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The Salt Lake tribune. (Salt Lake City, Utah) 1890-current, February 10, 1904, Image 9

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045396/1904-02-10/ed-1/seq-9/

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5Jy vRSe'Samt Lake Txubunis: "Wednesday Morotng, February 10, 1904. 4 q .
TiDDlTIONAL 1
iJcUSSlFIED ADS ... I
;S ON PAGE 10 J
1 AUCTION SALES.
I g the choice of them for SS.50
1 1 -z'is thai cost to JC. will
.i ?ntoCtaSt cost from S3 to
K ; SSt l the low price of 50c
K i to make room for my new
1 ftrh will be delivered aboul
V ,'-5,B0t foil to call If you want
V KeDfurVlturc. beds and bedding
r -l rf? irs value. Remember the
4 uth West Temple st.. 3 doors
f I fflajuralt"" Co. so53
2 tSklocated now in our
1 Trt r 2nd So., and are carrylnsr
i toek of now and nd-hand
I S?cMds in tho city. Terms to
f Furniture Co.. M E. 2nd
5 bTEBS. BASBBURNBRS AND
cJA. id-hand Terms to suit I. X.
"sSl jrfSasd 1 Store. 233 S. State. ol303
jtfCTRlCAL SUPPLIES.
"TfciT K,. lireo stock of latest chanae
j jiLEIeft Co.. -to B. let So.
I
:t COAL.
'15 faf Coal Co.. 53 W. 2nd So. Tel.
I SOCIETY NOTICES.
j -
c RITE NOTICE. -THE FOUR
mK; bodies of the Scottish Rite
aP!al meeting on Wednesday
; 't tth Inst., at 7.00 o'clock. Busl-
if gTcat Importance. All Scottish
if C tuus Invited.
'I h CHRISTOPHER DIEHL,
LL Secretary.
JIASONS.
j AROENTTLDGlaTrFTAJ
' t .LXt At Masonic hall first Tucs
lis of e3ch month Mombers of
diet lodges and sojourning broth-
iiSA
t4'. FRANK P SHERWOOD, W. M.
uj 3 C PHILLIPS, Secretary.
jrrt'.
IATCH LODGE NO. 1. F. AND A.
terlc ball, 6ccond Friday each
' i l Mrabers of sister lodges and so-
i u brethren In pood standing ln-
IA BROWN. W. II.
r ;L0WB, Secretary.
j JTOBIAH LODGE NO. 2. F. AND
Kuonlc hall, second Monday each
4 ; Members of sister lodges and so-
ft' f brethren In good standing In-
' JAMES H BROWN. W. M.
; CTOPHER DIEHL. Sccrotary.
I JAUH TEMPLE. A- A. O. N. m!
a !rl Wednesday of en ch month, Ma
.Tyll IX l p. m. All noble3 EOjuorn-
'ff C. F JENNINGS. Potentate,
, 'iyowy. Recorder.
RoDlIEN OF THE WORLD.
L Beet caipm&TietTvxrt,
Bf!.t at 8 o'clock in Knlghta o
D. l Main street,
t RUSSELL, Consul Commander.
iyXETtMAN', Clerk.
HBlSi: CIRCLE NO. MEETS
soaK t 1 " " F' haI1'
OAiK121 iPLE CIRCLE NO. 103
-JnT Friday nlcht at L 0. O. F.
a
jjjjf IERNAL UNION OF AMERICA.
.Bgg, Se?rCFnnRPER- R
( ODD FELLOWS.
E 5IRBH ENCAMPMENT NO. 1.
I gfurth Tuesdays. 8 p. nu I. a
M ? LODGE NO. L EVERT
g' ' P- m- L 0 O. F. tcmplo.
i' Jft-i? EVERT FRIDAT.
J L 1 0- 0. F. templo.
5 WBrtN03- EVERT MON
0 L 0. 0- F hall.
B WDOE NO. 9. ETOPY
w.. I. O. Q, F. temple
ERt1SE LODGE NO. 15. EVERT
1 SSDG? NO. 17. L O. O. F.
AlgDERSON. N. Q.
5iiKALJlA0MI , LODGE 113. OF
UB5 Ijd and fourth Sat
L O. Q. f. temple.
ySlQBTB' OF PTTHTAS.
