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The Minneapolis journal. (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, November 11, 1906, Part I, News Section, Image 6

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1906-11-11/ed-1/seq-6/

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City News
THE WEATHER
& The Forecast.
Minnesota, Nebraska and Iowa
Fair, colder today Monday, faie,
WyomingFair today, colder west
portion Monday, fair.
North DakotaRain or snow and
wanner today Monday, fair.
Bouth DakotaGenerally fair today
and Monday.
MontanaRain or snow today, cold
er in northwest portion Monday* fair.
Wisconsin and MichiganFair to
day and Monday fresh northwest to
north winds.
Northwest Weather.
Taken at 7 p.m., ninetieth meridian time at
all stations.
a
STATIONS
us
a a.
a.
a
i
St. Paul
Mtxrhi
Iiuluth Esc-uudbn. MlpU
Huron. S.
I'leric. S.
r.Kmnrtk, N.
WlUUton. N
Devils Lake
Helena, Mont
Havre Mont
Miles City, Mont
Winnipeg, Can
Mlnnedosa, Can
Qu'ApjM'lle, Can
Swift Current, Can
Medicine Hat, Can
Calgary, Can
"Edmonton. Can
Battleford Can
Vrlnce Albert, Can
Port Arthur
Yellowstone Park
Madison
3S 32
36
40 38
88 32 30
30 52
36 30
32
32 30
30 28 22 26 50
38 36
42 32 S2 20
34
42 50 SO
26
26
36
48 38
40 30 30 24 32
.04
44 30 24
26
28 42 36
.01,
Local Temperatures.
Observations taken at 7 o'clock m., 80tu
meridian time Metimum tempeiatuie, 36 de
grees, minimum temperaturo, 32 degrees, dally
range of temperature, 4 .degrees, dally mean
temperature 34 deyroes temperature at time
of obsrvation, 34 degrees.
AROUND THE TOWN tg.
His Money Plated.George Smith,
who savs his home is in Minneapolis,
was arrested in St. Paul last night for
passing counterfeit money. Complaint
swas made by a saloonkeeper. When
Jsearched by the police Smith had four
flead pieces electroplated with silver,
fwhicb appeared to be half-dollar pieces.
Typographical Banquet.A banquet i
|in honor of the visiting typographical
^delegates to ^the^ convention of ^Jhe
gAmerican Federation of Labor is being
frtrranged by the Minneapolis Typo
graphical union. The banquet will be
'given in the National hotel next
fWednesday evening.
NECROLOGIC
WILLIAM F. BIRKENHAUER, age
JS1 years, died Tuesday, Nov. 6. at his
Residence, 1516 Elliot avenue S. His
jgremains were taken to St. Peter, Minn.,
rhere the funeral took place Thursday.
Ir. Birkenhauer is survived by his
rife and two daughters, also by his
father and brother, all of Minneapolis.
W. H. GETCHELL of this city died
it his home yesterday after a pro
longed illness. He is survived by a
son, Otis W. Getchell, and a daughter,
O. P. Briggs. Funeral notice
later.
FATHER VAUGHAN WILL
GIVE RETURN LECTURE
Great Dramatic Orator Will Give An
alysis of "The Merchant of Venice"
inf Teachers' Club Course.
A return visit from Father Vaughan,
the dramatic orator, who splendidly
demonstrated when he opened the\
Teachers' club course on the evening of
Nov, 2, that, he is one of the few great
Shaksperean interpreters of the day, is
announced by the club for Monday
evening, Nov. 19, at the First Baptist
church.
Because of the general interest among
students and people of discriminating
literary tastes in Shakspere 's plays,
and also because of the years of dra
matic training which have made Father
Vaughan particularly entertaining in
^Shaksperean roles, the club selected
Father Vaughan's lecture on "The
..Merchant of Venice" for the second
fevent of the course.
I The Teachers' club has been gener-
'*lly congratulated upon securing Fa
ther Vaughan for the first two lectures
of the season. The first lecture was en
joyed by more than 1,000 people, and
the impersonations of great Shaks
'perian characters were considered the
finest feature of it. His second lecture
,1s even more attractive and promises to
deepen the favorable impression which
the great orator made on his first ap
pearance in the city.
