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The Washington herald. (Washington, D.C.) 1906-1939, December 26, 1911, Image 6

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THE WASHINGTON HERALD. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 26. 1911.
flrauifc Pa IOp frERY Woman
,l r bn EDITED BY fc prcsssgj Q&f
tu
JULIA CHAHDLER MAH2,
hi
Can Your Daughters Keep House?
A Story in Real Life Which Should Interest AH Moth
ers in Washington.
- B Jl'Ul CHlN'DLnil M4XZ.
Amid all the excitement of Christmas
Day, did you take time jesterday to read
Dorothy Dlx's article on the Woman's
Page in The Washington Herald on how
joung women should he trained to be
helpful wes'
It was an interesting articlr c-ifirillv
its reference to the law in Noria which
compels oung women to become profi
cient In sewing cooking. &e Aftei the
children had their presents on Christmas
morning I read the article again, and I
wondered how man mothers of grown
ups teach them to eare for housekeeping
I take it for granted ou are all sen"i
ble enough to wi"h th it our girls should
become practical housekeepers If the
are going to college and to adopt profes
sions I hope jou give them some instruc
tions In their half-holidas and -vacations
which ma make life easier for them
when the hae homes of their own
Even In this advanced d i of self-supporting
women there are mam who fol
low the good old plan of coming home
after the school dins are oer who cher
ish no thought of college or missions but
are content to llo the life of the home
daughter until thev marn ami enter
homes of their own How do jou help
them to lle that home life and how do
OU fit them for that future establish
ment "
Here is the stor of hu one mother
filled her dutv in thi respect Perhaps
her experience ma be of ser ice to some
of the rest of jou
The daughter was a nice girl t fairl
good student at school but with no espe
cial bent for an line of work or stud
Neither did she display am fondnes for
housekeeping
From her childhood .hn had been
taught such details as caring for her own
room dusting and brushing up a little,
helping with the dishes when she had
time, but the strenuous demands of her
work at school had interfeied with her
doing an thing more than this and dur
ing the last weeks of high school eerj
thing hut the insistence of stud and con
r hiding exercises was put lo one side
fter the final commencement per
formances and hc breaking up there
was the usual slump' The girl was tired
and the reacti - 1 naJ come w hicli gen
eralH follow strain and stress For the
ri t fortnight -hc seemed to hae en
Tgv for nothing but to sloop late lie
about with a book and " laze
The mother dio not interfere but when
she felt tune had been allowed for reco
ndition she began to institute a change
The daughter had alreadx dlsplaed
some signs of discontent
She had told of the girls among her
schoolmates hu were going to travel
or to isit and lad wished that the only
outing ahead of hei had not been plan
ned for the earl fall had said she
hoped something interesting would hap
pen to break up the long, dull summer
when nearH eer one was away
Here was the mother s chance and she
seized it One la she invited the daugh
ter into the kitchen and showed her a
shining clean corner In which had been
placed a small assortment of new uten
sil" Theie neio not trail of them an
egg beater a couple of long-handled
spoons, a measuring up two or three
mixing bowls of different sizes a small
vegetable knlf" a cake turner, and one
or two othei articles
Theeare foi vou niv dear, she said
bright!, 'and it is here that some of the
interesting things ou long foi are llkelv
to happen
"Have I got to learn to cook'" ex
claimed the girl Is that the wa I am
to spend im acatlon''
"When will vou learn if ou don't learn
now "aid tli mother Do ou mean
to wait until tall when all our friends
will be at home and there will be social
things on hand' You surelv don't mean
to be one of the little simpletons who
waits until she has married before she
knows how to bake a pan of biscuit or
broil a steak- '
But I ma ne ei get marritd. and
then all this will have been wasted," ob
jected the daughter
"Don't jou believe it,' said the moth
er "You re prettj sure to hao a home
of your own some di married or sin
gle, and then vou will want to learn
how to run it You needn't think any
one can keep house or cook Just b
studying about It In a book
The girl had not owned it, but she
had the Idea that she could cook If she
tried, without am difficult, so long as
she had a cook book and she also cher
ished the notion that It was rather ab
surd to expect an one who had held
a high place in her classes at school to
hao to stud housekeeping and cook
er as though the were sciences or
languages
So It was with a little suppressed
sulklness and with some condescen
sion that she fell into her mother's
plans. Halng been well trained In
obedience, she did not quite dare to op
OPEN UNTIL
W$t pfaesttem Co.
