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The Salt Lake tribune. (Salt Lake City, Utah) 1890-current, February 15, 1904, Image 2

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I: MATTERS POLITICAL
AND OTHERWISE
i
Tribune Correspondent at Washington Tells of Hearst's
Candidacy from View Point of Prominent Party Leaders
-Other Affairs of Interest to the West-
I ' (By A. F. Philips.) I
I i Washington, D. C Feb. 14. The can- I
H illdncy of William Randolph Hearst Cor
H ' the Democratic nomination for Presi-
H dent Is referred to here by prominent
members of his party as "perilous."
I ( Regardless of this, were the convention
HI 1 to meet tomorrow, he would doubtless
J- be nominated. He has a complete or-
I J Kanlzation. likewise: a "barrel," and the
latter cuts a great figure with Demo-
crats. Two million dollars 1b the sum
Ahich he is willing, it Is said, to chip
j 1 into the Democratic campaign fund.
I All over the country Hearst clubs are
H . being organized, and they will go to
J St. Louis to root for their leader. His
H boom Is no longer a booYn; It is a rcal
H Ity, as conservative members of his
H party are now compelled to admit.
H Hearst la now leading the Democratic
H procession, and1 many of the weak-kneed
H brethren are making efforts to get on
H the band-wagon.
.)
I Senator Dubois of Idaho has a. peace
j pact now with the two Washington
v Senators. At one time hostilities on the
'4 lloor of the Senate seemed imminent.
M it was all about the opening of the Fort
fl. Sherman military reservation, now
H. abandoned. Senator Foster, weeks ago,
H offered a bill to establish a branch of
Hp the Soldiers home there.
HJ'; The reservation, it should be said, is
Hi, in Idaho, and Mr. Dubois' regards Idaho
HL as his Joint legislative preserve, nlopg
Hj:i with Senator Heyburn. He went to Sec
HJ i retary Hitchcock to have the reserva
HJ tlon opened, and was confronted with
HjJJ Senator Foster's bill. The Secretary
HL did not want to act until that proposed
HJ legislation was disposed of.
Hh1 Harsh words were said and Mr. Du-
bois offered a resolution, to authorize
' the Secretary to open the reservation.
He threatened to denounce his colleague
HJ i from the neighboring State for trcs-
B. passing. But an adjustment was soon
Ht arranged. Mr. Foster withdrew his bill
HJ " and signed a statement to the Secre-
Hj! tary of the Interior, in which statc-
HJ ment Senator Ankeny of Washington
HJ Joined. Then Mr. Dubois withdrew his
H resolution and the entente cordlale is
H preserved.
HI Three ex-Secretaries of War, Elklns,
Hjl Proctor and Alger, all three now Sen-
HJ ators, greeted Secretary of War Taft
HJ one day the past week, when the lat-
HJ ter appeared in the Senate chamber. It
HJ was the Secretary's first visit to the
HJ chamber, and the glad hand was ex-
HJ tended him by his. predecessors.
u
In the last Congress official dlrec-
HJ, tbrles were printed with half-tone pho-
H! tographs of Senators and Representa-
HJL lives nicely inserted at the proper
H pages, says the Post. Those copies were
HJ not for profane eyes. Constituents for-
HJ tunate enough to secure one of the dl-
HJ rectories bad those without illustra-
HJ tlons Now a ban has been placed on
HJ the production of such fancy books.
HJ There can be no more illustrated dl-
HJ rectories. Some of the vainer states-
HJ men arc aggrieved and disposed to
HJ make a fuss, but the printing authori-
HJ ties at the capllol say It will avail these
HJ statesmen nothing Illustrated dlrcc-
HJ tories are regarded as costly luxuries
HjJ that can be dispensed with.
H 3 0 "
H H. W. Scott of the Portland Orego-
HJ nlan Js now being boomed as the run-
HJ l ning mate for the Republican Preslden-
HJ tiaJ nominee. Democrats from the
HJ Webfoot State now at the capital are
HJ helping to boom him.
a k
In capltol corridors there Is talk of a
HJ movement to spring Secretary of War
HJ Taft in connection with the Preslden-
H tial nomination. His boom, It Is said,
HJ Is to be sprung at a banquet to be given
HJ in his honor In Cincinnati on the 22nd.
ff e
These changes In officers in National
HJ banks have been reported to the Comp-
HJ troller of the- Currency:
HJ Utah First National Bank of Logan,
HJ George A. PerclvoJ, assistant cashier;
HJ National Bank of the Republic, Salt
HJ , Lake City, James A. Murray, vlce-pres-
HJ ident.
