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The Minneapolis journal. (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, December 31, 1906, Image 6

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1906-12-31/ed-1/seq-6/

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THE WEAfflER
The Predictions.
MinnesotaFair and decidedly cold
er tonight Tuesday, fair and colder in
east portion,
Upper MichiganSnow and decided
ly colder tonight, with cold wave in
west portion Tuesday, fair, except
snow near the lake colder in east por
tion.
WisconsinOccasional snow and
dethe
cidedly colder tonight, with cold wave
in northeast portion Tuesday, fair and
col dei.
IowaFair tonight and Tuesday, de
cidedly colder tonight.
North DakotaFair tonight Tues
day, snow and warmer.
South DakotaFair tonight Tues
day, fair, except enow an a warmer
west portion.
MontanaSnow tonight and Tues
day, warmer Tuesday and in west por
tion tonight.
Bechtel Trial Date.William F.
Bechtel, former life insurance presi
dent, will face trial on Feb. 18 on one
of the grand larceny charges brought
against him.
Burglars Get Cigars.Burglars broke
into the cigar stand in the Phoenix
building, First avenue 8 and Fourth
street, last night and stole several
boxes of cigars.
Dr. S. Nelson Asks Divorce.Dr.
Henry S. Nelson has instituted divorce
proceedings against his wife, Grace
Nelson. I is asserted that they were
married in May 1899, and that Mrs
Nelson deserted her husband in March,
1905. Dr. Nelson gives his age as 4 1
years and his wife's as 29.
Wife Paid His Fine.After testify
ing against her husband in police court
on a disorderly conduct charge, Mrs.
Carl Percush paid her husband's fine
today. The trouble grew out of the
husband's jealousy or a boarder. He
struck his wife with a stick and a po
liceman, who was going by, arrested
him. He was found guilty andfined$5.Henry
NELSON NOW HAS
A HEADQUARTERS
COMMITTEE OF MEMBERS HAN-
DLES SENATOR'S CAMPAIGN.
Five from Bach Congressional District
In Charge of Caucus Call, Wnicn. Al
Ait SigningOpposition lis Not De
veloping Among the Members.
Formal headquarters for Senator Nel
son will be opened tomorrow in St. Paul
by the caucus committee in charge of
the call. Room at the Merchants'
hotel will be the rendezvous. The for
mal call, drafted by Senator Calhoun
of Minneapolis will be kept there for
signature.
The Nelsotn committee consists of
two senators and three representatives
trom each congressional district. Mem
bers of this committee will take turns
between now and Jan 8 in looking
after the headquarters and getting sig
natures to the call. The committee is
as follows:
Senators, O. Cooke, Kellogg A
S. Campbell, Austin E Putnam,
Blue Earthj E Canfield, Luverne
C. A Johnson, St Peter O. Nae
seth, Zumbrota George Sullivan,
Stillwater: J. M. Hackney, St Paul
E. E Smith and F. Calhoun, Minne
apolis George 0 Carpenter, Buffalo
C. J. Ghinderson, Alexandria Ole
Canestorp, Elbow LakeD S. Hall,
Buffalo Lake T. Pugh, Iuluth
M. Gnnn, Grand Rapids A Stev
phens, Croolcston F. Peterson, Moor
head.
RepresentativesH. W. Libby, Wi
nona O. N. Thurndale, Harmony W.
A. Nolan, Grand Meadow E. W.Gates,
Garden CityS 1. Peterson, New
Ulm, B. H. Jefferson, Bingham Lake
W. H. Putnam, Red Wing A. J.
Rockne, Zumbrota George H. Denzer,
Le Sueur H. B. Vollmer, Stillwater
Ambrose Tighe and Allen. Rowe. St
PaulB A Tunberlake, F. E Nin\
ocks and Swan Nelson, Minneapolis A
J. Wood, Otsego: John R. Howard,
Sauk Center I W Bouck, Royalton
Elias Rachie, Madison Knut Knutson,
Swift Falls Hanson, Hanley
Falls N Hugo, C. Miller, Du
luth Henry Bines, Mora: Welle,
Breckenridsre E E Adams, Fergus
%FaUg Donald Robertson, Argyle.
