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The Washington herald. (Washington, D.C.) 1906-1939, August 18, 1920, Image 7

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'NATIONALS
Griffs Drop F
i to Browns, V
In Eleven-l
By JACK
! It was a bad day for pitchers o
i Handy were both the Nationals an
i eleven slabmen were used from fir
honors. The visitors took the openi
runs in the ninth off Harry Courtnc
venged in the second, winning by tl
eleven-inning battle. It was the first
hfcd won before a home crowd this >
Bans who hanker after plenty of b
hits and runs when they plank down p
for a ball frame had an eyeful of E
both yesterday. In addition, they ri
saw some nifty fielding: stunts, contributed
chiefly by Jimmy O'Neill
*nd Jack Tobin. the doughty right
fielder of the visitors. S
Brown Stars Corral Hits. ^
- Sisler gave a demonstration of u
?!assy batting in the opener, when h
connected safely four times in e
Ive trips to the plate, while in the k
fecond game the clubbing star was ^
Tobin, with Ave hits, one a double, n
n six trips up. O'Neill led the Na- v
;ional swatters in the closing battle i\
*ith two singles and a triple, the e
Matter coming when two were on the
fa^ks. r
Of the numerous pitchers used, off l
w End on, Harry Courtney, who toiled t
\ in the opening battle, was the only i
i one fo flnish. But his finish was t
nothing to hrag of. He entered the c!
ninth leading by a 2 to 1 margin, but *
the foe began a heavy attack and x
pounded the southpaw for five hits a
*nd six runs. Sothoron was started c
The First Game.
t ? Both teams started out with a
run in the opening round of the i E
first game. The Browns counted on [ s
Qerber's walk, an infield out andjJ
I Sisler's drive to right. Judge j jJ
opened with a single for the Na- .
tionals but was "forced by Milan.; ,
l Rice walked and. after Brower had
I popped out to Billings. Harris
Orove Zeb across th?* pan with a
I neat single over second.
T Milan scored Lhe second and last ' ^
run for the home brigade in the
| third. He singled, went to second c
| when Rice beat out a pretty bunt ; i
f and counted on another hit to cen-!K
ter by Harris. Zeb was injured I a
' sliding into the plat?* and later re- s
tired from the game. r r
Aided by fast fielding. Courtney r
fcept the enemy scoreless from the ' v
second to the ninth. H* got in g
trouble in the sixth, seventh and :
eighth, but Jimmy O'Neill con-'t
tributed some brilliant fielding that : t
cut off scores. ; b
In the sixth, after two had sin-j 0
gled with one down. Jimmy took | J
part in a double lightning play t
with Harris, retiring the side. But j
he furnished a big thrill in the j p
eighth when Sisler doubled after ^
two were down. Jacobson smashed ^
a low grounder near first base, but ; g
Jimmy sped across, snagged it just i
off the ground with one hand and j
made a perfect throw to first. It
was as fine a bit of working as ^
could be imagined, and brought a 1
yelp of delight from the stands. h
Courtney Hammered in .Ninth. ;a
Sothoron left the melee to give ; v
Way to a pinch batter in the seventh :
i and was succeeded by Burwell, who J c
i was also yanked in the midst of the J (
k enemy rally in the ninth to lend i t
I power to the artillery. T'rban J ^
f Shocker hurled the ninth and re- i
fused to allow the Nationals to I t
$tart anything in the nature of a t I
rally. j t
' Courtney's effectiveness disappear- j t
rd in the ninth. Williams started J
the trouble with a double to left ; f
center and Smith singled to right, j i
scoring the left fielder. Tobin. the . r
king of bunters. laid one down and j o
Was safe when Courtney foozled his : r
putt, so to speak. Billings' infield j v
vout advanced the runners, and Sev*
freid. hitting for Burwell, rapped!**
Smith home with a single.
' Cerber's hit scored Tobin and Sev- j
areid crossed the plate when O'Niell !
fossed badly to Harris for a force j
play on Gedeon's rap. With two on ; I
rlje cushions, along came Sisler and |
pushed out his fourth hit of the j ^
iky. scoring Gerber and Gedeon. |
After the enemy had batted j .
around. Courtney finally managed to j
retire the side. Iu
HARRY SLIPPED
* i
'Washington. AR R H SO BB TO A K ^
Judg<*. lb 4 0 2 2 0 11 0 ?if
Milan. if 4 2 1 0 0 3 O n
iU*rw>. 3b.... 0 o 0 0 0 0 1 Oj l'
*1,-#. cf S01H 1 4 00U
Brower. rf 4 n 0 O 0 2 0 t? j c
fftrri*. 2b 3 O 2 0 t) 3 4 0 I p
Srtank*. 3b-lf. . 401 O 0 020
e'Neill. s* 4 0 1 1 0 2 fl I K
dbarritr, c.... 4 0 0 l o 2 o 0 |
?ou-tney. p. . . 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 !
^Roth 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
; Total* 33 2 8 4 1 27 13 2 j,
' *t. Loots. AB R H SO BB PO A F K
<?#rber. a* 3 2 I 0 1 3 2 Oj R
rtfdeos. 2b 5 1 1 0 0 l 2 O R
Sialer. lb 5 0 4 0 0 11 4 0 B
J:n obson. cf... 3 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 H
Williams. If... 3 1 1 1 0 1 o H SI
8ltiitb, 3b 4 1 1 1 0 0 3 0 O
Tobin. /f 4 1 1 0 0 3 0 0 P
Billing*. C 2 0 0 0 2 2 1 0 0
Snthorou, p.... 2 0 O 0 0 1 4 0 S?
Austin 1 0 0 o 0 t) n O A
Harwell, p 0 o 0 0 0 l l 0 { :
gS^rereid C 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 0|Z
jThompaos .0 1 0 0 0 0 0 ?I
SiKKk'r. p 0 0 0 0 0 0 u Oj
Total* 37 7 10 2 3 27 17 1 j r.
, Batted for Courtney in ninth. 4;
. tBatted for Sothoron in seventh. | s
(Batted for Harwell in ninth. j j,
JRan for Serereid in ninth. I
Washington 10 1 00000 0?2 ; r,
ftC Loois 1 0000000 ??7 ! x
Baas batted in?Harris <2). Sisler ?3). I
Bfclth. Se^erled. Gerber. Two-base hits? | j.
