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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, January 25, 1912, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1912-01-25/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE DAY BOOK
$00 SO. PEORIA ST. 398 TEL. MONROE 353
Vol. 1, No. 103 Chicago, Thursday, Jan. 25, 1912 One Cent
BARTON CRUIKSHANK, "THE MAN WHO -WAS DEAD,"
TURNS UP AGAIN AND FIGHTS REPORTERS
Soldier and Educator Who Left "Widow" and Children To Mourn
Him While He Made Fortune and Courted Another Woman,
.Going Back to Family.
New York, Jan. 25. Captain
'Barton Cruikshank, the Man who
was Dead, returned to New York
today. He celebrated his return
by knocking out one reporter,
and flinging three other bodily
out of his office.
There is not a stranger story
than that of Cruikshank, in all
the pages of fiction.
Early in 1910, Cruikshank was
'the staid principal of a military
school at Potsdam, N. Y. The
"school was not successful. Cruik--shank
determined to "get out
from under." His method was
unsual.
One warm, June night, Cruik
shank went canoeing on the St.
Lawrence river. When satisfied
.that he was unobserved, he
knocked a hole in the bottom of
the canoe, swam to the shore,
caught a train to New York, and4
became "Donald Douglas," con-'
tracting engineer.
The canoe was found. Cruik
shank's "widow" mourned his
death, and collected . $20,000 in
suranceon his life. His two .
childrenxgave up all hope of see-J
ing heir father in the flesh again.
"Donald Douglas," contracting
engineer, was eminently success
ful. Within a year he had piled
up a fortune, and he never gave a
thought to his "widow" and two
"fatherless", children.
More, he allowed his eyes to
fall upon another woman, Miss
Roberta Robert of Brooklyn. He
wooed Miss Robert. She return
ed his love, and they were to have
been married this Spring.
Then the unexpected happen
ed. "Donald Douglas" went to
the offices of the National Guard
to bid on a contract, and came
face to face with a boyhood friend
of Barton Cruikshank. ,
There were explanations, and
much excitement on the part of
the boyhood friend. Cruikshank
himself was quite cool about it.
"I never have been so happy in
my life," he.satid.
"But your wife, and your chil
dren!" exclaimed the boyhood
friend.
"Oh, they're all right," said
Cruikshank.
Two days later, the police, urg
ed thereto by the insurance so
cities, who did, not approve oc
m
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