HJ; Wyoming Albany County National
HJ: bank, of Laramie City, E. Crumrlne,
HJi vice-president; C. D. Spalding, cashier,
HJ in place of E. Crumrlne: R. G. Fitch.
HJ assistant cashier. In place of C. D,
HJ Spalding.
HJ The Exchange National bank of Coeur
HJ d'Alene, Ida., has been organized, with
HJ a capital of $100,000. These officers
HE have been named: President, William
HJ! Dallas; vice-presidents, James H.
Hjl Harte, F. A. Blackwoll; cashier, Harry
HJ A. Kunz.
"
Hjl Late army orders are: Capt. James S.
HJ! Parker, Tenth cavalrj-, has been ' re-
HJ: lieved from temporary duty at Fort
Hi Myer, Virginia, and will Join his troop
HJ' at Fort Mackenzie, Wyoming.
The Bervlco pension bill pending In
H Congress, which propones to add more
HJj than half a million names to the pen-
HJ sion roll and increase the pension
Hjl budget more than -17,000,000 annually,
HJi is causing leadors In the House much
HJr worry and anxiety. The paying of pen-
HJ slons apparently has no ending, and
Hjl while the majority of the countrv be-
HH Ileves In caring for the old veterans,
HJI they will oppose the pending measure,
j
Speaking of pensions, a Washington
HI Times reporter asked this question to-
HB day of a prominent official of the pen-
Hl sion olflce: "When will the Government
HJ cease paying pensions?"
HJI "When''" was the surprised answer-
Hl ing inquiry, "heaven only knows. We
HH are still paying pensions to widows of
HH1 soldiers of the Revolutionary war,
Hn which has been over for 120 years. If
Hli we havrt to pay Spanish war pensions
HI as long we will still be paying pensions
HM 'way into the next century, and that
HV without a war in this one."
HH "In examining the pension report one
HJ: finds that there Is a daughter of a
HH Revolutionary soldier in Boston, who,
HB at the advanced age of 103 years, Is
HH still receiving aid from the Govern-
HH ment, aid which was earned longer ago
HH than her birth.
HH "Besides her there are two widows
HH of Revolutionary soldiers, Esther S,
H Damon of Plymouth Union, Vt and
H Rebecca Mayo of Newburn, Va., who
HJ are on the rolls.
HH "Supposing." eald the pension official.
HH "that we had the caae of a soldier of
H the Spanish war who contracted lung
HI trouble In the service. He may live
HHj thirty years, and toward the close of
HH life he might get married to a girl of 16.
H Then he might die, leaving her a
HH widow, and she might live fifty years
Hh more, and we would have eighty years
HV of pensions to pay In that one case.
H "Of couiv.o, the old veterans are fast
KH disappearing, last year at the rate of
40,000, and this year at the estimated
rate of 45,000. Theoretically, in fifteen
years the veterans of the Civil war
would be all dead, though we know
that they will not be all dead then,
and we know that those dependent
upon them will not all be dead. This
death rate would, If Congress did not
continue to pass legislation, decrease
the amount of money that the Govern
ment would have to pay, but there is
new legislation all the time, and this
keeps us pretty near to the mark of
$13S,0OO.0O0.
"Now as to the Spanish war veterans.
We arc getting calls from them all the
time, but wc turn down more than we
pass. We have had over 62,000 original
applications and 13,000 other applica
tions, of which we have admitted 15,000
and rejected 20,000, the others being still
pending. So far the Spanish war has
cost a little over 52,000,000 In five years,
which Is small when compared with the
money spent in other pensions.
kit
"Comparatively few veterans of the
Civil war are turned down, and then
they havo an admirable chance to
prove their case, which few people un
derstand. We have special examiners
In the field and when a veteran Is 're
jected we send to him and get a lint
of his witnesses. We go to. each one
of them and he can go with our exam
iners and listen to the evidence. He
has the right to appear by counsel or
In person, or both, and he can follow
our agents about from place to place
If he desires. If he does not want to do
that he can have the typewritten evi
dence sent to him and refute It as he
may see fit.
