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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, January 29, 1912, Image 13

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1912-01-29/ed-1/seq-13/

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MILLIONAIRE BOSS SENTENCED TO HARD LABOR
FOR GRAFTING ,
"
Woodrow Wilson Sends Attorney General Into Corrupt County
, to Prosecute. -
j
Atlantic City, N. J., Jan. 29.-r-In
Atlantic City, the most-corrupt
town in what was before, -the
election of Woodrow Wilson as
governor the most corrupt state
in the union, five political, bosses,
charged with grafting; have been
sentenced to prison stripes and
hard labor.
.The king-pin of the gang, Louis
Kuehnle, eminently respectable
millionaire, who held the bank
ers, business and professional
men of Atlantic City tight, in the
grip of one hand and the gam
blers, saloon keepers and disor
derly house proprietors in the
other, has been haled into court
like a common felon, ordered to
stand up before his fellowmen,
damned with the stigma of "guil
ty" by an impartial jury and sen
tenced by an honest judge
To one year in the penitentiary
at hard labor and to pay' a fine of
$1,000.
There is a chance for appeal on
a technicality, but lawyers say it
will be a vain appeal.
Two facts stand out big m the
s convictions. One is the whole
some spectable of the conviction
and sentence of a powerful boss
who had been immune to law and
courts and public opinion for
years. The other is the Woodrow
Wilson way of going after grafters.
Gov. Wilson pushed aside the
state's attorney of Atlantic City,
who was too closely identified
with the Kuehnle gang to be con
sidered dependable, and sent his
own attorney general, Edmund
Wilson, to prosecute.
He pushed aside the sheriff,
who, it was felt, couldn't be trust
ed to draw a grand-jury.
He pushed aside the local judge
and sent Judge Samuel Kalisch
j from Newark, to try the cases.
. He had the court select the trial
jurors, being afraid of jobbery if
the regular machinery were used.
All this was considered necess
ary because Kuehnle'bosses near
ly everybody in office in Atlantic
City.
The other big thing Kuehnle's
hard-laborsentence inspite of his
power and wealth is astounding
Note these facts about Kuehnle:
He's a millionaire.
He's president 'of the Marine
Trust Co., the biggest bank in At'
-lantic City.
He's director in several other
banks.
He's a stockholder in every
bank in town and many corpora-
tions. v
He's the politician who organ
ized the gas company and the
house-heating company and got
franchises in the old days when
people gave away their rights, ,

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