Staler. Williams. Stolen base?O'Neill. 1 b
Sacrifice bit*?Rice. Tobin. Double plays? | *,
Harris to O'Neill to Judge: O'Neill to Har- .
ris to Judge. Base on ball*?Off Sothoron. 1 \
1. Struck out?Bj Burwell. 1: by Shocker.
2. Hit*?Off Sothoron. 7 in 6 inninc*; off
Burwell none in 2 innings: off Shocker, 1
in 1 inning. Hit by pitcher?By Courtney
Olerberl: by Burwell (Harris). Winning
pitcher?Burwell. Time?2:05. Tmpiroa? ^
Hildebrand and Moriarity. Si
ZONE 6 WINS TITLE !1
IN NAVY YARD LEAGUE
| W
The Navy Yard League is over!
for the season with Zone 6 the'j;
pennant winner and the team toj2:
represent the Navy Yard League fnjju
the post-jeason series for the to
championship of the District. Yes- pj
ter day they tramped on the Zone 1J " ^
team and piled up 12 runs against l;
4 for the Zone 1 men. The first in- in
ning was enough for the winners, in
as they chased over ten runs. They w
gathered two more for some un- "T
known reason in the fourth inning. p'
R H E
Zone i 10 0 0 2 00 0?12 15 1
Zone 1 000300 1? 4 9 1
Batteries. Krye and Giovannette; he
Litchfield, Luscombe, Dyer and cl
Moore. Bi
A *
ID BROWNS I
:irst Game
Vin Second
'nning Fight
NYE.
n Georgia avenue yesterday. So
d Browns with the willow that
st to last as the teams divided
ing battle, 7 to 2, by scoring six
y, while the home crew was rcle
healthy score of 10 to 9 in an
extra inning game the Nationals
ear.
y Jimmy Burke, but (rave way to a
inch hitter in the seventh, allowing
lurwell and Shocker to divide the
emainder of the slabbing task.
Scknoht Snw Bum Doctor.
Great things were expected of A1
chacht, who started the second
ame, because of the time spent
nder treatment by a highly touted
one setter up in Rochester, N. Y.
lut the "doc" failed to oil all the
inks out of Al's system, for he was
armly greeted with three runs in
he opener. He retired early in faor
of Jose Acosta. who worked for
he first time before a local audince.
The Nats came back with some
uns themselves and. after more or
ess experimenting with pitchers,
wo runs scored by the Brownies
n the ninth sent the game fnto exra
innings. Zachary and Van Giller
were the finishers and the
lomelings won in the eleventh
vhen Shanks singled, stole second
ind tripped home on Gharrity's
I rive toward Jacobson.
The Second Cnme.
Occupying the hurling pit for the
frowns when the second game
tarted was a certain Adrian Lynch,
rho once wore the regalia ot the
rational?. He was alleged to be a
find" of Mike Martin and. if this
e true. Mike found himself one of
he wildest young men in the game.
V'ith a little practice he may soon
ival our own Joe Engel, our peerass
scout and now-and-then slabber.
Knowing the youthful Adrian of
Id. the Nationals insisted on waitng
him out. This peeved him. He
new it was going to cause trouble,
s it did. Finally the tension grew
o great, that Adrian walked four
en in a row in the fifth and was
obly led from the field by the everratchful
Jimmy Burke. But that's
;etting ahead of our story.
lrt the first inning, amone other
hings, Sisler doubled and Jacobson
ripled, and Kllerbe, playing third,
ooted one. so that the Browns
pened with a three-run lead. They
ame right back with three hits in
he second, but not a run because
Jrower tossed out a man at the
late, with the aid of Judge's arm in
he relay. But the frequency of hits
oded no good, so Acosta relieved
ichacht.
Lynch Walk* a Few.
Taking advantage of Synch's
nown ability to be wild, the N'aionals
landed one score in their
alf of the first. Walks to Ellerbe
nd llice. a wild pitch, and a puruant
bum throw by Lynch, did the
rork.
Tobin's double and Harris* error
tave the visitors their fourth run in
he fourth inning. In the fifth
hey rapped Ihree safe ones off
icosta and counted two more.
But a lead of six to one amounts
0 nothing when Lynch is pitching,
lis weakness cropped out again in
h?* fifth and led to five local runs,
ying the score. With one out.
udge, Ellerbe, Rice and Brower reused
to wave their bats and walked
n turn, forcing Joe across with a
un. Adrian saw Burwell coming
ut to relieve him and beat it. Haris.
Shanks and O'Neill greeted Burroll
with singles. Result, five runs.
With Gerber on third in the sixth,
acobson scored him with a long
y to Rice. The Nationals, howver.
added three tallies off Burwell
n th^ seventh and went into the
pad again.
Rallying in the ninth, the Brown?s
drove Acosta to cover and tied
he count with two runs. Jacobson
nd Williams singled. Smith bunted
hem along, a^d Tobins drove them
1 with a single. ' i
After this tne game rocked along
ntil the eleventh with Zachary and
turwell in the hurling roles. In
he tenth both teams got men on,
ut^acked the punch.
In the eleventh Shanks opened
rith a single and stole as O'Xiell
anned. Gharrity lined a hit to cenpr,
counting Hank and breaking
p the game which could not have
ontinued longer because of the
rowing darkness.
Right Back at 'Em
Washington. AB R H SO BB PO A E
Lidge. lb 4 1 1 0 2 13 2 0
llerbe. 3b 3 1 1 0 3 1 2 1
nth. If 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Iop. it 41002200
r??wer, rf.... 5 2 1 0 J 7 1 ?
larris. If 2b.. 41201 5 42
fiank.s. If-3b.. 42201210
Xelll. ** ? 1 3 1 o 2 4 0
icinich, c 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 0
hanity, c 3 0 2 0 0 0 I 0
rhaeht, p 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 P
costa. p 4 1 2 2 0 0 0 0
Milan 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
achary, p 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Total* 42 10 IS 3 10 33 17 3
St. I^onis. AB R II SO BB PO A E
erher. ss 5 0 2 0 0 0 2 0
edeon. 2b 512004 5 0
i*ler. lb 5 1 1 0 1 14 1 0
m?b?on. rf... 4 2 3 0 1 2 0 0
'illiam*. If... 5 2 2 0 0 0 1 0
mith, 3b 5 1 1 0 0 3 1 0
oMn. rf 6 1 5 0 0 4 2 0
preried. c ? 0 1 0 0 3 1 1
vnch. p 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 1
urwell, p 1*1 0 0 0 1 0 0
fcaatia 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
"oilman, p...O 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
an Gilder, p. 20100000
Total* 47 ft 19 0 2 $31 14 2
Batted for Pieinich in fifth.
Batted for Weilman in eighth and singled.
$0ne out when winning run wan scored.
Tashington 0000 5 13000 1?10
t. Louis 3 001210020 0? 'J
Runs batted in?By O'Neill <4>. Ghanlty
I). Harris. Shank*. Jacobson 13), Tobin |
l>, Williams. Two-ba-e hits?Acosta. Klrbe.