WOMEN'S AND MISSES' APPAREL, AT REASONABLE PRICES.
F STREET, CORNER THIRTEENTH.
Our Rebuilding Sale
CONTINUES TO-DAT "
WITH THE OFFERING OF
OUR ENTIRE STOCK OF
SUITS, COATS, STREET AND
CALLING DRESSES
WITHOUT RESERVATION.
At 1-2 Price.
ONE LOT OF SUITS AND COATS
THAT SOLD UP TO W. PICKED FOR
QUICK CLEARANCE AT
MILLINERY SECTION.
ALL FRENCH UNTRIMMED
SHAPES AT
WAIST SECTION.
ENTIRE STOCK OF WAISTS OF- I QFF
FERED AT J MtrW Price..
F STREETCORNER THIRTEENTH.
pose active resistance to the scheme,
but she felt that by a slight display of
her own powers she would easily con
vince her mother that she needed ery
little training
'I think I will begin with bread,' she
told her mother, with some private ad
miiatlon for the common sense that
had led her to take this instead of
cake or fudge "Just give me the recipe
and I II make It "
"A very good notion," commented
her mother, and having si en her the
directions introduced her to the flour,
the vrast cake, and other ingredients,
she left the joung graduate to her own
dev ices
Anj of vou who recollect jour be
ginning in cooker, or who have train
ed 'green hands' can guess what fol
lowed The recipe was explicit but
the flour lumped, she spilled it In the
stirring, the dough stuck to the board
and to her fingers, her arms ached
from the kneading, and she did not
know how to handle the dough, the
conslstencj it should have been was
an unknown quantlt. and she was
generall miserable b the time she
had reached the ' setting to rise' stago
But she was proud and would ask no
questions onl how was she to know
when It had risen enough" The book
said until light " hat constituted
lightness in bread' Was it color or
qualit "
Not until she v as coninced that there
was nothing in the directions to help her
did she shamefaccdl turn to her mother
and learn that the douh must swell to
twice its original bulk before it was read
to be worked again and put in the pans
When this period was attained, the moth
er taetfullc made a few suggestions, both
about the kneading and the making Into
loaves and gave sidelights on rolls at
the same time She also intimated that
there was Judgment m having the oven
the right temperature foi bread, and
dropped a word anent the varving heats
required for bread meats, muffin", cake.
&c
The girls eves opened a little and her
respect foi her mother and for trained
housekeeping rose togethei Bv the time
the bread was flnallv out of the oven she
had found that nerhaps eookcrv was
something which could not be acquired
altogcthei from books and that It resem
bled a language in that while jou might
be able to gain know lege of the grammar
and vocabularj b studv OU could not
speak it without some practice
This was the first step, and others fol
lowed It Graduall the girl became In
terested in cooking She perceived that
there was as much ictor in mixing and
baking i successful cake or pan of muf
fins as there was in solving .a problem in
geometr. and that the enj0ment she
found in seeing her dishes eaten with sat
isfaction was as gratifying as winning a
good mark in recitation
She learned also that cookerj Is as
much of an exact science as any of the
branches she had studied at school and
that her mothers mental equipment
was not to be despised, even If she
knew blologj' and phjsics and trigo
nometry onlv as names
Of course the girl was not always
successful In her cookery She had the
usual checks and disasters of the stu
dent but once she had grown into fel
low shin with her mother she did not
mind confessing her mistakes and be
ing instructed how to avoid them In
future
Moreover, the two developed one
another Thev devised fresh combina
tions, the tried new recipes together
the became close companions In the
novel interest and the mother's well-
trodden routine was enlivened by the
daughters experiments, while the lat
ter learned the small economies, the
wise savings long drill had taught the
older woman
This is not r fairv tale or a goodv
good storv but an account of what
reallv happened to one mother and
daughter, and that maj happen again,
in a home where the mother is a
trained housekeeper and has the pa
tience and ambition to help her daugh
ter to learn to keep nouse In a rational
way If I have laid special stress upon
the cullnar side of the home-making.