"The examiner acts as a master in
chancery. Then If he Is turned down he
can appeal directly to the Secretary of
the Interior and try for a pension be
fore the board of appeals, and finally,
if he falls there he can go to Congress
and get a special act In his case. So,
you see, few worthy pensioners are left
out In the cold."
FIGHTING DEATH AT
BEOSIDE OF HANNA
(Continued from page 1.)
Phelps, a niece. After the Senator had
made his wonderful and unexpected
rally, tho ladles, with the exception of
Mrs. Hanna. went out, at the sugges
tion of the physicians, for short walks
or drives.
Constant telegraphic communication
with Cleveland, New York and other
cities was kept up, and the relatives
and friends of the Senator were In
formed of every change In his condi
tion. Hundreds of telegrams of sym
pathy arrived.
The first bulletin of the evening was
issued at 6 p. m and was as follows:
"Senator Hanna was not so well this
afternoon, but he has rallied. His pulse
Is now 130, respiration 40, temperaturo
103.6. Rixcy, Osier, Carter."
A statement was made accompanying
the 6 o'clock bulletin that the rally
was due to Injections of brandy and
water under the skin. For about an
hour and a half following the sinking
spell the Senator had been conscious,
but he made no attempt to speak dur
ing the entire time. At 3:30, o'clock he
dropped Into a doze and at times slept
peacefully. Later he took a little
nourishment.
The physicians used oxygen continu
ously throughout the afternoon. The
rally from a third sinking qpell was
so unusual that the physicians them
selves were astounded. They said they
believed It due largely to the patient's
wonderful efforts to aid In their heroic
measures. It was stated that the re
currence of the sinking spells does not
Imply that these will continue, and that
simply because of the previous depres
sions there is no reason to look for an
other drain of like character on his vi
tality. At the same time, the doctors
hardly know just what to expect.
Neither could It be said. It was added,
when the climax of the fever would be
reached. Dr. Carter went to bed soon
after the 6 o'clock bulletin was Issued
and Dr. Osier remained for the jilght.
He made arrangements td stay over the
crisis, for every rally consumed so
much ofjhe patient's strength that the
greatest alarm was felt for the conse
quenco of another If It should come.
The S o'clock bulletin showed no Im
provement In the Senator's' condition.
Some milk and whisky were adminis
tered at C:30 o'clock, and shortly there
after the patient was given another
bath, but It caused no reduction In the
temperature, For an hour after the
bath Senator Hanna dozed and was
resting comfortably.
More nourishment was given at 8
o'clock. Throughout the evening the
doctors gave oxygen at intervals of
half an hour.
Dr. Oaler retired for the night Im
mediately after issuing the 11 o'clock
bulletin, saying that he anticipated no
Immediate change.
TWi KILLE1 ANB
SEVENTY-FIVE INJURED
Bun away Trolley Car Jumps tho
Track, Crashing- Into a Telegraph.
Pole, With Frightful Results.
Cumberland, Md., Feb. 14. Two per
sons were killed and about seventy-five.
Injured, twenty-five of whom were se
riously hurt, In a trolley-car accident
at Frostburg today,
The car ran away on a steep grade
on Grant street and, upon reaching a
sharp curve, Jumped the track and
crashed into a telegraph polo.
The car was smashed to splinters and
scarcely on of the eighty -passengers
escaped Injury of some sort.
The dead: John Gough of Midland:
J. J. Row of Lonaconlng-.
Pterin Falls, O., Feb. U.-A troller
car heavily loaded with papeeng-cra dashed
wn a steep hill hero for more than a
mile today and Jumped tho track at a
sharp curve. Sixteen persons were more
or less Hcriously hurt.
A Guaranteed Cur for Pilea.
Itching. Blind, Bleeding or Protrud
ing Piles. Your druggist will refund
money If PAZO OINTMENT falls to
cure you in C to U days. COc.