Father Vaughan looks upon "The
Merchant of Venice" as a satire on
Christianity,, and from this original
point of view, the play is considered
.thruout.
TO GIVE CHARITY BALL
Dovre Norwegian Ladles' Aid Society to
Raise Money.
I Dovre Norwegian Ladies' Aid society
gives its annual charity ball at Masonic
"Temple on Tuesday evening, Nov. 20.
The ball is arranged for the purpose
of raising funds for carrying on the so
ciety's charitable work. During the last
year the society has disbursed more
than $550 In cash besides contributions
of food and clothing, and has $250 with
which to begin the work the coming
winter. Ten families have received reg
ular support from the society and sev
eral individual emergency cases have
been looked after.
The present officers of the society are
as follows. President, Mrs. L. P. Foster
vice president, Mrs. Marion Donnelly
treasurer, Mrs. A. J. Leland recording
secretary, Mrs. O. E. Brecke correspond
ing secretary, Mrs. John Bjorhus chair
man of visiting committee, Mrs. A. N.
Wasmuth The charity ball is In charge
of a committee consisting of Mmes L. P.
Foster. A. N. Wasmuth, T. Guldbrandsen
iand I. Bjorhus
fwEINGART BELIEVES
HE'S ELECTED SHERIFF
)emocratic Candidate Says Canvass
Shows Enough of a Gain to Justify
Statement, Peter Wemgart figures that he will
ibe-the next sheriff of Hennepin county.
The official returns as canvassed by tho
board appointed for that purpose gives
him a gain of 57 the country towns
atrtl the first three wards of the city.
With this gjin Mr. Weingarfr computet
a majoritv of 140 over Sheriff Dregei.
In his opinion this lead wijl be hard to
overeonie, unless there'have been some
gjaring mistakes in the preliminary re
Wirns. i.
^Fragrant Evergreen Boughs
Take the place of flowers for fall end
ifrinter decoration of graves in Crystal
Stake cemetery. Order now. See us
ibout that lot you should have, -i,^^
ite&ifovVM
pfflyffflr/v
tM.ffl
SWITCHME N O STAY^
AT WORK: i STRIKE
PEACE .^AGREEMENT REACHED
YESTERDAY IN CHICAGO.
Railroads Grant Increase of 4 Cents an
Hour, and Menace of Walk-Out Tying
Up Twin City Lines Is Removed
Credit Due to Minneapolis Men.
There will be no switchmen's strike
this vear
Prank T. Hawley, president of the
Switchmen's Union of North America,
telephoned from Chicago last night to
Bobert J. Martin of Minneapolis, chair
man of the adjusting committee, that
he had reached a satisfactory agree
ment with the general managers of the
roads involved.
The wages of all the men involved
will be advanced 4 cents an hour with
the exception of the night yardmas
ters, assistant yardmasters and switch
tenders, whose claim will be adjusted
Monday. This means that, on the basis
of a ten-hour day, day helpers will get
$320 a day, day foremen $350, night
helpers $3.40 and night foremen $3.70.
Overtime will be paid at the same
rate. These are substantially what
were asked by the switchmen in the
first instance, and the arrangement is
said to be satisfactory to the union.
Itong Conferences.
For three weeks a committee of sev
enty-five, drawn from all parts of the
country, with Robert J. Martin of Min
neapolis for its chairman, has been sit
ting in St. Paul and attempting to ad
just all difficulties without calling a
strike. Last Wednesday a strike order
was prepared but it was withheld at
the request of the general managers of
the roads involved. Yesterday Presi
dent Hawley met the general managers
in conference at Chicago and they drew
up terms of peace. His telephone mes
sage to Mr. Martfn was the first inti
mation received here that what threat
ened to be the most serious strike in
the railroad history of the United
States had been averted.
"Credit for this victory belongs to
President Hawley and to the twin
cities," said Mr. Martin last night.
"It was President Hawley's diplomacy
which brought about a meeting between
_!.. J.& sub-committee of the S. U. N. A. ad
ustme
te
committee and a sub-commit
th
genera lag
manager
know-how to
i
TuesdaV
Chicagod
an
mee lagreemennt wa
ti Dr that the reache
yesterday arose. Minneapolirso hadt the
lion's share in this work, as it was
represented on this committee of six by
M. R. Carroll and myself.
"This agreement means that all dan
ger of a strike is at an end. By its
terms it can be changed only by mutual
agreement and cannot be terminated by
either party without thirty days' no
tice. This notice clause means that in
any caes there must be a conference,
and our experience shows that a con
ference is more likely to lead to an
agreement than a strike.