BBPk-ASP?51 no! lT EVERY
jgoP hSll. Ml Main atwaU
qviag. IC of P. halL
TOl0' EVERT
SL evenlris' 8 o'clock,
lfeTHE MACCABEES,
Swf.FnTENNoTT
fll5 balL Vlsillf
??SdS
I iKSl1 ov eagles.
gOgggAJ OP Lln, RC&
hoo;
Yesterday at high noon Miss Ida Noble
becatno tho bride of Lewis Cecil Robin
son, the ceremony bcln? performed at the
honn of tlio bride's father, W. P. Noble.
Only about thirty of tho most intimate
friends of tho young peoplo attended the
ceremony, which was performed by Father
Kelly of the Roman Catholic church. At
tho appointed hour the bridal party de
scended the stairs to the strains of "Tho
Wedding March" from "Lohengrin."
First enmo tho little flower clrl, Mar
garet Noble, dressed In a dainty cown of
white, with pink ribbons, and carrying a
basket of pink carnations. Next came the
matron of honor, Mrs. Robert Gould
Sm.th; then the maid of honor. Miss Mar
garet Mayme Noble, and lastly the brldo,
leaning on tho arm of her father. Both
tho matron of honor nnd the maid of honor
wore benutlfully embroidered gowns of
ch'.ffon made over tnrfcta, and carried Im
mense bouquets of pinks. Tho bride wore
a lovely gown of Venetian lace, made en
tralnc over taffeta and cliiffon. A long
'ell fell to tho hem of her cown. and
sho cArrled a beautiful bouquet of lllloa
of tho valley. Awaiting them In tho drawing-room,
whore tho coremony waa per
formed, were Father Klcly, the groom and
his best man. Will Hall. Tho ceremony
was porrormcd beneath a beautiful canopv
of asparagus plumosa, with a background
of palms and tall vases of calla lilies on
either side. Calla ljllcs and white carna
tions formed tho entire decoration of tho
drawIng-roo3i. In the library a stringed
orchestra played tho "Spring Song," and
ns the lost words were spoken, the wed
ding march by Mendelssohn. Thon the
friends of tho happy young couple pressed
forward to extend congratulations nnd
good wishes Following tho ceremony re
freshments were served In the dlntng
rocm. which was very prettily decorated
with American Beauties, while carnations
and smllax. tho cnndles and electroliers
being shaded in green. Palms were used
cntlroly In the decoration of the hall, and
palms and pink carnations In tho ilvlng
rooin Mr. and Mrs. Robinson left on
tho afternoon train for a month's visit
in the East. They will return and be
at home, after March 15th. at K5 Second
strcot.
Delightful indeed was the third in tho
series of Assemblies, given last evening
at Chrlstensen's. A larger number of sub
scribers than usual wero there, and tho
hours were most onjoyfibly passed by all
Palms were generously used In tho decora
tion of tho large hall and the reception
rooms to the south, and a most attract
ive cosy-comer was arranged to tho north
west Supper was served In the Commer
cial club dining-room, each of the fifteen
tables being decorated with a single crys
tal candlestick, surrounded by n wreath
of smllax tied with a bow of red ribbon
The candles and shades were In tho samo
bright color and the effect of the whole
was most ploaslng.
A charmingly appointed dinner preceding
the Assc-nbly was that given by Mr.
SchralJ nt tho Commercial club. Covers
wore laid for ten at n round table In tho
private dining-room. In tho center of tho
tabic wns a tall cutglnss vase of Ameri
can Beauties, the vase rising from a
mornd of plumosa. After the dinner each
of the ladles was presented with a hnir
dozen of tho Beauties as a souvenir
Covers were laid for Gov. and Mrs, Wells,
Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Walker. Mr. and Mrs.
Ernest Bamberger. Mrs. Bclvln of San
Francisco, Miss Judge, Mr. Critchlow and
Mr. Schramm.
Mr. and Mrs. T. C. GIosz entertained at
a very beautiful dinner Inst evening In
honor of their daughter Mrs. Rosemary
Glosz-Whltney, who leaves a week from
tomorrow for New Tork. Tho colors of
red, white and green wero carried out
In all tho decorations and refreshments.
In tho center of the round table was a
wroughtlron candelabrum. with red,
white and green shades On elthor side
wero vases of red and whlto carnations
with plumosa surrounding each. A hand
some cloth of cluny laco over red satin
covered the table, with sprays of plumosa
trailing over the cloth. A smnll photo,
graph of the guest of honor adorned the
place-cards. The guests at the dinner
wero Dr. and Mrs. NUctf. Mr. and Mrs.