Sisler. Tobin. Smith. Three-base'hits
O'Neill, Jacobaon. Stolen bases?Rice,
innks. Sacrifice kits? Harris, Oerber.
illiaras. Gedeon. Jacobson. Base on balls
Off Lynch. 7: off Bnrwcll, 1; off Weilman,
off Van Gilder, 1. Struck out?By Lynch.
Van Gilder. 1. Double plays?Harris to
Mlge: Brower to Jndg* to Picinich; Tobin
8isler; Smith to Gedeon to Sisler. Wild
toll?Lynch. Hits?Off S<-bacht. 3 in 1 Inng.
1 out in second; off Acosta. 12 In 7
* innings; off Zachury. 4 in 3 inning*; off
rnch. 3 in 4 1-3 innings; off Burwell. 5
2 1-3 innings: off Weilman none in 1-3
ning: off Van Gilder. 7 in 3 1-3 innings,
inning pitcher--Zachary. Loaing pitcher
Van Gilder. Time of game--2:23. L'rtrea?Moriarity
and Hildebrand.
Wasb. Gun Club to Sboot.
The Washington Gun Club will
ild Its weekly shoot today at the
ub traps, south of th? Highway
ridge, at 2:30 p. m.
5
5REAK EVEN-JOHNSTON
WINS
LONGWOOD CUP
Singles Champion Defeats
Niles; Cup Permanent
Possession.
Long wood Cricket Club, Chestnut
Hill, Mass.. Aug. 17.?William M.
Johnston, of California, national
singles champion of the United
States, won permanent possession of
the famous LongwooJ Cup here this
afternoon by defeating Nat Niles In
three straight sets in the challenge
round, 6?4, 6?0, 6?0.
It was the third time Johnston
has won the Longwood Cup, and it
is now his property.
The champion outclassed Niles
and won as he pleased. A good gallery
turned out to see the meeting.
Play in the national doubles was
suspended.
The national v champion began
service In the first set and Niles
broke through and took the first
game. Johnston -4n turn broke
through Niles' service and then won
his own, leading at 2 to 1. Niles
won his service and evened the set.
The champion then began driving
beautifully and reeled off the next
three games in decisive fashion,
leading, 5 to 2.
The challenger rallied and took
the next two, but Johnston would
not be denied, and won' the final
game and set on service, 6?4.
Johnnton Superb.
Johnston was in superb form in
the second set. He opened by winning
a love game -on service and
then ran through Niles for a love
set, 6?0. The champion drove
beautifully from the back lino and
continually tricked Niles out of
position for passing shots. His
service was also severe.
The third was a repetition of the
second sot. Johnston played superbly,
and won the first five games
handily. Needing only one more
game for the set, match, and Longwood
Cup, Johnston broke through
Niles' service and won the set, G?0.
I'oint scores:
First set:
I Jobimtoo 244 235 4224-36? fl
1 Nil** 402 433 0441?2."?4
| Srrond set:
{Johnston 443 045?2*?fl
Nile* 013 403?11?0
Third set:
Johnston 4.14 4412?33?0
Nile* 232 2010 ? lft?<1
The feature match of the second
round of the national doubles
brought together Watson M. Washburn
and Dean Mathey. and Willis
Davis and Roland C. Roberts.
Davis and Roberts, the California
youths, took the first set, 6-3. Seven
of the nine games went to deuce.
! Point score:
j First set:
jDavi* and Roberts 657 "74 44.~??15?-6
j W:i*hburn and Mather.. 435 356 063- 37?3
Tilden and Garland defeated Coyne
and Rrain in three straight sets. 6-0,
C-0. G-2, and advanced to the third
round in the lower half.
Jerry Conway, the husky leffcI
hander who was signed by Nick Altrock
in Holyoke, Mass., reported to
Griffith yesterday and warmed up
during the second game. He stands
jabout 6 feet 2 inches, and seems to
have a world of speed and "stuff."
i In addition to pitching. Conway is
also a good first sacker and a fine
batter.
Brower went hitless in the first
(game, though he smashed several
! hard drives and landed a single to
j right in the second in four times at
bat. He handled seven fielding
chances in the second affray in fine
' st vie.
Celebrating his return to the game,
Stanley Harris landed two hits in
, each battle, and also did some beau|
tiful fielding work, despite his three
errors.
j James Aloysius Shaw will prob|
ably hurl against the Browns today,
with Shocker as his opponent. Resting
Shocker is one of the toughest
assignments any pitcher can draw
. these days.
PHILS AND GIANTS
DIVIDE TON BILL
Philadelphia. Aug. 17.?The Giants
broke even with the Phillies today
when they took the first by an 8 to
7 margin and lost the second by
3 to 2. when the Phillies annexed
two runs in the last inning. Score:
Glasts. AB II O A! Phillies. AB H O A
I Horns.If... 4 13 0 Paulette, lb. 4 1 10 1
j 1-efevre.ss. 2 0 0 IjLeb'rreoa.if 4 2 1 C
j Young, rf.. 3 10 0|Rawting*.2b 5 0 3 9
Baird.3b... 10 1 2j Williams,cf. 5 3 0 C
Frisch.3b.ss 5 3 1 5!MeuKol,rf... 4 2 0 C
Kelly,lb... 4 0 8 0iJ.Miller.**. 5 2 3 U
! King.of.... 3 0 3 0 Wtstone,3b 5 2 2 0
I Spencer.ef. 1 O 0 OjWheat,c.... 5 1 11 C
Doyle.2b... 4 3 8 2iRlxey,p 1 1 u 2
Snyder.c... 4 2 0 0jMeadows,p. 0 0 0 1
Tone jr. p... 10 0 ljlietts.p 0 0 0 3
Douglas,p.. 0 0 0 OiG.Smith.p.. 0 0 0 2
j Barnes.p... 2 0 0 lltStengel 1 0 O (i
E. Smith.. 110 OjtCravath... 1 0 0 <i
Grimes.. 110 O'fFletcher... 1 0 0 0
Totals... .38 12 30 1JJ| Totals 31l t4 30 14
Smith batted for Lefevre in fifth.
Grimes batted for Toney in fifth.
Batted for Meadows in sixth.
Jhatted for Bctts in eighth.
|B:itted for G. Smith in tenth.
Score by innings:
Giants 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 0 1?8
Phillies 013 0 10101 u?7
Runs?Burns, Young. Frisrh. King. Doyle,
Snyder. Smith. Grime*. Paulette. Leborveua,
Williams. Meusel. J. Miller. Rlxey. Error*?
Frisch, King (2), Doyle, J. Miller. Two-base
hits?Friseh, Grimes. Burns. William*.
Yonng. Three-base hit?Mensel. Stolen bases
?Frisch (3), J. Miller. Wrightatone, Smith.
