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The Washington herald. (Washington, D.C.) 1906-1939, November 04, 1912, Image 3

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045433/1912-11-04/ed-1/seq-3/

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Vatioial Aati-Tkirtt Tern Orpii-
-ttio PkMte limit Pwi
aeatial Term.
EIGHT TEAM EIOUGH
70S OIE MAJ, IS 8LOGAH
Association Asiiitea im Coloxel's
Defeat at tie Chicago
Coarentioa.
t If CoL Roosevelt Is not elected to-morrow
an organisation will go to work at
1'onee to prevent a recurrence of his per
sonality In another campaign aa a can
didate. Thla organization Is the National
Anti-Third Term League, of which for
mer Senator Henry W. Blair of New
Hampshire la preoaeni. ii " zrr-
its neaaquaners in me vuiui-u -
or Blair haa carried on a fight against
the third term. Me nrgamxeu ""'
before the Republican convention at Chi
cago, and had done some effective work
even then. Alter we eiecuuu -tends
to direct the league work toward
.promoting sentiment In favor of a con
'... .. .tMn iimirin the ten-
UlUUVOU PIIITMV
ure of the Presidential office. The for
mer Senator believes that a resolution
similar to the resolution 01 ocuw
Works will pass. "When the omendment
goes before the Legislatures of the
States he thinks it will oe ratified. Most
of those Legislatures, according to the
present outlook, will be Democratic The
Baltimore convention platform, the for
mer Senator points out. Pledged the Dem
ocratic party to the single Presidential
term Idea. Mr. Blair believes that an
amendment making the President eligible
for only-two terms of four years each
will have a better chance for ratifi
cation than one drawn on the lines of
Senator 'Works resolution, which de
clares for a single term of six years.
la Mae with Tradition.
"The Idea of two terms of four years
each la In accordance with the tradi
tions of the office," said Mr. Blair. "It
would simply write Into the Federal
Constitution what the well considered
Judgment of the people of the United
States has always stood for, namely,
two terms of four years each. It was
Washlngton'a idea.
"At the last session of. Congress the
House leaders killed the resolution
limiting the Presidential term to six
yeara and making a President ineli
gible because Speaker Clark and Rep
resentative Underwood were In an em
barrassing situation, having been can
didates before the Baltimore conven
tion, and they did not want to appeal
to be wreaking revenge on their suc
cessful rival by passing immediately
on the heels of their defeat a resolu
tion foreclosing Wilson irom aspiring
for a second' term. Mr. Blair's two
term Idea would meet this situation.
It would also dispose of CoL Roosevelt,
for whether his service In the Whit
House be construed to have been one
or two terms, the resolution would be
worded to fix the limit Of the tenure at
eight years, and that would make the
colonel ineligible for another four
years.
"If the resolution can be passed
early, in the session by the House,"
said Senator Blair, "the Legislatures In
raany States could ratify It at once."
Wilson Success
Predicted by
N. Y. Herald
New York. Nov. 3. Basing Its conclu
sions on straw ballots and judgments of
political reporters, considered jointly, the
New York Herald to-day predicts the
election of Gov. Wilson Tuesday, he to
have 360 electoral votes to 27 for Taft, and
7 for CoL Roosevelt. One hundred and
Milrty-seven electoral votes are placed in
the doubtful column. The Herald fore
csst by States follows:
aaal VHBtfl'HfMMMi
SWIrf 1 -if-v
VAJoOTntoittMnm
'. . ..
UaH!i3Ei3&yhiMB&aBH
faaVw 3anl?'(ii&?r.f3eKxSieH
BBBBBBBBBW!4BttsBBBHi
aKssWWSJj'vStsssssssssssssssy
HtJi4BBBBBBBSBBaftavavrc
iiAcsiSd
ottoiah pom ih
END
.
CjaattsnaC trass Pave
aesvyja-itfxic'-W
swiatiiuwqoio
HISS taCRA MERRIAM,
Wbo Is to wtd Jtmet F. Cnrtii. Aaalitint Secretur
of U Tmra7.
Affairs of Heart
'Not Foretold, Says
Miss L. Merriam
State.
Alabama ........... 12
Arizona ............. 3
Arkansas .... 9
California
Colorado ........... ..
Connecticut ........ ?
Delaware 3
Florida 6
Georgia ............ 11
Idaho .............. ..
Illinois
Indiana 15
Iowa 13
Kansas 10
Kentucky 13
Louisiana 10
Maine
Maryland 8.
