for it.
Over 300,000 users testify to the high quality of METZGER RYE.
If you never used this whiskey and your lodal dealer does not keep it,
send your order direct to us. We will send you 4 Full Quart Bottles, packed
in a plain box so that contents will not be known, without any marks
for $3.20 and prepay anUcharges. We do this only to have you try this
whiskey to prove to that what we say about it is
true.n ordeandf Jou quartsyou you will oMe full cases W retur money
itisf~ "J.
METZGER RYES is not satisfactory.
-SEND FOR OUR COMPLETE PRICE
Lewis L. MetzgerLIST-&II Jf Co.
After
this
Jt- is*? i*
0
thought with the terrible calm" of dis
solution. During these last months of
illness and isolation he had beon less
lonely than at any time of his life save
during those few weeks in California,
for he had lived with her incessantly in
spirit and in that subtle imaginative
communion had pressed close to a-pro
found and complex soul, revealefl be
fore only in flashes to a vision astray
in the confusion of the senses, He had
felt that her response to his passion
was far more vital and enduring than
dwelt in the capacity of most women
he had appreciated her gifts of mind,
her piquant variousness that scotched
monotony, the admirable characteristics
that would give a man repose and con
tent in his leisure, and subtly advance
his career. But in those long reveries,
at the head of his forlorn caravan or
in the desolate months of convales
cence, he had iarrived at an absolute
understanding of what she herself had
divined while half comprehending.
Theirs was one of the few immortal
loves that reveal the rarely Sounded
deeps of the soul while in its frail tene
ment on earth and he harbored not a
doubt that their love was stronger than
mortality and that their ultimate union
was decreed. Meanwhile she would
suffer, no one but he could dream how
completely, but her strong soul would
conquer, and she would live the life she
had visioned in moments of despair
not of cloistered selfishness, but of in
comparable usefulness to her little
world: and far happier, in her eternal
youthrulness of heart, in that divine
life of the imagination where he must
always bo with her as she had known
him briefly at his best, than in the
blunt commonplaceness of daily exist
ence, the routine and disillusionment of
the world. Perhapswho knew!he
had, after all, given her the best that
man can offer to a woman of exalted
nature: instead of taking again with
his left hand what his right had be
stowed completed the great gift of
life with the priceless beacon of death.
How unlike was life to the old Greek
tragedies! He recalled his prophetic
sense of impending happiness, success,
triumph, as he entered California, the
rejuvenescence of his spirit in the re
newal of his wasted forces even before
he loved the woman. Everv event of
the past year, in spite of the obstacles
that mortal must expect, had marched
with his ambitions and desires, and
straight toward a future that would
have given him the most coveted of
all destinies, a station in hietory. There
had not been a hint that his brain, so
meaningly and consummately equipped,
would perish in the ruins of his body in
less than a twelvemonth from that fra-
omet
ran morning when he had entered the
of Concha Arguello tingling with
a pagan ioy in mere existence, a sudden
rush of desire for the keen wild happi
ness of youth
His eyes wandered from the bright
cross above the little cemetery where
he was to lie. and contracted with an
expression of wonder. Where had Jon
found Castilian roses in this barren
land? No man had ever been more blest
in a servant, but could even hehere
With the last triumph of will over mat
ter he raised his head, his keen, search
ing gaze noting every detail of the
room, bare and unlovely save for its
altors and ikons, its kneeling priests and
nuns. His eyes expanded, his nostrils
quivered. As he sank down in the
embrace of that final delusion, his un
conquerably sanguine spirit flared high
before a vision of eternal and unthink
able happiness.
So died Eezanov and with him the
hope of Eussians and the hindrance of
Americans in the west and the mortal
happiness and earthly dross of the
samthest of California's women.
The End.
I" OF THE MEAT
CANADA WBEAT BELT
Saskatoon Proudly Claims the
Title of the "Coming Metropo-
lis," and Its Progress Is One of
the Wonders of the Canadian
West.
By HERBERT VANDERHOOF.
Saskatoon, Sask.. Nov, 10."A com
ing metropolis'' is the proud title
which Saskatoon boasts. It backs up
its claim to the distinction by proving
that there are few other cities in Sas
katchewan, or, in fact, in the whole
Canadian West, that are making such
rapid strides. Every day witnesses
the advent of new industries and the
city is fast taking on metropolitan
airs. The extension of the Canadian
Pacific railway to the city is destined
to give it a tremendous onward im
petus, and its geographical position as
the hub of the great Canadian wheat
belt gives it commanding importance.
Building operations were never so
brisk in Saskatoon as they have been
during the past season. In all sections
of i the city new structures have been
going up, both for residence and busi
ness purposes. On the main business
streets the new stores that have been
erected would reflect credit on a city
the size of Winnipeg, which has as
handsome mercantile structures as are
in the Dominion.