Double play*?Rawling* to J. Miller: Frisch
to Doyle to Kelly; Rixey to Rawling* to
Paulette; Friseh to Kelly. Struck out?By
Rixey. 4: by Toney. 3: by Meadows. 4; by
Douglas. 1. Rit by pitched ball?By Toney.
2. Bas** on ball*?Off Bett*. 1; off Rixey.
1; off O. Smith. 1: off Meadow>. 1; off
Barnes. 2. Passed ball?Wheat. Umpire*?
Rigler and Moran. Attendance?8,000.
Giant*. AB II O At Phlllie*. AB R O A
Burn*.If... 3 1 1 O,Paulette.lb. 4 15 1
I>?fevre.*s. 2 0 0 2|l<eb'rveati.lf 2 12 0
Balrd.Sb.. . 1 0 0 2Bawling*.2b 4 13 2
Yonng.rf.. 4 2 0 OlWilliams.cf. 4 16 1
FrUch.3b.sa 3 0 1 2'Meu*el.rf.. . 4 2 0 0
Kelly.lb... 4 0 10 2 J.Miller.**. 4 110
Spencer, cf. 4 3 1 0' R.Miller. 3b. 4 12 3
Doyle.2b... 4 1 5 3'Trnge*ser.c. 3 0 7 1
Snrder.r... 3 0 0 UFlnbbell.p.. 3012
Nehf.p 3 1 2 2'*#Crarath.. 110 0
Smith 10 0 OjtStengel 0 0 0 0
Total* 32 8*26 13! Total* 33 0 27 10
Batted for IWevre in seventh; two out
when winning run scored.
; Batted for Rnbtxfll in ninth.
i +Ran for fmvath in ninth.
I Score by inning*: i
Ginnt* 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0?2
PbliliV 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2?3
Run*?Young. Kelly, Meusel, Rubbard,
Stengel. Errors?Doyle. J. Miller. Two-base
hits?Young. Spencer. Cravath. Three-base
hit?Young. Sacrifice hit*? Leboreveau. Nehf.
Frisch. Snyder. Double plays?William* to
R. Miller: Frisch to Doyle to Kelly. Left
on bases?New York 7; Philadelphia. 4.
Struck out?By Rubbell. 6; by !felif, 3.
Base on hall*?Off Hubbell, 1. I'mpires?
Moran and Rigler. Attendance?10.000.
PLAYERS WOU
| MAJOR LEAGUl
YESTERDAY'S
AKZXICA3I LEAOtfK.
St. Lotila, 7; Waahlnfton. 2. (lat fame )
Wiih,, 10; St. Louts, 6. (11 lnntnf*) '-a
Ho, too. 4; Detroit, 3. (lat ??m?.)
Detroit, 3; Boaton, 1. (2d fame.)
STANDING OF 1
AMETLICAM LEAGUE. .
1920 1919 Poa. n-? |
W X. Pet W L rrt 1919 1919
Cleveland 70 40 ?3? 57 45 .MO 3 2 It
Chicago.. 72 42 .532 85 38 .825 1 1 C]
.New York 72 43 .826 55 46 .545 4 3 X
St I-ouia 54 55 .4115 54 48 .429 5 5 I Pi
Boaton... 50 59 .4.",9 ?* 54 .471 8 8 CI
Waah'ton. 48 80 . 444 42 81 40k 7 7 Si
Detroit. . 42 68 .3*2 69 43 .578 2 4 B.
Attiletlca. 35 76 .315 28 72 .280 V 8, V
GAMES T
AMERICAN LEAGUE.
St. Louis at Washington.
Detroit at Boaton.
Chicago at Philadelphia.
Cleveland at New York. '
GENERALS LOSE \
I TO OPERATIONS
jTeams Fight Hard for Up-, Ii
per Hand; Result 6-5
Naval Operations.
District Championship ?
Series.
I a
Today's games: \
Atlantic A. C. vs. Mohawk A. c
2., Independents at Union League J1
[ f'ark; Treasury vs. War, Leagues. 1
at Union Station. v
Yesterday's results: ,
Navy, 6; War, 5.
Winston A. C.. 4; Aloysius, 4. J*
Called in the fifth.
i -?
ny JACK HAAS. d
Naval Operations, champions of %
the Government League, barely j,
nosed out the Generals from the o
i War Interburrau League; the final a
I p
1 result was 6 to 5. The navy team p
i 1 is composed of some of the best j e
i players from the Navy Department.)
; | Naval and Marine Service. They j ^
1 came on the field with all the con- j ^
jfidence in the world of taking the s
i I
j game from the junior organization. ^
The confidence of the other fellows
did not seem to feaze the young- c
sters and it was a great battle, H
which, if it had gone another inning,
might have been a different | ^
Stale. cShow
Fight from Start.
War started right after the game
'their, first time up. when Tetreault. r
Hartman, Brownell and Lucas sin- ^
gled, the last one bringing two 11
I counters across the platter. Navy
| came right back at them in their Sl
half and sewed it up, scoring two *
Ion hits by Newton. Beard and Hou- R
jlihan. War did not score again until
the eighth, when they came near
winning the old ball game just as '
time was called. Tetreault atrain jj
jcame across with a single. Hart- tj
man slammed another past B* ard, u
| followed by one over the "two- R
i base-hit fence" by Loomis. Lucas D
I hit one to right and three runs *'
| had come across. U
After two were gone in the sec- j,
ond. Driver, for Navy, drove one L
down the third base line for two
bags. Newton singled and Purdy. he
of the fiery hair, belted one to deep
tight for the circuit. Total, three ^
runs. Navy's last tally came jn
the sixth on singles by Driver, Newton
and Beard.
Roche distinguished himself in ro
the third when three were on with j|
no one down. The next batter anri h
the on" following hit easy ground- D
era to Roche, who tosse.d to Loomis
for the out. By striking out the ^
next batter, three Navies were left Im
on the sacks. The score: im
Navy. Ab II OA] War. Ah II O A jD
Newton.2b. 3 2 '* 1 Tetreault,ss 4 2 - 3j
Purdy.ss... 2 1 - 1,Hartman.lb. 4 2 7 0 VJ
Beard,lb... 4 2 0 0, Brnwnell.cf. 4 1 0 Oj*
I.vnch.cf... 4 10 OLoomas.c.. . 4 1 .r> 0
lioulihan.rf 3 10 1 Penke,2b... 2 0 10
Harnub'r.lf. 3 1 3 0jAme*.2b 2 0 3 0
Clark.2b... 4 0 1 4|Lucas,3b... 3 2 13
Milier.c 4 0 8 1 Pitts.If 2 0 1 1
I Driver p... 3 2 1 1 Marker.rf.. 10 0 0
|! lark.rf.. .. 2 0 0 0
|Roche,p. 3 1 1 4 c]
Totals... 30 10 24 ft, Totals ... 31 0 2111 n'
| Navy 2 3 0 0 0 1 0 x?6
] War 20000 0 0 3?3 t<
! Runs ? Newton 2, Purdy 2, Beard, Driver, o
i Tetreault 2, Hartman, I/>omi?, Ames. Er;
rcrs ? Driver. Peake. Left on bases?Navy
j S War 4. Two-base hits ? Beard. Driver,
1: I.oomas. ITome run?Pnrdy. Stolen bases ? a
' Lynch, Harnsberger. Tetreault. Base on ^
II balls ? Off Roche 4. Strike outs ? By
M Driver. 5: Roche, 3. Double plays?Tetreault
1 to Ames to Hartman. TI!t by pitcher ? By 1 V
1 Driver (Lucas. Pitts); by Roche (Purdy). u
| Umpire?Woodward. z n
i PIRATES CAPTURE
FINAL OF SERIES ?