Massachusetts IS
Michigan
Minnesota .......... 12
Mississippi 10
Missouri IS
Montana ..
Nebraska S
Nevada 3
New Hampshire.
New Jersey
New Mexico 3
New York 45
North Carolina 12
North Dakota
Ohio 24
Oklahoma 10
Oregon ..
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island ..
South Carolina 9
South Dakota
Tennessee 12
Texas 20
Utah
Vermont
Virginia 12
wasninRton
P h C
Miss Laura Merriam, Washington so
ciety belle and fiancee of James Free
man Curtis, Assistant Secretary of the
Treasury, evidently Is not given to su
perstition, for she laughed to scorn
Ir.st night the story that a gypsy fortune
teller had predicted her two engage
ments and final marriage even before she
became engaged to Theron M. Catlln,
dt posed Representative from St. Louis.
Such a story has in some unexplained
way found the light. The story has It
that even before the day In 1909 when
the papers announced the engagement of
Miss Merriam to Mr. Catlln, the brilliant
society belle, sometime known as the
"Golden Butterfly," had with a party
of Washington younk folk, sought out
a gyp3y woman and demanded that the
will of the fates be read in her palm.
Then it was, so runs the story, that the
old woman said:
"Missy will be engaged twica, and mar
ried once this year that I see in the
lines."
This tale has- gained' wide circulation
and even found its way into the papers.
but Miss Merriam denied It In part and
In trto last night.
Fortune-tellers;" she laughed when
asked as to the Incident. "No, there
never were any fortune-tellers, gypsy or
otherwise, concerned. There Is no truth
ir. the story. '
And thus has another piece of pretty
sentiment vanished.
ILLINOIS SWINGS
BACK TO TAFT
Turkish. Skaplre and the Balkans are
enough greater than the' other powers
to warrant her dealing wlth.the Balkans
direct, waleh ah proposes to do. Thla
action of Austria la 'Viewed with consid
erable alarm by aosae diplomats to-day.
Inasmuch as It may Influence Russia to
attempt independent action and thus Pre
cipitate the dreaded controversy over the
territorial spoils-spoils which the Balkan
leaders declare' are theirs, to be de
fended by arms.
The first division of' the third British,
battleship fleet, under Admiral Burner.
left Gibraltar this morning and the sec
ond division, under Admiral Tbursby,
followed this afternoon for the near East
Itaatlea Bier Aeate. .
In the meantime thm Ittiatinn 'in rnn.
stantlnople.' and Salonlkl grows more
acute. The Bulgarians apparently have
undertaken two turning movements with
the Obieet of mmntaHnr s ImJ. annul
the force under Naxtm Pasha, now fall-
ins; oacicto the fortified line of Tchatal-
dJa. West Of thn Vlttnmafi lanital Alt
the meager dispatches received to-day.
oeanng on tne Bulgarian operations. In
dicate that the Bulgarian commanders
are aaiavlna th. ..tiiBi ....u . r.
-- ..... .viuw uiyilVB Ul UIU
wnunopie Dy attempting this new
movement for humanitarian reasons.
ShOUld th TlnlM-fana mM .1 f..-!...
- . ., un u(s
directly back Into the city, which It Is
uuw uiuium uey wouia ce able to do,
the erased Mohammedan troops would
tory. u the Bulgarians can turn back
" " - me -.-ursaau army, encircle
NaaJra Pasha, force his surrender, and
inarch nn rAmiontinnnu ..-. ...i
-vh-mo...uswl-4-o IUC.T WDU1U
!2Vu. deal 0lUy wUh thc MohammcdanM
The Turks! airs. In .... ... v
- - ess uiuiUI VOIIIUU. Xill-
tsiWItVf tSv thinaat.4. . .. jj .
.r .-. .... .HWUB,itvw ui iruuouea, wun a.
depleted commUwiry, and disheartened
SmV fllaAVWlnlaJ aS
-..uju, uiey are retreating in
disorder, prepared to surrender and pull
Turkey to her knees In supplication be
fore the victorious enemies from the
north.
MeanwhllA lit. RMrt.n ... ...a ,
,h i? . r3r- ls Plpg the remnants of
M .im irom aicwonu. Turkish rule
in Macedonia Is to-day a fact of history.
The Servians have established Christian
rule In all the conquered provinces,
which comprise practically all of the
western portion of the Turkish Empire.