Whatever opposition there is to Sen
ator Nelson is not showing itself among
the members. Th emptiness of the
talk about Jacobson as a candi
date is shown by the fact that Elias
Rachie. from Mr. Jacobson's own town,
has signed the caucus call and is on
the caucus committee.
SDLTAN OF TURKEY IS
BELIEVED TO BE DEAD
That the sultan of Turkey is dead
and the government is and has been
for some time administered by a group
of former favorites who hold affirs
their own hands, is the insinuation of
an, Englishman engaged in business in
Turkey who is in Minneapolis today.
Bobert M. Gibletts, the man in ques
tion, in business in Constantinople, is
registered a the "West hotel. Gib-
lettS does not say that he believe that,
np i^iw
6 Monday Evening,
CITY NEWS
Around the Town floes no say xnat ne uueve mat ri""*
bazaars all over Turkey that the sul
tan is dead.
I believe the rumor is the work of
a growing revolutionary party," said
Mr. Gibletts. "It is not boldly talked
of, but is kept alive the agents of
the party who are constantly moving
about. The fact that the common peo
ple are not allowed any opportunity to
investigate tends to keep the story
alive among the people Prom time to
time persons are brought out who are
alleged to be former servants in the
royal household, who say that to their
knowledge the sultan is dead. Al this
is easily believed in Turkey and is
quietly passed about."
Mr. Gibletts handles American manu
factured products, including farm ma
chinery and novelties, in Turkey, spend
ing most of his time in America in
the interests of his business.
NECROLOGIC
OLGA H. OLSON, age 39 years, died
Saturday at Asbury hospital. Funeral
Wednesday at 2 p.m. from the resi
dence, 1410 Fifth street N and from
the German Lutheran chureh, Eigh
teenth avenue and Sixth street N at
2:30 p.m. Interment at Lakewood.
*!T MRS. T. KELLY of 507 Fourth
street N died Sunday morning.
^Funeral from the residence Wednesday
at 9 a.m.
-r- Before the Year Endfi-v,
Buy your lot in Crystal Lake Cemetery.
You will b,e glad'you have it. Partial
payments and^gp terms^
Weather Conditions.
Saturday's storm, now central over
Lake Michigan, is much increased in
intensity, and has caused precipitation
during the. past twenty-four juours from
tlio Atlantic coast westward the M.is-
SISSIDPI nver, and Missouri and Ne
braska and the country north of these
states. This low, in conjunction with
the cooling-,ttending the approach of
a high pressure area now over the Can
adian provinces, has caused snow in
Montana and the Canadian provinces:
precipitation has also occurred %est of
Rocky mountains, due to a deep
barometric depression over Nevada.
Fair and colder weather may be ex
pected this vicinity tonight ana Tues
day, with decidedly colder tonight the
minimum may reach 4 degrees.
Charles A. Hyle, Observer,
Temporarily in Charge.
Weather Now and Then.
Today, maximum 22, minimum 21 de
crees a year ago, maximum 11, mini
mum zero.
Sold Milk Below Test.A. P. Thomad
and Anton Christ proprietors of cream
eries on Central avenue, were fined $50
each police court -today for selling
milk and cream that was below the
standard The warrents were sworn out
by a member of the Milk Dealers' as
sociation.
New Citizens.Thru the process of
naturalization, 1,141 aliens living in
Hennepin county have become citizens
of the United States in 1906. This rec
ord, shown by the books in the office
of the clerk of the district court, is
large, compared with 1905, when only
287 aliens residing in the county be
came citizens.
Fight Chamber Writ.Notice has
been served on the attorneys for the
Langley Commission company and other
companies charged with illegally using
the quotations of the Minneapolis Cham
ber of Commerce, that the case has been
set for trial on Jan. 7. The defend
ants will fight the iniunction sought by
the complainants and will be represented
by Frank Larrabee, James R. Corrigan,
E. Barnes and John F. Kelley.
DR. W MAYO.
Famous'1
the sultan is dead, but merely states SSharS Sr- I Dec. 16, 1906,
that it is common gossip in the street j"
Surgeon Who Will Be Regent
of University of Minnesota.
Governor John A. Johnson today an
nounced the appointment of Dr. W. J.
Mayo of Rochester, Minn., as regent of
the state university tos succeed Dr
Stnckler of New Ulm.
0.MANAHAN WOULD
BE REINSTATED
SHIPPERS' ASSOCIATION INTER-
CEDES FOB ITS ATTORNEY.