St. Louis. Aug. 17.?The Pirates ^
1 finished their series of seven games ^
with the Cardinals today with a g.
lO-to-6 victory. Schupp was ham- ^
mered out of the box in the fifth
with five runs. Cooper held the
Cardinals to three hits up to the
sixth. Five singles in the sixth and
four in the seventh netted the jt
Cardinals six runs. Score: w
Pirates. AbH OA| St. Louis. AbHOA p]
Bifbee.lf.. 5 10 OiFournier.lb. 1 1 0 g|
Carey.cf... 4 2 4 0|Janvrin,lb.. 4 1 12 0 |a
Nic'lsoo.rf. 4 3 3 0(rf?-hult*.rf. . 5 13 0
Whitted.lb. 3 112 0,Stock.3b. . . 5 3 2 5
Cutshaw.l?b 3 13 4] Hornsby.2b. 5 2 1 1 j?
Barbare.Bs. 5 2 0 4 McHenry.lf.. 5 2 5 0 fi
M'K'hnie,3b 4 1 0 2 Lavan.ss. . . 5*2 0 3 gj
Hneffncr.c. 4 15 OlH'thcote.cf. 4 2 2 0
Cooper.p... 4 1 0 1 Dilhoefer.c. 4 0 2 1
Carlson,p.. 10 0 l|Scott.p 0 0 0 0
jSchupp.p... 1 0 0 2 A
(Goodwin.p.. 0 0 0 0
jGlenn.p.0 0 0 0 h'
( North 1 0 0 0 C(
| tCIenions.. . 1 0 0 0
jtKnode.... 1 0 0 0 y
Totala.. 37 13 27 121 ToUla... 42 14 27 12 E
8core by innings: e(
Pittsburg 201 050 11 0?10 te
St. Louis 000 003 30 0? G fe
Batted for Schupp Jn fifth inning.
tBatted for Goodwin in sixth inning.
i Batted for Scott in eighth inning.
Runs?Carey (3). Nicholson <3), Whitted, *
Cutshaw, Barbare, McKechnie. Schultz,
Stock (2>. Homsb.r (2), McHenry. Errors? p(
Nicholson. Mt-Kechnie. Lavan, Schupp <2). pi
Two base hits?Hornsby. Fournier. Home
rcn?Nicholson. Sacrifice hits?Whitted (2M.
Cutshaw. McKechnle, Haeffner. 8tolen bases
?Bigbee, Carey (2). Nicholson. McHenry. h(
Passed ball?Dilhoefer. Base on baili-?Off
Schupp. 1; off Scott, 2. Struck out?By
Schupn. 1; by Cooper 2: by Carlson. 1. sn
Pitching record?Off Schupp, 11 hits and 8 St
runs in 5 innings; off Goodwin. 0 hits and b
0 runs in 1 inning; off Cooper. 12 hits and
6 runs in 7 innings; off Scott. 2 hits and r
2 runs in 2 Innings. Left on bases?St.
lx>uls, ft; Pittsburg 8. Winning pitcher?
Cooper. Losing pitcher?Schupp. Umpire* ?P
?Harrison and Hart. Time?2:00. in
i OF MAYS-W
PLAYERS HERE
PLAN PROTEST
Banishment of Girl Mays
! May Be Demanded, with
Strike as Alternative.
By GEORGE L. MORELAXD.
Aroused by the death of Ray Chapman,
star Cleveland shortstop, as
the result of being: hit in the head j
by a ball pitched by Carl Mays, of
the New York Americans, Washing- *
ton and St. Louis players, in a meeting
held before yesterday's doubleheader.
decided to demand the banishment
of the New York pitcher
from baseball, or to refuse to take
part in any game in which Mays j
pitches.
j Similar action is reported to have
been taken by the Boston and De- j
J troit clubs in Boston, and it is be- |
lieved the movement will spread i
throughout the entire league.
Feeling among the Washington!
and St. Louis men was bitter. Play- I
ers who as a usual thing have few I
words to say were violent in their
denunciation of Mays. This was espeel
ally true of the St. Louis men. j
as the result of narrow escapes Sis- |
ler, Severeld and others had when !]
Mays nearly beaned them in a recent 11
series in St. Louit. Sharp words ,
passed between these players and ]
the Yankee pitcher, and a physical
encounter was narrowly averted. |
Prompt action by the players is I
predicted, with an ultimatum going j
to President Ban Johnson to keep j
Mays out of baseball.
War on Dean Ball.
With the players of lhe league |J
fully aroused, it is predicted that i
(Chapman's death will bring about J
jthe final abolishment of the bean I
;ball. Clark Griffith, president of the !
jlocal club, Indicates that he will \
j take a leading hand in bringing this |
.about. Mays, he declares,-has been!
beaning players for a long time, and j
lit is time the practice be done away ;
with in the league.
Had this action been taken last ;
winter when President Griffith of !
the local club and others asked to'
have a rule made on this kind of a :
pitch. Chapman would have been
alive today.
It may be true that Manager!
! Speaker of the Cleveland club says J
I it was an accident, but that is not ,
, Koinp to make hundreds of ball
l players believe it.
I Mays has hit many batters in his;
' tim*? and this year he has beaned i
I 25 men in 32 games. Many may!
j have been accidents, as he will
; claim. but the fact is that no per- i
' son who knows will believe it. The!
, fact is. Mays has deliberately hit j
batters and says he has done it on '
' purpose.
Pratt Given May* Arruf.
Only last Sunday the writer was
I talking to I>el Pratt, second base-j
t man of the Yankees, about hitting;
batters and what several pitchers,
, have done. "Why." came the reply,'
j "we have one on our team that (
makes no bones about what he is
going to do. Only the other day we .
; held a meeting in the club house'
1 previous to an important pame |
! (Pwitt would not say which game).'
j We were talking over how he j
; would pitch to the different batters.