"Never before has an employees' or
ganization been given the attention by
the railway officials of this country
that has been given to the Switchmen's
Union of North America. The doors of
the general managers have been open to
us at all hours and they have always
been ready to listen carefully to our
side of the case. This is something new
in the history of railroading.
Strike Order Was Beady.
"For years the switchmen have been
looked upon as the most radical element
among railway employees, but I think
that they have shown themselves in a
f
1
^n&n
different light this time. Tho the boys York secretary, of the National Con-
in the yards were anxious to start ferenee of Correction and Charities,
something the middle of the week, and will be in Minneapolis Friday to meet
we had,a strike order ready Wednes- and confer with Wallace G. Nye, secre-
day, we withheld it at the request of tary of the public affairs committee of
the general managers, on their state- the Commercial club, and with Edwin
ment that they still hoped to offer D. Solenberger, manager of the Asso-
terms satisfactory to us. The outcome ciated Charities, in regard to the na-
has more than .-justified our action. tional conferenceplameeting her next
"After this
experienceS thew
general June
i
52
Sb
3!!J
i
no*7h?i.W ifn w*ot *?#*'C i.1
tattiJi nJp/wlrtT
tfrnp
S
Si
ult
Wtldn^T rro?Jit V^x
vf
Cx
*n,
fe *2^3"?
tha
/V
S
9U
S
laim
a S
Ur m
el^ne
%Zl HJP Jl
It
fo-pr7n? tft J^' The-
ma
th
tw
en
?tn IlV SEI b^V1?I
e.*
%LllJL??*ei
?t
Sotc5Xr*f-
ims averts
i lh
*T
huA
nS^^^TJlK
eir
i iSl
i
thr
hem
ar
dl
lot ^-i-
Cr
i.
Wa."f
theof
men strike.
tend the meetings the America Fe
eration of LaborPresident
le
J?U Minneapoli Tuesda at ing
The Fechheimer Fishee Co.,
Makers of "EFF-EFF" Clothes, desir
ing a more exclusive selling house in
Minneapolis, have appointed as exclu
sive agent
Hoffman's Toggery Shops, 51-53 4th st S,
Hatters Tailors Outfitters.
Laundry, 720-722 First Ave So.
SCHOOL TRUSTEES MEET
Hennepin County Districts Were Well
Represented.
Pi i 11
and Ventilating School Buildings MV
Manuel "How School Officers and Coun-
tendent B. T. Shaver "School Officers
Make School Sentiment,"
U8e
News- Section* THE ^INKBA^ljlC
HEADS OF CHARITIES
CONFERENCE COMING
BUTLER AND JOHNSON WILL
VISIT MINNEAPOLIS.
In Councils with Secretary Nye and
Others, the Details of the National
Conference to Be Held in Minneapolis
Will Be Worked Out.
AMOS W. BUTLER,
President, National Conference of Correction!
and Chanties.
Amos W. Butler of Indianapolis, pres
ident, and Alexander Johnson of New
vantages of Minnesota as a summer re-
wiI
1
Clt sor
we got on so well withy the others. That Widespread advertising of the ad-
IhJ^i ieJJt^n
7^
th
f.
conclusions of this difficulty without at this conference. Circulars explain-
ftruce. ine how eastern and southern people
iad there been a strike, it would can combine their attendance at the
have tied up every line of importance conference with their Summer vaca
the country. One of-the general tions will be prepared by Mr. Nye and
managers said to me the Chicago mailed to the 15,000 persons on the
conference last Tuesday: I tell you, conference mailing list by Secretary
Bob, if this comes to a strike it will Johnson. W. R. Calloway has also
make 94 ^ook like nine-spot.' He promised to ge imatteer 1La
Hawleyto
-nUnn, i for the mass meeting and the various
1
se n,\
a
nmr$ 2T
officers meeting: held yesterday the has consented to deliver the eonfer-
probate courtroom in the courthouse i ence sermon. An effort will be made
The meeting, which was called by County I to secure the attendance of President
School Superintendent D. C. Mackenzie, .Roosevelt. that, thes of
was the first of its kind in the county 'the speakerTraverschoice probably
Among the more Important addresses and fa
papers were the following: "Some Essen- Governor Polkt or James A Garfield,,
tials in a Good Country School," State Followinrgn their visit to Minneapolis,
Superintendent J. Olsen- "Heating
H.S'Ro
ell "Reforms in School Conditions,"
Axel McNeil "A Lesson in Elementary
Agriculture," D. D. Mayne.