It is because this is the side which can
not be picked up at random or learned
b chance or from a book, as some
other details of housekeeping can be
gained but must be acquired bv actual
practice and apprenticeship.
An Unfailing Pie Crust Recipe.
One cupful sifted flour
One tablespoonful lard
One big pinch salt
Mix Add enough cold water to com
bine ingredients. Just flinging them to
gether Be careful not to knead, as it
makes dough tough
6PM DAILY.
$9.95
$2.95 '
YODNG IRISH WOMAN
BECOMES MARQUISE
Wife of Marconi Has Had a
Picturesque Career.
The world, which has a surprising
wa of turning around and of breeding
few 111' winds that don't blow somebody
good, has Just placed high In the Italian
court a handsome Irish glrl'who, a little
over a dozen ears ago, had no more
notion of being an Italian countess than
she had of setting wireless messages
out of the air wrom warring Africa or of
riving.
Yet, all these things have come to pass,
a couple of them, at least, directly con
nected with each other
The good-looking Irish girl was then
the Hon Miss Beatrice O'Brien,
sister of Baron Inchequin, and heiress
to $20,000 a jenr She became the Sig
nora Gtfglielmo Marconi, and the war
between Italy and Turkey was hardly
well under way ere the fates decreed
that she should be the Marquise Mar
coni and hold the distinguished post of
ladv -in-waiting to Italj's queen, Helena.
Romance the modern sort of romance,
which mixes up affairs so astonishingly
has apparentl been looking after this
popular Irish belle from the very be
ginning, and she's only half a woman
If she doesn't believe that the world had
to receive the benefits of wireless teleg
raphv partly for the sake of giving an
ambitious Inventor the fame and fortune
that enabled him to la his triumphs at
her feet
PRETTY LITTLE MOTIF FOR
GOWNS OR FANCY WORK
Thta rlalntv mHf mnlrps n pharmlnr
It Is done entirely in the outline stitch In
cotton No 18 for the vvjjrk.
HER GREAT-GRANDSON HAD
XMAS DINNER BY HER SIDE
Mrs. Danenhower, Aged 88, Surrounded by Her
. Many Decendants.
A family reunion with four genera
tions represented at an old-time Christ
mas dinner no music except that of the
human voice and the clatter of silver
and china
Rare, indeed, was the privilege of being
the one outsider, or, proper! speaking.
the invited guest at the dinner where
Mrs. Elizabeth S Danenhower, active,
alert, and beaming, albeit she Is on her
way to life's eight -ninth milestone, was
the chief figure
There were fifteen at the table includ
ing the "stranger within the gates" The
purel Informal gathering was in a pri
vate dining-room of the New Tredonla
Away back In 1S61 that place was known
as the "Old Chain Hou'e," famed as the
stopping-place of Gen WInfield Scott
when he was a candidate for the Presi
dency. William W. Danenhower, gov
ernment officer, friend of Lincoln, law
er, and real estate man, with his wife,
the now venerable but sprightl gentle
woman, purchased the "Chain House"
for a home
At the dinner yesterdaj there were
sons, daughters, sons-in-law, daughters-in-law,
nephews, nieces, grandchildren,
and one great-grandson, a w ee sprite.seat
ctl doe to the elder" Mrs Danenhower.
PHILADELPHIA PEPPER POT.