ARMIES OF CZAR AND
MIKADO IN BATTLE,
i
(Continued front Pase 1.)
tal at 9 o'clock tonight. Lines of
mounted pollco guarded and kept clear
the streets from the legation to tho
Shlnbashl station, whero the Minister
ontralned.
The crowds were not difficult to han
dle, but were good-naturedly Intent on
celebrating the successes of their navy.
The diplomatic staffs and many friends,
both Japanese and foreign, assembled
at the station and bade Baron de Rosen
farewell with a ceremony somewhat
mournful.
The police guarded the train and ac
companied the Russian Minister and
party to Yokohama, where it embarked
on the French steamer Yarra, which
Is to sail at 9 o'clock tomorrow.
The Government denies that M. Pav
loff, Russian Minister to Korea, with
drew under Japanese pressure, but that
his withdrawal wan entirely voluntary.
It Is stntcd that M. Pavloff. through
the French Minister, Intimated a desire
to leave Seoul and Intrust Russian af
faire to the care of the French legation
and have placed a French guard around
the legaflon.
The Japanese Government acquiesced
In this arrangement and arranged that
when M. Pavloff left the legation to
day, In place of police soldiers guarded
the route to the station, where a spe
cial train to Chemulpo was furnished.
The Japanese fleet was given Instruc
tions not to Interfere with M. Pavloff's
departure. M. Pavloff will go to Che-foo.
MEETINGS OF INTERNATIONAL
PEACE CONGRESS ARRANGED
New York, Feb. 14. The executive
committee elected In Washington last
month to arrange for the International
Peace congress which is to be held In
the United States next autumn, held
Its first meeting in New York today.
It was resolved unanimously to hold
the congress In Boston In the ttrat week
In October, and It was voted that meet
ings be arranged Immediately follow
ing the congress In New York, Phila
delphia, Washington, Chicago, St.
Louis and perhaps other cities.
It was resolved to present the name
of Robert Treat Paine, president of the
American Peace society, for president
of the congress, with the following
American vice-presidents: George F.
Edmunds. Andrew D. White. Rev. Ed
ward Everett Hale, Andrew Carnegie,
Edwin Glnn, Albert K. Smiley and
David Starr Jordan.
COLD-BLOODED WORK
CHARGED AGAINST RUSSIA
San Francisco, Feb. 14. A cablegram
from Tolclo, under date of February
12th, says:
Japan Is deeply stirred and bitterly
resentful over the sinking of the mer
chant vessel Zensho Maru by four Rus
sian cruisers which yesterday attacked
the Zensho Maru and her companion,
the Naganoura Maru, while they were
on their way from Hakala to Otaru, on
the Island' of Hakkaldo.
The attack of the Russians Is declared
to be a wanton crime, unjustified under
any circumstances, even assuming that
the Zensho Maru disregarded signals,
which Is denied. 4
The Foreign office has Issued the fol
lowing statement regarding the sink
ing of the Zensho Marur
"Two Japanese merchant vessels, the
Zensho Maru and tho Naganoura Maru,
tonnage 170 and 700 respectively, while
sailing from Hakata for Otaru, were
suddenly attacked by four Russian
cruisers from Vladlvostock on February
11th, when ten miles off Jensangta.
"Fire was opened without any order
being given the vessels to surrender.
The Naganoura succeeded In escaping.
VACATION TRIP,
SAYS UNCLE SAM
Colon, Feb. 14. Hurried orders from
Washington were received yesterday to
embark a battalion of marines on the
Prnlric.
A speclRl train left Colon this morn
ing and returned at noon with the 450
marines who were encamped at Bas
Obispo station on the Panama railway.
The Pralrio's boata were kept busy
PANIC-STRICKEN CHINESE
FLEEING FROM PORT ARTHUR
London, Feb. 14. A cablegram from
Chefoo, under date of February 11th,
says: The steamer Chefoo arrived here
today from Port Arthur with a largo
number of refugees, consisting mostly
of Chinese, but also a few Europeans.
The reported land fight between
Dalny and Port Arthur Tuesday morn
ing Is not confirmed by those who came
from Port Arthur.
After the attack on Port Arthur
Tuesday the Japanese fieet did not re
turn. During the engagement about
thirty shells Btruck the town. One
landdd on the main street and broke
windows In every house. Others struck
chiefly on the hills among small houses
and one of them killed a woman and
a chlld.