MACCABEES IN REVIEW
Supreme Record Keeper to Witness the
Ceremony.
L. E. Sisler, supreme record keeper or
the Knights of the Maccatfees, will be the
guest Of honor Nov. 24 at a grand' review
of all the knights in Minneapolis be
held in Morgan Post tieM, tPhird street
and Nicollet avenue. A class of fifty
candidates will be introduced in the mys
teries of the order, after Which, a, pro
gram of speeches, songs and^ music will
be given. The great commander and
other state officers will be present, ana
as this js the first visit 6f a supreme:
officer to the state since the Maccabees
have been given home rule great enthu
siasm ppevails among the members.
NEW BANK BUILDING A FIRST AVENUE S AND FIF^H STREET.
of an executivee' com -e
following the adopted for th
han
Commercial club,
managementy otfh this conference will
th
National Encampment of the G. A. R.,
th i
hoe
assistedc b8 sub-committees from the
mitte ai
thei
conference which will attend thle otheto loca aa
manNyy points of detail,
^n" matter0s wholly pertaininge toconference-
de dperfect
the con
^rence. Tcoi these arrangements
Mr
representatives of th
wit
Wl11
th mee
me wil
1
^iam
0
b0 st attendance
th game with a lot of advertisint calling atten
threatened switch- tion to the attractions of Minnesota, the
will conferences an
advantagesyofofmake thJohnsonddithteadditio
sclwo
1
*l
en th
iy.Ja
trip wes the wa th-
great lake an the Soo line
Mr to being th
conference secretary, is the editor of
the Conference Bulletin, and will take
advantage of his visit to Minneapolis
to secure material for a special edition
devoted to the gathering next June
and the attractions and accommoda
tions of Minneapolis. Mr. Johnson will
arrive Wednesday, two days in ad
vance of Mr. Butler, in order to have
more time in which to look over the
city and gather material. Thursday at
5 p.m. he will lecture at the University
of Minnesota.
Many plans have been made for the
conference already. The date of its
meeting has been fixed at June 12, and
it willcourthouse. continue inArchbishop session thru June
19. Th
Auditoriuim
has been secured
*etion meet the memorial hall
of the Irelan
at
ten
and Mr will go correctionsJohnso.W
Butl e] W
.en.dc Ee
f *L W1-1
ty Superintendent May Be Helpful to !^W opens there Saturday night.
Each Other," Assistant County Superin-
1
COnfe
the
Whlle
t?ier
commissioners, appointed to assist in
the entertainment of the conference,
by the governors of the northwestern
states which were active in having Min-,
.^.ffij^"^^
HOT CONTEST IS ON
_0VER NEW P. 0. SI/.J5
Secretary Shaw Declines to Postpone
Hearing, but Notice, Is Received at
Eleventh Hour. \V
7
With election exeftanu-nt out of the
waj-, lively interest has been aroused
by the three-cornered contest over the
selection of a site for the proposed new
postoffice. The contest is between the
Commercial club and other business or
ganizations'of the citj', Seeretarv Shaw
of the treasury department and William
Henry Eustis.
Last week Secretary Shaw notified
the Commercial club's public affairs
committee that a hearing would be
granted a committee from the club to
argue foi the Pence site, which has
been indorsed by the committee and
other business interests, the hearing to
take place Monday, Nov. 12. Suffi
cient time was not given to send a dele
gation to Washington, and i-n Thursday
B. F. Nelson, cnairman of the commit
tee, wired the assistant secretary ask
ing a postponement of one week. Re
ceiving no repty, Mr. Nelson went to
the northern part ot tne state on busi
ness and other members of the proposed
delegation made to plans for an imme
diate trip.
