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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, December 19, 1911, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1911-12-19/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE DAY BOOK
m
500 SO. BEORIA ST.
398
TEL. MONROE 353
VoL-ljNo. 71 Chicago, Tuesday, Dec. 19, 1911 One Cent
CHICAGO'S. TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES
Street Car Transportation Controlled in the Interest of
. the Big Stores in the Loop District Rather Than for
the Benefit of the P.epple Who Ride on Street Cars.
Chicago is a great city, but it could and would be greater than
it is, if its general growth was not choked by the selfish attitude
of Big Business. - r
Where is. there another city on-the globe, equal, to .Chicago in
population, that tries to confine most, of its business activity to a
territory about one mile square.
No explanation that actually explains this peculiar situation
Has ever been offered the people most interested, the citizens of
Chicago who' are entitled to know the reasons, if any exist.
The, natural river division of the city logically resulted in the
creation of a north, 'south and west side, lake Michigan being-the
barrier that made an east side a practical impossibility.
As everything in this world in its 'process of growth must star,t
from some given point, villages, towns or cities invariably radiate
froma center point of common interest
The court house and postoffice of every human settlement con
stituting civic necessities Wfurally form the hub qf common interest
and the growth of the settlement usually goes from the center out
ward like Jhe spokes of a: wheel.
When Chicago grew to a size that suggested to waiting capital
a good profit in street car transportation, a central dumping ground
for passengers was an ideal arrangement, since it enabled the street
car company to keep its north, south and west-side lines separate
and distinct, did away with transfer privileges' and enabled them
to hold up Chicago citizens, for more cash fares, when their des
tination was beyond the central dumping station.
. Capital, always looking for the best of itand ever -striving for
monopoly, soon saw its opportunity in a restricted central district.
Land Values boomed and, those in on 'the ground floor boosted the
game. "
As this central bee-hive -began to buzz with human energy the

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