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The Salt Lake tribune. (Salt Lake City, Utah) 1890-current, February 28, 1904, Image 1

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SXIjVI. No. 318. Salt Lakb City, Ut-ahTstostday MomsnEyg. Februaut 28. 1904. 32 phges..:fiv:e Oettts. ' I
8oops of Czar and Warrior Legions of the Mikado Nearing Each
II Other in Korea, and Must Soon Meet for the First Try-Out--Dis-M
patches From Moscow Tell of Movements of Russian Hosts and
3 Indirectly Indicate That Conflict Is Imminent--Viceroy Alexieff
if Sends in a New Version of the Latest Fight at Port Arthur.
jjjjjpjT, Feb. 27. Cablo advices last night and this morning telling o
'rerosnt of Russian and Japanese land forces leads to a belief that an
icnt can bo looked for almost any day. Yesterday's dispatches an
!rf that the Japanese forces were massing in the vicinity o Plngyang
tjt parties of Russian and Jap scouts had come -within stent of each
i n0 cifl5h had occurred. It is assumed from the dispatches that tho
Pf wmewbore in the vicinity of Plngyang will be the theater of the first
I eljgemcnt of any consequence and that onco tho belligerents get
in there will be continuous fighting all along the line.
F&ratch dated today at Moscow and received hero tht3 evening tells of
Lament of the Russian forces. It says that, according to the latest ln
In nigh military circles, Russian Infantry has occupied the road be-
ghUauyang, on tho railroad from Mukden to Port Arthur and the Yalu
I'tj front and flanks beings strongly supported,
terlcht flank Is at Tokushan and the left near the town of "WIJu.
b Russian cavalry crossed tho Yalu between Antung and Yingahmpho
rtupled the road toward Sukchon, and Cossack scouts advanced along
rtatcr and lesser caravan routes.
&3t3 are now ten miles cast of Plngyang. The cavalry Is 355 miles
kasd the Infantry 125 miles northwest of Plngyang.
sl Petersburg dispatch of today says the desperate manner In which
imese are returning to the attack of Port Arthur, In spite of their
tj repulses, has convinced the military authorities that their main ob
bfor the present Is hopelessly to cripple the Russian fleet. In order to
Ktteolute freedom In the disembarkation of troops. For this reason
yBgjjslin commander is carefully guarding against exposing his ships,
ih'Kpthem in the harbor, under the guns of the fortifications.
fjH 4444 4 4-4 44 -4 4-4 4- 44---4-4 4-44-4
Mil PROPHECY ON RESULT 8F THE
WAR BY A FAMOUS RUSSIAN OFFICER
Til WUS. Feb. 23. Col. Mouravioff Amoursky, v.'ho was recalled from Paris .
a! cte ires military attacho at tho Russian Embassy becauso of reflcc-
1 aest on the French army, has written a letter to tho Gaulols In which 4"
Hp the war In tho far East will be tcrriblo but short. It will be a pre-
lj its ethers wars between tho white and yellow races. The victory In this -t-
7 rudoubtedly will bo for Russia, but Russia will havo to have somo dls- 4
jg it!o surprises similar to tho Port Arthur and Chemulpo affairs. 4
'is to tho rolo of tho various powers," tho Colonel continues, "it will be
flfes passive, with the exception of tho bravo Anglo-Saxons on tho two
-Scres. These two powers will attempt to compass slyly nil posslblo
DW$j) Russia, but without daring to participate in the struggle, "
Xi$rtnany has everything to gain by preserving her frlondly neutrality 4
Swj ?Ejjla, and when peace Is concluded sho will not be forgotten in connec- 4
Ig erth tho compensation in tho extreme Orient. j
lit Interest of all tho countries of Europo lies in putting themselves as
siispossiblo upon the Russian side. Tho Czar is worthy of tho. highest
4 fchdon. and ho has the prayers and good wishes of all his people. With
.KHS tecs and Blmpllclty and with Immense faith in tho all-powerful, he in-
bvlth his personality and hl3 words conlldcnco In all classes; ho fur- 4
ezst unites tho entire country In a slnglo and great effort." 4
J
fn) PvOYAL FAMILY
STILL AT DEVOTIONS.