Yesterday Secretary Shaw, after
consultation with the officials of the
supervising architect's office, decided
that the hearing could not be postponed
and telegraphed Mr. Nelson that the
Commercial club representatives would
have to be present on Monday. The
reason given was that Secretary Shaw
wishes to settle things at once, as many
options on blocks south of Hennepin
avenue expire early in December.
Washington dispatches further contain
the announcement that "William
Henry Eustis will remain in Washing
ton to appear on Monday and argue
for a south side site.''
Secretary Shaw will receive a vig
orous telegram tomorrow from the
interests friendly to the Pence site.
The telegram will state that the Com
mercial club had no knowledge that
anybody else was to be heard on Mon
day and therefore does not see why
others should be allowed to have any
thing to say on the date set for the1]
club. The attention of the secretary
will be called to the ,,fact tha the
Commercial clubl the1
'cit councilt com
mittee and the 'North* 'and East Side
Commercial clubs' favSf^'Che Pence site.
It will be stated thtffc the growth of
the city is north and west of Henroepin
avenue, and that 80 per cent Of the
street car tiaffic goes nearer the Pence
site than any other proposed site. i
SONS OF NORWAY TO
HONOR LEIF ERIKSON
Fest Will Be a Tribute to the Viking
Who Is Looked On as America's
Discoverer. Four lodges of the SQns of Norway
in Minneapolis will unite this evening
in a Leif Erikson fest to be held at
Normanna hall, Third street and
Twelfth avenue S. This fest is intend
ed to commemorate the discovery of
America by Lief Erikson, the daring
viking. Every man, woman and child
in Scandinavia knows that it was Lief
and not Christopher Columbus who was
the first white man to see what is now
called America, but which in bis day
was called Vinland and other lands.
Vinland was what is now known as
Massachusetts. The old sagas tell the
taie in the most straightforward man
ner, and syrely no one can doubt the
story.
At any rate, it is a custom among
the Sons of Norway to recall Leif. and
his discoveries. The celebration this
evening will be a fitting one,
large attendance is expected.
Friday "5$
con-
eitheFailing Wfllia Jerome,
oconference
tat
hwill
and charities
lt
neapolis named as the meeting place. IT Moran read the Bervice A break
fast followed at the iSmmett residence
Leading dealers handle Foot-Schulze and then the young couple left for an
rubbers. 60 years in the lead. eastern trip.
"PRETTY, SOON"
Is what you have been saying wheriever that promised piano has been
mentioned. No excuse for delay. Enjoy the living present. Our system of
easy payments enables almost anybody to own "a piano. New Hardman,
Rrakauer, Mehlin, McPhail, Behhing, Sterling^ Crown,.**"' Hnntingtpn
pianos sold for cash or monthly installments of $6 to $10.
3f436
Totals
38
..211 $317,231 200 $446,941*
BtlLDING PERMITS.
1906.
,Xo Amount.
Saturday 7 $15 085
Monday 21 25,570
Tnesday Electioni
Wednesday 25 }8# 275
Thursday 21
th
1905.
No. Amount.
0 $11,525
13,50$
12,2$0 41.880
7 085
5,120
15
38,89
14
9 Friday 15 S1.GJ0
Totals 89 $146,325 72 $137,405
Tie marriage of Miss Mabel Emmett,
daughter of Mr. and MxU. _George Em
mett, and Francis Edward Shields, took
place in the Church of the Immaculate
Conception, Thursday morning Rev.
^^uUo.y iu....^.
BEPRESENTATIVES FOB THE KltABE-ANGELTJS PIANO. &$
FOSTERfi&jyALDO
36 Fifth Street South, Corner Nicollet Avenue.
Defective
uc
age J|
I FI111I. I I OR E i
IUIMLUILKI
*c V*
OOLLECTORS .FIND MANY BABE
i^M^-r/^
3
A
fi .v ,,__'
West India Mahogany.
"Th is colonial sideboard is made of
West India mahogany, which weighs
6% pounds to the square foot, tho the
ordinary Mexican mahogany weighs
only 2V6 pounds. When it is rebuilt
and renovated it will be easily worth
$125, yet it was thrown out to make
room for a $27 machine-carved oak
sideboard. *When 1 found it, it' was
stored- in a woodshed in St. Anthony
Park. It was once highly prized by the
family to which it belonged, but the
man to whom it descended married a
woman of the kind who wants 'some
thing up to date' and it had to go. This
is the history of many heirlooms.