Committee Headed by Grant Van Sant
Asks that Order of Disbarment En
tered by State Railroad and Ware
house Commission Be VacatedAc
tion Delayed Pending Return of Com
missioner Mills.
The state railroad and warehouse
commission will not take any action on
the request of the Minnesota Shippers'
association to reinstate James Manahan
to practice before the commission until
the return of Commissioner Ir a
Mills from the east. Mr. Mills is at
present visiting his old home in New
England and will not return to Min
nesota until the middle of January.
There seems little likelihood, however,
that the commission will change its
attitude.
Today the request of the shippers
was presented by a committee consist
ing of Grant Van Sant, J. C. Apple
gate and Thomas E Carlman, in the
following communication:
"To the Honorable Railroad and
warehouse Commission:
"At a meeting of the shippers and
commercial organizations of the state
of Minnesota, held in St Paul, Dec
29, we the undersigned committee,
were directed to present to the rail
road and warehouse commission of Min
nesota the re-quest that the ordei of
S"J^/*i^
practicin* before said commission,
should be vacated and set aside.
"We respectfully state to the com
mission that it is the judgment of the
shippers and public generally that the
exclusion of Manahan does an in
justice to him and his clients, and to
the members of the commission as
well."
I N MOORE CASE
The list of county officials who are
waiting for J. E Moore, who is wanted
in northern Minnesota counties, accused
will represent his county in the fight
to keep Moore in custody. Th sher-
Big Building Permit.T. B. Walker
took out one of the largest year-end
permits for 1906 today, amounting to
$85,000. This covers the addition to
the Wyman, Partridge & Co. warehouse
which Mr. Walker built this season at
Third avenue S and -Seventh street.
The addition will extend at an angle
from tho rear o the present building
and will abutt on the railroad tracks.
Side tracks will enter the new struct
ure for loading purposes, The two ad
ditions* w,ill be joined in one structure,.
i ^^.inAL^h,},.^ M.V^ &e\IAA
mm
BANK CLEARINGS $*
HOST A BILLION
RECORD YEAR'S VOLUME O BUSI-
NESS I N MUffXTEAFOfcilS.
Highest Mark Ever Reached in City Is
the 1906 Showing of $990,890,208,
Made in the Face of Adverse Condi
tibris in One of the Greatest Branches
of Local Trade.
With a volume of business the lar
gest ever recorded, and $77,319,645 in
excess of the total of 1905, Minneapo
lis -winds up a -wonderful commercial
year.
The record is gratifying in the ex
treme, not only because of the big
gam, but because it was made in the
face of adverse conditions affecting
one of the greatest of local industries
the allied milling and grain trades.
The car shortage and the railroad
congestion brought about such condi
tions that grain that should have moved
into Minneapolis terminals piled up in
stead in the country, and receipts or*
grain of all kinds from Sept. 1 to the
close of the year were nearly 35,000,-
000 bushels lighter than in 1905.
This suggested a possible falling off
in bank clearings, but so heavy was the
business in jobbing, retail and general
manufacturing lines that the Vrain
trade difference was wiped out and a
seventy-seven-million margin remains.
The grain trade will make up its
proportion 1907, for grains in the
country will necessarily move to mar
ket later on.
The Minneapolis comparison for
seven years is as follows:
JS0*
$90 890 203
JXX* 843,230,773
\Zi 741,040,342
iXXf 720652,331
jXXi 620,020,457
1W
W
,T
579,994,00 0
$2 50 Neckwear, Sl.50.
off
Hoffman's Toggery Shops..
NEGROES TO OBSERYE
EMANCIPATION DAY
The past and the present condition of
the negro will be reviewed in speeches
to be delivered at a citizens' lecture
and concert at Labor Temple tomorrow
at 8 p.m., given by the colored congre
gation of the Zion Baptist church. I
will be a, celebration of the forty-third
anniversary of the emancipation proc
lamation. Special attention is to be
given to the action the president
discharging the colored troops of the
Twenty-fifth infantry.
i A.. E Jenlss, professor of sociology
in the University of Minnesota, will
speak on The Laws of Eace Develop
ment former Governor S. R. Va
Sant on "Our President and the
Soldiers Brave," and there will
be short speeches by prominent
colored men among them Mc
Ghee, St Paul W R. Morris, Rev. G.