PETERSBURG, Feb. 27. After
ti&t& the Czar drove today to
fithioS palace to partake of the
net He was accompanied by the
aad his daughter Olga', who
Ltsstd In white in honor of tho
iKcasion. His majesty was clad
Ittlform, The congregation in
I tiw Dowager Empress; the
ii&sr, Grand Duchess Olga, and
W, iho Duke of Oldenburg.
Jjuty took the consecrated bread
ft from Court Chaplain Yany
fisfl afterward bestowed the
i slteped' in wjne, upon the
P Empress, the Czarina and the
iDxhtts. The rules of the ortho
tosh forbid the administration
t.&raents separately except to
ft! customary mutual congratu
' Allowed the partaking of the
K-jli and the Imperial party then
at the winter palace. Later
r thoy dined at the Anitchkoff
fTbs crowds along the Nevsky
RUSSIAN EXILES FROfVl
JAPAN MUST RETURN
4-' SEATTLE, Feb. 27. Because they 4-
4- havo not the necessary money to 4-
"4- pass tho Immigration officials, 4-
4- Samuson Gourman, a Russian Jew. 4-
4- and his family, consisting of his 4-
wife, motlicr-In-law and seven chll- 4-
4- dren, may be sent back to Japan, 4-
4- from whenco Uiey fiod from Russia 4-
4- llvo months ago to avoid tho pcrso- 4-
4- cutlon of tho Russians In tholr 4-
4- homo in Odessa. Gourman, who Is 4"
4- a tailor, and who, when ho left 4-
4- Russia, had $2000, now has but $u, 4-
4- and for this reason tho officials 4-
4- rofuso to pass them. Tho family 4-
4- aro of tho best class of Russian 4
4- Jews, well educated and refined. If 4-
4- sent back to Japan they will orrivo 4-
4- penniless and will undergo great 4-
4- hardships. An effort la being mado 4-
4- to raise sufficient monoy among 4-
4- local Hebrews to satisfy the lmml- 4-
4- gratlon officers.
4444444444444
WAR CLOUDS CONTINUE
TO DARKEN BALKANS
ROME, Feb. 27. Tho situation in tho j
Balkans, with which Russia, Italy and
Austria are eo closely connected, al
though it has apparently Improved
somewhat during the last few days,
still occasions much anxiety. It is no
longer a secret that Boris Sarafoff, tho
, Macedonian leader, came to Italy with
the principal object of deciding on a
course of action with Rlcclottl Gari
baldi, who heretofore has not approved
of an isolated movement on the part of
the Macedonians.
In an Interview tho two leaders
agreed upon a plan which will result
In a general rising In the Balkans
should tho necessity arise. With this
object a meeting of all tho Balkan lead
ers has been provisionally arranged, to
take place in Venice about the end of
March. The possibility of arbitration
was also discussed by Sarafoff and
Garibaldi. The latter proposed to sound
the United States as to whether or not
that country would be willing to act
in the capacity of arbitrator, as he con
sidered it the Government best fitted
to do so. it having no direct or Indirect
(Continued on, Pago 0.)