I had a table the other dav which
younger 'son of a noble English am
ilv brought across the water. He tried
farming Iowa, but went broke, and
Mr. Ammnndsen, the editor of the De
eorah Pobten, staked him with enough
to get home. I found the table stored i
in a barn there last Christmas.
"Then I had some old mahogany
'Napoleon' beds that were brought over
by a Freneh family. For twenty years
they were stored in a barn in 'Minne
apolis pending the determination,of lit
igation over the estate. This quaint
German-tabic is 200 years old. This
dresser.is real '^mp^re.' I evidently
worked its way down from Canada and
has passed thru many hands,
THE LID ON ST. PAUL
That Is, the Safoorts Must'
rvjldnlght.
nounced th
For Wives aaq Bothers
Save the Loved Ones from Drink Evil
Orrino Guaranteed to Cure
Can Be Given Secretly.
If your husband or son has fallen a
victim to tho drink habit, stop plead
ing scolding and crying. Use Orrine, I
winch is recommended by thousands.
This successful remedy can be given
secretly if desired, or the patient can
take jt of his own free will. It abso
lutely destroys the desire for string
drink, and builds up the run-down sys
tern, strengthens the weakened nerves
an
soo
noms phle
and a
FIGURES ARE COMPARED
Growth of City Shown by Comparison
of Realty Transactions.
Real estate transfers and building per
mits for the week ending Friday, Nov. 9,
are compared with the totals for the
corresponding week of 1905 by the Daily
Legal News as follows
TRANSFERS.
1906
No. Amount
Saturday lg $6S,07C
Monflny 68 78,064
Tuesday Election
Wednesday 54 ^96 26.1
Thursday 42 48 'jflg.
1905
No Amount
16
32 37
$13,84*1
1"S4,747
34,109 77 440
50.661 63,133
'i^mmmm*:
PIECES. r,
iwi\
Household Articles That Once' Graced
Mansions' of Old World Gentility
Find Their* Way in Early Day to
NorthwestUnappreciative Owners
O'ften Throw It Away. ji^r-j^*
tf|,
Minneapolis is becoming more" and
more the center of authority on antique
furniture, in the northwest. Furniture
which wa beginning to be antique
when the nineteenth century opened is
constantly turning up in Minneapolis.
Back of almost every marred and'bat
tered piece of walnut or mahogany is
a stoiy which, if it were only known,
might furnish material for a romance,
Massive mahogany or walnut bureaus i
with rope-marks deeplv scar-red in their
edges might tell tales' of tedious jour-1
neys by rail to Chicago, by prairie
schooner to the river and by steamer
to St. Anthony. Other pieces are once-1
eherished heirlooms from old New TSng
land homesteads, owned later by the
descendants of the original New ^Eng
land immigrants to the northwest and
since thrown on the market thru the
changing fortunes of the family.
"That chest of drawers over yonder
was usetf as a trunk by one of the
early settlers," said J. K. Shaw, 419
Fourteenth avenue SE. "You can tell
that by the deep rope-marks in its
edges. Manv of these old chests came
out here packed with clothing and bed
ding. As they had neither mirrors nor
castors, they made ideal trunks.
vWhen I
first got it it had be^n made over sev
eral times and had a mirror and cheap
brass mountings which werp plainly
not the work of its maker. These
little chairs came from Norway with
some immigrant. Thqy are made from
hog oak an dare at least 100 years old.
"Yo migh on and find a story
verv piece in this shop. When you
think that muc" o~ this furnitrre was
made in England, came to New Eng
land before the revolution, and has
drifted out into tJie northwest, you get
a mighty impressive view of the great
Anglo-Saxon immigration to America
and many picturesane side lights on
the early history of Minnesota.'/
in everv piecet inothis shop
Close' ax
The midnight hd went on in St. Paul
last night The instructions to the police
were t6 see that every saloon and hotel
diexpresslyaffect
not
12 o'clockthat sharp.e Iorder was an
Sunday closing and, that the saloons
might be open today.