Cleanse and boll for an hour three
pounds of honejeomb tripe and three
pounds of "velvet" tripe. At the end of
the hour pour off the water; add fresh
boiling hot from the kettle, and cook
until the tripe Is tender. In another
kettle boll a knuckle of veal slowly for
three hours. Then cut the lean meat
and the tripe into inch pieces and return
to the veal broth. Pour Into this kettle
more than half of the tripe broth and
add a tablespoonful of sweet marjoram
(dried) and summer savory with thyme.
Mix the dried herbs well together before
they go into the broth, and use rather
more of the thyme than of either of the
others. Now put Into the pot a few
peppercorns, one red pepper (minced).
and salt to tasto. Cut raw whjte pota
toes Into small cubes; make small, light
dumplings not larger than a marble
drop Into the boiling pot, and cook thirty
minutes.
This recipe should make rather more
than a gallon. When cold (if it Is-not all
eaten while hot). It should form a Per
fect Jelly. It will keep for a week, and
fa as good when warmed up as at first,
not losing Its flavor. If desired, a few
allspice may be added, This Is done
sometimes, "but It is not so good as in
the original state.
Buckingham Palace has a -pre-cllp-
plag bureau of Its owa,
GIRL'S ENGAGEMENT
IS HAPPY EVENT
Some Ideas as to Making An
nouncement to Friends.
The announcement of an engagement
marks a Joyous period In a girl's life,
and the news should be made known
amid the happiest of surroundings. Here
Is the way one joung woman told the
glad tidings: Invitations for luncheon
were sent to eight of her chosen com
panions, who were those she first wished
to tell The centerpiece was a low vase
filled with tall stalks of larkspur. At
each place was small sponge cake "lady
finger ' encircled by a paste diamond
ring, while the bride-elect wore her own
engagement ring with a spray of artificial
orange blossoms tied to It All the others
had knots of blue ribbon, her chosen
color
Another simple but effective way of an
nouncing the news Is to have ribbons
tunning to each place "from the center
with hearts attached with Just one let
ter on it, the whole spelling "congratu
lations " This scheTie, of course, re
quires as manv guests as there are let
ters The one holding letter C should be
seated next to the bride-elect, and if the
luckj man Is present, the one having the
last letter should bo placed next to him
Of course ever one immediately show
ers him with congratulations Some
times the letters spell "congratulate us,"
or "congratulate us two," according to
how many are being entertained.
riprnrfltlnn tnr crowns nr fnnn artfrles
either white or colors Use mercerlred
Between times the interesting gentle
woman was led to speak of the holiday
season She expressed her delight at
having so man, of her family around the
board and observed:
' That scarf or veil which appeared In
my picture in The Washington Herald
on m birthday annlversarj, November
7, was brought to me by m son, Lieut.
John Danenhower, of the United States
navy, who, on the Vandalla, accompa
nied Gen Grant on his world tour. I
prized It highly, as I did a Bible, bound
in olive wood, from a 'tree of the Holy
1-and, both souvenirs of mj son's Jour
ne with the great soldier. I sent both
scarf and Bible to my daughter In Hart
ford, Conn , as Christmas remem
brances. After the nuts, raisins, and coffee. Mrs
Danenhower, mother of nine sons and
two daughters, five of whom are living,
expressed a willingness for a "set-to" at
backgammon with her stalwart son.
"Will " She talked remlnlscently and
entertainingly of Washington In civil
war dajs; of the "contrabands" coming
up isew York avenue, then a mudhole,
and of the progress in the real estate
line, of which she is to-day one of tha
keenest observers.
Revival of Homely Customs.
From Leslie'.
A revival of the old customs of our
greatg-great-grandmothers Is the com
mendable task to which the newly or
ganized Illinois Colony Club has set It
self. "The women," says Mrs. George
E. Colby, president of the organization,
"may bring their darning to the meet
ings, or their sewing. Then we are go-
inr to stndv the Uvea nf tha cnlnnl.t
women and emulate them. For example.
we snaii maxe our own preserves and
pickles and attend to other household
duties women nnra rilH " Than nrr.
a lot of women who have never given
mese customs or our grandmothers up,
but it sounds good to hear women of
leisure talking about danclnc. nlokl Inl
and preserving.
i
Lady Baltimore Gingerbread.