A large portion of the inhabitants
of Saskatoon and the province of Sas
katchewan are Americans, who have
been attracted there by the cheap lands
and the great wheat production. In or
der that these people may return to
their old homes for the holiday season
and tell their friends of the advan
tages of life in the Canadian North
west, the Canadian Pacific railway
will, during the month of December,
give practically a single fare- rate to
St. Paul, Chicago, Cedar Bapids, Sioux
City and Des Moines, Iowa Omaha,
Kansas City, St. Louis, Peoria and Mil
waukee, from Calgary north and from
Begina north, and from all the prin
cipal points in the province of Sas
katchewan and Alberta. These tickets
will be good for the return trip any
time within three months from the
date of issue, and it is expected that
thousands of Americans will avail
themselves of the re-
visit their old homesopportunity at the cheato rate
offered them? and to preach the gospel
of opportunity* which Saskatoon and
i the other growing Canadian cities ex
emplify.
The present year has been the great
est that the Canadian West has ever
experienced for new immigration, and
by far the larger part of the new set
tlers around Saskatoon are from the
i states. These people will return to
their old homes and the educational
work they will do in informing their
I friends of what Canada has to offer
will undoubtedly attract more new set
tlers next year.
1
New Use for Asbestos.
Doctor Hogyes, a Hungarian army
physician, has demonstrated by thor
ough investigation that the marching
ability of soldiers, the most important
requirement for an army in the field, is
less endangered by fatigue than
through the sensitiveness of the skin
of the feet against leather. This sen
sitiveness, which has heretofore been
well recognized, the Hungarian phyi
cian has tried to avoid by a peculiar
remedy, namely, through lining or
socks of asbestos. The Hungarian
army has already adopted this innova
tion. As a tonic and health-maker
there is nothing like golden grain belt
beer. It is the ideal home beverage
and should be served daily with meals
to insure good health.
'HAS THIEF* ARRESTED
FINDS HE'S HER SPOUSE
X^"
Lost Husband Takes Wife's Suit
Case by Mistake in Depot
Far from Home.
Pueblo ol., Nov. 10.The reunion
here of Horace N. Cummings and his
wife, Clara, who last met in Syracuse,
JN. Y. their home, six years ago, was
dramatic.
Cummings was at the Union station
on his way from Salt Lake City to
Denver. His wife, who is in business
here, went to the station to take a
train for California. They placed their
suitcases side by side while each sought
station officials for information.
When Cummings returned for his
valise he picked up the wrong one.
His wife saw him, called a policeman,
and had her husband arrested. Then
she recognized him and plied him with
questions as to where he had been.
Six years ago Cummings enlisted in
the army and went to the Philippines.
He became ill, and his wife heard he
was dead. He lost his mind and mem
ory, and it was months before he re
covered. He found no letters, and
went back to Syracuse to find her, but
she had disappeared. Since then he
had been searching in vain for her.
They have gone to Denver, where
Cummings will engage in business.
Cost no more. Last longer. That's
the "why" of Foot-Schulze rubbers.
The Journal of Commerceinestimates
*re
ne'
*o
su
Sunday, November n, 1900
f
securities Octobe
?o^^
at $37,663,000, the, smallest month this
year. This compares with $45,947,000
for September and $66,958,609 for Au
gust. The bonds issued amounted to
$20,501,000, and stock to $17,162,000.
The total thus far this year is still far
ahead of 1905, the ten months record
ing $1,065,626,383, as compared with
$869,529,000 for the twelve months of
Thru the munificence of the widow of a
New York capitalist ther means has been sup
plied for the establishing of a magazine printed
in. blind point type.
t*
THE LARGE PROFITS made in min
ing investments are made by those who
go in at the start, or at the first offer
ing price.
The stock of the CALUMET CLIF
TON COPPER COMPANY presents an
opportunity for profitable investment,
which is worthy the immediate atten
tion and investigation of everyone.
The CAPITALIZATION IS $750,000,
divided into 150,000 shares of the par
value of $5.00 each, of which 50,000
shares are Treasury stock. The REG-
ISTRAR of the Company is the COLO-
NIAL TRUST COMPANY of Pitts
burg, and the DEPOSITORY of the
Company the FIRST NATIONAL
BANK of Clifton, Arizona.
THE FIRST OFFERING of Treasury
stock is now being made at one-half
the par value, or $2.50 a share, being
full paid and non-assessable.
CLIFTON, where all the mines of the
Arizona, Detroit, Standard, New Eng
land, Shannon and Calumet Clifton
copper companies are located, is one of
the best and richest districts ever dis
covered in this country.