"restores the patient to his
condition. AVrite for free pam-
euF
a i co holism to Orrinen
Cot, Washingtonf, C. Sen in plai
sealed envelope.
The price of Qrriue i $1 box.
Orrine is sold aiid guaranteead by
Voegeli Bros. Drug Co., corner Wash
ington and Hennepin avsj corner 7th
st and Nicollet av corner 4th av S and
22d st corner Lyndale and 20th av K.
for return of the leqses taken from
Opsahl's Studio.
23 So. SJxtb St.
FADDEH'S
BUTTER
in the height of
butter perfe5Ud
Gfet it at your
SSSmSUmSimmm
:Kidt^ove^-Cte^ihed'
'.Wi'olk UkV-Vse.vvi:-'
'i 1"J
Edlsoa and Victor.
TALKING
MACHINES
mBatrParmnts
tiBneMiUFbontgraphC*. J^S^.
Send for k(Jtan and Victor Catalog.
1*4
,Vrjr
bar the city ceased to do business at Interest and dividends 250 000
C^'-^Jfi:
riental
Perfect Specimens
IN ADDITION to the following, special offerings we direct
your interest to beautiful art pieces in KXRMANSHAHS
room sizesjost receivedevery one purchased at a great
concession. We are dally complimented upon the beauty of
our rugsno one should buy Oriental Rugs without seeing
^v
what we have to offer.
KAZAKSAntique and modern rugslarge square sires4
to 5 feet wide, 6 to 9 feet longthick a^ffeSSTP A
heavyvalues that are exceptional !&%$ m%9*Jf
KAZAKSAntique and modern pieces, extra qualities3 to 4
feet wide by 8 to 20. feet longvery good
values $30 to $65
ANTIQUE KURDISTANS and MOSOULSThese are very
fjne pieces and out of the common run in designsrare
coloringsfour lots $15 $20 $25 $30
TERMS TO SUIT
Beginning Monday, Nov. 12, all purchases of Oiiental Rugs
may be made upon terms to suit each individual customer.
Oriental Bugs Cleaned and RepairedPrices Reasonable.
ALDEN-KELJIK CO.,
Oriental Rug Merchants
NICOLLET AVE. and TENTH ST.
TRJ-STATE TELEPHONE &
TELEGRAPH CO. STATEMENT
&ross earnings $900,000
All expenses, including taxes and insurance.. 300,000
$600,000
Maintenance and depreciation 200,000
$400,000
Surplus $150,000
The above is the financial statement of a year's receipts and expenditures, based
on those of the present month, of the Tri-State Telephone Company
There is now offered to investors $500,000 of preferred siock, bearing 6 per
cent interest, free of tax.
The above surplus of $150,000 i sufficient to pay the dividend on the stock now
offered for sale five times over.
For any further information desired, please write to the company, or caU on
E. H. MOULTON, the President, at the Main Exchange, corner of Seventh St.
and Third Ave. 8., Minneapolis.
HAVE YOUR TEETH EXTRACTED
OR FILLED BEFORE COLD WEATHER
Q* And just so do many in private life who
OSllCl have musical inclinations and tastes to be
gratified. The New Infant Grand is de-
iViSltfa^imtf* signed for the parlor or music study, with-
iTiauaiii^
QUt
E3'#MAA4
aacrifice 0f toa
The aim of everybody is to save
money. Now, if you want to save
money and your teeth you call and
have a talk with me. Established
1880. My work lasts and is
right. The prices as low as
any competent dentist's in
the United States.
IIlcS Come In and See These Pianos.
HOWARD, FfiRWELL SCO.,707 Nicollet Av.
5*
Free examinations and priees.
Call and aee sample*.
DR. H. S. RAY,
S29 Klcollet Avenue,
Cor. 4th S
wmmmm^mmmmmKmmmtammmti
I Want a Chickering,"
i qUaiity. Jfsreasonable.lmarvea
with the pricen astonishingly
90c SIZE, 49e
"Won't Cut Wood"--WHI Cut Meat
(cooked or raw)vegetables, etc 5
cutters, family size. Cut 1 pound of
meat per minute.
SULLIVAN COAL CO., 626 1st Ave. S.
-Plymouth Ntrt
for Ranges and
Small Stoves. Prompt' 1
Delivery. #$

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