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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, February 08, 1912, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1912-02-08/ed-1/seq-1/

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35T f
THE DAY BOOK
f)
398
500 SO. PEORIA ST.
TEL. MONROE 353
Vol. 1, No. 115 Chicago, Thursday, Feb. 8, 1912. One Cent
WALL STREET THINKS LACK OF HAWLEY WILL JUST
AWFUL, BUT ONE WOMAN SAYS "GOODY!"
Pretty Little Mrs. Fred Crandall, Wife of the Disinherited Nephew,,
Who Had To Work as Stevedore, Has the Laugh on Everyone
Hubby Gets $2,500,000.
New York, Feb. 8. When the
news that Edwin Hawley, the
railroad king, had left no will,
was taken to Wall stret, Wall
street shook its hoary head and
prophesied evil.
Finances would be disturbed,
financiers might lose money, and
heaven alone knew what might
happen 'because Hawley hadn't
left a will.
But when "the same news was
carried to a little flatn Hdboken,
a pretty little woman, dressed in
a useful looking Mother Hub
bard, who evidently fhad been
washing dishes, cried:
"Oh, goody! goody!"
And when you come right
down to cases, what .the pretty
little woman thinks about it is
much more important than what
Wall street thinks about it, be
cause the pretty little woman is
going to be a mother soon, and
who can fortell the importance
of a new life?
He might be a son, and become
a Napoleon of the people, and
humble Wall street in the dust,
and teach the 400 that all men are
brothers, arid ,
But let's get on with the story:
The pretty little woman used
to be Mary McManus, private
telegrapher for Edwin Hawley.
Now she is Mrs. Fred Crandall,
and just because Edwin Hawley's
will can't be found, Fred Crandall
will get $2,500,000 of the money
Hawley couldn't take to heaven,
or wherever railroad magnates
go when they die.
Crandall was the nephew of
Hawley. At one time he was the
favorite nephew of the railroad
wizard, and used to live with him
in the big, gloomy mansion on
Fifty-fourth street, where Haw
ley hid when he wasn't working. 1
That was when Fred was only
16 years old and was attending
school. Fred an his uncle got
along fine then. It was when
Hawley insisted that Fred go to
work that trouble came.
Fred had about as much liking
for work as any other rich man's
nephew. Hawley gave him a job
in the Southern Pacific offices in
the old Equitable building under
himself.
Once in a while Fred used to
do a little work, just enough to
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