THE CALUMET CLIFTON PROP-
ERTIES comprise five claims each 1,500
feet in length by 600 feet in width and
covering 100 acres of surface. They
are the Ninety-six, Randolph, Ran
dolph No. 2, South Slope No. 3 and the
Copper Bug. They lie directly north
east of the great "Shannon" mines
and westerly from the mines of the
"New England" Copper Company, and
north of the "King" group of mines,
owned by the "Arizona Copper Com-
pany," and north of the "Standard"
copper mines.
THE GENERAL FORMATION of
the country at the Calumet Clifton
property is identical with the formation
of all the great copper producing mines
of this district, being limestone, por
phyry, quartzite and granite, the
ledges or deposits being heavily capped
with iron, which is general with all the
large copper producers of the district,
and is a sure indication of the perma
necy of the deposits.
EACH AND EVERY ONE of the
claims showing ore in paying quanti
ties.
The principal development has been
done on the "Ninety-six" claim and
consists of the following:
Tunnel No. 1, about the center of the
claim, driven 75 feet all in ore that
will average from 5 to 30 per cent cop
per, heavily impregnated with iron,
making an ideal smelting ore. The vein
is strong and well defined, and will
average about 15 feet in width.
At the mouth of this tunnel has been
sunk a shaft to 50 feet deep, all in ore
of the same grade and character as the
tunnel.
About 100 feet northeast of Tunnel
No. has been run a tunnel 50 feet,
known as Tunnel No. 2, showing the
same grade and character of ore and
same width of vein.
Tunnel No. 3 is about 200 feet from
the southwest end line of the claim,
and has been run 40 feet on the same
vein, showing the same ore and width-,
of vein.
Back of Tunnel No. 1 about 100 feet
has been sunk a shaft 40 feet all in ore
of the same grade and character as the
others.
SEVEN ASSAYS made by the Pitts
burg Testing Laboratory, Ltd., of
Pittsburg* Pa., all taken from the work
ings of the Ninety-six claim show cop
per values from 4.64 to 27.66 per cent.
When it is taken into consideration
that the general average of all the ores
in this group will average from 4 to
30 per cent copper and that the large
producing and dividend paying com
panies are working ores as low as 4
per cent copper and paying large divi-
UNSETTLED QUESTIONS
With the election out of the way,
says the Wall Street Journal, there are
now five leading topics of interest di
rectly related to the business of the
country. These are:
FirstCar shortage of a more pro
nounced and general character than lias
probably ever been the case hitherto.
SecondThe labor question, involv
ing numerous demands for higher wages,
shorter hours and better conditions.
ThirdWestern railway rates, in
which the old question of Atlantic and
gulf competition threatens to disturb
the whole interior rate situation.
Fourth-The high rate of interest at
which money is now lending in finan
cial centers, and its relation to the
larger problems of banking and cur
rency.
FifthThe early assemblage of con
gress and state legislatures, in which
many questions relating to the regula
tion of industry, commerce and finance
are to be brought to the front. Mean
while there is much activity in -judicial
circles in the prosecution of suits and
administration inquiries, the end of
which has not yet been reached.
SALES OF COPPER
A representative of one of the largest
metal-selling agencies in the world es
timates,^ for the Boston News bureau,
the sales of copper in the United States
during October -just ended, approximat
ing 120,000,000 pounds, or about one
half the volume sold the previous month
September, the record month. He fur
ther adds that September's exceedingly
heavy volume of transactions so nearly
bared the market of copper for the
time being that the smaller sales re
sulted in October.
Herbert Knox Smith, deputy com
missioner of the bureau of corporations
in the department of commerce and
labor, is reported as saying at Hart
ford that as a result of investigation
that he had been conducting, the
United States government will prose
cute the Standard Oil company, to col
lect if possible, $160,000 in penalties
for violations of the Elkins act.
Director Boberts of the mint, quoted
at Denver, thinks bar silver will ad
vance to 76 cents or better within the
next two years.
John C. Welling, vicepresident of the
Illinois Central, is dead.
Pig iron prices show a tendency to
ward higher figures.
COPPER"
N. S. MITCHELL,
First National Bank Buildintf, Duluth, Minn.
^m^^^.v.^Mm^%mmimmw-**m muni i
BONDS VS. MORTGAGES
Farm indebtedness is almost invari-
ably the result either of a mortgage
given as security for a part of the
original purchase price, for the purpose
of improving or stocking land already
paid IOT, or for the purpose of buying Npf|
additional land for investment pur- if^S.
poses. But in no case do the mort-it^
gages of the class considered exceed
one-half the value of the unimproved
land. this particular mortgaged!
farni, and others in the community,
fail to produce the returns necessary*
for the interest charges against them,S
whence will come the interest on the
bonds issued by a railroad dependent'%
on this community for its origin of~?
business!
"If one can imagine/' says H. L.