Scutari, Monastir, Janlna and Salonlkl
are the only remaining Turkish strong
holds of Importance, and the capture of
each of those places Is only, a matter of
hours. '
The last pretentious offensive action at
tempted by the Turks seems to have been
a strategical flank movement, and ft
failed miserably. A force of 30.000 was
landed at Media on the Black Sea and
waa completely defeated before It had
gotten under way.
V t 7 "St" "Mwicre oi wnrutlans
and Jews in Constantinople and Salonlkl
..... n utira ai latest reports from
those cities to-day. but telegrams that
the slaughter has begun are expected
momentarily. There are COO.000 Chrls
I "ikl '" ConstanUnPIe and TO.000 in Sa-
The London foreign office has been ex
ceedingly active all day. but the foreign
representatives are keeping a uniform
silence, rfvlnir ma inirii.... ....
- .w .M,,M6 ui tne progress
of the war.
Constantinople Is practically in a state
of siege to-day and crime In many quar-
tars la gois'sMesvifaay families
eeaf;jtMvatT wMe grsat kortUsof refu
gees, imruts tret tike amy, and the
lawles;ljaMs frem aH.tae sarround
Ing cwatryiare pentas la. More than
UatM Mealsm refaaees atoaa. burnlnr win.
la ., .hI.. .,lul -- - -- r
PBHa. an.a.. iwaii vhwh COBQuer
era, nave eaterea me. city, iq the past
fort'y-atght houn." And 'rumors are cur
rent 'that' th ,Toung Tories' committee
are planning, to start .riots with the ob
ject of: overthrowing the government.
At'Chatalja, the Turks are making their
final stand. And,, there too, the Bulga
rians, are now "at work In an effort to
flank and surround the Turkish army and
cut off any possibility' of-Its sctreat upon
the capital. A few hours ought to decide
the Issue.
What will happen If the Turkish sol
diers fall-back within. the gates of the
city Imagination resists picturing." it
is not difficult to realise, .however, that
the defeated and disorganised forces win
v wiw iura uivir guue ana Dayonets on
those who are awaking In Constantlnor
pie, In fear and' trembling, . the outcome
of the conflict ' v
rareisraera la Daacer.
At best the Uyta and property of thou
sands of foreigners will at once be
placed completely at the mercy of a
horde of .barbarians. In a city -of chaos.
Warships, therefore, are of supreme
Importance In the crisis, and It ls sig
nificant of Its appreciation of the situa
tion that the Turk baa grudgingly given
permission to each of the powers to send
warships through the Dardanelles in
preparation tor the emergency.
Meanwhile the Turkish authorities in
fuse to abandon hops. An official dis
patch declares that Naxlm Pasha now
haa a plan to surround "the Bulgarians
wiuie atanmoud Muictar Pasha works
around to the northwest of Visa. A col
umn or 39.090 Turks will then be ordered
to make a sortie from Adrianople to Join
hands with Muktar and bar a Bulgarian
retreat to the north. The Turkish army
at Dedcaghatch at the same time la to
hem In the western flank of the Bul
garians, while the main Turkish force,
occupying the line between Cborlu and
Serai, ls expected to .deliver the decisive
blow against the enemy. Military ex
perts, however, are skeptical of any fur
ther effective resistance of the Turks
against the victorious Bulgars.
Bryan Family
Boasts at Least
One President
lTa4
fron his atastrtoos-aJrariotHa wasa.
iiasm.aiaejaiiu ot ats ciass wht -a
flght. Z'K ' - , ' . -l '
The struggle, it la troa, was set jrltata
the party, btrfc-wlth the umimliwail
who ayd:tHsiinlBid;taat jtaa traasssMai
shm Jwt:hd.ia;inseUBg aa elaot at
cmAssMt Bomb, ataar: isjalHmilstihir
a twbuf-xt? mmm.ot we
nraaSrtMt itHT hta.taaWfaftaat4'
PRESIDENT MilES
nRLEA FOR fi,' P.
X-
- '' "' t."
4 t
. n r
Saji' Tariff legulatioa -laa-leea
faeeeM uti lawi Mun
" leia Eaforeec .,- .
NewJ.Tprk. Noy'l-Bef5re7liavtac for
Ohio uo-nlglrt,' to cast WaTrotsuPreai
dsht 'Taft gave out a statement-'la which
h'ejays? J , , '
"The, Republican f Urlff legistatTon of
the Congress of 1909, while not perfect,
has- actually "reduced excessive-".tariff
kratea.ahd has yet retained Mho ; pro
tective features so instrumental 'In cre
ating industrial-prosperity. And this ad
ministration had already taken steps to
secure' a' fair means by a taruT'commis
slon of 'further reducing and readjusting
the: tariff 'within the' limits of ' proper
protection; to our Industries..