One-half pound butter.
One sup sour cream or clabber.
Two cups brown, dark, moist sugar
(sugar-cane sugar, not beet).
J)ne cup New Orleans or Porto Rico
molasses.
One teaspoon ful soda.
'Four cups flour measured after twice
sifted.
Spices to taste ar omitted altogether.
Bake In very slow oven and test wlfh
broom straw, being careful aot to have
tatter too stiff.
WAGING WAR ON
THE CIGARETTE
Nation-wide Campaign Being
Conducted from Chicago.
By ELLA WHEELER WILCOX.
"Bjpjs who smoke cigarettes are like
wormy apples they drop long before har
vest time."
DAVID STARR JORDAN.
"A good deal has been said about the
evils of cigarette smoking, but one-half
the truth has never been told Cigarette
smoking first dulls the whole moral na
ture It has an appalling effect upon the
phjslcal 8 stem as well. It first stimu
lates and then stupefies the nerves. It
sends bos into consumption It gives
them enlargement of the heart and sends
them to the Insane aslum. I have seen
bright bojs turned Into dunes, and
straightforward bos made Into miser
able cowards by cigarette smoking."
A. a CMNTON.
Phj-ridtn to Serenl Boj' School
The Anti-CIgarettc League o( America,
with general headquarters at the Wom
an s Temple in Chicago, is conducting an
America-wide campaign of education,
law enforcement, and legislation against
the cigarette evil
It Is leading the fight against tremen
dous odds
It depends for success upon the co
operation of parents, teachers, preach
ers, doctors, legislators, and other friends
of the bovs
Judge Burke, of Chicago, has stared
that "Our liws and times would not tol
erate for one single moment the cigar
ette evil If the desolation which it works
could be full realized "
w FCTS
1 1 200 to l.yio bos begin smoking ev
erv da- estimated
.' Bad habits are the starting point in
criminal careers
3 Crime is keeping pace with the cigar
ette habit Nlnetj per cent of jouthful
offenders are cigarette smokers
4 8,644.937 000 cigarettes were consumed
in the United States In 1910, an increase
of 1.856.487 SOS over 1909. not Including
those Imported and rolled by hand.
5 Tuberculosis fatalities are greatest
among cigarette smokers
a The cigarette Is considered a key to
the Insane asylum
7 Most school dullards and truants are
cigarette smokers
8 Man colleges are distributing cen
ters for cigarettes
9 Students' mental and physical effi
ciency Is lowered by cigarette smoking.
10 The cigarette torch imperils life and
propertv everywhere
11 Eleven States have prohibited the
manufacture and sale of cigarettes
12 Prohlbltorv laws are upheld by the
United States Supreme Court
All rlght-thinl: ig people demand the
extermination of this pest of society.
Many devotees of tobacco are ignorant
of its Injurious nature. However, owing
to the rapid decline of the race during the
past few decades and the increase of
crime insanltj. and other diseases, special
attention has of recent jears again been
called by leading medical men, scientists,
religious teachers, and commissions ap
pointed by various nations to investigate
the causes of the almost universal physi
cal, intellectual, and moral degeneracy
to the fact that tobacco is responsible
for much that has. In the past, been
attributed to other causes. To ascertain
the real Injurj' to the race from such a
habit we must necessarily go to the third
or fourth generation of its devotees. Nat
urally, the sad havoc wrought bj tobacco
upon the race Is more manifest now than
It has been In the past.
If j ou are a parent, a teacher, a preach
er, or a friend of the boys and a well?
wisher of the race, help this American
campaign against the cigarette evil by
writing to the Woman's Temple, In Chi
cago, and asking what jou can do to
push the cause along. And send a self
addressed stamped envelope for reply.