I 'Well,' replied Mays, 'first I will
dust him off and then feed him one j
. over the corner.' When he made'
this remark he also said: I don't :
j care what you fellows say about it.
1 know I have no friends on this I
I! team and I am going to do what 1
want." "
"Chapman's death is going to j
cause more trouble than any other I
case in the history of baseball,"' j
said one of the local players.
"Players on every team in the
American League will take action J
Bland, if I am not mistaken, will,
j refuse to play in any game that'
(Mays is slated t?? pitch." The player,
and he is one of the leaders j
j in the game, says that the bail j I
| players should take the case to
i President Johnson and tell him in
i plain words that they would re-i
jfuse to play if Mays is on the card
j to pitch.
Strike Talk Heard.
This appears to be the sentiment,
of every man on the W a^hington !
and St. Louis clubs, and word from
Boston is that the players on both .
the Detroit and Boston clubs are ;
i ready to strike and force Mays out j
'of the frame. The players up there ;
j have started action to this effect, j
land it would be no surprise if the (
I same action is taken by every club,
in the American League.
I George Sisler?and there Is no
i finer ball player in the game than
this sterling man?said yesterday j
'that hardly a game Mays^ pitches,
against the Browns doesn't see a
! batter hit. "Why. 1 have had so (
| many close calls that 1 ran not j
| remember them. Not a time I go |
I to bat but what I do not have to j
'dodge at least one of them," Sisler!
i continued.
Hank Severeid is also ready to
make a statement that he has been i
hit more than once. "Only a couple 1
of weeks ago when we beat the
Yanks three out of five games. Mays I
told me that he would bean me
every time he got a chance," he
said. I
Several of the Browns also remarked
on the many close escapesj
that they have had and not one j
could be made to believe that Mays
hitting Bay Chapman was an ac'cident.
Hank said he would not .
| believe it under oath.
REDS DEFEAT CUBS
IN UP-HILL BATTLE
Chicago. Aug. 17.?In' a tight |
game Cincinnati defeated Chicago j
In the final game of the series today,
3 to 2. Doubles by Sicking
and Allen, after two were out in
the ninth, putting over the winning |
run. The score:
Cimcx. Ab H O A! Chicago. Ab H OA:
C,roh.3b.... - 1 2| Klack.rf.... 4 J
Daubert.lb S 1 ? 1 Terry.".... ?''"?!
Honsh of 2 12 0 Rob tuon.lf. 4 3 3 0(
Do wan. If!. 3 0 S 0|Merkle.lb. 3 Oil 0,
Kopf.ss... 8 0 2 l|r?skert.cf.. - ?|
Neale.rf... 4 0 1 OlDeal.*.^.. ? 1 # 3
(tlekim.ib. 4 1 3 2|Herw* T>.. - 0 1 M
Allen...... 4 1 n O-Twombley. 1 1 0 0
ller.p.... 4 1 ? 2(B?U.e ? ? Jl
| Vaughn.p.. 4 0 0 2|
Totals.. 31~7lS~8| Totals... SI C 27 10
Batted for Hereog in ninth inning.
cSSSjS , 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1-41
::::::::: ??<> ?? ? ?2u-!
Runs?Groh. Klcklnc. Eller. Kl.ck, Robertson.
Error- r??kert. Two-b.se bit. Oroh.
Rou.li, RobertM>D. Klack Si<kins.
Allen. Horn, run -Robertson. Stolen bases
?!>ua<-an. Groh. Ilaubert. Robertson. Sacrl(l.e
hits? Uaubert. Roush. Heraoj Terry.
Left on base.?Cincinnati. 6; thlcajo, 7.
Ba*e on ball.?Off Kller. 3; off V.nthn,
Hit b.v pitcher?Br Vau*bn Mruck out
- By Eller. 8; by Vau?lm. 3. Pas.ed ball?
Allen, tnjpirea?0'Daj and Buljloj. Tlm?
?1:40.
r
LP RIP GAMI
E STATISTICS |
RESULTS.
NATIONAL LEAGUE.
N?w York, 8; Phila., 7. (lut ram*.)
Pblla., 3; New York, 2. (lid game.)
Pittsburg. 10; 8t. Loula, 6.
Cincinnati. 3; Chicago, 2.
rHE CLUBS.
KAT10XU LEAGVZ.
1820 1910 Pm. Ft*.
W L Pet W L Pet 1?1? 1919
rooklyn 63 48 JHM 60 53 .485 4 5
tncinnati 00 46 .566 71 34 .676 1 1
ew York m N) .54,-, ag 37 agg 2 2
IttKburf 33 52 .514 54 46 . 540 3 4
llc??o. . 58 5H .41(1 48 53 ,47."i 5 3
!. I .out*. 51 59 ,464 St 60 SXS 7 7
oaton... 47 57 .452 30 57 .406 6 8
Mia.... 44 68 .400 37 58 ,3M S 8
ODAY.
XATXONAL league.
No gamut scheduled.
VINSTON AND
ALOYSIUS TIE
ndependents in Near Riot
On Umpire's
Decision.
The frame staged between the
Pinston A. C. and the Aloysius A.
at Union Park yesterday in one
f the independent series games for
ne championship of the city proved
thriller. The game was called on
ccount of darkness, as- was the
ase the day before, but there was
o decision, so to speak, as the
cams battled to a 4 to 4 tie. Over
decision of Umpire Doyle there
'as so much trouble and disorder
hat it was necessary to have police
rotection for the arbitrator, who
?ft the field with one of the guarding
of the law.
The teams put up a spirited fight
uring the five innings played. Dais
went on the slab for the Alosius
men and looked good for four
linings. Then tho miserable work
f his mates In the field had such
bad effect on him that the oponents
might have sent him to the
howers had the battle been lengthned.
The trouble, which cropped up in
he Kame, came when the Winstons
rent into the field after they had
atted in the sixth inning, and
eeminglv thought that they had
een regularly retired. The misake
was noticed as the first batter
or the Aloysius went to the plate.
>nly two outs were officially rebrded.
so the sides had to change
ack apain to the first half of the
ixth inning. Before the second
all had been pitched Umpire Doyle
ailed the game on acount of darkess.
Immediately the Winston men
rowded around the arbitrator and
ngrily argued that th<> Aloysius
ad deliberately stalled and kept
he gam?' at five innings and a tie
core. They also persisted that the
ame should go on until the sixth
ad been completed or at least unit
they had been retired.