H. Wade of St. James A. M. E church
Rev. R. E Wilson of St Peters A
E. church Z. W Mitehell, supreme
master of the Loyal Legion of Labor
W. E Grant, ex-sergeant in the Twen
ty-fifth United States infantry Mrs
lone Gribtas, president of the "Women's
State Federation Mrs. L. J. Withers,
president of the City Federation, and
others. Admission is free.
ATHLEIJG STUNTS
ATTHE Y.H.G.1
New Year's Day will be celebrated
at the A \yy a continuous
program of sports and entertainment,
beginning at 10 a.m. and continuing
until 6 p.m. The doors will be thrown
open to the public in general.
The program will begin with a Series
of handball games between experts of
the ^association. At 3 p.m. an entertain
ment will be given in the auditorium
in which such well-known entertainers
as G. L. Tinker, F. M. Vogt, Ralph
Kenny, Hugo Lutgens and Mr. and Mrs.
George Ransom will be heard. In the
gall,
ymnasium boxing, wrestling, basket
athletic stunts, iuggling, tumbling
and clubswinging will be on the pro
gram.
HATCH DENIES HEROISM
Also, He Doesn't Own Building Which
Was Afire.
J. W. Hatch of the City Eealty com
pany, 111 Sixth street S, protests that
he is not the man -wh assisted some
of the women and children from the
burning building at 112 Sixth street S
Saturday night.
Mr. Hatch says he is not the pro
prietor of the building and was not
there at the time of the fire. After
the fire some of the occupants of the
building took refuge in his office and
he gave them his business cards. Some
of them understood he was the owner
of the building.
DR. VOLLMER DEAD
Special to The Journal.
Hutchinson, Minn De 31 Dr. Jo
seph Vollmer, for twenty-one years a
practitioner in this place, died at 3 30
am. today or Bright's disease, aged 66
years. was graduated from the Frei
berg university in Germany and before
coming here had practiced in Milwaukee
and Grand Rapids, Mich
One of the moat pathetic features of
his death is the fact that his wife must
leave tomorrow afternoon, directly after
his funeral, for her old home in In
diana to attend the burial of her only
son.
CRIME IS DECREASING
ca
of fraudulent transactions, now includes decreasing the sum total of county jail
E. E McDonald, county attorney of 'prisoners. Even so, the decrease is're-
Beltrami county, who arrived today and maskablofficerd
Crime is decreasing in Minneapolis,
the county jail people say. They base
their opinion on the fact that only 500
prisoners have been behind the bars this
year. In 1905 there were 529 entries
on the iail lists.
According to the nailer, Nels Clausen,
many prisoners charged with petit lar
ceny, who formerly would have been
confined ihn the county jail7 have ess
DY
wit workhouse sentences, thu
an
th
iffs of Beltrami and Itasca counties during the last year,
have been in the city for a week with
warrants for Moore's arrest. Th ar
guments in the Moore case were to be
presented early today, and Police Su
perintendent James Doyle had his pris
oner in court. The case -was continued
to this afternoon.
it is generally asserted
of the law that Henne
county has been decidedly orderly
$
*timh,:i,r. n$PA*P&l
THE MINNEAPOLIS JOURNAL.
FRANK HAMILTON DIES
FRANK H. HAMILTON,
Former Minneapolis Newspaper Man
Who Died Saturday.
4 Frank Hastings Hamilton, at one
time a reporter on the Minneapolis
Times, and later on the St. Paul Globe,
died at Sa Francisco, Saturday, of
pneumonia. Mr. Hamilton went'from
St. Paul to the coast about two years
ago, working on the San FranciBCo Ex
aminer. went thru the earthquake
experiences of last April, and his stories
of the catastrophe were ranked among
the best sent from that stricken city.
For the last month he had been em
ployed on the San Francisco Bulletin as
a special writer, and he had made ar
rangements to go to New York the first
of the year to engage in special work
there.
In November, 1905, Mr. Hamilton
and Miss Pauline Kruger of Minneapo
lis were married. Relatives here have
received no particulars beyond the fact
rE-OMINENT MEMBER OF^TlflB
from 1875 to 1892. He was partner for
a time of Btanfbrd Newel, under the
name of Young & Newel. Since 1883
he has been associated with William H.