B. F. Bauer. Mr. and Mrs. Charles J.
Boyd, Miss Bauer.
Miss Dorothy Kinney leaves soon for a
visit on the coast.
Miss Lawson entertains Informally this
evening In honor of Mies Mclntyre.
Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Henderson have re
turned to their homo In Ogden, aftor a
pleasant visit with Judge and Mrs. Henry
P. Henderson" of this elty.
A very elegantly appointed dinner of
last evening was that given by Mr. and
Mrs. Walter G. Flier in honor of Miss
Buford of Tennessee, who Is visiting Mrs.
Babcock.
There will be a meeting of tho history
section of the Ladies' Literary club at
tho clubhouse on Thursdny morning, Feb
ruary 11th, at 10 o'clock.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred C. Nwltt of Field,
B. C, arc guests of Mr. and Mrs. Philip
J. B. Newltt of 8-11 East Templo street.
The young people aro on their wedding
trip, having been married at Field. B. C,
on tho evening of January 19th. They
will make their homo at Field.
A a .
Mmc. Amanda Swenson announces tho
engagement of her daughter, Carrie Her
mla. to Lieut. William E. KneaBS, N. G.
U. Tho marriage will take place today at
noon at the homo of the bride's mother,
the young people leaving immediately af
ter for their future homo In Ogden.
m
At a special meeting of the Homo Pro
tective league, held yesterday afternoon
at the Davis Deaconess Home, the regu
lar day of meeting was changed from Fri
day to Monday afternoon. The noxt reg
ular meeting of tho league will therefore
bo held Monday, February 10th, at 3
o'clock.
This evening at 8 o'clock at the home of
tho bride's parents will take placo tho
marriage of Miss Jessie O. Miller and
Homer F. Robinson. The bride will bo at
tended by her sister. Miss Leila Miller.
Only a few of the most Intlmato friends
of the bride and groom will bo present at
tho ceremony, which will bo performed by
the Rev. Dr. Padun of tho First Presby
terian church.
Tho marrlavo of Mls3 Mnbello Snow,
daughter of Mrs. Mlnnlo J. Snow, and Al
fred L. Cole of Logan, takes placo today
at noon In tho Salt Lake Temple. A Bmall
and Informal recoption will be given In
honor of the young people this evening at
tho homo of tho brldo'a mother on Third
street.
On Frldav nftornoon tho children of tho
free kindergarten will have a valentine
entertainment, when a large number of
valentines which they havo been busl y
ongaged in making for tho past week will
be distributed among their friends.
s
Mr. and Mrs. E Kahn entertained very
delightfully at their residence Jonday
evening I" honor of the Utah Kndlmo
Gate. Progressive high-live a
turo of the evening. Mrs. L. Smith won
first ladles' prize, and Miss Lillian Alox
nndor took the booby prize; fa. Sickle, first
gentleman's prize; Mr. Johnson the booby
nr ze. Miss Lillian Alexander took tho
proposal prize. Fifty-live guests were
present.
CUBES COLDS IN RUSSIA
LAXATIVE BROMO QUININE. To got
the genuine, call for tho full name. 2jC
Don't fall to hear Utah's greatest
singer, Agatha Berkhoel, Friday even
ing If delivery of the Tribune In irregular
please make comprint to offlce.133 South
Ynjom0.
MEN WHO SAVED WEST
Why Veterans of Indian Wars
Should Be Pensioned.
PLEA 0F UTAH'S SENATOR
Bill Arguod Bofora the Senatt
Committee.
r
Senator Kcarns Sets Forth That the
Hardy Pioneers Who Fought the
Redmen Saved the West.
TRIBUNE SPECIAL.
Washington, Feb, 9. Senator Kearns
appeared before tho Senate Committee on
Pensions yesterday and argued in behalf
of hlB bill to pension Black Hawk Indian
war veterans In Utah. Tho Senator said:
"Mr, Chairman nnd Gentlemen of the
Committee: I appear before you this
morning In tho interest of Senate bill 212,
which has for its object tho pensioning of
veterans of the Indian wars of Utah, for
which there is no provision of law. This
bill was presented to me a.3 a substitute
for Senate bill 1375. which, after consider
ation, was found not to fully cover the
cases sought to be reached. Thero are
on tho statute books at the present time
laws providing pensions for veterans of
Indian wars under what is known as tho
act of Juno 27, 1902. This law, however.