, ' lr
4 PARIS, Fob. 27. An American 4
4 official who for two years past has 4
4 been studying tho conditions In tho 4
4 Balkans, today made an Interesting 4
4 statemont of tho situation. Ho said: 4
4 "I am satisfied Turkey will not 4
4 declare war. She has been Informed 4
4 by tho powers that oven If ahc does 4
4 engage In hostltltlcs sho will gain 4
4 absolutely no result therefrom, and 4
4 even may suffer from a military oc- 4
4 cupation by the powers, and that 4
4 perhaps it may result In the separa- 4
4 tlon of Macodonla from tho Turkish 4
4 empire. It Is true that Turkey Is 4
4 sending reinforcements to Macedo- 4
4 nla, but this is duo to tho prospect 4
4 of an outbreak of another lnsurrec- 4
4 tlon and possible interference on tho 4
4 part of Bulgaria, now that Russia 4
4 Is occupied with Japan, but the Sul- 4
4 tan has everything to lose and lit- 4
4 tic to gain by a war, and If It coaics 4
4 you may depend upon It that Bui- 4
4 garla will be the aggressor. Should. 4
4 war como I am satisfied that Bui- 4
4 garla will bo beaten." 4
44 H M M M H4 M M M M 4 M U M M H M M M M M M M M44H M H M U H H M U f4444-f j
t SALT LAKE MERCHANT ONE OF THE MOST HEAVILY 5 j
t INSURED 8F 4500 PERSONS IN THE UNITED STATES j
4 X 1 !
' (Special to The Tribune) 4 ,
4 NEW YORK, Feb. 27. The Standard Insurance company has- just compiled a list of persons who aTa 4
insured for S50,000 or more. T
T 'The list contains tho names of 4500 persons. The most hoavhy insured man in tho United States is
T Hodman "Wanamakor of Philadelphia, a son of John Wanamaker. He carries policies aggregating S2,- t
T 000,000. ' 4 '
T S. H. Auorhach of Salt Lake City is seventeenth on tho list, "with policies aggregating S751,0OO. i" j
THttllUMHlHIIHtmt 4444444 HHHIIIIHm 4444h-44-44444 4444444444 ' :
HEAVY DEMAND FOB.
ADVERTISING SPACE
4 4
4 Late last evening, as on the pre- 4
4 vlous Saturday, tho demand for ad- 4
4 vertlslng spaco In The Tribune was 4
4 so heavy that it became neccs- 4
4 sary in order to accommodate tho 4
4 advertisers and at tho samo tlmo 4
4 give full measure of news to read- 4
4 ers to add four pages to the Issue, 4
4 making thirty-two pages In all. 4
4 The Insert pages aro Initialed A, 4
4 B, C and D. 4
4
SETTLERS IN WEST
RISE IN PROTEST
Object to Any More Forest Reserves
in the West and a Halt Is
Called.
. (Special to Tho Tribune.)
(By A. F. Philips.)
WASHINGTON, Feb. 27. Ono of the
most important orders to the inter
mountaln country issued for soveral
years was mado by the President tills
morning regarding forest reserves.
The Interior department has been set
ting aside so much public land for for
est reserves and has in view the set
ting apart of thousands of acres more
that many arid States have protested. '
Protest after protest has been filed
with the department against the enor
mous acreage withdrawn for this pur
pose, but apparently without avail.
Senators and Representatives have i
been flooded with petitions until the
larger portion of tho mall for Western
members consisted of these petitions.
Senator Heyburn of Idaho had a con
ference with the President on the ques
tion. Tho conference was a prolonged
one and tho result was that the Presi
dent Issued an order to the Secretary
of the Interior to create no more forest
reserves and make no more withdraw
als In any State without llrst consult
ing the Senators and members of Con
gress of each State and giving them an
opportunity to be heard.
It Is understood that another con- t
Terence will be had on Monday with .
the President upon tho same subject.
It Is also understood that the Presi
dent will discuss the question with tho
Cabinet, as no much public land has
been set apart for forest reserves and
withdrawn for Irrigation purposes that
but little public domain remains,
Lands within a five-mile limit of
Pocatello on the Fort Hall reservation
will not be open to entry at tho date
expected. Tho bill providing therefor
which has passed Congress and which
was sent to tho President for signature,
it Is discovered, has a flaw in It.
Through an error In engrossing tho
measure making provision governing a
portion In range 31 eaat was written 3G
cast. This Invalidates the bill, and It
will have to again take its regular
courso.
It Is understood unanimous consent
will be asked in both Houses when the
bill Ij again Introduced: to have the
measuro put upon Its passage without
a long delay in committee rooms.
4 V
Congressman French has secured the
passage of a bill through the Houso
granting a pension of $30 per month to
William A. Sheridan of Moscow, Ida.
Senator Smcot Is advised by tho Pen
sion bureau that a pension of $12 per
(Continued on Page 9.)
WILL BROOK NO DELAY j
IN SMOOT INVESTIGATION
I
!
Senatorial Jury Will Begin Hearing Testimony in ;
Support of Charges on Tuesday-Hearing Will
Be Open and Inquiry Very Searching.