Ligrhtner in the firm of Young & Light
ner. He ha,s beeja one of the special
lecturers the University of Minne
sota law school on the subject, "Con
flict of Laws." He was not only a
leader of the bar but a man of schol
arly and literary tastes. -was a
vice president of the Harvard Law
School association, a member of the
Minnesota Historical society and the
Selden society, and was in the council
of the Society of Colonial Wars.
BEAUTIES FROM BALT
They Indulge In a Merry Burlesque Show
at the Dewey.
Franklin Batie's singing Is the. best
number of many good acts given by
"The Baltimore Beauties" at the Dewey
theater this week.
Mr. Batie has a well-cultivated, clear
barytone voice that has not been over
worked, and he knows how to use it to
the best advantage. His selections show
good taste and ff was with reluctance
that the audience let him go.
The burlesques are new and stale jokes
are barred. Tha opening farce, called
"Tucker's ,Farm," furnishes opportunity
for several new Rube stunts and pretty
stage ^settings. Th closing burlesque,
nowever, is the oest. It is" called "Fun
In Camp," and the scene is laid at San
tiago de Cuba, The chorus in rich mili
tary costumes, gives several attractive
drills, and the music is well adapted to
the-act. There are several catchy songs
and the comedy parts are above the
average
In the olio Marion and Pearl taRe the
lead in a nondescript act that includes
dancing, singing, a clever sidewalk turn
and finished acrobatic work. E and
Holla White make a hit In their comedy
bpxing,bout, but the turn takes too much
time. King and pdell have a catchy
sister act, and thV Sidonias keep the fun
going In an autonjibbile specialty that'is
full of surprises.
An additional specialty Is the appear
ance of young Carrigs, a Ne England
boxer, who gives exhibitions at the close
of each perfo-rmance
NEW BANK AUTHORIZED.
Peter M. Kerst, public examiner, to
day authorized the Exchange State
Bonk of Grand Meadow to begin busi
ness. The new bank has $25,000 capi
tal and succeeds jthe Exchange,bank, a
private institution. C. F, Greening is
president, and E.J. Greening, cashier.
$10 SENDS A PIANO HOME
Xnd ,yo^ carv^ay balance $6, $7, $8 or $10 a months
We offer you some of the finest pianos in America to
select fromMehjinr. Krakauer, McPhaH,
Betaiing,**-"-**h
Crown," Sterling, Kohler & Campbell, Huntington"'
and other good makes. ^|*p& _.
Representatives for the Knobe-AngeiuJJano '1
FOSTER4^ WALDd,aftSSft
jit.: i:
SNOWS GENERATE
Hf TORRID
tfrf
Cremated in San Francisco todav Mrs to drift the sogev snow t-lt
GEORGE B. YOUNG IS DEAD
HOTTEST SPOT IN COUNTRY
STiVRTS MINNBAPOWS WINTER,
Arizona Critics Notice Unusually Wet
Rain Wnich Travels Northeast and
Becomes "the Beautiful" in Minne-
sotaRunners Supplant Wheelg, and
Sleddin' Is Said to Be Fine.
Fort Yuma, Ariz., the hottest point
in the United States, was the starting
point of the storm which has covered
Minneapolis with seven inches snow.
Hamilton will probably make her* future cars were able to keep the tracks cWr
home in Minneapolis. and there were no snow blockades
Coasting will replacieo the
Popular sport during^the remainder of
SA- J18*??B
STATE BAR PASSES AWAY AT
HOME IN ST. PAUL.
George Brooks Young, a former asso
ciate justice of the state supreme court,
died Sunday afternoon at his home,
324 Summit avenue, St. Paul. ..The end
came suddenly in consequence of a se
vere cold contracted on a trip to New
York a week ago.
Judge Young was one of the best
Known corporation attorneys the
state, and was, Reading counsel for the
Northern Securities company in the
celebrated litigation to wind up the
merger corporation. also conducted
the legal proceedings by which the St
Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba acquired
its line of road, and was frequently
counsel for that company and Mr. Hill,
tho never officially connected with any
railroad. was born in Boston Jul
25, 1840, of an old colonial family,"
graduated from Harvard in 1860 and
from the Harvard, law school in 18^3.