Is Inadequate. It requires as a condition
precedent to consideration tho establish
ment of a record of service, cither from
tho records of tho War department or
from tho rolls of the auditor's offico in
tho treasury.
"A numbers of tho veterans of Utah
havo availed thomsolvcs of tho privileges
of this act nnd arc drawing pensions, but
thero Is still a greater number who nave
been unable to comply with tho require
ments of this law men just as dcsorvlng
and who are denied the benefits which the
United States generously gives to thoso
who fought for Its support.
"Every Bchoolboy familiar with the his
tory of his country lenows of tho early
struggles of tho pioneers against tho In
dians. Tho wresting and civilizing of our
great Wcstorn country forms ono of tho
most thrilling chapters In tho history of
tho nation. Thoso hardy pioneers who
wont into Utah had to fight for their
homes, and these are tho ones the Gov
ernment is asked to assist in their old age.
RAIDS OF DAILY OCCURRENCE.
"From 150 until 1EC3 Indian outbreaks
wero of almost dally occurrenco. Tho
army at that tlmo was of Insufficient
strength to cope successfully with the sit
uation, and the records of tho War de
partment arc replete with evidence that
tho Government was called upon a great
many times to help suppress theso Indian
outbreaks. Nor is evidence wanting that
tho Government directed that tho State
call upon Its militia for tho purpose, ns
tho sceno of the outbreak was too far re
moved from tho military power of the
United States.
"So it was. gentlemen, that these plo
neors bandea together and Joined tho
State mllltla, giving their tlmo and pro
viding their own nccoutremonts. The ros
ters of these mllltla companies arc still
extant and contain tho names of those
who mado war upon the red man until
finally he was driven farther west and
tho civilization of tho Territory became a
possibility.
"These men have never been compen
sated cither for tho loss Incurred in re
pelling the Indians, nor for the armB they
contributed and the time given. Tlmo has
not dealt gently with them. Many havo
passed tho eightieth milestone and some
aro In dire need of Federal aid. I doubt
If tho bonellccnce of tho United States
could be better bestowed than by giving
these men Federal recognition in tho ahapo
of a service pension at least. They can
not show that they wero mustered Into
the sorvlcc of tho United Statos, but they
can show by tho exhibits they present to
you, amplo proof that they rendered the
sorvlco for which they seek recognition
and aro entitled to it by everything that
stands for Justice.
PROVISIONS OF BILL.
"The bill provides for the extension of
the provisions, limitations and benefits of
the act of July 27. 1&)2, as amended by tho
act of June 27. 1902, to Include Indian wars
of the United States which occurred In
tho Territory of Utah down to and In
cluding the yoar 1SG7. 1 havo asked for
this extonslon to 18C7 in order to Include
the survivors of the Black Hawk war
which raged In Utah during tho yoars
1SCC and 1!CT. A brief account of this war
Is Included in the exhibits which I havo
handed you for consideration In connec
tion with the bill. The bill provides that
proof of scrvlco shall bo by affidavit of
survivors or surviving widows of such sol
diers, corroborated and attcstod by two
reputable witnesses, said evidence to be
taken as full and satisfactory proof of
service when no record of service Is In
cluded in the flics of the War or Treas
ury departments. With such affidavits,
corroborated by tho muster-rolls, It Occurs
to mo the proof is amplo to establish tho
service rendered.
"Section 2 provides for tho pensioning
of those included under tho terms of this
bill from tho date of the passago of tho
amended act. which was Juno 27, 1902.
TIiIb provision, It seems to me. Is merely
carrying out the Intent of Congress,
which was. I believe, to pension all tho
veterans of tho Jndlan wars on that dato.
"Now, gentlemen, in submitting this bill
to your earnest consideration I ask that
you bear In mind tho difficulties under
which thcBo men fought and tho grand
rcBulls they achieved. Thoy aro worthy
applicants indeed, empire-builders. If you
please, and the bcnetlts which tho bill enr
lico will only bo for a Httlo while. I ask
your earnest and favorable consideration,
and call your attention In conclusion to
tho c?:hlblt8 that aro tiled herewith."
Marriage Licenses.