The score:
Winntnn. AHH O A' Aloyalnn. AR II O A
atrraaa.lf 2 2 1 O"E.Mader.3b 1 1 2 3
igglns.Sb. 2 0 0 2[Fit*g?r'd.lf 2 1 o 0
ouck.a* . 3 0 12 IIo]b-k.2h.cf 3 1 1' 1
lights.lb. 2 1 1 OIR'rdon.rf ,2b 2 0 10
ich'da'n.cf 3 1 1 OB.Fiug'd.lb 3 n I? 1
rescber.rf 2 11 ?'Duffy.aa... . 3 0 0 ^
li'm'k*r.2b 2 1 0'<I.Mnder.c.. 2 0 1
weedale.c. 2 0 4 0!0'Lone,rf... 2 2 0 0
offman.p, 1 0 0 OiDavii.p.... 2 0 0 1
eib.p 0 0 0 0
ewis.p. .. 10 1 1!
Total* 20 0 15 5! Total* 20 5 1.% 10
F<-ore by innings:
'inston A. C 0 1 0 1 2?4
loyaiaa A C o n i 3 0-4
Game called on account of ilnrkn**?.
It ana?Bate man. Iligginft. Huffltva. Pichdson.
E. Mader i2?. <1. Mailer. O'Lone.
ft on bases?Winston. 3: Aloysius. R. Errs?E.
Mader. Ilolbrook <31. O'Lone.
ugbea. Hoffman. Two-base hits?Batemnn.
nghM. Stolen base* ? Bateman. Hughes,
ppacber, Ricardson. Shoemaker. E. Mr?ler.
ise on balls?Off Davl*. 1: off Hoffman. 4;
f I*ib. 3. Struck out- By Davis. 1: by
offman. 1: by Lewis. 2. Double play?Bntean
to Hughes to Bateman. Hit*?Off Iloffan.
4: off Lewi*. 1. Hit by pitchcr?By
it via. Hughes and Bateman.
iMERICAFASf
RUNNING AWAY
WITH OLYMPICS
CONTINUED FROM PA?1E ONE.
leared on his second trial without
inch difficulty.
Ekeleend. of Skeden, the only connder
against the Americans, went
ut, leaving Muller second.
Congratulated by KJnR.
King Albert walked onto the field
nd congratulated Landon. shaking
ands with him.
A. G. Hill, a British entrant, proided
the big surprise of the day
hen he won the final of the 800teter
event, beating Eby, who was
econd for America, and Rudd, of
ingland. third. Rudd was the faorite
to win the race. The time
as 1:53 2-5.
The order in which the other en-ants
finished was: Mountain. Engind,
fourth; Lieut. D. M. Scott, U.
fifth: A. B. Sprott, Los Angeles,
xth. Tom Campbell, the Yale runer,
collapsed when 50 yards from
ic finish.
U. S. Poor In 5,000-Mcter Him.
America made her worst showlg
today in the 5,000-meter run.
hen her team failed to secure a
lace. Joseph Oulllemet, the French
:ar. won the event. Nurmi. of Finmd.
was second; Backman. of
sveden. third; Koskoniemia. of Finmd.
fourth; Blewett. of England,
fth, and Seagrove, of England,
xth. Time for the event was credable
at 14 minutes 55 3-5 seconds,
ngland won the tug of war from
merica. <
The semi-final in the 110-meter
iirdles showed America ready to
>ntest this event when Barron,
mlth and Murray all qualified,
ount failed to place. Barron and
arl Thomson, the Canadian crack,
mailed the Olympic record of flfen
seconds for the event in their
ats.
Plant, Maronev and Fearman qualed
for America in the 10,000 meter
alk.
Pat McDonald, the big New York
>liceman, and L.eversedge obtained
aces in the finals of the shot put.
Board Mrrti Today.
The Olympic board which will
>ld a meeting tomorrow, will not
cide where the next Olympiad
,alll take place but it is underod
that the French proposal may
i accepted by asking that only
hlftic sports be included in the
ogram in the future games with
ily one point trophy for the major
orts?track, field, twimming, boxg.
wrestling and rowing.
El WAR ON'
Move to Ban
On Foot Am
Prosecut
*
Twenty-Five Players
Hit by Mays This Year
!
Twenty-five players have been
hit this season by Carl May*. ,i
who struck Ray Chapman, the <
Cleveland shortstop, in the head h
Monday, causing his death.
Following: is a list of the bats- 1
men he has hit: <
April 19?Menosky, Boston.
April 24?Welsh. Athletics.
April 30?Foster. Boston.
May 11?Jourdan. CMcaffO.
May 16?Smith, Cleveland.
May 22?Jacobson. Austin, St. 1
Louis. 1
May 24?Veach, Detroit.
May 27?Schang, Boston.
May 29?Jones. Boston. '
June 6?Strunk, Athletics.
June 15?Chapman, Cleveland.
June 17?Weaver, Chicago.
June 22?Severeid, Sisler, St.
Louis. <
July 6?Shanks, Washington. !
July 11?Cobb. Detroit. i
July lfi?Sisler, St. Louis.
July 17?Rlsberg. Chicago. i
July 21?Speaker, Cleveland. i
July 30?Sisler, Severeid. St. <
Louis. i]
August 3?Jackson. Chicago. i
August 11?Johnson. Cleveland.
August 16?Chapman, Cleve- ]
land.
Total?25.
TIGERS SPLIT EVEN
WITH BOSTON RED SOX
Boston. Aug. 17.?The Red Sox
and the Tigers broke even in their
double-header this afternoon, the
Boston Club winning the first game
4 to 3. and Detroit taking the second
game 3 to 1. Score:
rir?t Game.
Boston. Ah 11 o A Detroit. Ab H O A
Yitt.Sb 4 2 0 4 Young.*.... 4 2 t 5
Brady.2b... 4 0 1 4 Bush.afc 5 2 11
Menosky.lf. 4 1 S 0 Cobb.cf 4 14 1
Hooper.rf.. 4 12 Oj Veach.If 4 110
Melnms.lb. 4 2 17 1 Uoiinu.|>,lb. 4 111 IV
Hendryx.cf. 4 1 1 0*FneUi 0 0 0 oj
Hcott.ss 3 12 2 Ellison. 1 0 0 1 O
Walter*,e.. 3 1 0 2 Shorten.rf.. 3 10 0
6. Jones.p. .2 1 1 3 K. Jones.3b. 4 2 0 2;
Sunaie.c. .. 3 1 1 lj
jtFlagstead.. 1 0 0 0j
Oldham.p... 3 0 0 4,
JJliale 1 0 0 Oj
Total*. . . 32 10 27 16 Total* . 36 11 24 10 j
Kan for Heilman is 8th inning.
tBatted for Stanug* in 1Mb inning.