'f " '"' ' (Special to The Tribune.) ' '' r' '''' j
(By A. F. Philips.) I
(By A. F. Philips.)
WASHINGTON. D. C. Feb. 27. The
Senate Committee on Privileges and
Elections will begin Inquiry Into Smoot
case Tuesday regardless whether wit
nesses summoned from Utah arrive at
that time or not. Several witnesses sub
poenned are here, and they will be put
upon the otand at once. It was thought
the witnesses from Utah did not start
until today and the hearing would1 not
begin until later In the week, but in
quiry at Senator Eurrows's committee
room resulted in information that the
inquiry will proceed on the date fixed.
Tho hearing will bo open to the pub
lic and be had before full committee.
It is believed that President Smith
will occupy the stand for at least a
week, and maybe longer. The Investi
gation will be a most searching one and
several of the witnesses have been asked
in the summons to bring documents,
Waldemar Van Cott, one of the coun- J
eel for Smoot, arrived this morning,
and a conferenco with Worthlngton, al
so of Smoot counsel, followed- 1 1
Of the witnesses from Salt Lake City I j
E. B. Crltchlow and C. Mostyn Owen H
are now here, and it Is very likely that 1
one of these gentlemen will be placed I
on tho stand first. I
The inquiry- will be a prolonged one,
and every Indication is that a sub-corn- I
mittec will visit Salt Lake City and
continue It there after May 1st, on J
which date It is thought Congress will
end the present session.
SMOOT WITNESSES i I
START FOR THE EAST . I
President Joseph F. Smith and his
church people who were subpoenaed to
Washington to testify in the Smoot
case, together with Judge Hiles, are
now en route to Chicago, from which
point they will depart Monday morning
for the national capital. The party
consists of Francis M. Lyman, Hyrum
M. Smith, Andrew Jensen, Thomas H.
Merrill, Alma Merrill, Charles E. Mer
rill, Mrs. Charles H. Mathews, Lorln
Harmer. Mabel B. Kennedy and Judge
Ogden Hiles. These, in addition to the
three sick witnesses, Moses Thatcher,
John Henry Smith and W. M. Merrill,
were the only witnesses served, llvo be
ing missing.
The party are traveling together in
a Pullman standard sleeper, and It is
expected that Washington will be
reached Tuesday about noon. ,
Mrs. Mabel Barber Kennedy, one of
tho femalo witnesses, was at one time
a plural wife of a well-known Mormon,
and her testimony and that of her
mother, Mrs- Charles H. Mathews, is
Bald to bo desired in order to establish
proof that alleged polygamous prac
tices were known by Senator Smoot to
exist in the State since the manifesto.
It Is not known how long the wit-
1
nesses will be required to remain in
Washington, but It Is not expected that j
they will be back for a month. Wash- J
ton dispatches report that the hearing
has been postponed until Thursday or
Friday, and It Is thought to be not at ;
all Improbable that some of the wit
nesses may be required to remain East ;
for several weeks. j
The presence of the head of the j
church in Washington is said to bo j
anxiously awaited by the newspaper I
men, and the probability is that PresI- '
dent Smith and Ills party will receive
greater notoriety during the coming
weeks than at any time in life. 5
Tho apparent willingness of tho Mor-
mons to testify In the case Is much i
commented on both In Salt Lake and '
by the metropolitan press, and it is
claimed that this will have a distinct
bearing on tho final result of tho In
vestigation, j
County Clerk James, who was report- ;
ed to be wanted as a witness, presuma- ;
bly to produce records of his olnce, was
not served with a subpoena last night. j
It is possible that his name was over
looked by the authorities at Washing
ton, and that service will be had later.
Clerk James has gone to Denver, but
he left his address with Marshal Hey-wood.
4. I
MEN BEHIND GUNS DO SOME RERIARKABLE SCORING. 1
4 2LSNILA, Feb. 27. The battleship Wisconsin has beaten the world's 4 I
4 record with 13-lnch guns, Its expert gunners having made nine bullsoyea 4-
4 out of ten shots fired within ten minutes. 4 I
4 Paymaster Morse of tho Wisconsin, accused of irregularities in com- 4 I I
4 miBsary fund accounts, is to be tried by a court-martial. 4 I
44
E a4aoae3 I
ZWAR SENT 1MENT AND COMMENT IN EUROPEAN CAPITALS....