Horace Renshaw. Salt Lake City 20
Lillian Gurtke, Suit Lake City .....19
F.rncst L. Smow. Draper 20
Jane Cottrell, Draper 25
J. Herbert Wessman, Salt Lako City 21
Ruby Durrant, Salt Lake City IS
James R. Danslo, RIverton 17
Florence Bills, Bluff Dalo 16
Gcorgo I. Hocking. Bingham 23
Ellen Spencer, Blurt Dalo 22
Alfred W. Bishop, Rlvrrdnlc. Ida 20
May Van Noy, RIverdalc, Ida 19
Alfred L. Colo, Logan..... 2-1
Mabello Snow, Salt Lako City 21
Hcber C. Butler, Wlllard 33
Rose M. Beechcr, Wlllard , 21
Eugene Blackott, Eureka 2S
Maguerlte Adams, Eureka,, 3
Samuel Knight, Warren 33
Maggie Canlpkln, Parrio 24
Edward D. Whiting. Mt. Gem, Or 23
Mary E. Olscn, Lognn 20
Robert G. Page. Cedar City 26
Dora llaltorman, Parowan ,.21
Lorenzo Taylor, Farr West 21
M. Maud Harding, Provo 21
James II. Rampton, Taylorsvlllo 25
Eugenia T. Hardy, Salt Lako City 22
For Over Fifty Years.
An old and well-tried remedy. Mrs.
Winslow's Soothing Syrup has been
used for over fifty yenra by millions of
mothers for their children whllo teeth
ing, with perfect success. It soothes
the child, softens tho gums, allays all
pain, cures wind colic and Is tho best
remedy for diarrhoea. Sold by drug
gists In every part of tho world. Bo
sure and askJCor Mi WillglQg'AQOth-
MORMONISM IN WAY.
One Reason Statehood of Arizona and
Hew Mexico Is Opposed at
"Washington.
TRIBUNE SPECIAL.
"Washington, Feb. 0. Opposition to
the spread of Mormonlam Is at the bot
tom of a large share of the opposition
to Statehood for Arizona and Now
Mexico, according to a member of Con
gress, who discussed the subject in the
course of a recent call at the "White
House.
He asserted that if Arizona and New
Mexico are admitted as States, It will
not be long until the Mormons will have
ten members of the United States Sen
ute, and the balance of power In that
body.
"I have not the slightest doubt that if
Arizona and New Mexico are admitted
ns States It will not be five years be
fore the Mormons have ten Senators in
CongrjsV' said the Representative.
"They will have the Senators from
Utah, Idaho, Wyoming, and thoso from
Arizona and New Mexico. This will
give them the balance of power In the
upper House. There Is no question that
proselyting of the most active sort Is
being conducted by Mormon mis
sionaries in New Mexico and Arizona
at this time. It Is not likely In all or
even moat cages that Mormon church
members would be sent to the Senate.
But men would be sent whom the Mor
mons could control. Even In California
the work of the Mormon missionaries is
showing results."
SIDE OF THE HOUSE
HOWELL PREFERRED J
TRIBUNE SPECIAL.
Washington, D. C, Feb. 0. The
capital chatman's column of the Post
today contnlns thi9 story on the Repre
sentative from Utah, Hon. Joseph
Howell. Says the Post
"Representative Howell of Utah came
here early in November, looking for a
place to reside. Tho proprietor of a local 1
hotel sought to uccommodate the ar
rival from Utah, and wds showing him
what rooms were still available. As
they were entering the elevator the pro
prietor Inquired 'Which side of the
House do you prefer, Mr. Howell?'
meaning which side of the hotel. 'The
Republican side, of course,' responded
Mr. Howell In an absent-minded way."
GRUBER IS SUPERINTENDENT.
General Manager W. H. Bancroft's first
official circular as manager of the Union
Pacific was one announcing the appoint
ment of J. M. Gruber of the Rock Island
to be general superintendent of the road,
with headquartora at Omeha. Gruber'a
name has been mentioned In connection
with the office for the past ten dnys or
so, but his appointment Is rcallv a nur
prise, as It was thought that a Short Lino
man or a Union Pacific official would bo
promoted.
Mr. Gruber was general superintendent
of the Western division of tho Rock
Island, with his offlco at Topcka, Kan.
Bcforo he wont - tho Rock Island ho
was assistant general superintendent ot
the Great Northern at SU Paul. E. Buck
ingham, who has beon doing tho work of
the superintendent of the Union Pacific
i for some time, steps back to his old po
i sltlon ns superintendent of transportation.
