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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, January 30, 1912, Image 9

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1912-01-30/ed-1/seq-9/

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"THE SAND 'LADY" HAS A
NOVEL BUSINESS ,.
"The SandLary," 'is the way
Miss Clarice L. Martin, a Chicago
girl, is known to mothers. She is
the originator-of ' "sarid suits," a
slip for little" girls ' to- wear at
play. .
Two years ago When Miss Mar
tin was ill tttie idea came to her
that mothers would like-td have
their small daughters play in
simple, comfortable, girlish suits
rather than in the ugly rompers
and the blue overalls -of boys.
With a capital of $5, she invest-
Miss Clarice L. Martin.
ed in three kinds of ginghams and
sat down to embody her idea in
four sample suits. These she
called 'sand suits." If they were
not successful she intended to
make the rest of the gingham into
aprons.
"The sample suits were hor
rible," says Miss- Martin. But
when she showed them, mothers
did upt see thequdwprJcroan-;
ship of the. garment; they saw
health, happiness and comfort for
their little girls in the dainty .suits
which did not disturb a single
feminine tradition.
After Miss Martin had sold the
four sample "sand suits" for $6,
clearing $1 on her original, she
determined to try out the' idea
thoroughly. A somewhatumusual
feature of Miss Martin's success
is that since those first four sam
ples she has never made another
"sand suit."
About twenty women, who sew
carefully and painstakingly, make
them for her. She uses her own
patterns and selects her own
ginghams and gives out materials
to women workers.
Kindergarten teachers find the
"sand suit" essential in connec
tion with, the kindergarten work;
physicians favor the new garment
because it permits, a normal de
velopment of the child: mothers
like the suit because it is practi
cal, stylish and saves laundry
bills : fathers enjoy seeing their .
small daughters in plain, cont
fortable garments without being
less feminine in them.
Qualified.
Father Well, my son, you
have now got your commission
and are prepared to join your reg
iment and fight for glory of our
country. Do you know you have
the necessary qualifications?"
Young'Officer Well, I should
think so. I am the champion long
distance runner of our clnbl"
Tit-bits,
w
iMtiMantiiaiHrillMittttiBHl

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