"The anti-trust laws on the statute
books -have beent enforced without re
gard 'to v persons,' and without fear or
favor, and-the 'resulting decrees, if al
lowed to .have', their normal operation,
will tend to restore competition and win
remove the oppression that the statute
was passed to prevent
"In this view of what has been done
In the last four years, the Republican
party should not now be turned out of
office. Its promises have been confplled
with, real proxress has been effected, and
Its conduct of the economic policies of
tne government has been such as to
make It possible for the country to en
joy and' prolong the widespread and
growing prosperity now at hand."
'MOVIES' TO HOVE
AS IN THE PAST
POPULAR VOTE CAST
&
.vVv?,J
PRESIDENTIAL ELECTORS !
-- vv
:
'! - ,pm
',,
Vi
"A chip of the old block."
This was the comment made in many
homes yesterday by Democratic scions
as they announced the election of Will
iam Jennings Bryan, jr., as president of
the freshmen class of Georgetown Uni
versity Law School, over the top of
their spectacles to their sedate wives
who were eagerly perusing the society
columns to see If a card party they had
attended on Tuesday was given due no
tice.
Just to show father how It ourhl to
be done, William Jennings Bryan, jr.,
came to Washington, entered Into college
politics, and was elected executive of
his class, so that father, away off In
Nebraska, might, on inauguralon day,
take consolation In the fact that his life
long dream of "President Bryan." was
accomplished in name. If not In fact.
Although cruel fate has decreed thst
It wss for a younger generation to bring
the coveted title to the family. William
Jennings Bryan, Jr.. displayed In his
campaign much of the bulldog determlna-
Year.
IMS'
1892
1S96
1900
1904
190S
Total vote.
I1.SSI.40S
12.04S.S03 ,
13.S1S.243
12.9f4.51S
13,52341
14.887.1SS
Democrat
6.540.050
5.554.414
S.4S7.94
8,158.071
S.0S4.191
(.40940S
Representatives of the Moving Picture
Operators' Union and the Rxhlbltors' As
sociation met yesterday and practically
agreed upon terms for a peaceful settle
ment of their differences. There will be
no strike In Washington for at least an
other month.
At a meeting of the Exhibitors' Asso
ciation held yesterday morning In the
Chamber of Commerce rooms the "de
mands of the operators were discussed
and It was decided not to take any defi
nite action until the next meeting, to be
held some time within the next month.
B. A. 8pellbring, president of the oper
ators' union and himself a manager of
a moving picture theater, waa Informed
of the Exhibitors Associations action
and he stated the operators did not
want to use force to gain their end and
were willing to give the managers ample
time to consider the demands of the
operators.
Both sides have receded from their
original positions. It is understood that
the two organizations have practically
agreed that operators working full days
shall be paid at thc rate of 3614 cents
at
Democrat-Populist.
The popular vote In ltOS follows:
State.
a r Ken Baa ............................
iiiioriua ...........................
tonnecticut .........................
Delaware
Florida . . .
Georgia . .
Idaho ....
Illinois
Indiana
Kainsas ,))
Kentucky
Louisiana ..........
Maine
Maryland ..........
Massachusetts .....
Michigan ,
Minnesota .........
Mississippi .........
Missouri .
Montana ...........
Nebraska
ScTaUil
New Hampshire ....
New Jersey ...
New York
North Carolina .....
North Dakota
onto ...............
Oklahoma
Oregon .........
Pennsylvania .......
Rhode Island .......
South Carolina .....
South Dakota
Tennessee ..........
Texas ..............
I'tsn ...............
Vermont ...
Virginia
Washington. .......
West Virginia ......
Wisconsin ..........
Wyoming
Republican.
6T444.S37
6.190,802
7.015.S3S
7.219.510
T.628,834
7..79.00J
TolaL
10S.S09
1S3.12S
3SS.SS7
- 263.877
189.993
48,024
49.180
132.79
7,2S8
L154.751
721.12S
494.770
375.94S
490.CS7
75.1 4 C
10,33
238.581
456.92
641,749
331.304
66.904
715,874
C8.822
266.799
24.52C
89,692
467.19
1.832.250
252.310
94,582
1,121.588
255.22S
110.889
1,267.443
72.317
66,398
114.775
2 57,5 IS
292.472
108,611
52.654
137.066
183.879
258.151
454.425
37.609
.. ...
a'lurautix.