He was admitted to the bar in New
"Xoxk. city, served, for a time as man
aging clerk for David Dudley Field
and practiced on his own account till
1870. I that year he married Miss
Ellen Fellows3of Edgartown, Martha's
Vineyard, a descendant of Governor
Mayhew, the original patentee of the
island. Mrs. Yotfig died Jan. 20, 1905.
I 1870 Judge Young settled in Min
neapolis and engaged in practice. I
1874 Governor C. Davis appointed
him an associate justice of the supreme
court when, Chief Justice Bipley re
signed and Associate Justice McMillan
was named his place. On leaving
the bench in 1875 he established him
self in practice St, Paul and was
appointed reporter of the supreme court.
compiled twenty-seven volumes of
the decisions, froni 21 to 47 inclusive,
Ihree days ago this climatic disturb
ance waB a rainstorm which attracted
much favorable comment from the
weather critics of arid Arizona. De
spite the chilling effects of the north
western atmospnere, enough heat was
absorbed from the torrid air about the
Yuma reservation to render the flakes,
which began falling early yesterday
morning, slightly moist and sticky.
Connoisseurs sleighing say
u-
t?
the ^L
re
Colder weather is imminent. Th
eall
IIHW
rv
December '31, 190R
blankeft of the beautifutltha
eav
which covers the streets will make an
idesd foundatiod if it freezes after the
packin it will receive today. The
?omg
weather, issued from
9i
col
the Minneapolis weather bureau, indi
cates that from now on runners instead
of wheels will be the means of trans
portation about Minneapolis.
Runners Axe Good Form.
Wheels on either carriages or drays
are the exception today. Yesterday
saw some rapid work with the duster
and cloth in many barns, and by after
noon the cutters and slei hs were iin
glmg their way along every street of
the city Owing to the fact that the
storm did not begin u-ntil the street-
a a temperature
orecas
of 4 degrees in Minneapolis tomorrow
morning. Today's opening tempera
ture was 22, a fall of 12 in twenty-four
hours. Eeports from the Canadian
northwest show plenty of cold weather
headed this way. ,Some of the temper
atures are: Battleford, Sas., 12 Cal
gary, Alb., 14 Edmonton, Alb., 18
Medicine Hat. Alb., 4} Minnedosa,
Man., zero Qu'Appelle, Sas., zero
Swift Current, Sas, 4.
"HoB's" $6 Stetson Shoes, $4.98.
Hoffman's Toggery Shops..
STEAMER'S HVXL TO BE EAISED.
Special to The Journal,
Stillwater, Minn., Dec. 31.The hull of the
steamer Bun Heraey. which was partly burned
and Bunlt a montn or eo ago, will be raised
and Its machinery sayed. The work WBB start
ed today by Michael Welsh of Stillwater, who
has been gWen the contract.
McSweeney, a veteran barber, Is lylnir at
death's door He la 72 years of age and has
failed steadily since the death of hi* wife about
two months ago
Charles McCluie of New Zealand, an extensive
grower of hemp fiber, la the guest today of
Warden Wolfer.
S4 South Third St.
Diagonally opposite pogtoffica, Minneapolis
fcttfNCw4iiiftl-fei 'JflfeP
*v W i5
hauled
acat nskating
be
eSledas
8 7
tm
1
and
av
tt ?f -a1
1
ort
i
ac in barns and
attics Theodore Wirth, superintend
ent of parks, has
announcedi
that hi weath-s
last winter's order permitting coasting
the parks which havh hills will hold
good this Winter. Golf is the only
hl,tlie
can
*it
B^?-er
T" M^kahda club members had
planned to enjoy a good afternoon's
sport yesterday, but owing to the storm
the matches have been postponed.
Snow is General.
Minneapolis did not enjov the snow
alone yesterday. The storm was gen
eral thmout the state. Snow and ram
storms are reported from all but eleven
of the seventy-six stations reporting
today from all parts of the United
States and Canada. The precipitation
in Minneapolis, in melted snow, was .44
inches.
1
PfP!P"i
'w
The Swedish American
Savings Bank
LUMBER STATISTICS
BEACH BIG FIGURES
Xill off chilblains with Foot-Schulze
standard rubbers and arctics.
WU SING IS ROBBED
Wii Sink's lanndry, 12 "Western ave
nue, was entered by burglars last night.