Prophets See Signs of 4
TOijjfffrktts International En- 4
tanglemonts. 4
If iHy, rtb- 27. Reports of intcrna
SaHaglocient3 growing out of tho
ftWk to occupy a prominent placo
JBtttlonaJ branch of tho press.
a wk tho officials of tho
who aro m c1ob ani con"
'vWF1 with the- Cablnots of other
&mi Eatlsf,c1 themselves, first,
y,!ttr"atlonal complications aro
Fr or llboly at least for tho pres
f'3Ko' Ulat Franco Is In no present
raF6 danger of being imbrollcd
i- Jtloaal conClct.
SS-Bourc'j panlo brought about
'fc Kh BUrvcy oC th0 situation
yf Europe, as tho heavy decline
gMkis rtculted aiftinly from fean
fcjflK, EurPean powers mlcht ba
Zmik 050 confl,ct Tno Inquiries
SEpat. whllo Uio possibilities of
--''Hl Ccml)1'Cttt'0"fl n-ro alwayB
.tfo Lj no Immediate reason to
"C2BiH!,e5tn """D1'00110119. t!ie mlll
'lUi at Vftrlo"J points being tho
eUt of an outbreak of war be
SO,9J?rtat Pors. Concornlng tho
tfllV'rmranCe t0 h0!d al00C fr0m 010
.vjajl MBcUla base their belief on tho
jjJE" of tho mat fow weeks of bos
jj flrS the detTrratimtlin to ob-
servo neutrality brought out a sentimental
reaction favorablo to Russia, with pop
ular demonstrations and subscriptions In
behalf of that country. Tho authorities
havo now been able to take Into account
! all tho various currents, tho result being
a firm conviction that Franco will not
havo her hand forced by International
agitation or external complications.
An official said today that tho new
Ko'oan-Japancso treaty had been tho oc- .
caslon for putting out a number of reports
calculated to foment discord between
Franco and Korea and perhaps force the
hand of Franco In relation to other pow
crB. particularly Buasla.
Tho authorities had taken not that tho
reports emanated fiom high Japanese
Bourccs. But, tho official declared.
French policy was definitely fixed to.
maintain neutrality and refrain from tho
slightest active participation In tho war.
and this will not bo changed by the
Korean-Japanese treaty or othor event so
far as possibly can be foreseen at present.
It is the understanding in Government
clrclen that Japan will not ask tho pow
ers to Rlvo formal recognition of the
Korean-Japaneso treaty, particularly its
Indirect establishment of a protectorate.
Koreans position I liUoncd to that of
TiSumnnln after taking advantage of the
offish war to declare It Independence,
hut bcroro tho Berlin congress had suue
. tloned its becoming a Klngdom
j 4.
INDEX TO SUNDAY'S TRIBUNE. 4
I . -L.
X PAGE 2
4 FIGURES ON PENSION BILL.
4 WISCONSIN STATE HOUSE
4 BURNS.
4 PAGE S-
4 COURTS.
4 POLITICS.
4 PAGE -1
4 CHURCH APPOINTMENTS.
4 "THE MAN ABOUT TOWN.'
4 PAG 13 5- ,
4 THE WOMEN'S CLUBS.
4 ONE SPIGOT HOLE.
4 PHILIPPINE P.AIROAD.
4 PAGEC-
4 IN THESPORTING LINE.
4 PAGE 7
4 MUNROE BESTS SHARKEY.
4 OTHER SPORTS.
4 PAGE 8-
4 OGDEN. . .
4 PARK CITT, ,
4 STATE NEWS.
4 PAGE 0 ' '
4 AMONG THE COAL MINEHS.
4 PAGE 10-
4 MINING NEWS.
4 PAGE 11-
4 IN THE MARKETS.
4 PAGE 12
4 EDITORIAL.
4 PAGE 13
4 PICTORIAL WAR PAGE.
4 PAGE 11
4 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS.