.Bern. Xep.
95.712
263.(12
0Te9e
aol.459
2.544.343
... 1.2(9,900
Democrat
74.274
87.01S
127,492
124.64 4
68.255
22.071
31.104
72.413
36.1(2
450.795
228.262
200.771
161.: 09
244.092
63.568
35.403
115,908
155.542
175.771
109.401
60.287
346.574
29.326
131.099
11.212
22.655
182.567
667.468
136,995
22.885
B02.721
122.363
38.049
448.778
24.70S
62.290
40.26
135.608
217,303
42.601
11.496
82.946
6S.691
111.418
166.632
14.918
Republican.
25.208
66,760
214.298
123.700
112.915
25.014
10.(54
41.(92
52.421
(29.929
348.993
275,210
1 97.21 S
23S.711
8,958
(6.987
116.513
265.966
325,580
195,843
4,3(3
S47.203
22.333
126.997
10,775
S3.149
265.326
870,070
114.937
57.680
672,312
110.474
62.530
745.779
42.942
3.965
(7.526
118,324
65.666
61,028
39.652
52.573
106.062
127.869
247.747
20.816
an hour, which will mean a weekly
wage of of about 220.50. The operators
demanded S22 a week, with an eight-hour
day and GO cents an hour for overtime.
They have receded from their demand
for an eight-hour day. It ls under
stood the agreement provides a wage
of (15 a week for operators who work
la moving picture theaters which are
open only in the evening.
14
Weal Virginia-.
Wlsansln
Wyoming ......
13
Totals !...360 27
137
TO-DATS SELECTIONS.
By New York Telegraph.
Fissile.
First race Marjorie A. Mad'
man. Yellow Eyes.
Second race Pan k hurst
Trifler, Syosset
Third race Ocean Blue. Ca
deau. Bryndown.
Foiirth race George Eno,
O'Bear, Shannon River.
Fifth race Tartar, Strenuous,
Early Light
Sixth race Altamaha, Donald
MacDonald, EI Oro. -
Seventh race His Majesty.
Virile; Astute.
Lateaia.
First race Terra Blanco, Ask
Ma. Gardenia;
Second race Chilton King,
Smash. Old Woman, t.
Third race Sir Alvescot, Eth
elda. Chapultepec.
Fourth race Ella Bryson.
Oxana. Belle Horse. ,
Fifth' race Merrick, McClln
tock. York Lad. - .
Sixth race Sister Florence,
Carlton Club; Tajr Pay.
Fomer Senator Mason Says Bepub-
lican Stock Has Bisen Coinci
dence in President's Itinerary
Former Senator William E. Mason of
Illinois, who has been campaigning In
that State, In a letter to President Taft
yesterday said that within the last fort
night he has found a decided rise in
Taft stock particularly In the south
eastern section, and more especially in
Representative Rodenberg's district
which Includes East St Louis. He says
his campaigning in that district con
vinces him that Taft and Rodenberg
will be given the old-time Republican
majority there.
Politicians and newspaper correspond
ents who were with Mr. Taft four years
ago at this time recall the coincidence
of his being in Buffalo on the Sunday
prior to the election. Four years ago
yesterday thc President arrived in Buf
falo on his final speech-making tour of
the campaign, which Included points In
Pennsylvania and New York. He spoke
In Buffalo Saturday and left that city
Saturday evening for Cincinnati, where
he will cast his vote.
He made a swing through Ohio on
Monday, arriving at Youngstown at
night where he made his closing
speech of the campaign. There waa
an all-day rally, and Senator La Fol
lette. who had been a candldte for the
nomination at Chicago, as this year,
was the principal speaker of the after
noon meeting. A dinner was given to
the candidate preceding the night
meeting, and Senator La Follett
dropped In to greet him. The Senator
was urged by Mr. Taft and the others
at the dinner to remain, but he said
he was rushing off to carch the last
train that would get him to bis home
In Wisconsin In time to vote the fol
lowing day.
La Follette had made a meteoric
campaign, and he. waa speaking for the
Republican committee, but his speech
at. Youngstown left so much doubt as
to his real attitude - that , some one
asked him who he was going to vote
for. He blushed deeply, declined to
answer, and rushed from the hall.
Now he ls on record aa saying he will
not vote for any of the Presidential can
didates. Mr. Taft arrived in Cincinnati
on the morning of the election four Years
ago. He bad planned to follow practically
the same itinerary-xrom uunraio this year,
spending all day to-day speaking in Ohio,
but will not do so on account-of the death
of vice President Sherman.'