} Bat ted for Oldham in l?th inning * '
Boston 4 0 0 0 O < 0 0 X?4 j
Detroit 0000020 1 0?3
Rons?Vitt. Menocky. Mclnnie. Hindryx j
Runs ? Vitt, Mcnofkr, Mclnni*, Hendrrx. I
Bush 2. Cobb. Error?ilenofky. Two-base I
hit*?Vtt. Hem1r>x. Veach. Young, lleilman. j,
Vitt. Bush. Huns baited in?By Menocky. I
Mclnni*. llendryx. Scott. *"obb, Veach. Left
<?n ba*e*?Boston 5; l>etroit Stolen ba*e
Menosky. Sacrifice hit?S. Jones. Base on
I-Jills?By 8 Jones 2. Double play ? Cobb
and Bukh. Time 1 hour 3 minute?. I'mpire* j
?Dineen and Evans. Attendance, 6.200.
Second Game. {
Detroit. Ab H O A Boston. Ab II O A <
Young.2b.. 3 2 4 2, Vitt.3b 4 1 1 51 |
Bush.r-s 4 12 1 Brady.^b... 3 O 1 lj
lobb.cf 5 1 4 o Foster, rf... 1 0 0 1
Veach.If... 4 3 0 0 Menosky.If. 5 2 3 0
n*11 ma nib 3 1 5 0 Hooper.rf. . 3 1 1 0 j
Plagstead.rf 4 0 4 0 Mclnni* lb . 3 115 uj
jl*inelli.3b. . 4 0 2 3 Hendryx.cf. 2 2 1 oiJ
Stanage.c.. 4 1 5 3 Schang.< . . .3 0 3 lj
Ehmke.p... 4 2 1 1 Scott.*s.... l 0 2 3!
iMcN'ally.ss. 10 0 o|
Harper.p... 3 0 0 3
*Karr 1 0 0 0| '
11Walters... 0 0 o 0'
i{Bailej 0 0 o Oj
Totals. .. 3.1 11 27 10 Total*. 30 7 27 14 \
Batted for Brady in 7th inniug.
Batted for Harper in ??th inning.
SRan for Walter* in Oth inning.
Detroit 10000100 1?3l
Boston <i 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0?1J
Runs?Young 2. Ve#ch. Scott. rrors ? I
Bush. S?-ott. Hooper. Two.base hits?Veach.
Bush. Ehmke. Vitt. Three-base hit?Veacu. J
Runs batted in?By Bu?-h. Veach. Heilman, !
Vitt. Kirst base on err?.r>?Detroit 1. Left j
or-abses?Detroit 9. Boston 11. Stolen bawes i
?Hooper. llendryx. Caught stealing Me-J
nosky. Hendryx 2. Sacrifice hits ? Young,]
Mclinnis. Base on balls?By Ehmke 6; by I
Harper 3. Struck out ? By Ehmke 4; by |
Harper 2. Doubie plays?Pinelli, Bush and J
Heilman: Mclnni* (unassisted); Scott and.
Vitt. Passed ball?Stj-nage Wild pitch ?I
Harper. nit by pitched ball?By Ehmke,'
Hendrrx. Scott. Time. 2 hours. I'mpires?j
Evans and Dineen. Attendance. 6.200.
ras
1331 F
" The Store Wi
Men's $
SUl
'50
Palm Beach or Koc
Kloth Suit Free
Total Value, $100
The 3-piece Fall Suits
would sell in the regular way
for $75. The Free Summer
Suits are worth $20 to $30.
(A Iterations Free)
j Only Three More Da
BEAN" BALL
ish Mays
tong Players;
ion Planned j
New Tork. Aug. 17. ? With a
movement on foot among baseball
players of the American League to
flrive Carl Mays out of the game for
Brood. Indications here tonight art
tnat more serious action may be demanded
of authorities as a result of
the death of Ray Chapman, popular
shortstop of the Cleveland Indians.
Chapman died in a hospital here this
morning from a fractured skull,
which he received when struck by a
ball hurled by *. Yankee pitcher,
In a game Monday afternoon.
Team Frrli His L?m.
Members of the Cleveland team,
heartbroken at the loss of their fellow
player, who was the favorite of
the team, were incensed today at apparent
efTorts in local sporting circles
to whitewash Mays Without
>penlv charging the New York pitcher
with intentionally striking Chapman
in the head, they plainly made
It known that an investigation was
necessary.
Mays has a peculiar manner of
throwing the ball, delivering in a
'oni. sweeping underhand movement
so that it rises toward the batter.
This eccentric style makes It
difficult for even the best hitters to
guess whether the ball is to curve
or be straight. Frequent complaint
against his pitching often has been
made.
Up until a late hour tonight Mays
had not been arrested, although in
the normal course of events, had he
been driving an automobile and run
flown Chapman, killing him. the
nearest policeman would have placed
him under arrest and a charge of
manslaughter would have been
placed against him. This charge.
Cleveland fans maintain, if not a
more serious one. should have been
placed against Mayi today at least
as a formality.
TelU H?n Ball Mas Tkr*wm.
This had not been done, despite
the fact that Mays went to the
district attorney's office today, ac-?
mmpanied by Trij. Speaker. manager
of the Cleveland team and Chapman
s room-mate, and Charles McManus.
in charge of the Yankees.
Following this interview Mays
calmly described to reporters how
he threw the ball that killed Chapman.
"It was a straight, fast ball I
threw, such as I had delivered hundreds
of times, and I can't understand
how it happened. 1 followed
Chapman into the players' house
and he looked up at me and said:
'It's all right, Carl. Everything will
be all right.'
"I never threw a ball with the
intention of hurting any ball player,
much less Ray."
t ?fcb Accused Mays.
Ty Cobb, on one occasion, however.
accused May? of attempting
to "bean" him. and even went so
far as to attack Mays with a bat.
until restrained by other players
in the game. It was generally conceded
here tonight that the killing
of Chapman would be sure to reopen
the old discussion of banning
th?* so-called "b^an ball** from baseball,
officially and forever.
Other parts of the country, from
the tone of reports received, are
not regarding the incident a? the
Polo Ground?* yesterday as calmly
as New York. Even here, however,
among fans who love the game
for the game's sake, there Is an
undertone of comment and sever*
criticism of such pitching as resulted
in Chapman's death.
Certain of these followers of the
pame have not forgotten that Mays,
too. was at the bottom of the "baseLall
war" a year ago.
Fools J wen.
Brooklyn, Aug. 17.?Ivan Olson
has a new method of turning a deaf
ear to Irate fans who howl at his
occ?si*~' ? ?-s. He stuffs
ears with cottatu II rwtiHB
MARLBORO
FAIR and RACES
AFGFST 17th U> Hth
Seres Races Duly Special trains lear*
District Line on Chesapeake Beach ? &.
at I N F. 1
I ?181! 1
STREET
ith a Smile"
175 Fall
ITS
ya?August 18 to 20 Jj

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