The people arc panic-stricken and are
i loavlng town on every train.
SITUATION IN NORTH
CHINA VERY DELICATE
Tokio, Sftturdaj'. Feb. 13. United
States Minister Griscom called on
Premier Komura last night and an ex
tended conference was held, the nature
of which has not been disclosed. It Is
thought it related, probably, to the ef
fort of the powers to obtain a statement
of the attitude of Japan toward pre
serving the entity of China, as has been
proposed by Socretary Hay.
The situation In the north of China
Is exceedingly delicate. The Japaneso
have legation guards at Peking and
Tien Tsln In close proximity to the
guards of the Russian legations, and
there Is danger of a conflict. It Is also
feared that If the north of China la In
cluded In the sphere of operations It
will be impossible to prevent disorder
and uprisings us a blind for attacks on
all foreigners.
STEAMER PLEIADES GETS
AWAY FROM RUSSIANS
Boston. Feb. 14. Word was received
here today that tho Boston Steamship
company's steamer Pleiades had ROt
away from Port Arthur, where it is be
lieved sho was detained for a week or
more, first by the wrecks of tho Russian
warahlpB. which blockaded tho exits from
tho harbor, and later by the refusal of
the Russian authorities to permit her de
parture. Alfred Wlnpon, president of the com
pany, received a cablegram today con
voying the information that the Pleiades
had been released and had arrived at
Chefoo, China, on Saturday.
Mr. wlnsor said tonight that tho cable
gram was presumably from the com
pany's agents at Hongkong. He had not
heard anything as yet from the State de
partment at Washington, to which tho
owners of the steamer had appealed to
secure her release.
RUSSIAN SYMPATHIZER
IN SEOUL IN DANGER
Seoul, Fob. 14 The Japanese Minister
has advised tho Emperor of Korea to ar
rest Yl Yong Ik, who has been a practi
cal dictator and who was very friendly to
Russia until there was danger of Japanese
predominance.
Two thousand Russians havo arrived at
Kapsad, at the headwaters of the Yalu
river.
Tho Japanese are constructing a tele
graph lino north from Seoul.
MIKADO'S TROOPS TRY
FLANKING MOVEMENT
St. Petersburg, Feb. 14. There Is no
official confirmation of the rumor from
Port Arthur of the landing of Japanese
troops at Shan Hal Kwan. If the rumor
should prove to be correct. It will mean
that the Japanese are trying to get in
the rear of the Russians from both
flanks with the object of cutting com
munications. In military circles confidence is ex
pressed that the forward movement
from Korea will be checked as soon as
the Russian advance is encountered.
The retirement of the families of Rus
sian officials across the Yalu river from
Yongampho Is interpreted as an Indi
cation that the news of the first serious
land fighting will emanate from this
point.
The alarm occasioned by the reported
landing of Japanese In Korea extends as
far back as Mukden, where the Chinese
are said to be In a state of panic. Some
The other vessel was surrounded by tho
cruisers and sunk. All on board were
olther killed or drowned."
It Is said the Japanese Government
Is planning reprisals. Several Russian
ships which have been detained in order
to prevent reports of the movements of
the Japanese from reaching the enemy
will now, it la said, be sent to the prize
courts, and that all will probably be
I confiscated.
of the newspapers here are protesting
vigorously against the consorship of
war news.
The Novoe Vremya says: "We are
not children; let us hear the worst."
The wife of Copt Roudncf of the Va
rlag has received a telegram from,'Vlce
roy Allexeff saying that her husband is
alive and unhurt.
An account of the Injury to the wall
at Port Arthur during the Japanese
bombardment Is the sum total of the
war news Issued officially up to mid
night At the Admiralty it was said that
notification had been received of the
attack February 11th on two Japanese
merchant steamers, the Naganoura
Maru and Zensho Maru, which vessels
were said to have been shelled by four
Russian -warships and one of them
sunk.
The Admiralty stamps as nonsense
tho story that the Baltic fleet has been
ordered to the far East, pointing out
that the ships are laid up at Cronstadt,
where they will be Ice-bound for the
winter.