Taft in Moody's Magazine, "sueh a
thing as a country suddenly rendered
barren, the railroad has become worth
less for dividend purposes while, on
the other hand, should the same coun
try simply be stripped of its railroad
mileage, it would continue self-support
ing and at the same time demonstrate
its ability to pay any reasonable inter
est charge against it. It has already
done this in times past in all portions
of our own country before the railroad
construction reached the community.
If, therefore, the investor must 'ulti
mately look to the earning capacity of
his investment,' we feel that it is
demonstrated that he can most safely
do so when his investment is a properly
made farm mortgage."
SHAW AND WALL STREET
The most successful traders are spec
ulating with a sharp eye on Washing
ton, waiting for Secretary Shaw either
to increase public deposits in the banks
or retire bonds. They believe such an
announcement would result in a sharp
advance and that stocks would be a
purchase on it for a turn at least. It
is the prevailing confidence in the in
tention of the secretary "to do some
thing" that explains the tenacity with
which holders cling to their stocks, in
the face of the high rates for call
money. It is intimated by well informed
people that, as was the case last week,
there has been this week a continuance
of the shifting of loans to the trust
companies.
Dun's review says many industries
are severely handicapped by traffic
delays and shortage of labor is also
felt.
dends, with the immense surface show
ings and the character of ore exposed
and in sight, it removes all speculative
values from this property, which, with
further and proper development, should
soon take rank as a producer and divi
dend payer.
FUTURE PLANS provide for the
immediate and energetic development
of the entire property the extension of
tunnels and the deepening of shafts,
which work will be carried on from the
proceeds of the sales of the Treasury
stock. INCIDENTAL TO THE DIS-
BURSEMENT OF FUNDS THERE
WILL BE RENDERED TO THE
STOCKHOLDERS FROM TIME TO
TIME detailed reports showing the
AMOUNT OF MONEY SPENT the
AMOUNT of work done, and WHERE
done the cost per foot, and in general
such an itemized statement as will af
ford to all the stockholders a clear and
concise statement which will indicate
specifically just how and for what the
Company's funds are being expended.
These statements will be thoroughly
audited and at all times duplicate
vouchers may be inspected by any
stockholder at the office of the com
pany.
OF FIVE DIRECTORS the president,
Mr. James Harvey, and the Treasurer,
Mr. B. B. Adams, reside at Clifton, ad
jacent to the property. The advantage
of having two directors right on the
ground is recognized. Mr. E. W. Hunt
of Boston, Treasurer of the Saxonville
Mills Mr. M. M. Ganser, Merchant, of
Duluth, and Mr. E. C. Blanchard, Su
perintendent of the Northern Pacific
Railway, Duluth, Minn., complete the
Board of Directors.
The mining will be under the direct
supervision of Mr. Ben M. Crawford,
associated with the Clifton district for
many years. Formerly associated with
the Standard Copper Company, his abil
ity as regards conscientious and ener
getic work is known to every one in
the district.
FURTHER INFORMATION as to
the Company, properties and operations
may be obtained at the offices in Du
luth, Minn., where maps of the mines
and specimens of ore may be seen, and
every facility afforded for the fullest
investigation, which is cordially in
vited.
THE PRESENT OFFERING OF
STOCK IS AT THE PRICE OF $250
PER SHARE. THE TERMS OF PAY-
MENT MAY BE EITHER CASH IN
FULL, OR $1.00 PER SHARE ON AP
PLICATION, AND THE REMAINING
$1.50 PER SHARE IN THREE EQUAL
PAYMENTS OF 50 CENTS PER
SHARE IN 30, 60 AND 90 DAYS
THEREAFTER, AND SHOULD PAY-
MENTS NOT BE COMPLETED, CER-
TIFICATES WILL BE ISSUED TO
SUBSCRIBERS TO COVER WHAT
EVER THEY MAY HAVE PAID IN.
IT IS ANTICIPATED THAT CAL-
UMET CLIFTON STOCK WILL BE
ACTIVELY DEALT IN ON THE BOS
TON CURB, ALSO IN DULUTH,
PITTSBURG AND NEW YORK,
WHICH WILL AT ALL TIMES IN
SURE A READY AND ACTIVE
MARKET, AND IT IS CONFIDENT-
LY BELIEVED THAT IN THE VERY
NEAR FUTURE A DECIDED AD-
VANCE WILL TAKE PLACE, BASED
ON ACTUAL DEVELOPMENTS.
INTENDING PURCHASERS WHO
ARE DESIROUS OF OBTAINING
PART OF THIS FIRST ALLOTMENT
SHOULD SUBSCRIBE OR MAKE
THEIR RESERVATION AT ONCE.
Further information may be obtained
by addressing immediately as below.
Make all checks, drafts and money
orders to the order of "N. S. Mitchell,
Financial Agent."
a
*'"$*,

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