Ammonia caused seventy-one deaths In
England during the past jear, thlrty
three of them being accidents, the rest
suicides ,
f
Change in Store Hours
AGAIN OUR TWICE YEARLY SALE OF
SAMPLE SHOES
and Makers' Surplus Stocks
With every size md width, we can fit any one from these great lots.
Women's $3.50, $4, $5,
and $6 Iress and Street
Boots, all sizes ......
Again we expect the large crowds that always attend these sales. Our regular patrons who
see this, announcement (and many are looking for it) will surely be here and many new customers
will be attracted to it because of the great values which represent the entire clean-up of one of the
best makers of shoes to sell at $3.50 to $6.00. All new models. We cleared his floors at our own
price of every sample pair and every surplus lot, which enabled us to fit any size or width you may
ask for. ' "
Many extra salespeople to expedite selling
And what an array of materials 'and leathers.
Black Suede Tan Suede Gray Suede Blue Velvet Black Velvet Brown Velvet Gray
Velvet ColoredvSilk's White ' Canvas White-Cravnette Gun Metal Calf Vici Kid Tan Calf
skinTan Kid Patent Coltskin PatenfTCid Brown and Blue Corduroy.
Remember, sample sizes for women are Sj2 A, B, and C; 4 A and B, and '4y2 A of these we""
have the greatest quantity, but there is plenty of every other size. v
The Misses' and Children's Shoes in all sizes, 8y2 to 2, are in Tan Calfskin, Tan Kid, Gun
Metal, Vici Kid, Patent Coltskin, Patent Kidskin.)
Each in button, blucher, and lace styles. They-ate the .best leathers, and made for service. Come
early for your share. The rnajority are in sizes 10 C to 134 B, but plenty of every other, size.
$2.50 to $3.50 shoes, at one price $1.00 a pair.
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmammmmmmmmmmmmmmmmtmmmmmmmm
Not Too Busy To Solve Puzzle
Readers of Woman's Page Are Sending In Many An
swers to Candy Enigma.
It seemed to me that perhaps my
friends, the readers of this woman's
page, would be too busy with Christmas
to spend much time In solving the Christ
mas Candy Puzzle.
But, bless j'ou, the answers have come
piling In upon my desk just as If this
was the'lazj summer time. It is a sweet
task to And the name of some candy
which would be purchased bj the lover,
the schoolmaster, the flatterer, the butch
er, and all the rest of mankind and wom
ankind The zeal with which the puzzle
has been taken up shows that the sub
ject Is attractive
Remember that the contest closes on
Frlda. Send in jour solutions the puz
zle was printed In full in jesterdaj's
Herald and add jour name to the many
already on my list.
One of my correspondents wrote that
she would hand her guests the list at a
Christmas supper last night, and ask
them to find the answers I am really
curieus to know how many gave correct
solutions It was a clever Idea, anyway,
to entertain her friends with the puzzle.
Send In our answers, and if jou have
a word of suggestion as to future puz
zles or an feature of the woman's page
so much the better J. C M
ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS.
Editor's note Question. In this de
partment are anntrered In the order of
their receipt wherever apace permit. A
fen- dnvi are required for Inquiries re
quiring reaenrch.
Jabot..
A M M Fine mull or lawn trimmed
with batted wheels and edged with bat
ting make exceedingly pretty Jabots.
The lawn Is shaped so as to be side
plaited and the medallions are arranged
along the straight edge and on top of
each plait
It Is best to cut out a paper pattern
first, plait as jou wish, and use as a guide
for the mull Jabot
In this waj no material Is wasted as
might be the case If you do not first ex
periment with the paper patterns.
Ilnjo Embrolileryr.
Miss R Rajo embroiderj consists of
numerous little flowers whose petals are
formed by single stitches, which resem
ble rajs
It is very simple embroidery and easily
cTecuted
The different flowers are embroidered
in different colors of floss which gives a
very unique effect
This embroiderj' Is verj popular Just
now, and much of Its beauty depends
upon the colors used, rather than the
work.