FOREIGN WARSHIPS REFUSE TO
SURRENDER RUSSIANS AS PRISONERS
Nagasaki, Feb. 14. The survivors
from the Varlag and the Korletz, the
Russian cruisers that wore sunk by the
Japanese fleet at Chemulpo last Tues
day, Ertlll remain on board the British
cruiser Talbot, the Italian cruiser Elba
and the French cruiBcr Pascal.
The situation regarding their disposal
is becoming acute, a3 the Japanese
have twlctf made demands on the com
manders of the three foreign vessels
that the Russians be surrendered as
prisoners of war.
The captain of the Talbot, being tho
senior naval officer, each time has re
plied that he was awaiting Instructions
from his Government.
None of the Russians are on board
the American gunboat Vlcksburg,
whose commander considers that the
Japanese arc right In their demand,
as the Russians took advantage of the
clemency of the Japanese, In returning
to the harbor, then taking refuge on
the foreign vessels and refusing to sur
render, whereas the Japaneso fleet re
frained from sinking them In the open
sea, as they could have done.
t
all day embarking camp fittings, bag
gage, stores, etc., and. this ta6k Is not
yet finished.
MaJ. Lucas will command the bat
talion and the Prairie will sail tomor
row undor sealed orders.
It has leaked out here that the ma
rines are destined for Santo Domingo,
Only about 100 marines now remain at
Bas Obispo.
Washington, Feb. 14. Naval officials
say that while the Prairie, with the 450
marines from Colon aboard, will touch
at San Domingo, tho real destination of
the vessel 13 the naval station at Guan
tanamo. The purpose of taking the men there,
thoy say, la to give them a change of
climate hnd surroundings.
UNCLE SAM'S NEW
AND GREATER NAVY
.With Carrying Out of Plans Formulated by Committee on
Naval Affairs and Building of New Fighting Machines,
U. S. Will Rank Third as a Naval Power.
NEW YORK HERALD SERVICE.
Washington. Feb. 11. With plans of
naval aggrandizement brought so prom
inently to public notice by the appro
priation bill just completed by the
House Committee on Naval Affairs, the
significance of tho relative standing
reimltant from this prospective augmcn- 1
tatlon Is awakening keen Interest not
only in official clrclew, but also In the
press and with the general public.
If the ambitions of tho Naval com
mittee arc carried out, when the ag
gregate of tonnage under construction
and projected is completed, the United
States will stand third in the order of
relative naval strength, instead of fifth,
as at present, and' a combination of the
two English-speaking nations will give
the Anglo-Saxons a total of 2,484,000
tons, or clo&e to the combined total ton
nage of all other navies of note.
Britain now rules the seas by right
of a naval equipment comprising 201
ships of 1,516,000 tons displacement and
in commission. France, which is sec
ond, makes about one-third of this,
showing an aggregate of 750,000 tons
displacement. Germany Is third and
Russia Is fourth.
The United States is now In the fifth
ROOSEVELT BUILDING
POLITICAL FENCES
Hand of President Seen in the Ap
pointment by the New York
County Committee.
NEW YORK HERALD SERVICE.
New York, Feb. II. In tho appointment
of tho advisory committee by the Repub
lican county committco a few days ago,
many Republicans profess to sec Presi
dent Roosevelt's hand.
This committco consists of a number
of tho most prominent men of the pnrty
in tho city. It Includes former Gov.
Frank S. Black of Troy. Louis Stern, Cor
nelius N. Bliss, former Secretary of War
Root and several others high In the party
counsels.
Mr. Root's presence on tho committee Is
particularly significant. He 1b, pcrhapsN
tho strongest advocato of President Roose
velt's nomination In New York. He made !
a moat vigorous defonso of tho President
In his first public utterance after leaving
tho Cabinet, and one reason for his resig
nation at this tlmo. It Is said, was that ho
might be able to get right Into tho fight
In New York State.
It is said that Mr. Root will bo a dclo
gate to tho national convention at Chica
go, and many expect that he will be the
man to make the spoech nominating Mr.
Roosevelt for a second term.
1 has also been Intimated that Mr. Root
can have tho nomination for Governor If
ho will take It, but It In said he prefers
to work in the ranks for the nomination
and re-election of tho Presldont.
