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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, January 06, 1912, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1912-01-06/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE DAY BOOK
500 SO. PEORIA ST.
,TEL. MONROE 353
Vol. 1, No. 87 Chicago, Saturday, Jan. 6, 19l2 One Cent
ROOSEVELT WOULD HAVE PEOPLE CLIP
JUDGES' WINGS WITH THE REFERENDUM
Former President Joins in "Anarchistic" Demand of the
People That Rule by Judges Cease, and Says This
"Anarchy" Was Advocated by Abraham Lincoln.
constitutional.
ThiSjSame law, which the New
York supreme court killed' has
been upheld by the supreme court
of Washington, the supreme
court of Kaisas, the supreme
court of Wisconsin, and is now
in force in every civilized country
of Europe, in Australia, in New
Zealand, in the Transvaal and in
the Dominion of Canada..
Roosevelt says he is not cham
pioning this, or any other law;
lie is merely saying that if the
majority of the people desire any
law, they have a right to have it,
and no court should have the
power to deny it to them.
. He also declares that bf all
functionaries, the judges, are the
least qualified to pass on the pres
ent day needs of the people
The judges, he says, can decide
well ordinary; every day law suits
between man and man, because
they have had personal knowl
edge of such affairs; but he con
tends; that when it comes to ques
tions of trusts, of labor, of the re
forms demanded by modern so
cial life, the judges arc without
In a remarkable editorial in the
current issue of The Outlook,
Theodore Roosevelt deniands
that the judges be shorn of their
power of declaring a law passed
by the people unconstitutional.
He declares that no court
should have the power to over
rule the wishes of the majority
"If the policy of the govern-
ment upon vital questions af-
fecting the whole people is to
be irrevocably fixed by deci-
sions of the supreme court, the
people will have ceased to be
, their own rulers, having to
that extent practically resign-
ed their government into the
the hands of that eminent tri-
bunal." Abraham Lincoln.
h6i the peopleand he points out
that for the last 25 years, certain
courts have been doing jut this
thing.
He calls particular attention to
that crowning shame of the New
, York supreme court, the killing
' of the Workmen's Compensation
Act on the ground that it was un-
.j.!-'" v-;-v

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