4 PAGE 1&-
4 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS.
4 PAGE 10-
4 TRADE HOLDS ITS OWN.
444444--4-44-4-4H
4 In St. Petersburg Press Agita- 4
4 tion Increases Antl-Ameri- 4
4 can Sentiment. 4
ST. PETERSBURG, Fob. SS.-Tho news
that tho United States had asscntcdto
tho extension of the Paclflo cablo to
Japan, with the reasons thereof assigned
In tho dispatches from Washington, still
further aggravated tho popular belief
that tho United States Is siding with
Japnn against Russia,. Tho for Ameri
cans In St, Petersburg havo all remarked
upon tho changed demeanor of their
Russian friends. Formerly they were
treated with tho greatest cordiality, but
now tho Russians greet them wtlh tho
question:
"la America our secret enemy and win
wo have to fight her also before tho war
comes to an end?"
How deeply tho Russians aro wounded
by tho belief, destined, unless checked,
soon to becomo a conviction, that Amor
lea has spurned her old frlond and 1b now
playing a hostile role. Is shown by this
Kcycruncc of personal lies, of which n
striking instaneo occurred this week In a
prominent drawing-room, when the most
Intimate Russian frlond of an American
lady ii)lnod her profforcd hand. Upon
PAGE A 4
WARDEN DOW DEAD. " 4
BARON KOMURA. 4
PAGE B- 4
DOINGS IN SOCIETY. 4
IRRIGATORS MEET. ' 1 -"4
WORLD'S FAIR WORK 4
PAGE C 4
CONGRESSIONAL REPORT. 4
ROBBED FATHER'S GRAVE. 4
CRIMINAL BOYS. ' 4
PAGE D 4
, CONTEMPORARY THOUGHT. 4
PAGE 17 4
"AFTER CDLLODEN." 4
PAGE IS . 4
SOCIETY. . 4
, PAGE 1&- 4
STATE SOCIETY. 4
PAGE 20- '4
' PARIS FASHION 'LETTER. ' 4
STATE SOCIETY. . 4
PAGE 21- 4
STATE SOCIETY. 4
PAGE 22 4"
MUSICAL NOTES.- 4
PAGE 23 .: " 4
WASHINGTON SOCIETY. 4
PAGE 21- ' 4
BASEBALL MATTERS. 4
SPORTING COMMENT. 4
PAGE 25- 4
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS. - ' 4-
PAGE 20- ' 4
WASHINGTON NEWS. 4
PAGE 27 4
WITH THE STAGE FOLKS. 4
PAGE 23- 4
CURRENT PUBLICATIONS. 4
h444444-4-444-4
tho lady's exclamation of astonishment,
her friend burst into tears and said sho
felt aggrieved at all Americans elnc tho
reported action of tho commandor of tho
United States gunboat Vlcksburg at
Chemulpo.
Tho attitude of the United States is a
subject of constant discussion even In tho
highest circles hero, where with tho great
est regrot tho fear Is expressed that tho
two countries, without excuso so far as
Ruastla is concerned, seem to bo drifting
opart Tho recently reported cancella
tion of American contracts Indicates how
tho resentment of America's supposed
hostility has invaded business affairs.
Popular feeling i'e, of course, to bo
largely attributed to certain of tho Rus
sian nowspapers, which have suddenly
turned their batteries from Groat Britain
to tho United States and havo Helzcd ev
ery rumor to place tho worst possible In
terpretation upon Its acts.
1 Without wailing for an explanation.
I which, It is apparent from tho dispatches
rccolvcd horo today from Washington,
will put another complexion upon tho
Vlcksburg Incident, tho columns of tho
prces for days pnst havo boon full of ex
cited comment based on tho original ver
sion of tho affair. In splto of tho state of
popular opinion the Government, It can
bo confidently assorted, places tho high
cat valuo tva American frlcudKblp.