Mr. Gruber has already gono out on an
Inspection tour.
niniil0iicilaini I
gf 1 RINKING Coffee, or Tea, to spur on a tired Brain 1
I 1 and Nerves, is like flogging a Starving horse to U
II 1 m mae m look spirited. B
irjl rJjLX Every bit of action thus forced, means a heavy mm
draft on the future. ff
With the majority of people Coffee trades upon to-morrpvs M
vitality, like Opium, weakening the Heart, and arresting the Digestion fl
of food eaten with it. M.
Can you quit coffee to-day if you want to ? CL
Well, here is a good reason for quitting it, while you can! JjfC
Coffee acts directly, and disastrously, upon the Spinal Se-
Cord, which is the center of the whole Nervous System. CjF
If you doubt this, try the following test. WESTS'
Take four cups of strong coffee, without food, upon an jff" v J
empty stomach, in the morning. ftfir' s 1
; Then note the tremors that seize youl 3
These tremors spring from the same cause as the f S
'-. ' shaking hand of the confirmed Coffee Toper. (f
'i They are shudders of the Spinal Cord, in a Coffee-
lashed system.
' j - . 7
A weary Brain and Nerves need feeding instead of flogging!
If they don't work well without coffee, you may be sure they
won't work long with it. j
What they need is neither tonic nor stimulant, but food of a
J kind that will restore the Phosphates and Albumen, consumed in
excess by overwork.
n These constituents, if assimilated, will build Brain and Nerve
' up to normal condition, and keep them feeling as good all day as
Coffee makes them feel for a few minutes in the day.
( 6
y In the outer coats of the Wheat berry are located the richest
M and readiest form of Brain-building and Nerve-feeding elements,
I the substances which are consumed in mental activity.
This portion of the wheat cannot be digested by the stomach,
in the form of Flour, or Bread, because it consists largely of a woody
fibre, enclosing, in sealed up cells, the tiny Mineral particles that are
1 such rapid builders of Brain and Nerve tissue.
But what is not milled into a digestible condition can be
mulled into it, by the Post process, under which Postum Food
I This process so loosens the mineral particles from their
1 sheaths of Cellulose, that fifteen minutes' boiling of " Postum " ex- a
' U tracts the Brain-building materials in fluid form, ready for prompt as-
W similation, while leaving the useless woody portion in the coffee pot.
" Postum " feeds, with these elements, what Coffee or Tea
f Jt exhausts, through over-stimulation
II "Postum" builds Brain, Nerve, and Heart, while Coffee
n corrodes and weakens them
I "Postum" differs from coarse Rio Coffee in flavor, resem-
I bling instead fine Old Government Java, while costing no more than
1 1 common bitter Coffee.
'I But, don't use Postum at all unless boiled fully fifteen
minutes, because it takes that minimum time to free the Brain-fooc
u in it, and to develop its rich flavor and aroma. " 1
Postum is a Coffee-cure, and a logical Nerve-feeder.
I Try it for ten days and note the striking improvement " .
Food Coffee
PELES jl
'I hT8 infferod with nlloi for thlrty-lx yiurs.
Ono year eo Ust April 1 been taklne Ca?nreti t
for constipation, In the courso of aweek I noticed 17
wo pile beenn to dlunpponr nd at the end of tlx 1 !
yeolcs iney did not tronblo mo at nil Canenreti
Javo 'done -woadera for mo. I am entirely cured and 1
xeelllkoa noTVmon." Goorgo Krydor, linpoleon, O. ?
m Caltffi The Dowels
PlBasant, PalsUbl. Potnt.Taati Good, Do Good.
NoTor 8lcken, Woaken or Orlpe. ltc. jJo.Mo.NeTer r
old In bulk. Tho connlno tablet tarapod OCO. i
uaaranteed to enro or 7onr tnoncy back. H
Sterling Remedy Co., Chicago or N.Y. 593
AHHIifllSflLE, TEH HIIUOH BOXES "n 1
I LEMP'S BEER I
I Elk Liquor Co., I
I Salt Lake Agents for 1 ; jH
A WM. J. LEMP BREWING CO.'S I ! "
Bt. Louis Draught and 1 ,11
BotUed Beer. 1 , IH
I 'Phone 2065-X. Corner Statu I ,
and First South. If " i
Ruumu nm-w,wtj i l jinn mmnwm rwJl ' '
:
PICTURE FRAMING 1 ' ! I
I at Popular Prices. 1 I
I American Wall Paper Co. I , j H
I G E. THIRD SOUTH.