SN8W BANK THE
SEPULCHRE OF THREE
Auburn, Cal., Feb. 14. Three men lost
their lives Friday last In a landslide
and cave-In of a portion of the rail
road company's snowsheds a few miles
this side of Truckee.
A gang of forty-six men were work
ing when they heard the slide coming
and all made a run for their lives.
Several were buried waist deep and
were extricated by their companions.
One young man was taken out com
pletely suffocated and the others can
not be found. Their bodies are prob
ably burled under thirty feet of snow.
The body recovered was Identified as
that of Daniel C. Olbrok of Derby,
Conn.
ALVINZA HAYWARD. a millionaire
mining man of San Francisco died yester
day afternoon. He was stricken with
paralysis several weeks ago.
PROF. CHARLES EMERSON BECK
ER, Ph., D.. professor of paleontology and
curator of Pcabody museum at Yalo col
lege, is dead at New Havon.
JUDGE LYMAN DENISON BREW
STER, a Jurist of national reputation, was
found dead at his home In Danbury.vConn.,
yesterday.
JOHN HENRY HAMLINE. a promi
nent lawyer and club man of Chicago, and
well known throughout tho country as a
champion of civil service, is dead of
pneumonia.
WO Doses
For One Dollar
Economy in medicine must be
measured by two things cost and
effect. It cannot be measured by
either alone. It is greatest in that
medicine that does the most for
the monoy that radically and per
manently oures at the least 05.
pense. That medicine is
Hood's Sarsaparilla
It purifies and snriches the blood,
cures pimples, eczema and all
eruptions, tired, languid feelings,
loss of appetite and general debility.
"I have taken Hood's Sarsaparilla nnd
found it reliable und clvinir perfect satisfac
tion. It takes away that tirnd fcellnc. elves
enorcy and put3 tho blood in (rood condition."
Mies ErriE Colojoo:. 1635 10th Street, N. W
Woahinaton, D. C.
Hood's Sarsaparilla promises to
cure and keeps tho promise.
place, with thirty-five ships of 298,000
tons .displacement Warships below
100,000 tons are not reckoned In this
estimate.
With the new building programmo
carried to completion, France will still
remain second, with 76C.000 tons, and
the United States will take next rank,
with 616,000 ton? displacement, 110,000
tons more than the naval armament of
Germany, which Is next lower In the
scale,
Ships aggregating 44,000 tons displace
ment are provided for in the naval ap
propriation bill which the House Com
mittee on Naval Affairs has Just voted
to report to the House.
In the list are Included one battle
ship of 16,000 tons, two armored cruisers
of 14,000 tons each, three scout cruisers
and two colliers. Half a million dollars
la appropriated to make tests of sub
marine boats, of which the Secretary of
the Navy Is empowered to purchase not
more than two.
Battleships and armored cruisers are
to cost about $7,250,000 each, the scouts
$2-,000,000, and the colliers ??,00,000 each.
Last year's additions to the fighting
strength of the navy amounted to 62,000
tons, and, If the present building pro
gramme is carried out, those members
of Congress who are favoring a larger
navy declare they will be satlsiled with
the progress of this nation.
DREYFUS CASE TO BE
TRIED FEBRUARY 25TH
1 4-
Paris, Feb 14. The Dreyfus caso
has been definitely set down for
it- trial by tho Court of Cassation be- -f
ginning Feb. 25th next.
I
1
Mail Steamer Pulled Off Bocks.
Victoria, 13, C . Feb. 14, Tho Canadian
Pacific steamer Tecs was haulod off Trlel
Island rocks at high tide this morning
and taken to Esquimau marine ways for
repairs. Sho escaped with ullght damage.
CASTOHZA.
Beam tho KlIul YotJ ',aVB BOUgM
mm w 1 wiwiin
And Everything
Known in Music
at Reducad Pricw
Carstensen & Anson Co.
Temple of Husla
74 MAIN STREET
Formerly Daynes Music Comapny,
I 100$ Processes I
Serve to place tho kornel of wheat I
1 on your tablo In form of broad. R
H Tho most up-to-date mill in tho
I Intcrmountaln West Is I
J HUSLER'S
1 FLOUR...
I Mills and tho best bread is mado I
N from Hualcr's Flour. W
Better than any Eastern make. Will,
cost you less money. Ask your deal
r for them. Look for our trade
mark.