The thieves entered a rea'r window and
took $10 in cash and a gold watch.
pofis, Minn. 5 2 South Fourth S
Has met with very gratifying success and the trus
tees now feel -warranted xn increasing the interest
rate, beginning with the next quarter, from 3 per cent to
31 PE CENT.
Deposits should be made on or before
January 4th, 1907
In order to draw interest for the next quarter.
OFFICERS
N. 0 Werner, Pres. O. S. Hulbert, Vice Pres.
J. A. Latta, Vice Pres. E L. Mattson, Treas.
Kimball Pianos
Like the good old songs of long ago, KTMBALL PIANOS endure and
retain their sweet tone quality.
W don't ask you to take our word for it "that the life of Kimball
Pianos is longer than that of any other make." W want you to call at
our store and examine them for yourselves, see the strength, solidity of
construction, etc., etc., and you will be fully convinced.
ONE PROFIT. Factory Warerooms. ONE PRICE
MINNEAPOLIS SAWMILL PRODLCTIOX
1406 1905
Lumber, feet 297 112 Sll 3GS 4T 7 OOO
Lath 53,717,850
Shingles 1,401,001)
W. W. KIMBALL 0 0.
Statistics of the Minneapolis lumber
cut for^fche season ha%e been collected
by J. E Rhodes, secretary of the North
ern Pine Manufacturers' association.
They show a decrease of 71,834,189
feet, or nearly 20 per cent compared
with the 1905 cut, an a a reduction of
11,981,150 the lath output. Shingles,
which do not form a big factor, show
an increase.
The reduction is partly due to the
fact that the Nelson mill closed down
for good a tH eiid of the 1905 season,
and only six mills ran during 1906.
Two or three of the mills ran only days
this year, instead of night and day as
formerly. This was on account of the
scarcity of logs during most of the
season.
Mr. Rhodes is getting reports from
mills all over the northern pine terri
tory, and says the total production for
Minnesota and "Wisconsin is likely to
show a big decrease.
*A',
Our Third
Semi-Annual Clearance
OF-
FURNITURE
Begins Wednesday, January 2nd.
Discounts of 10 to 50%
on every article in Mr. Coppage's large department.
SEE TOMORROW'S PAPERS.
Dayton Dry Goods
Co.
7th and Nicollet.
JO.
M/AfATE'JS'/J TA
The School tKat Has MadeGood for 30 Years
SL I C-" Ask the leadinrfjmnkers and business firms which school furnishes the best stenographers and
bookkeepers. jSlk tile and bookkeepers school prepared for
their work. Da^ichoolleadingsstenographers alway open. Evening sessions beginwhat January 7. Come inthed anmtalk
ItyoMannptcaUrwrtteorphonefwinformatian. &#,&
IhW *JE
*5
V*^
LIVELONG.
SB and 3T
Fifth Street
HENNEPIN CAUCUS
ON CHIEF GLERKSHIP
The fourteen republican house mem
os ooo bers from Hennemrt eountv will hold
o5,099,ooo another caucus Tuesday evening at
I io7,ooo! the office of O. L. Sawyer, on the ques
tion of chief clerk.
An effoit will be made to have the
delegation indorse one or the other of
the Hennepin candidates, Adolph E
Johnson and John T. Jones. A the
last caucus the delegation refused to
take such action, on the ground that
Hennepin could not ask for another
eleetl\ office. A steering committee
was named, but it refuses to make a
choice without the consent of the whole
delegation. If the delegation takes a
vote, it is probable that Adolph John
son will be indorsed, as lie is favored
by a maioritv.
The clerkship will not be finally set
tled till about Jan 7, it is thought.
Two or three of the congressional dis
tricts have not named their steering
committees yet and will not get to
gether till they arrive St, Paul next
Monday.
Sixty years the standard.
I Schulze" arctics and rubbers.
Ji
"Foot*
TOO LATE O CLASSIFY
'F00TCURA" ANTISrPTIC FOOT BATH FOB
bore, tendtr tirod and aching feet The only
thing that actually does give relief
WANTED GOOD G1HX FOH GENERAT*
bouKT orU, tamilv ot tnrec, must coot and
wash 2004 ISth av S
BEAUTY BBINGERS] ABE BATIK 8X11?
cieam and Satin skin completion powder. 25c
04
r*2i
RICKARD & QRUMAN,
ProprMon
?^n^s
Jus--

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