HOT SPRINGS, ARKANSAS. ! VM
Health. Recreation and Pleasure. Get '
Booklet. j
The Park HoIqI, high class ' i ,
American and European Plan. j
Finest Cafes and Grill Rooms West of , iH
N. Y. Marble Bath House. Coraplat i ' i
Gymnasiums. Open Dec. 1st to May 15th. I , JH
J. R. Hayes. Lessen and Manoffer; J. C ' i i J JH
Walker. Assoclatd Manager. likkl
1 1 i liH
The State Bank of Utah J.
Corner Main and South Temple Sts., ' I j
Salt Lake City. , . jt
JOSEPH P. SMITH. President. I! K -
WILLIAM B. PRESTON. Vice-President. ' -CHARLES
S. BURTON. Cashier.
HENRY T. M'EWAN, Asst. Cashier. j
GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS. I ' IH
Accounts Solicited. Special attention to H 'Ll
country trade. Correspondence Invited, I I
J. E. Cosgrlff. Pres. E. W. Wilson. Cashier. I Y ' LH
OPEN AN ACCOUNT WITH J ,
COMMERCIAL ;
NATIONAL BANK V
J. J. Daly, W. P. Noblo. Vlce-Presidonts. 1 1 ''ffll
A. II. Peabody, Ass't Cashier. I, 'f'H
WELLS, FARGO & CO. BANK
Salt Lake City. Utah. '
Established 1S52. i IH
The Oldest and Strongest Bank In Utah. jj IH
Capital ) I i
Burplua ..$13,336,812.40 t
Undivided Profits .,) ' ' V
Transacts a general banking business, IH
domcBtlo tnd foreign. IH
Direct connections with banks In all
principal cities of tho world. 1
ISSUES:
Drafts. ) On all IH
Letters ot Credit, '- prominent IH
Telegraphic Transfers. ) cities. i IH
Deposits received subject to check. '! ;
H. L. MILLER. Cashier. - i
H. P. CLARK. Assl Cashier. i!
ESTABLISHED 1SI1. 150 OFFICES. 1 i1
THE OLDEST AND LARGEST. j j, i
R, .UN&CO., - 1 l
The Mercantile Agency, J
GEORGE RUST. General Manager, ' fl
Utah, Idaho and Wyoming. I :j j
Offlco in Progress bldg.. Salt Lake City.
, . I li iiH
CAPITAL FULLY PAID, tKO.CO0.03.
WALKER BROTHERS,
Bankers,
SALT LAKE CITY. UTAH. i
Established 1S53. Incorporated 1901 1 IH
Transact a General Banking Bunlncss. , j H
SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT. '
i
JESERET NATIONAL BANK, ,,;
UNITED STATES DEPOSITARY. , j JM
Salt Lako City, Utah. .j M
Capital, 8500,000. Surplus, 3250,000 tt
L. S. HILLS, MOSES THATCHER, 1 1
President. Vtce-Presldent. ( H
H. S. YOUNG. E. S. HILLS, i
Cashior. Asst. Cashier. 1 1 H
Safe deposit boxes for rent. j jH
NATIONAL BANK OF I j
THE REPUBLIC ! (
U. S. DEPOSITARY. f
FRANK KNOX President r JH
JAMES A. MURRAY. ...Vice-President ' f IH
W. F ADAMS Cashier ' JH
CAPITAL PAID IN, J3O0.OOO. I IH
Banking in all its branches transacted. t IH
Exchange drawn on the principal cities 'H
of Europe. 'I
INTEREST PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS ' (It
jy-cCORNICK & CO., M Jt
Bankers. . I
Salt Lake City, Utah. . h fl
ESTABLISHED 1S73. ' j J
T T NION ASSAY OFFICE, , 1 I
M, S. HANAUER, Mauajw. j 'H
Removed to Id South W. Temple. j 1 j H
SAMPLES BY MAIL AND EXPRESS , V
will recelvo prompt attention. Analytical ' 1
work a specialty. Send for price list j ,
T W. CURRXE, AS Si YER, li'
.. JP W. South, SaH LaJm Clt 1

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