Utah Bedding & MTg Co.,
Salt Lake City, Utah.
I PORTLAND CEMENT, I
I LUMBER, COAL. I
i Burton Coal Sc Lumber Co. I
D Yard and office, SO W. Fifth South. 1
Up-town office, 66 W. Second South. H
I Telephone 03. H
HOT SPRINGS, ARKANSAS.
Health. Recreation and Pleasure Gtot
Booklot
The Park Hotel, high class
Amorlcan und European Plan.
Finest Cafes and drill Rooms Wcat of
N. Y. Marblo Bath House. Corapleta
Gymnasiums. Open Dec. 1st to May 15th.
J. R. Hayea. Loase and Manager; J. C
Walker. Aaaoclate Manager.
EVERY BLADE WARRANTED
1 J!'! ri nffl YOUNG, MIDDLB-
I f iH AGED AND ELDER
3 1 mM Di LY. If you aro aexual
9 1 i I 851 V Si ly WCQ-ki no matter
9 I J I gfl m from what cauco; unde-
I I "lffm 81 ll fl vcloped; havo stricture,
JKHH' varicocele, etc., MY
RBRFECT APPLIANCE will euro you.
No drugs or electricity, 75.COO cured and
developed 10 DAYS' TRIAL. Bond for
free booklet. Sent aealod, Guaranteed.
Write today. R. C. Emmet, m Tabor
Block, Denver, Colo,
Isale PricI,;
I Winter Overcoatsi f ?
e& $1?.50 to 515 Co j fjlCE A
X values s0.2g" f
JC $18 to $20 ! ;
values ",7S' '
522.50 to 527. CO J "
X value9 i5-ooj jJItl8 f
Buy one for next wlntr'
Save more mney than you can'
Jr mako any other way. ,
x Gray BrosJ I
x &Co. T ;
O ..154 Main Street;.!
1 Sterling Silver; S:
Flatware i
in best patterns on earth at 90 i?1'
and S1.00 an ounce, and trivia 'v
20 per cent discount on much, e ftS
our sterling hollow ware. ti 1
SALT LAKE W "lbj
MONDAY, TUESDAY
AND WEDNESDAY? jR
WEDNESDAY MATINEE. 4 tU efi
Engagement of tM.e
HI H lA A Ur m'
m W WW LA 11
y v i JTm 1 J
K y Han vr
YIP j
In a Revival of Louis N. Parker M i
Romantic Comedy, P tor
Rosemar!
cs ram?
(That's for Remembrance.) s rfclble
Greatest Success In the History nMtiit
the Empire Theater, New York Cltj cf lh
DIRECTION GEORGE H. BRENN Hired 1
Seats on sale V
jir
Jr-JKaJCffl Matinee, 25c, Tmv
THREE NIGHTS BEGINNINQlfcy &
THCRSDHY, FEB. 1,
Matinee Saturday at 2:15 p. m. Wnii
Stetson's Original Big Double Spectaa KALI
UNCLE TOM'!
CABIN.Bns.
THE BARNUM OF THEM ALL.
I PICTURE FRAMING
I at Popular Prices. ,W
American Wall Paper C jjb
6 B. THIRD SOUTH, i'1
X bJn
I IT'S EASY TO p
CUT UP .
A LOT OP THINGS IF "SmJ In
POSSESS 'A GOOD POOKWTf
KNIFE, AND THEY'RE EAsyst
TO POSSESS. WE SAVE
LARGER, MORE ATTBAWWi
TTVE STOCK NOW TSKyj;r i
EVER BEFORE, FOR IAD2V,' jjS 1
AND GENTLEMEN. LS0,gat
BEAUTIFUL LINE OF Bf!Jnl
ZORS FOR MEN ONLY. TMij
STEEL IN ALL OF THESJ
N GOODS IS OF EXCEPTIONAL, Ftrf
I QUALITY. :
SCHRAMM'!!
Where th
Cars 5top. jSSf1 f
....FREE....
Delivery to all parts of tho city. '
Dr call and loavo your orders for v
BREAD AND CAKES. 3rc
Vienna Model Bakr)Ju
and Cafe :.ftff

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