4 In Kaiser's Realm 2Tew3 Prom 4
4 Seat of War Is Published 4
4 Without Comment. 4
BERLIN, Feb. 27. Tho silence of tho
Gorman press toward tho war projects
Itself upon tho attention of any ono
searching tho nowspaporn hero for an
opinion about It. Tho News Agency dis
patches from abroad aro printed with oc
catlonal explanations of their meaning to
military and naval students, but that la
all Tho usually opinionated editor has
nothing to any on tho Japanese-Korean
treaty, concerning Russia's protest against
this alleged Infringement of Korea's neu
trality whethor tho Kiel canal may bo
used by bllllgeronts or on Forolgn Secre
tary von RIchthofen'a statoracnt to tho
budgot commission respecting tho con
tinued occupation of Chill provlnco by tho
troops of tho powers. Tho Gorman nows
p&pors on all subsidiary questions grow
ing out of the war are, with tho exception
of froo lanco and Socialist papcro, as muto
as thoy aro on tho largor rights &r wrongs
of tho combatants. This sllenco plucoB
In high relict tho relation of tho press to
to tho Government a relation qulto dif
ferent from that of tho nowspaporn in any
othor country on subject of foreign pol
icy. Tho Government has givon tho press
to understand that noutrallty In uttcranco
und rceonro, as complot as tho Gowtn-
' mentis own, Is a patriotic duty at this
time. Tho Foreign offlco has tho con
viction that tho German press has largo
powers of doing mischief in supplying
material for Ill-natured foreign commen
tators, and tho Government desires to bo
perfectly freo to act should action bo de
sirable at a later period in tho dovclop
monts of events without foreign feeling
or that of cither of tho belllgorento hav
ing been cxgltod against Germany by In
judicious comment. Tho presa Is thus H
hold in restraint by no Illegitimate lnflu- H
ence, as in tho "reptilian days" of tho s H
lato Prlnco Bismarck, but by impressing H
to tho fullest extent that tho Govern- I
mont's forolgn policy In tho present lntor- H
natlonarfcnnont must not bo cmborraasod ' H
by editorial discussion of events. Tho ed- H
ltors aro not restless, soomlngly, In ao- H
coptlng this rolo, becauoo thoy bellovo that IH
thoy aro nctlng patriotically. H
TWO YEARS AND FINES OF $10,000 j
WASHINGTON, Feb. 27. August W. Ma
chon, formerly general superintendent of
tho freo dcllvory postal sorvlco; Dr.
Georgo F. Lorcnz of Toledo, onco pout
mantor of that city, and DUlcr B. Groff
of this city, all of whom woro convicted
of conspiracy against tho Govornmont in
connection with tho supply of Groff fast
oners to Iho Postoffloo dopartmont, today
woro sentenced by Judgo Pritohuxd to two
yoarH ImpriBonmcnt in tho MoundHvHlo.
W. Va., ponltontlary and a flno of J10.O
each.' Tho dnfondanta Immediately guvo
uollco of iippcal to Iho Court of AppeulH
and woro released on $20,00) bonds each.
Samuel A. Grofr, aa to whom Special
Counsel Conrad for tho Govornmont said
Bomu days ago that thoro wna not suffi
cient ovfdonco to convict, was not Ben
tf.nocd, and his motion for a now trial and
for arrest a Judgment being allowed far
ther consideration, Ids counsel were given ;
four days within which to prepare to or- i
guo tho motions. Tho sonlCneo ImpoBcd
on Mnchcn, Loronz and Dlller B, Groff Is I
tho maximum allowed under tho law, al- ' i
though tho court, contrary to tho conton- '
tlons of tho prosecution, ilocldcd that tho .
several counts in tho Indictment consti
tuted but ono offonse. Tho appeals to tho
uppor court will bo pressed as rapidly as
possible, according to tho defense, but
months may elapso boforo tho appeals can
bo heard. '
Tho Govornmont has not yot decided on
Us next stop In tho proncciiUon of tho pof
tal casos. In which thoro havo boon mo
many Indictments In which Mnchcn Is
named, involving offonso other than cov
ored in tho indictment in which ho hnu
already been convicted, will bo pressed for
trial next. Thero uro fourteen lndlotment.s
ngalnsl Jtfnohen, olthor singly or Jointly,
with others, and tho Govemmont oxpecta
to bring him to trial on most of thorn.
Ii

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