Accordingly; he will go -direct to Clncln.
nati from Buffalo, arriving there this aft
ernoon. x
The price off every article in our store is marked in figures you can read
CASTOR I A
Itt Iafcalt asd C&iUim
Tie KM Yn Im iUmfs lHtl
Vgjaxm&Jtm$(ffifcmlt
You want to buy Furniture
Come here for reliable goods
at low prices
Just that plain statement may not arouse your enthusiasm, but if youll stop and think for a mo
ment is there any fact concerning furniture that can .mean more to you?
Absolutely reliable goods at prices as low or 'lower than you will be asked for equal values else
where. We don't know how to offer ybu more than that !
- ,; In the matter of paying, our claim is stronger. We will grant you easier terms than any other
store in Washington. Open an account here and tell us how you'd like its payments divided -to suit
your circumstances. We ask you to sign no notes, and charge no interest.
Carpets
-Wherever you may buy a carpet, us entire cost is
not reached, until it has been laid on your floor. This
is probably the only store in Washington where you
may know exactly what 'this entire cost will be at the
time you buy.
Here you will- find the price per yard marked in
plain figures, and that price covers every penny of cost
Our service covers the, making, the furnishing of
linings, and the laying absolutely free. Your floors are
measured and you are charged for only what is actually
necessary to cover them. AVhatever may be wasted in
cutting' to match; figtires is not charged to you.
Blankets and Comforts
We can show you a pair of good, warm blankets
for $1. They are good-looking and serviceable. In
the better qualities we have them up to $18.
Prices fpr comforts begin at $2, and the range
in quality extends up to the luxurious styles in quilted
down at $20.
Curtans and. Draperies
Our stock of lace curtains is large and varied. A
good quality of Nottingham is priced at $1.50. In
this and the better styles we will give you big values
at any price up to $10.
v Portiere prices begin at $3 and mark" a style at
ahnosteverydollar of advance up to $30.
Stoves
Our stove department is as well stocked and as
well equipped" to give you perfect stove-satisfaction as
any store handling such goods exclusively.
No matter whether you are looking for the simplest
style of oil heater or an elaborate kitchen range, we
can give you a reliable value at a price that will please.
6 An Oil Heater at $2.75
A In the Fall or Spring this size is ample to take the
chill from any room, and in cold weather will heat a
small room thoroughly. We carry many larger sizes at
moderate prices.
A Coal Heater at $5.50
. This has long been one'of our leading stove values.
It's, a style that throws an unusual volume of heat, and
has always proved most satisfactory in every respeat
Our line of the larger sizes 'is" very complete.
Peter Grogan and Sons Company, 817 to 823 Seventh Street
1
I to. ,.
. v i
Durin Past Tweaty Yean Total NMer f Baloti
Cast His Jaarfrwn 11,000,000 to H000.0W.
"Popular rota (or PrtsIdenUalElsstors. by Principal politics! partis.
lSM-lsOS." Is the title of a satiss of tablss. spsclallr laUrsatlac at tsa prissat
moment published In -the Statistical Abstract ottha Uoltsd States, issuad br
tba DtTlslon of Statistics' of th Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Coauosrcs,
Departnrerrt of Commerce, and tabor. These tables, occupying sereral pasa
of 'the Abstract, present the oadal record of the vote cast In-each Presides tlsl
election as far back as bflclal raaards are ars liable.
Congress passed. In JUT-an 'act providing that State officials should there
after- file with the Secretary of. State, certifled statements of the rote cast In
their respective Stales' for electors' of each ,nartr in the Presidential elections.
and the; records thus nle'd'wjthjthe Department of Bute were utilised la the
compilation of the tables above referred to, thus making them the. first and
perhaps only offlclal publication of the voto cast In .Presidential elections by
Statea and parties In each election' since the -enactment of the law providing:
for an offlclsl record by -the national government of the vote cast.
A study of these tables, covering a full twenty-year period. 18S8 to 1S08,
presents many facts especially Interesting at this moment. The total vote east
for Presidential electors ns grown from 11481.488 In 18.8 to 14.887.118 In 108.
This Indicates that the vote of 1108 was about 20 per cent greater than that
of 1888. An examination of "the totals In each of the elections during that
twenty-year period, however, shows marked fluctuations In the number of votes
cast and In the increases during the four-year periods from one election to
another.
Following Is the popular vote for Presidential electors from 1888 to 1108:
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