Tblrd Weddlns; Year.
We have been married three years in
January and would like to celebrate.
What anniversary is it? R. F. E.
There Is no special celebration chron
icled for the third anniversary, but that
is no reason for not observing the day.
You can have any entertainment that
suits your purse and convenience from
the regulation reception to a cozy little
dinner for six or eight intimate friends.
Conch Cnablona.
Columbia Road Couch cushions are now
being made of tapestry-' Care must be
taken, however, in selecting colors which
will harmonize with the color scheme of
the room for which the pillow Is intended.
Oblong pillows predominate and are fin
ished either with a cord or have the seam
concealed with flat upholstery braid
Very handsome effects may be obtained
with the beautiful pieces of tapestrj'
which may often be secured at remnant
sales
The municipal council of Paris alms
to teach hlstorj by means of street
names Two or trie signs already in
place read Rue Rlvoll French vlctorj',
1797. Avenue Victor Hugo French poet
and novelist, 1S02-1SS3
Open 8:30 a. m.; Close 6
THE B.USY CORNER
fUCrWOlH&'fi
V W W 8 Tn St. a Pa. Ave. " M I
aS S Van .. "ar am a
QO00
Misses' and Children's '
$2.50, $3, and $3.50
Shoes, all sizes
Christmas Candy Puzzle.
What kind of Christmas candy
will be purchased by
1. The lover?
2. The schoolmaster?
S. The flatterer?
4 The coiner?
5. The pickle manufacturer?
6. The minister?
7. The miller?
8. The German?
9. The dentist?
10. The pugilist?
11. The shoemaker?
12. The dairymaid?
IS. The calendar designer?
14. The cranberry picker?
15. The milkman?
16. The editor?
17. The butcher?
18. The halfbreed?
19. The sailor?
20. The stonemason?
21. The Mormon?
22. The old maid?
A NEW IDEA IN
CHICKEN SALAD
Very Delicious and ftoyel
Dish for Entertainment.
In households where hospitality Is fre
quently' extended, it Is an excellent Idea
If the cullnarj- department Is ordinarily
efficient to undertake tome of the cater
ing at home from time to time.
A considerable saving Is one result ob
tained by the undertaking, but another
and sometimes more Important one is
the getting away from the somewhat
hackneyed viands which professional es
tablishments supply.
For instance. Instead of the familiar
standby of chicken salad a variation very
delicious and much less generally served
can be substituted JThls is the rule for
It:
Cut the cold boiled or steamed chicken
In cubes and for every three cupfula
thereof have one cupful of English wal
nut meats Put the nuts In a pan.
sprinkle but lightly with salt, and add
butter In the proportion of one and a
half tablespoonfuls to each cup of nuts.
Cook In a slow oven until they have
browned delicately and are heated
throughout, stirring when, necessarj-.
Take them from the oven, allowing them
to cool before breaking them In hits and
mixing with French dressing) la which
they must soak a while. Add the cubtfa
of chicken and later. Just before the dish
Is wanted, celery prepared and crlspeQ
as usual, cut In small pieces. To each
three cups of chicken add one and a half
cups of celery.
The sauce Is made In this way: Having
prepared an ordinary mayonnaise dress
ing by ths usual -clpe (one having raw
and hard-boiled j-olks In the same pro
portion. Is quickest) add the following
mixture: Four ounces of cooked spinach,
two tablespoonfuls of capers, a shallot
chopped fine, two-thirds of a cup of
parsley, and one cupful of cress. Thesn
are pounded together In a mortar until
fine enough to press through a very flno
strainer.
A damp hand Is not healthy and cannot
be beautiful. Apply the following lotion
two or threa times a day: Ten grains
tannlo acid, two ounces eIderJower wa
ter, and one-half ounce tincture of ben
zoin. If used persistently It will arrest
excesslvn perspiration and dry up tha
molstness In the palms of the hands
)
p. m. Saturday 9 p. m.
x1
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u.-U.iat-t-,-k..'

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